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Hispanic link weekly report, July 4, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 4, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
President Reagan presents to Navv Cmdr. Everett Alverez and four other active and retired military personnel medals honoring the thousands of U.S. servicemen who have been prisoners of war at one time or another since 1917. Alverez’s captivity in Vietnam was the second longest... Los Angeles City Planning Commission President Dan Garcia, 41, announces he will step down from his position in September. Garcia had been on the commission 12 years... Viola Lopez, the first female labor commissioner of New Mexico, receives, along with 29 other women, the Governor’s Award for Outstanding New Mexican Women... The U.S. State Department denounces the
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decision of Mexico to release fron\Hrftorf CArlos Morales, a Puerto Rican separatist wanted by the United States for escaping from a federal prison. Mexico rejected a U.S. extradition request, saying that Morales was a “political fighter.”... Newsweek magazine honors Arzie Galvez, an assistant high school principal in Denver, and Juan Cbrdova, an 11-year-old from Mesa, Calif., as two of its 51 unsung heroes. Galvez was recognized for his efforts to convince Mexican American studentsto stay in school. Cordova helped police break up a lunch-money extortion ring... Waking to the sound of breaking glass and an explosion, 26-year-old Richard Castro rescues Irma Uriarte and 11 members of her household from their burning home. To alert the family about the fire,which occurred at 5:30 a.m.,Castro smashed into the house with a fire extinguisher...
Vo I. 6 No. 26
1») HISPANI^^^^^H^Y^^jORT
Latino Attorneys Losing Ground
U.S. English’s Chavez
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As the Hispanic community grows, the number of Hispanic attorneys as a percentage of the population is dropping alarmingly, said National Hispanic Bar Association President Michael Martinez.
The U.S. Department of Census put the number of Hispanic attorneys in 1980 at 9,000 - 2% of the total attorney population. Seven years later, the U.S. Bureau of Labor estimated their number at 12,000-still 2% of
the nation’s attorneys. Meanwhile, the total Hispanic population grew from 14.4 million to 18.8 million between 1980 and 1987.
“As our population grows we’re losing attorneys at the rate of one-fifth of one percent a year,” said Martinez. He said this reflected government figures from 1980 through 1985.
A 1987 survey of Hispanic representation in the country’s most prestigious law firms by
continued on page 2
Hispanics primarily to their rapid population growth. Conversely, the study, titled “Racial Change and Desegregation in Large School Districts,” attributed the low numbers of white students in urban districts primarily to the declining white birth rate.
Among the 60 largest school districts, the 10 worst for Hispanic segregation were New York City, Los Angeles, San Antonio, Chicago, Houston, Brownsville, Texas, Newark, N.J., Oakland, Calif., Philadelphia and San Francisco.
Almost 70% of Los Angeled Hispanic students are in highly segregated schools, in New York 68%, in Chicago 50%, and in Dade County, Fla., 42%, the study showed.
Orfieldand Franklin Monfort, at the University of Wisconsin, analyzed data on 219 school districts. - Darryl Figueroa
U.S. English’s Chavez Chairs Migrant Panel
Linda Chavez was appointed chairperson of the newly formed National Commission on Migrant Education by President Reagan June 24.
Chavez, president of U.S. English, was one of four persons chosen by the president to serve on the 12-member body. The commission will study all aspects of current migrant education programs and consider whether a national center for migrant affairs should be formed. It will also conduct a special two-year review of the migrant student record-transfer system.
In responding to the criticism that U.S. English’s anti-bilingual education stance might hinder Chavez’s effectiveness on the commission,Tom Olson, director of public affairs for U.S. English, said that Chavez does not oppose bilingual education, adding that she would just like “more flexibility.”
The commission, funded at $2 million for three years, was mandated by a recently passed education bill.
Jim Lyons, counsel to the National Association on Bilingual Education, said the appointment was “like appointing the imperial wizard of the Ku Klux Klan to a commission on civil rights.” -Angela Walker
Bush to Address LULAC
Vice President George Bush will address delegates to the League of United Latin American Citizens convention in Dallas July 6. Jesse Jackson and Democratic presidential candidate Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis are also expected to speak.
LULAC will conduct its own presidential election, with four candidates- Andres Tobar of Washington, D.C., Jose Garcia De Lara of Texas, Jose Velez of Nevada and Raphael Acosta of Texas- seeking to replace its outgoing president, Oscar Moran.
The convention, July 5-10, is expected to draw 5,000 to 6,000 delegates from around the country, according to spokesperson Richard Sambrano. Dallas Mayor Annette Strauss and Al Gonzalez, Dallas City councilman, will also address those attending.
Students Segregated in Urban Schools
The typical Hispanic student in a U.S. public school is found in an intensely segregated metropolitan area classroom where a disproportionate number of students are poor and where academic ratings are low, found a report released June 22 in Chicago by the National School Boards Association.
