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Hispanic link weekly report, June 20, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, June 20, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Joaquin Aviho officially becomes the Dade County manager. Avifto will receive a $110,000-a-year salary to head the $2 billion-a-year Metro-Dade County government... Andres Solares, released from a Cuba prison May 13, travels to the U.S. Capitol to thank Sen. Edward Kennedy for his help in obtaining his release... Brooklyn, N.Y., federal Judge Thomas Platt finds Nelson Ramirez, a 28-year-old emergency medical technician from Manhattan, in contempt of court and orders him jailed. Ramirez refused to appear before a federal grand jury that is investigating the Puerto Rican separatist group FALN, the Fuerzas Armadas de Liberation National. . . A
hearinguoffi^ferf Civil Service Commission of Los Angeles
County rules in favor of Ronald Rocha, a 20-year veteran of the county marshal’s department who claimed that he was a victim of bias against Latinos... The University of California at Los Angeles elects Mike Meehan as undergraduate student president a week and a half after several fights and the destruction of voting booths by students who were upset that Latino Lloyd Monserratt was declared ineligible to run. It was alleged that Monserratf s grades disqualified him as a candidate... Miami resident Judith Castro gives birth to6-pound,4-ounce Michael Robert Fitzgerald in an ambulance after being stopped by a police officer for being in a speeding car. The birth took 10 minutes...
WEEKL^^EPOF^JQ)ao'19sa
Texas GOP Platform Favors Official English
Despite opposition from Vice President George Bush, Texas Republican Gov. Bill Clements and the state’s Republican National Hispanic Assembly, Texas Republicans supported official-English legislation in their platform June 10.
“It’s like shooting yourself in the foot for no reason,” said RNHA’s Harris County Chairman Angel Abitua “They (the Republican Party) will have to suffer the consequences.”
Speaking to RNHA June 9 during the Texas Republican Convention in Houston, Bush said, “ We just don’t need (this) kind of legislation or constitutional change.”
The state’s Republican voters supported an official-English referendum in their March 8 primary by 92%.
The Democratic National Committee opposes official-language amendments. The Republican National Committee has not taken a position.
RNC deputy press secretary Beth Brainard in Washington, D.C, said “It is entirely possible that this will be brought up (at the national convention). RNC will then take a firm position either way.
Section missing


Hispanas Account for 11% of Nation’s Births in 1987
Hispanic females 18 to 44 years of age accounted for 11% of all births in 1987 despite representing only 8% of the women in that age group, found a U.S. Census Bureau report released June 16.
Of the 7.1 million children born in 1987, some 411,000 were born to Hispanic women, reported “Fertility of American Women: June 1987.”
The estimated fertility rate for Latlnas in the 18-44 age group was 96 births per 1,000 women, said the report. The com-
parable rate for black women was 83, and for whites it was 69. The overall fertility rate was 71 births per every 1,000 women.
Slightly more than a quarter of Hispanic women who had a child in the 12 months before June 1987 did so out of wedlock The percentages of women who were not married and had children during that period were:
HISPANIC BLACK WHITE
26.3% 55.4% 12.4%
Eighty percent of black women 18 to 24 years of age had their children out of wedlock Thirty-five percent of Hispanic women in that age group who had children were not married, said the report.
Hispanas who had children in 1987 had the lowest labor force participation rate -36%, the report said. Black women led all groups in their numbers in the labor force; they had a rate of 53%. White women had a participation rate of 51%.
- Felix P6rez
Federal Contracts to Latinos: 0.5%
Section missing from original
Two Court Rulings Aid Undocumented Aliens
In separate federal court rulings, issued June9 inAtlantaandJunelO inSacramento, Calif., undocumented aliens received good news on two fronts: they are entitled to protection underfederal labor laws, and those denied legalization because of “brief absences? have another shot.
In Atlanta, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11 th Circuit ruled that undocumented aliens not paid minimum wage or fairly compensated for overtime can sue their employers under the federal Labor Standards Act. The three-judge panel held that despite the immigration act making it illegal for employers to hire undocumented employees, these workers were still entitled to federal protection.
U.S. District Judge Lawrence Altman in Sacramento ordered the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to nullify the rejection of some 25,000 undocumented aliens nationally who left the country for brief periods after Jan. 1,1982. Altman also ordered that the deadline for legalization be extended to Nov. 30 for aliens who thought they were ineligible because of the INS strict interpretation of the act’s brief absence provision.
Peter Schey, the director of the National Center for Immigrants’ Rights, which represented the plaintiffs, estimated that the inter-


Richard Avena, guest columnist
El Willie
As I was sitting in his hospital room in San Antonio, I started to reminisce with Willie Velasquez, the founder and director of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, about the good old days.
It struck me, after watching the parade in and out of his room for several hours, that maybe El Wee-Lay- a name he, at 44, still hadn’t outgrown - was not the genius we all took him for. We thought he was so smart, registering so many mejicanos, first in Texas, then in other states. Now I realized that all he had to do was register all his orimos and Has and tlos and compadres, and that alone would be enough to change the political bent of Texas.
I first met El Wee-Lay in Washington, D.C., in the ’60s, when we had the Poor People’s March and assorted civil rights activities
While I was becoming a revolucionario de biblioteca working in the Library of Congress,
El Wee-Lay was starting a revolution in South Texas.
As one of the founders of the Raza Unida Party and of the Mexican American Youth Organization, Willie already understood that the key to social changes was a simple concept - gain and retain power.
The late ’60s and early’70s in Texas were times of change. School walkouts, boycotts, “Kill the Gringo” rhetoric, and marches.
REGISTER AND VOTE
The Raza Unida Party was being formed primarily to challenge the “Good Old Boy” Democrats. El Partido took control of the Crystal City schools, and later its city hall and the county courthouse.
The upheaval continued into the early’70s and somewhere along the way Wee- Lay came to realize that the best road to political control wasconvincing people to register and vote. He became a missionary preaching the gospel. “If your streets and drainage are bad, register and vote.” “If you don’t like the way the schools are educating your kids, register and vote.”
I never heard Wee-Lay tell anyone to vote for a Democrat or a Republican, either. Just register and vote.
In my work, I visited dozens of communities in Texas and New Mexico. Every time I would meet with a group of activists, I was told: "Por aca andaba El Wee-Lay”
The rest is history. The Voting Rights Act coverage came to Texas. Law suits were filed to bring single-member districts to the state legislature, and later to cities and school boards. Places that had never seen a Mexican American on the city council or school board now looked at Hispanic majorities.
‘FIRE THE S.O.B.’
As the result of the work of El Wee-Lay and the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, Mexican Americans began winning elections all over. I remember when several city council members from a small community south of San Antonio came to my office for some advice. They had swept their election. They asked me, “What should we do now?”
I told them, “Read the minutes for the past several years and find out what’s been done by the outgoing council. This should be your first step.” Later, they called and said the city manager refused to give up the minutes.
I lost my temper. “Fire the son-of-a-bitch,” I yelled into Uncle Sam’s telephone.
The gaining and retaining of power... Willie taught us all.
I had dozed off. I woke up as a new flow of compadres and children came in to see El Wee-Lay as Willie was taking another phone call from a well-wisher. His body housed cancer, but he looked good. I prayed for him as I left the room.
Willie died June 16. I wish there had been another way. I wish all he had to do was register and vote.
(Richard Avena, of San Antonio, is former Southwest regional director of the U.S Commission on Civil Rights.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
THE INSIDE SCOOP: Three weeks ago, in the space to my right (your left), businessman Raoul Lowery Contreras described a police action by the San Diego County Sheriffs which made him tremble.
The lawmen, including SWAT teams in camouflage combat fatigues, armed themselves with high-powered, semiautomatic rifles. In their search for two men described as “young, Mexican, approximately 5 feet 7 inches tall” who had raped a 15-year-old girl, they rounded up 85 Latinos who had the misfortune of being in the general locale. The Latinos ranged in age from 16 to 50. Some were 6 feet tall.
According to witnesses, including Anglos, the Latinos were slammed against walls, handcuffed and spread for hours on a parking lot as the sheriffs took their sweet time interrogating them.
The Border Patrol was also called in to deal with any of the brown “voluntary witnesses” who didn’t have papers.
The result None had anything to do with the rape, nor knew anything about it (Two suspects and four others allegedly at the scene were picked up later on a lead supplied by other Latinos repulsed by the crime.)
Less than a dozen of those rounded up earlier were kept by la migra; the rest, after hours in detainment, were sent on their way.
Lowery Contreras was angry and dumbfounded that in the '80s people could still have their constitutional rights trampled on because of their brown skin.
This week he is still anarv. but not so dumbfounded.
The victim, reporters have since discovered, was the daughter of a San Diego police officer. And her mother and stepmother both work for San Diego law enforcement agencies.
The case's latest twist. The story broke in an out-of-town newspaper that three court-appointed defense attorneys resigned from the case, saying they know the victim’s policeman-father.
“Never let it be said that U.S. Justice isn’t even-handed, and that everyone charged with a crime is innocent until proven guilty and entitled to a competent legal defense,” Lowery Contreras now concludes. “Especially when the victim’s daddy, mommy and step*mommy all wear badges.”
BEFORE I FORGET: My nomination for the worst television news report of the year goes to N BC for a lengthy segment on the Hispanic vote in California just before the primary there.
Narrated by Tom Pettit, it started with “the Sleeping Giant” and left the impression- after interviewing three high school students and no Latino political scientists - that we just don’t care.
Shame.
SHOULD JUAREZ BE SAVED? Dagoberto Gilb wonders in a critique in Texas Monthly why some Latino activists want to save ABC-TVs cop show Juarez. While agreeing that Latinos have a legitimate complaint about television’s overall treatment of His-panics, he describes Juarez as “the wrong program to battle for.”
Why?
“Juarez assumed the racist image of Mexican Americans as criminals, bandidos, and the liberalism of the show was to allow a noble Detective Rosendo JuArez to overcome his instincts.”
ARE YOU FUNNY? You didn’t laugh at this week’s cartoon? You weren’t supposed to. It doesn’t have a caption line yet
Artist Virgilio Garcia, who’s usually very funny, wrote one that nobody here understood. But none of us could come up with anything better.
The illustration lends itself to humor, we decided, but we need your help. If you can come up with a good line, we’ll run it and send a 13-week subscription to Weekly Report to anyone your heart desires.
- Kay B&rbaro
June 20,1988


COLLECTING
FERTILITY PATTERNS: “Fertility of American Women: June 1987” is a 67-page report that details the fertility rate of Hispanic, white and black women according to several criteria For a copy of the report, contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402(202)783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
BOOK ON HISPANICS: RobertW. Mullen, associate professor of speech communication at Northern Kentucky University, has compiled a 115-page collection of articles and essays on Mexican and Central American history, culture and other topics by various authors titled “Hispanic Voices.” For a copy, send $6.10 to Northern Kentucky University Bookstore, Student Center, NunnDrive, Highland Heights, Ky. 41076, Attention Bill Reed.
WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN THE SCIENCES: A 264-page report by the Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology finds that the number of female students in sciencesand engineering is dropping and the upward movement of non-Asian minorities in these fields has stopped or is declining. For a copy, send $85 to CPST, 1500 Massachusetts Ave. NW,- Suite 831, Washington, D.C. 20005.
FORTUNE 500 HISPANICS: The National Hispanic Corporate Council consists of representatives from Fortune 500 corporations throughout the United States. Membership includes a quarterly newsletter, a directory of Fortune 500 contacts and other benefits. Requests for further information should be sent to NHCC, P.O. Box 16421, Phoenix, Ariz. 85082-1421.
EDUCATION FOR THE DISABLED: The Handicapped Minority Research Institute on Language Proficiency disseminates its research findings through the Bilingual Special Education Newsletter and via a bilingual electronic bulletin board accessible to users nationwide. For further information on HMRI and its bulletin board, contact Dr. Nancy Russell, Bilingual Special Education, Department of Special Education, EDB.306, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712-1290.
CUBA DICTIONARY: “Historical Dictionary of Cuba” is a 406-page volume on historical facts, events and leaders in Cuban history from pre-Columbian times to the present. To receive a copy, send $39.50 (add $3 for postage and handling for one, 50 cents for each additional order) to Scarecrow Press, 52 Liberty St., P.O. Box 4167, Metuchen, N.J. 08840.
FREEDOM OF SPEECH: A 19-page report summarizing the 1986 “Freedom of Speech in Miami” conference discusses First Amendment rights in light of the Cuban American experience in the Miami area For a free copy, write to the Cuban American National Council, 300 S.W. 12th Ave., Third Floor, Miami Fla 33130-2038.