“In the top 25 school districts, Hispanic students are even more (highly) concentrated than are blacks,” said Gary Orfield, a University of Chicago professor who co-authored the study.
In U.S. public schools, the numberof Latino students swelled by 103% between 1968 and 1986. The number of black students grew by 5% during this period, while white student rates fell 16%, according to the report
Orfield attributed the high concentration of
1986 Student Population, Enrollment Shifts: ’68-’86
DISTRICT HISPANIC WHITE BLACK ASIAN
New York City 319,899 208,057 360,242 57,873
Shift +11% —26% +5% +5%
Los Angeles 326,941 104,260 106,944 47,663
Shift +36% -37% -4% +4%
Chicago 109,474 60,678 244,271 12,329
Shift +17% -27% +5% +2%
Dade County 101,442 59,087 80,322 2,741
Shift +25% -40% +9% +1%
Houston 72,860 32,937 82,763 5,885
Shift +24% -37% +10% +3%
San Diego 21,041 47,986 19,998 18,791
Shift +9% -32% +7% +15%
Philadelphia 16,764 45,862 118,506 5,780
Shift +7% -15% +5% +3%
Source: “Racial Change and Desegregation in Large School Districts" by the National School Boards Association.


Fla. English Plus Battles Official Language Measure
Florida’s English Plus organization has initiated a campaign to defeat a ballot measure that would make English Florida’s official language.
Formed two months ago, the group is drawing financial support from Unidos, a loosely connected, local coalition of Hispanic organizations. Jon Weber, recently named executive director of English Plus, declined to state how much money has been raised or how much they expect to raise.
Weber said funds would' be used to tell voters the initiative, if passed, will hurt tourism and the state’s ability to compete economically.
On June 21 a fund-raising appeal for
English Plus was broadcast for 13 hours over Spanish-language radio and television stations in Florida, garnering $50,000. The group has an office in Miami and plans to open another in Tampa “I think its important for the voters to understand this is not a Hispanic issue,” Weber said. “Ifsabouthowwecan best get people proficient in English. How does this (measure) accomplish this? It doesn’t.” Thus far, the state has validated 253,700 of the 470,000 signatures turned in by Florida English to put the proposal on the November 8 ballot. Both organizations consider it likely the remaining 86,300 of the340,000 signatures needed by the Aug.
9 deadline will be validated.
Pat Fulton, Florida English’s director of communications, explained the amendment is needed in a state that is home to 75 language groups. She said, “English has been the language of government. There’s been no question... except in the past 15 years.”
She said her group intends to put together a legislative package that will include a request for exceptions on the use of English in instances involving cases of health, safety and justice. It wo.uld advocate English language proficiency tests for doctors and lawyers and promote more funding for English-language classes. - Sophia Nieves
Law Schools Contribute to Scarcity Capitol Hill Meetings
Emphasize Education
continued from page 1
the National Law Journal paints a grimmer picture. Of the 250 largest firms employing 100 attorneys or more, 98 firms had no His-panics, according to the survey published in February. Overall, Hispanics made up less than 1 % of attorneys employed by the largest firms.
The reasons given for the underrepresentation include overreliance on law school admissions tests, the prohibitive costs of a legal education, the increasing scarcity of grants to students and stereotyping.
Gilberto de Jesus, executive director of the Council on Legal Education Opportunities in Washington, D.C., said law schools rely too heavily on results of the Law School Admissions Test, rather than focusing on how students fared as undergraduates.
“If they use this as a primary predictor, we’ re going to have problems,” de Jesus said.
Martinez, from Salt Lake City, said lack of role models in law school is also a factor. “Out of 6,000 law professors (on the mainland), 35 are Hispanic. Only 16 are tenured faculty.”
The majority of the law professors - 24 - are Mexican American, said Michael Olivas, a law professor at the University of Houston.
When looking for a position with a firm, Hispanic attorneys are confronted by the widespread belief that Latinos are interested only in “non-intellectual” specialties such as ’ family law, said Martinez, who represents the 4,500-member NHBA.
Martinez also said, “The American Bar Association has not done anything to assist Hispanics in getting into the law profession.” The ABA began a year-long program in May to begin to alleviate the problem Hispanics and other minorities have in obtaining substantial contracts and in being hired by major firms. The Minority Counsel Demonstration Project brings together 11 Fortune 500 companies, six Anglo/owned law firms and 20 minority-owned firms, five of them Hispanic The companies committed to using the services of minority firms when possible, and Anglo-owned firms promised to put minorities on these corporate cases. - Sophia Nieves
Chi. Hiring Record Stays Below Par
A report released by the Chicago Mayor’s Advisory .Commission on Latino Affairs last month finds that although the number of Hispanics employed by the city is rising, aggressive steps must be taken to retain and hire a number to reach parity.