CONNECTING
PROJECT AIMS AT PRESCHOOLERS This fall the Arlington County, Va, school system will initiate Spanish-language radio announcements with basic tips aimed at Hispanic parents of preschoolera The program, Project Family, is designed to help parents teach children the skills necessary to become good students before they begin elementary school. Other parts of the program include distributing booklets to new parents and encouraging them to enter classes on nutrition and child development The county manager has recommended that the county board set aside $37,000 for the project
Planners hope this first-of-a-kind program will help future students stay in school. Hispanics make up 18% of Arlington’s students Last year 6% of the county’s Hispanic students dropped out
LAW FIRM AIDS POOR
New Yorks largest law firm and the nation’s top in terms of earnings and revenue announced June 7 it will establish a $10 million fellowship program to place lawyers in legal aid groups across the nation.
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom said it will use the money to sponsor 125 fellowships to aid poor people in lawsuits ranging from child-custody disputes to aiding the homeless in finding housing.
The firm will set up a committee of trustees to select 25 fellows per year from graduating law students. Those selected will be paid a minimum of $32,500 for at least two years. The firm will also assist in helping the fellows pay their student loans.
Representatives of the firm said they hope the program will move other firms to implement similar ventures. Unlike similar programs, the fellows will not be required to return to the firm after their fellowship is over.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES The University of Colorado, Metropolitan State College in Denver and Community College of Denver have each donated $23,000 to establish the Colorado Institute for Hispanic Education and Economic Development in Denver. The think tank, to be directed by Ray Sandoval, will develop policies to increase the educational and economic opportunities of Hispanics in Colorado. It will work with other Hispanic organizations, higher education institutions and businesses. For more information on the institute, call (303) 556-4436... Manuel Olivarez, a civilian employee of the U.S. Department of Defense, announces he will seek a second two-year term as president of National Image, an organization concerned with the employment and advancement of Hispanics...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
TRADE CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. June 22-24 A conference on Central American trade, investment and tourism will be held with representatives in attendance from Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Panama Encuentro New Orleans is sponsored by New Orleans, the U.S. Department of Commerce* The Chamber/New Orleans and the River Region, the Port of New Orleans, Tulane University and the World Trade Center of New Orleans
Paul Guidry (504) 589-6546
GOLF TOURNAMENT Los Angeles June 24
The University of Southern California’s Mexican 4
American Alumni Association will hold its eighth annual Golf Classic. Contributions will go toward scholarships for Mexican American students MAAA (213) 743-5280 HISPANIC FAMILY AWARDS Los Angeles June 24
The Hispanic American Family of the Year Foundation will hold the fourth annual California Hispanic American Family of the Year Awards banquet Winners may participate in the Great American Family awards program. The foundation raises money for scholarships and conducts workshops on family issues Evelyn Leyva-Kemp(818) 500-1309
HISPANIC YELLOW PAGES Arlington, Va. June 24
Directory495- The H ispanic Yellow Pages will hold a luncheon to celebrate the completion of this year's edition. The publication will be available July 24.
Francisco Vega (703) 820-GUIA
COMING SOON
June 20,1988
MINORITY CONTRACTING FORUM Government Marketing and International Trade Institute
Arlington, Va June 28-30 Trudy Deller(202) 659-2468
LULAC CONVENTION
League of United Latin American Citizens
Dallas July 5-10
Joe Campos (214) 565-8522
MINORITY RECRUITMENT CONFERENCE American Association on Education Washington, D.C. July 5-8 Ann Davie (202) 939-9395
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items ta Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-STOUT
Department of Counseling & Psychological Services seeks two faculty members.
Associate Professor Tenure track opening for specialization in graduate level psychological measurement and diagnosis for counselors, psychologists, family therapists; supervision of field and clinic practicums; supervision of master’s and Education Specialist research studies
Qualifications: Doctorate in Psychology, Counseling, or related field; professional experience as practitioner in related field; graduate teaching/research experience. Assistant Professor Tenure track opening in teaching core graduate level courses for counselors, psychologists and family therapists - group, counseling theory, careers counseling process, AODA, marriage & family therapy, research advising.
Qualifications: Doctorate in Psychology, Counseling or related field; prefer practice as counselor, psychologist with graduate teaching experience.
Salaries for both positions are commensurate with training/experience. Academic year appointments with summer teaching possibilities. Send letter of application for Associate or Assistant position, resume and three reference names to: Dr. Carlyle Gilbertson, Chair, Department of Counseling & Psychological Services, UW-Stout, Menomonie, Wl 54751. Applications open until positions filled.
The University of Wisconsin-Stout is an equal opportunity and Affirmative Action university. Applications from women, minorities, and persons with disabilities are especially encouraged
PUBLIC INFORMATION DIRECTOR
National Hispanic organization seeks a Public Information Director. Experience in working with national and local media. Excellent writing and editing skills, experience in layout and publication design. Bilingual (English/Spanish) strongly preferred. Formal training plus practical experience, Master’s degree helpful.
Position available immediately, salary based on experience. Send resume and writing samples to:
National Council of La Raza 20 F Street NW Washington, D.C. 20001 Att: Lupe Lemus
ATTORNEYS
MALDEF, a national civil rights organization seeks 2 attorneys for its Los Angeles office. Associate counsel directs all activities of the L.A regional office, and is responsible for supervising all litigation, programs, and personnel Required: licensed attorney, minimum 6 years legal experience (3 years in civil rights law and 3 years litigation experience in federal and state practice); supervision & management skills; bilingual in English/ Spanish. Director of Immigrants’ Rights assesses local, state, and national needs of immigrants rights for litigation and advocacy, and develops plans and strategy for implementation. Required: licensed attorney, 5 years of legal experience (3 years in civil rights law and 3 years of litigation experience in federal and state practices); bilingual (English/Spanish).
Send resume, writing sample and 3 references by June 27 to E. Richard Larson, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014.
NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The National Board of Directors of the ASPIRA Association, Inc invites nominations and applications for the position of national Executive Director. Minimum qualifications include a Master’s Degree; five years successful administration, program development, fundraising, budget planning and management experience; oral and written proficiency in Spanish and English; and demonstrated interpersonal and public speaking skills.
ASPIRA is a national Hispanic community-based organization active in youth leadership development, promoting Latino educational advancement, and conducting research and advocacy. Send resume and nominations by July 15,1988, to:
Search and Screen Committee The ASPIRA Association, Inc.
National Office
1112 16th Street NW, Suite 340 Washington, D.C. 20036 Attn: Lisa Bonilla
GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Typesetting • Layout • Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010(202)483-7755.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
National nonprofit highly visible, public service organization with minority issues orientation seeks Executive Director. Excellent writing, speaking, fund raising skills, grass roots involvement experience, and good management background needed. Bicultural sensitivity, political awareness, creativity, diplomacy, initiative, reliability, loyalty, orderliness are essential. Computer expertise a plus. Send resume, references, writing sample and salary requirements to: LULAC, 110114th St NW, Suite 610, Washington, D.C. 20005.
DIRECTOR, RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION The Latino Institute seeks a director for its research and documentation division to join its management team. Responsible for designing, developing, and providing research on issues affecting the Latino community with priority in the areas of Education, Political Empowerment Health, and Economic Development Requirements include: Master’s degree in a social research related field, minimum of three years research experience, minimum one year supervisory experience, excellent verbal and written communication skills in Spanish/English. Bicultural preferred. Salary: $30,000 - $40,000.
Send cover letter and resume by July 1, 1988, to:
Jos6 C. Matos-Real Executive Director Latino Institute 228 South Wabash Room 600 Chicago, III. 60604 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
The Latino Institute is a not-for-profit organization which promotes Hispanic progress through research, training, and advocacy. Service area is limited to Chicago.
ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST, Washington, D.C., based, will do free-lance work at reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (E7) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Arts& Entertainment
PLAYWRIGHTS CHOSEN: Participants have been announced for the third annual Hispanic Playwrights Project, conducted by the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, Calif.
The plays Bang Bang Blues, by Charles G6mez, Everything In Its Place, by Rafael Lima, and Lynette Serrano-Bonaparte’s Broken Bough will be read publicly as part of the two-week workshop, Aug. 2 to 14. Three other plays by Josefina Lopez, Bernardo Solano and Rafael Melendez will be read before invited audiences of theater professionals
The South Coast Repertory - a recent Regional Theatre Tony Award recipient - has expanded the Hispanic Playwrights Project from the one-week program offered in ’86 and ’87.
According to HPPdirector Jos6Cruz Gonzalez, doubling the length of the project is due to an increase in funding, including a $50,000 grant from the Ford Foundation. Other grants from Pacific Telesis
and the Ruth Mott Foundation, as well as anticipated proceeds from this weeks Noche de Teatro fund-raiser, are expected to increase the projects budget to about $100,000.
Lalo Guerrero, Latin Anonymous, Miguel Delgado, Abel Franco and Mexican Dance Theatre are among performers scheduled to appear on Noche de Teatro June 20 at BCR’s Mainstage Theatre.
FOCUS ARGENTINA: Los Angeles’ A Celebration of Argentine Cinema this week coincides with the 53 rd anniversary of the death of tango supestar Carlos GardeL
Activities, organized by the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, begin June 20 with a reception at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. Highlighting the week will be a film series at UCLA co-sponsored by Argentina’s Instituto Nacional de Cinema-tografia, launched June 23 with La pelicula del rey. Director Carlos Sorin is expected to attend.
Gardel fans throughout Latin America commemorate the singer's death, which occurred in a plane accident in Medellin, Colombia, June 24,1935. _ Antonio Mejias Rentas
Media Report
REMARKS: At a June 8 luncheon hosted by the Media Institute in Washington, D.C., Univision news director Guillermo Martinez addressed a gathering of some 50 news people. Among his remarks were these:
“Over the weekend, NBC, CNN and CBS all did pieces on the Hispanic ethnic vote in California. It’s about time...
“There is no doubt that the major English-language networks will do an exhaustive job of covering the conventions. They will detail the impact of the gender gap vote, of the black vote, of the Southern white male vote... Will they research and report in depth on the impact of the Hispanic vote? Probably not. Three and a half million Hispanics are expected to vote in this year’s election, compared with 4.5 million blacks.
“Consider what the candidates are doing. For the first time in U.S. history, all of the major presidential candidates have produced campaign commercials in Spanish. Mike
HISPANIC LINK I WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N9 Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234*0280 or 234*0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix Perez
Reporting; Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Diana Padilla, Angela Walker Graphic^Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (50 issues):
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week Multiple use rates on request
Dukakis’ campaign manager in California was a Hispanic. Also, Jesse Jackson’s campaign staff allocated 25% of his media budget for the state to Spanish-language outlets.”
Lisa Solomon, CN N public affairs coordinator in Washington, D.C., said, “We have been covering Hispanic voters throughout. We can almost guarantee that Hispanic voters will be covered (at the convention).”
At CBS in New York, executive producer Lane Venardos, who is responsible for convention coverage, responded to a Weekly Report inquiry on the networks inclusion of Hispanic participation and influence, “We don’t have a task force to take care just of Hispanics - there is no designated Latin correspondent or unit.”
A FIRST: NBC has produced the first-ever Spanish-language TV and radio promotional spots for its more than 200 affiliates.
Its Chicago affiliate, WMAQ-TV, was the first to order. The “Solo en NBC’ commercial will air in August. John Chavez, who conceptualized the project, said calls have also come in from affiliates in San Antonio and Brownsville,
Texas, and he expects requests soon from all regions with large Hispanic populations.
The network spent about $3,000 to translate the English jingle, said Chdvez.
TIMES’ CHANGES: Jesus Rangel and Alfonso Narvaez switched reporting spots at The New York Times last month. Rangel is now New Jersey Bureau Chief, while Narvaez is reporting from the Manhattan office.
Another Times reporter, Lydia Chavez, left the paper June 14 to movetoCincinnati. She had been covering the Wedtech proceedings. Rangel said Chdvez will be free-lancing from Ohio.
The Times has left in its New York office six Hispanics, including desk staffers, who write.
MOVING ALONG: Cuban American journalist Myrna Sonora, who worked for Miami’s WLTV and WSVN-TV, and as a national correspondent for SIN, becomes news director of WSCV-TV, Channel 51.
She leaves WQBA La Cubanisima in order to accept the post.