The report states that over the past five years, Chicago’s Hispanic work force has increased from 3.8% to 6.12%. “An Assessment of the City’s Work Force: Who are They?” says that Chicago must seek to roughly double the current number of its Hispanic employees. The ideal figure, according to the commission, is approximately 11.6% - the percentage of Hispanics in the work force nationally.
The commission recommends, among other things, that Chicago’s Personnel Department seek to develop culturally sensitive hiring and retention programs, that acting Mayor Eugene Sawyer meet with the Affirmative Action Council chairman on a monthly basis to assess the compliance of department heads
with the hiring and retention of Hispanics, and that the city’s Affirmative Action Council devise a system of accountability for those not complying.
- Diana Padilla
Latino education leaders presented their concerns to key government and agency officials at three separate meetings on Capitol Hill June 21-22.
The U.S. Senate Republican Task Force on Hispanic Affairs listened June21 to testimony on education and literacy from five Latino experts on its 50- member bipartisan advisory committee, which was organized in April. Among those who testified were Edward Franco, president of National SER-Jobs for Progress.
The following day, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus focused its attention on the status of Hispanics in higher education. About ten Hispanic college presidents and others spoke to the five CHC members who were present, including chairman Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas).
CHC also sponsored later that day a roundtable discussion with the San Antonio-based Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, which represents 70 Hispanic institutions, with senate aides and U.S. Education Department officials.
“It was a historic occasion,” said HACU Executive Director Antonio Rigual, who was present at the June 22 meetings. “Wehopeit is the beginning of a partnership between the different groups to facilitate access for Hispanics. _ Darryi Figueroa
PepsiCo Charged With Language Bias
In a case touted as “.. .an American success story gone awry,” the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed a lawsuit in Pima County, Ariz., Superior Court June 15, charging PepsiCo Inc. with discriminating against an employee on the basis of his language ability.
The suit was filed after the Arizona State Civil Rights Division found “reasonable cause to believe that an unlawful employment practice .. occurred.” MALDEF is working with private attorney Richard Martinez to gain Rafael Lugo’s reinstatement and backpay.
Despite a termination report stating that Lugo, a production technician with the Tucson-
based Santa Rita/Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. for 14 years, was a cooperative employee with satisfactory job knowledge, an excellent attendance record and a superior quality of work, he was terminated in May 1987 after a newly hired engineer complained that Lugo's English was insufficient to perform his duties. Shortly before being fired, Lugo, who was a legal immigrant, had received an “A” in an . English as a Second Language course.
Jos6 Roberto Juarez, MALDEF director of Employment, said, “People need to know how harmful English-only sentiments can be... Hopefully, this suit will prevent other employers from taking similar discriminatory actions” Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Lawrence Thomases, guest columnist
Anita
When Anita came to Boston, we were too happy being together to worry about technicalities. So it was only later I learned she had arrived in the country on a 10-day permit
The 10 days already expired by the time Anita reached Boston. Soon 10 became 20 and days became months. The permit gradually became just a memento, the down payment on a citizenship plan that required far more credentials than we could ever hope to have.
Anita claimed to be unconcerned about overstaying her allotted time. There was a hint of daring to it She took pride in leaving home young while her brothers and sisters settled down in the same barrio where they were raised. She was secretly pleased, even, that we didn’t consider a marriage license essential.
Still, Anita paid a price for living outside the law. Without the almighty green card, her job options were narrow and grim.
Despite her nonchalance - and my avoidance of the subject - we shared the fear that she could be apprehended at any time.
HOPE CAME AND WENT
Anita found work in a neighborhood laundry run by a man named Azim. She stood all day writing out tickets at the front counter, where she was spared the heavy work, but not the monotony, of those who washed or pressed or folded clothes in back. Azim paid his workers at best the minimum wage.
Anita made a few friends among those who were able to endure Azim for more than a few days. One was a woman named Elisa, who claimed to be from Puerto Rico. Anita gave her occasional sewing lessons, and a few days before Elisa left for home - having met her goal of saving $1,000- she came by with a lamp she had bought Anita in appreciation.
Just before she left, she told us, “ I’m really Guatemalan.” She began to sob, and it was some time before we could turn her attention back to the happy family reunion that awaited her. Though it had meant her survival, she couldn’t forgive herself for lying.
Every so often came a small sign of hope for Anita. One friend, who worked in a hospital, said he might be able to fabricate a false birth certificate; another was supposedly onto a magical Social Security number that could be used with impunity. Neither plan ever materialized. That left the great unspoken solution: marriage. But we were young and frowned at convention. What we couldn’t admit was our uncertainty that we could make it through a lifetime together.