- Darryl Figueroa
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Joaquin Aviiio officially becomes the Dade County manager. Avino will receive a $11 0 ,000-a-year salary to head the $2 billion-a year Metro-Dade County government. . . Andres Solares, released from a Cuba prison May 13, travels to the U .S. Capitol to thank Sen . Edward Kennedy for his help in obtaining his release. . . Brooklyn, N.Y., federal Judge Thomas Platt finds Nelson Ramirez, a 28-year old emergency medical technician from Manhattan, in contempt of court and orders him jailed. Ramirez refused to appear before a federal grand jury that is investigating the Puerto Rican separatist group FALN, the Fuerzas Armadas de Liberaci6n Nacional . . . A 1iEC'D. HR/CR Civil Service Commission of Lo s Angeles County rules in favor of Ronald Rocha, a 20-year vetera n of the county marshal's department who claimed that he was a victim o f bias against Latinos. .. The University of California at Los Angel es elects Mike Meehan as undergraduate student president aweekand a half after several fights and the destruction of voting booths b y studen t s who were upset that Latino Lloyd Monserratt was declared i ne l igi b l e to run . It was alleged that Monserratfs grades disqualifie d him as a candidate .. . Miami resident Judith Castro gives birth to 6 p ound, 4 -ounce Michael Robert Fitzgerald in an ambulance after being stopped by a police officer for being in a speeding car. T h e bi rth took 10 minutes ... VoLSNo.241 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Texas GOP Platform June 20, 1988 Official English Despite opposition from Vice President George Bush, Texas Republican Gov . Bill Clements and the state's Republican National Hispanic Assembly, Texas Republicans sup ported official-English legislation in their platform June 1 0. "lfs like shooting yourself in the foot for no reason," said RNHA's Harris County Chairman Angel Abitua " They (the Republican Party) will have to suffer the consequences." Speaking to RNHA June 9 during the Texas Republican Convention in Houston, Bu s h said , "We just don't need (this) kind of legislation or constitutional change." The state's Republican voters supported an official-English referendum in their March 8 pri mary by92%. The Democratic National Committee op poses official-language amendments. The Republican National Committee has not taken a position. RNC deputy press secretary Beth Brainard in Washington, D.C, said " It is entirely possible that this will be brought up (at the national conv ention) . RNC will then take a firm position either way. Section missing from original . . \ ... ' ,

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HispanasAccountfor11 o;o of Nation's Births in 1987 Hispanic females 18 to 44 years of age accounted for 11% of all births in 1987 despite representing only 8% of the women in that age group, found a U .S. Census Bureau report released June 16 . Of the 7 . 1 million children born in 1987, some 411 ,000 were born to Hispanic women, reported " Fertility of American Women : June 1987." The estimated fertility rate for Latinas in the 18 -44 age group was 96 births per 1 ,000 women, said the report . The comparable rate for black women was 83, and for whites it was 69 . The overall fert i lity rate was 71 births per every 1 ,000 women. Slightly more than a quarter of Hispanic women who had a child in the 12 months before June 1987 did so out of wedlock The percentages of women who were not married and had children during that period were : HISPANIC BLACK 26.3% 55.4% WHITE 12 . 4% Eighty percent of black women 18 to 24 years of age had their children out of wed lock. Thirty-five percent of Hispanic women in that age group who had children were not married, said the report . Hispanas who had children in 1987 had the lowest labor force participation rate36%, the report said . Black women led all groups in their numbers in the labor force; they had a rate of 53%. White women had a participation rate of 51%. Felix Perez F ederal Contracts to Latinos: o.so;o TwoCourtRulingsAid ...-----...;...;.........;;....;;....;;.....;...;;.-...-....-.....llllllill-.iliiii-Undocumented Aliens Section missing from original In separate federal court rulings, issued June 9 in Atlanta and June 1 0 in Sacramento , Calif., undocumented aliens received good news on two fronts : they are entitled to protect i on under federal labor laws , and those denied legalization because of " brief absences" have another shot. In Atlanta , the U . S . Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit ruled that undocumented aliens not paid minimum wage or fairly compensated for overtime can sue their employers under the federal Labor Standards Act. The three judge panel held that despite the immigration act making it illegal for employers to hire undocumented employees , these workers were still entitled to federal protection. U . S . District Judge Lawrence Altman in Sacramento ordered the U .S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to nullify the re jection of some 25,000 undocumented aliens nationally who left the country for brief periods after Jan . 1 , 1982. Altman also ordered that the deadline for legalization be extended to Nov. 30 for aliens who thought they were ineligible because of the INS ' strict inter pretation of the act's brief absence provision . Peter Schey, the director of the National Center for Immigrants' Rights, which repre sented the plaintiffs, estimated that the inter-

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Ric hard Avena, guest columnist El Willie As I was sitting in his hospital room in San Antonio, I started to remi nisce with Willie Velasquez, the founder and director of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project , about the good old days. It struck me, after watching the parade in and out of his room for severa l hours, that maybe El Wee-Lay-a name he, at 44, still hadn't outgrown-was not the genius we all took him for. We thought he was so smart, registering so many mejicanos, first in Texas, then in other states. Now I realized that all he had to do was register all his orimos and lias and tios and compadres, and that alone would be to change the political bent of Texas. I first met El Wee-Lay in Washington, D.C., in the '60s, when we had the Poor People's March and assorted civil rights activities. While I was becoming a revolucionario de biblioteca working in the Library of Congress , El Wee-Lay was starting a revolution in South Texas . As one of the founders of the Raza Unida Party and of the Mexican American Youth Organization, Willie already understood that the key to social changes was a simple concept-gain and retain power. The late '60s and early '70s in Texas were times of change. School walkouts , boycotts, "Kill the Gringo" rhetoric, and marches. REGISTER AND VOTE The Raza Unida Party was being formed primarily to challenge the " Good Old Boy" Dempcrats. El Partido took control of the Crystal City schools, and later its city hall and the county courthouse. The upheaval continued into the early '70s and somewhere along the way Wee-Lay came to realize that the best road to political control was convincing people to register and vote . He became a missionary preaching the gospel. " If your streets and drainage are bad, register and vote." "If y ou don't like the way the schools are educating your kids, register and vote." I never heard Wee-Lay tell anyone to vote for a Democrat or a Republican, either. Just register and vote . In my work, I visited dozens of communities in Texas and New Mexico. Every time I would meet with a group of activists, I was told: "Por aca andaba El Wee-Lay." The rest is history. The Voting Rights Act coverage came to Texas . Law suits were filed to bring single-member districts to the state legislature, and later to cities and school boards. Places that had never seen a Mexican American on the city council or school board now looked at Hispanic majorities. 'FIRE THE S.O.S.' As the result of the work of El Wee-Lay and the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, Mexican Americans began winning elections all over. I remember when several city council members from a small community south of San Antonio came to my office for some advice. They had swept their election. They asked me, "What should we do noW?" . I told the111, "Read the minutes for the past several years and find out whafs been done by the outgoing council. This should be your first step. " Later, they called and said the city manager refused to give up the minutes. I lost my temper. "Fire the sonofabitch," I yelledinto Uncle Sam's telephone. The gaining and retaining of power ... Willie taught us all. I had dozed off. I woke up as a new flow of com padres and children came in to see El Wee-Lay as Willie was taking another phone call from a well-wisher. His body housed cancer, but he looked good. I prayed for him as I left the room. Willie died June 15. I wish there had been another way. I wish all he had to do was register and vote. (Richard Avena, of San Antonio, is former Southwest regional director of the U . S Commission on Civil Rights.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sin pelos en Ia lengua THE INSIDE SCOOP: Three weeks ago, in the space to my right(your left) , businessman Raoul Lowery Contreras described a police action by the San Diego County Sheriffs which made him tremble. The lawmen, including SWAT teams in camouflage combat fatigues, armed themselves with high-powe red, semiautomatic rifles. In their search for two men described as "young, Mexican, approximately 5 feet 7 inches tall" who had raped a 15-yearold girl , they rounded up 85 Latinos who had the misfortune of being in the general locale. The Latinos ranged in age from 16 to 50. Some were 6 feet tall. According to witnesses, including Anglos, the Latinos were slammed against walls, handcuffed and spread for hours on a parking lot as the sheriffs took their sweet time interrogating them. The Border Patrol was also called in to deal with any of the brown "voluntary witnesses" who didn't have papers . The result: None had anything to do with the rape , nor knew anything about it. (Two suspects and four others allegedly at the scene were picked up later on a lead supplied by other Latinos . repulsed by the crime.) Less than a dozen of those rounded up earlier were kept by /a migra; the rest, after hours in detainment, were sent on their way. Lowery Contreras was angry and dumbfounded that in the '80s people could still have their constitut ional rights trampled on because of their brown skin. This week he is still anorv. but not so dumbfounded. The victim, reporters have since discovered, was the daughter of a San Diego police officer. And her mother and stepmother both work for San Diego law enforcement agencies. The case's latest twist: The story broke in an outoftown newspaper that three court-appointed defense attorneys resigned from the case, saying they know the victim's policeman-father. "Never let it be said that U . S . Justice isn't even-handed, and that everyone charged with a crime is innocent until proven guilty and entitled to a competent legal defense," Lowery Contreras now concludes. "Especially when the victim's daddy, mommy and step-mommy all wear badges." BEFORE I FORGET: My nomination for the worst television news report of the year goes toN BC for a lengthy segment on the Hispanic vote in California just before the primary there. Narrated by Tom Pettit, it started with "the Sleeping Gianf' and left the impression-after interviewing three high school students and no Latino political scientists-that we just don't care. Shame. SHOULD JUAREZ BE SAVED? Dagoberto Gilb wonders in a critique in Texas Monthly why some Latino activists want to save ABC TVs cop show Juarez. While agreeing that Latinos have a legitimate complaint about television's overall treatment of His panics, he describes Juarez as "the wrong program to battle for. " Wh'{? "Juarez assumed the racist image of Mexican Americans as criminals, bandidos, and the liberalism of the show was to allow a noble Detective Rosendo Juarez to overcome his instincts." ARE YOU FUNNY? You didn't laugh at this week's cartoon? You weren't supposed to. It doesn't have a caption line yet. Artist Virgilio Garcia, who's usually very funny, wrote one that nobody here understood. But none of us could come up with anything better. The illustration lends itself to humor, we decided, but we need your help. If you can come up with a good line, we'll run it and send a 13-week subscription to Weekly Report to anyone your heart desires. Kay Barbaro 3 June 20, 1988

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COLLECTING FERTILITY PATTERNS: "Fertility of American Women: June 1987" is a 67-page report that details the fertility rate of Hispanic, white and black women according to several criteria. For a copy of the report, contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) BOOK ON HISPANICS: Robert W. Mullen, associate professor of speech communication at Northern Kentucky University, has compiled a 115-page collection of articles and essays on Mexican and Central American history, culture and other topics by various authors titled "Hispanic Voices." For a copy, send $6.10 to Northern Kentucky University Bookstore, Student Center, Nunn Drive, Highland Heights , Ky. 41076, Attention Bill Reed . WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN THE SCIENCES: A 264-page report by the Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology finds that the numberoffemalestudents in sciences and engineering is dropping and the upward movement of non-Asian minorities in these fields has stopped or is declining. For a copy, send $85 to CPST, 1500 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 831, Washington, D.C. 20005. FORTUNE 500 HISPANICS: The National Hispanic Corporate Council consists of representatives from Fortune 500 corporations throughout the United States. Membership includes a quarterly newsletter, a directory of Fortune 500 contacts and other benefits. Requests for further information should be sent to NHCC, P.O. Box 16421, Phoenix, Ariz. 85082. EDUCATION FOR THE DISABLED: The Handicapped Minority Research Institute on Language Proficiency disseminates its research findings through the Bilingual Special Education Newsletter and via a bilingual electronic bulletin board accessible to users nationwide . For further information on HMRI and its bulletin board, contact Dr. Nancy Russell, Bilingual Special Education, Department of Special Education, EDB,306, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712-1290. CUBA DICTIONARY: "Historical Dictionary of Cuba" is a 406page volume on historical facts, events and leaders in Cuban history from pr&Columbian times to the present. To receive a copy, send $39.50 (add $3 for postage and handling for one, 50 cents for each additional order) to Scarecrow Press, 52 Liberty St., P.O. Box 4167, Metuchen, N.J. 08840. FREEDOM OF SPEECH: A 19-page report summarizing the 1986 "Freedom of Speech in Miami" conference discusses First Amendment rights in light of the Cuban American experience in the Miami area For a free copy, write to the Cuban American National Council, 300 S.W.12th Ave., Third Floor, Miami Fla. 33130-2038. CONNECTING PROJECT AIMS AT PRESCHOOLERS This fall the Arlington County, Va., school system will initiate Spanish-language radio announcements with basic tips aimed at Hispanic parents of preschoolers. The program, Project Family, is designed to help parents teach children the skills necessary to become good students before they begin elementary school. Other parts of the program include distributing booklets to new parents and encouraging them to enter classes on nutrition and child development The county manager has recommended that the county board set aside $37,000 for the project Planners hope this first-of-a-kind program will help future students stay in school. Hispanics make up 18% of Arlington's students. Last year 6% of the county's Hispanic students dropped out. LAW FIRM AIDS POOR New York's largest law firm and the nation's top in terms of earnings and revenue announced June 7 it will establish a $10 million fellowship program to place lawyers in legal aid groups across the nation. Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher& Flom said it will use the money to sponsor 125 fellowships to aid poor people in lawsuits ranging from child-custody disputes to aiding the homeless in finding housing. The firm will set up a committee of trustees to select 25 fellows per year from graduating law students. Those selected will be paid a minimum of $32,500 for at least two years. The firm will also assist in helping the fellows pay their student loans. Representatives of the firm said they hope the program will move other firms to implement similar ventures. Unlike similar programs, the fellows will not be required to return to the firm after their fellowship is over. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES The University of Colorado, Metropolitan State College in Denver and Community College of Denver have each donated $23,000 to establish the Colorado Institute for Hispanic Education and Economic Development in Denver. The think tank, to be directed by Ray Sandoval, will develop policies to increase the educational and economic opportunities of Hispanics in Colorado. It will work with other Hispanic organizations, higher education institutions and businesses. For more information on the institute, call (303) 556-4436 ... Manuel Oliverez, a civilian employee of the U.S. Department of Defense, announces he will seek a second two-year term as president of National Image, an organization concerned with the employment arid advancement of Hispanics ... Calendar American Alumni Association will hold its eighth annual Golf Classic. Contributions will go toward scholarships for Mexican American students . MAAA (213) 743 MINORITY CONTRACTING FORUM Government Marketing and International Trade Institute Arlington, Va June 28 Trudy Deller (202) 659-2468 THIS WEEK TRADE CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. June 22 A conference on Central American trade, investment and tourism will be held with representatives in attendance from Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Panama Encuentro New Orleans is sponsored by New Orleans, the U.S. Department of Commerce, The Chamber/New Orleans and the River Region, the Port of New Orleans, Tulane University and the World Trade Center of New Orleans. Paul Guidry (504) 589. GOLF TOURNAMENT Los Angeles June 24 The University of Southern California's Mexican 4 HISPANIC FAMILY AWARDS Los Angeles June 24 The Hispanic American Family oft he Year Foundation will hold the fourth annual California Hispanic American Family of the Year Awards banquet. Winners may participate in the Great American Family awards program . The foundation raises money for scholar ships and conducts workshops on family issues. Evelyn Leyva-Kemp (818) 500.1309 HISPANIC YELLOW PAGES Arlington, Va. June 24 Directory495-The Hispanic Yellow Pages will hold a luncheon to celebrate the completion of this year's edition. The publication will be available July 24. Francisco Vega (703) 820-GUIA COMING SOON June 20, 1988 LULAC CONVENTION League of United Latin American Citizens Dallas July 5-10 Joe Campos (214) 565-8522 MINORITY RECRUITMENT CONFERENCE American Association on Education Washington, D.C. July 5-8 Ann Davie (202) 939-9395 Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date . Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Wasll ington, D.C. 20005. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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• CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-STOUT Department of Counseling & Psychological Services seeks two faculty members. Associate Professor: Tenure track opening for specialization in graduate level psychological measurement and diagnosis for counselors, psychologists , family therapists; supervision of field and clinic practicums; supervision of master's and Education Specialist research studies. Qualifications: Doctorate in Psychology, Counseling, or related field; professional experience as practitioner in related field; graduate teaching/research experience . Assistant Professor: Tenure track opening in teaching core graduate level courses for counselors, psychologists and family therapists group, counseling theory, careers, counseling process, AODA, marriage & family therapy; research advising. Qualifications: Doctorate in Psychology, Counseling or related field; prefer practice as counselor, psychologist with graduate teaching experience. Salaries for both positions are commensurate with training/experience. Academic year appointments with summer teaching possibilities. Send letter of application for Associate or Assistant position, resume and three reference names to: Dr. Carlyle Gilbertson, Chair, Department of Counseling & Psychological Services, UW-Stout, Menomonie, WI 54751. Applications open until positions filled The University of Wisconsin-Stout is an equal opportunity and Affirmative Action university . Applications from women, minorities, and persons with disabilities are especially encouraged. PUBLIC INFORMATION DIRECTOR National Hispanic organization seeks a Public Information Director . Experience in working with national and local med ia. Ex cellent writing and editing skills, experience in layout and publication design. Bilingual (English/Spanish) strongly preferred. Formal training plus practical experience, Master's degree helpful. Position available immediately, salary based on experience. Send resume and writing samples to: National Council of La Raza 20 F Street NW Washington, D.C. 20001 Att: Lupe Lemus ATTORNEYS NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The National Board of Directors of the ASPIRA Association, Inc invites nominations and applications for the position of national Executive Director. Minimum qualifications include a Master's Degree ; five years success ful administration , program development, fund raising, budget planning and management experience; oral and written proficiency in Spanish and English; and demonstrated inter personal and public speaking skills . ASPIRA is a national Hispanic community based organization active in youth leadership development, promoting Latino educational advancement, and conducting research and advocacy. Send resume and nominations by July 15, 1988, to: Search and Screen Committee The ASPIRA Association , Inc. National Office 1112 16th Street , NW , Suite 340 Washington, D.C. 20036 Attn: Lisa Bonilla GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D .C., provides: • Design • Typesetting • Lay out • Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483-7755. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR National nonprofit, highly visible, public service organization with minority issues orientation seeks Executive Director. Excellent writing, speaking, fund raising skills, grass roots involvement experience, and good management back. . ground needed. Bicultural sensitivity, political awareness, creativity, diplomacy, initiative, relia bility, loyalty, orderliness are essential. Computer expertise a pius. Send resume, references, writing sample and salary requirements to: LULAC, 1101 14th St. NW, Suite610, Washington, D.C. 20005. I DIRECTOR, RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION The Latino Institute seeks a director for its research and documentation division to join its management team . Responsible for de signing, developing, and providing research on issues affecting the Latino community with priority in the areas of Education, Political Empowerment, Health, and Economic Develop ment. Requirements include: Master's degree in a social research related field, minimum of three years research experience, minimum one year supervisory experience, excellent verbal and written communication skills in Spanish/English. Bicultural preferred. Salary: $30,000 $40,000. Send cover letter and resume by July 1, 1988, to: Jose C. MatosReal Executive Director Latino Institute 228 South Wabash Room 600 Chicago , Ill . 60604 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. The Latino Institute is a not-for-profit organization which promotes Hispanic pro gress through research, training, and advocacy. Service area is limited to Chicago. ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST, Washington, D . C . , based, will dofree-lanceworkat reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737. ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS: with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252. MALDEF, a national civil rights organization seeks 2 attorneys for its Los Angeles office. Associate counsel directs all activities of the LA regional office, and is responsible for supervising all litigation, programs, and per sonnel. Required: licensed attorney, minimum 6 years legal experience (3 years in civil rights law and3 years litigation experience in federal and state practice); supervision & management skills; bilingual in English/ Spanish. Director of Immigrants' Rights assesses local, state, and national needs of immigrants' rights for litigation and advocacy, and develops plans and strategy for imple mentation. Required: licensed attorney, 5 years of legal experience (3 years in civil rights law and 3 years of litigation experience in federal and state practices); bilingual (English/Spanish) . DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p .m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Send resume, writing sample and 3 refer ences by June 27 to E. Richard Larson, MALDEF , 634 S. Spring St., 11th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif . 90014. Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES Ordered by 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone Organization number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. Street ______________ _ DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES City State & Zip (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) ' ' ---------'---$45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

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Arts & En tertainment and the Ruth Mott Foundation, as well as anticipated proceeds from this week's Noche de Teatro fund-raiser, are expected to increase the project's budget to about $100,000. PLAYWRIGHTS CHOSEN: Participants have been announced for the third a nn ual Hispanic Playwrights Project , conducted by the South Coast Repe rt ory in Costa Mesa, Calif. Lalo Guerrero , Latin Anonymous, Miguel Delgado, Abel Franco and Mexican Dance Theatre are among performers scheduled to appear on Noche de Teatro June 20 at SCR's Mainstage Theatre . The plays Bang Bang Blues , by Charles G6mez, Everything In Its Place, by Raf ael Lima, and Lynette Serrano-Bonaparte's Broken Bough will be r ead p ublicl y as part of the two-week workshop, Aug. 2 to 14. Three o t h e r plays by Josefina L6pez , Bernardo Solano and Rafael Melendez w ill be read before invited audiences of theater professionals. FOCUS ARGENTINA: Los Angeles' A Celebration of Argentine Cinema this week coincides with the 53 rd anniversary of the death of tango supestar Carlos Garde I. Activities, organized by the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, begin June 20 with a reception at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills . Highlighting the week will be a film series at UCLA, co-sponsored by Argentina's /nstituto Nscional de Cinema togr afia, launched June 23 with La pelicula del rey. Director Carlos Sorin is expected to attend . The South C oas t Repertory -a recent Regional Theatre Tony Award recipient h a s e x panded the Hispanic Playwrights Project from the one-we e k p rogram offered in '86 and '87 . Acc o rding to HPPdirector Jose Cruz Gonzalez , doubling t he length of the project is due to an increase in funding, including a $50,000 grant from the Ford Foun dation. Other grants from Pacific T e lesis Gardel fans th roughout Latin America commemorate the singer's death, which occurred in a plane accident in Medellin, Colombia , .edi a Report REMARKS: At a June 8 luncheon hosted by the Media Ins titute in Washington, D.C. , Univision news d irector Guillermo Martinez addressed a gathe r i ng of some 50 news people. Among h is re m arks were these: "Over the weekend, N BC, CNN and CBS all did pieces on t h e H i spanic ethnic vote in California. It's abo u t time ... " There is n o doubt that the major English language networks wi ll do a n exhaustive job of covering th e c onv en t ions. They will detail the impact of th e gender gap vote, of the black vote, of the So uthern white male vote . . . Will they researc h an d report in depth on the impact of the Hi spa nic vote? Probably not. Three and a half m i llion H i spanics are expected to vote i n this ye ar's election, compared with 4.5 million black s . "Consider wha t t he candidates are doing. For the firs t t ime in U . S . history , all of the major pres identia l ca ndidates have produced campaign commercials in Spanish . Mike HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A n a t iona l pub l icatio n o f Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publis h er. H ec tor E ricksenMendoza Ed it or. F elix P e r e z R eporting Anto nio Me jias-Rent as, Darryl Figueroa, Sophia N ieves, Dia n a Padilla, A ng ela Walker Gra ph i cs! Prod uctiorc Carlos Arrie!\ Zoila Elias No portion of H i span i c Lin k Weekly Report may be reproduced or b ro a dcas t i n a n y for m w ithout a dvance permission Annual subscripti o n (50 issues): InstitutionS/agencie s $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPO R ATE CLASS I FIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word Disp layadsare$45 per co lumn inch . Ads placed by Tuesday wil l run inWee klyReportma iled Friday ofsameweek u se r a t es on req u es t 6 June 24, 1935. -Antonio Mejias Rentas Dukakis' campaign manager in California was a Hispanic . Also , Jesse Jackson's campaign staff allocated 25% of his media budget for the state to Spanish-language outlets." Lisa Solomon, CNN public affairs coordinator in Washington, D.C., said, "We have been covering Hispanic voters throughout. We can almost guarantee that Hispanic voters will be covered (at the convention)." At CBS in New York, executive producer Lane Venardos, who is responsible for con vention coverage , responded to a Weekly Report inquiry on the network's inclusion of Hispanic participation and influence , "We don't have a task force to take care just of Hispanics there is no designated Latin correspondent or unit." A FIRST: NBC has produced the first-ever Spanish-language TV and radio promotional spots for i ts more than 200 affiliates. Its Chicago affiliate , WMAQ-TV, was the first to order. The " Solo en NBC" commercial will air in August. John Chavez, who concept ualized the pro j ect, said calls have also come in f rom affiliates in San Antonio and Brownsville, Texas, and he expects requests soon from all regions with large Hispanic populations. The network spent about $3,000 to translate the English jingle, said Chavez. TIMES' CHANGES: Jesus Rangel and Alfonso Narvaez switched reporting spots at The New York Times last month. Rangel is now New Jersey Bureau Chief, while Narvaez is reporting from the Manhattan office. Another Times reporter, Lydia Chavez, left the paper June 14 to move to Cincinnati. She had been covering the Wedtech proceedings. Rangel said Chavez will be free-lancing from Ohio. TheTimeshasleft in its New York office six Hispanics, including desk staffers, who write. MOVING ALONG: Cuban American jour nalist Myrna Sonora, who worked for Miami ' s WL TV and WSVNTV, and as a national cor respondent for SIN, becomes news director of WSCV-TV, Channel 51. She leaves WQBA La Cubanisima in order to accept the post. Darryl Figueroa (See Sin Pelos) Hispanic Link Weekly Report