Somehow Anita managed to adjust to her job, and Azim’s antics were mentioned less and less, Anita became one of the few workers he was fond of. Once he even told her that he didn’t know what he would do without her.
KINDNESS LIMITED TO WORDS
But such kindness didn’t go past words. On the day she left, after more than a year on the job, h is only recog nition was a few extra cents and a cursory goodbye.
Eventually we formalized our marriage, an act which helped Anita resolve her immigration status. But new problems ensued. The time came to see a divorce lawyer, Our wedding bands consigned to a drawer at home, citizenship then seemed the smallest of concerns.
I haven’t seen Anita in a long time now.
Sometimes I think back to the rainy afternoons in that tiny flat when I’d brew coffee in our two-cup pot and wait for Anita to come home, hoping her time at work hadn’t bruised her spirit too badly.
Our world was smaller and simpler then. Villains like Azim and federal agents were easy to identify,
Maybe we needed a common thread to survive; maybe love runs its course as surely as a visa. Somehow the explanations don’t seem to matter much any more.
(Lawrence J. Thomases, of Brighton, Mass., is editor of El Boletin, the newsletter for Centro Presente, a Central American refugee aid agency in Boston.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
WATERFALL* Hispanic Link experienced a waterfall the other weekend. Editor Felix P6rez and I walked into the office on a Sunday night to discover the spectacle at its height Unfortunately, there were no dancing, bombilating crystal waters. No grandeur. j No majesty. Just a case of undiscovered backed-up plumbing.
It didn’t move me as Vosemite Falls has in years past But it did stir me to sort some soggy notes and papers. Among them: GERALDO’S LINT: Among the yellowing (even before the flood) newsclips were such gems as:
In May, a Miami disk jockey wanted to send the listener who came up with the best subject for Geraldo Rivera’s incredible talk show some of Geraldo’s lint.
Rivera graciously cooperated, mailing KLSX morning man Phil Hendrie an envelope filled with lint- from two loads in his drier, he explained.
The winning entry: Should fat people work in bakeries?
There has to be a better one than that If you have an idea and mail it to me, I promise to forward it directly to Geraldo, and mail you, as a reward, a memento of Hispanic Link’s “Waterfall of Summer’88.”
POLITICAL SHUFFLE: In Show Low, Ariz., Diana Lara, 39, and Leon Taylor, 71, tied in their city council race May 30, tallying 275 votes apiece. Instead of conducting a run-off, they meandered down to the Show Low jailhouse and cut cards to decide - reenacting an 1876 game that gave the town its name. Lara drew the deuce of clubs for a four-year term - on the council, not in the cooler.
ADD AN AD TRIO: 1) A full-page display ad in one tasteless Los Angeles newspaper offered this “C/nco de Mayo fiesta" enticement at the Eagle bar “CHEAP MARGARITAS & PRETTY SENORITAS (OR IS IT THE OTHER WAY AROUND).”
2) The Crystal Cathedral, Southern California’s Community Church, paid big bucks for an L.A Times ad urging readers to attend its Father’s Day services and visit with the inspirational Garfield High School calculus teacher whose story was told in the movie “Stand and Deliver.” “Meet Jamie Escalante,” it invited. Any relation to Jaime? (The ad also said “ who’s life was documented. . .”) Tsk tsk. Whatever happened to copy editors and proofreaders?
3) As part of their daily routine, columnists are paid fancy salaries to stereotype and/or insult Latinos. GeorgieAnneGeyer and Mike Royko are two who come immediately to mind.
Most recently, we have New York Daily News columnist Jimmy Breslin identifying Latinos involved in the Wedtech case by their ethnic origin: “Hispanic,” “Colombian-born” or in the case of John Marriota, “of Puerto Rican descent but white as paper.” Breslin pins no ethnic labels on Wedtech “players” of Italian, Irish and Jewish heritage whom he mentions, however.
What can one do about it? At best, we’re allowed a letter to the editor, usually trimmed and always, of course, unpaid.
The Colombian government tried to counter such press bias June 6 with an ad in the Washington Post that filled nearly a page. Using the Vietnam veteran’s memorial wall as a model, it ran the names of many of the “thousands of Colombians who have died fighting against the international drug terrorists” - the victims included Supreme Court members, senators, judges, prosecutors, army officers and journalists
Smear ‘em with innuendo and let’em buy an ad to straighten out the record. What a way for establishment media to do business.
Do you suppose the mainland media ad folks are hitting up Rafael Hernandez Col6n and Miguel de la Madrid, too?
QUIZ: The Washington Post, by the way, has only one- repeat one - full-time reporter or editor who is Hispanic. Can you name any large-size daily in the nation with a worse record? If so, let me know and I’ll pass the information along to Ben Bradlee. He can use it to defend his record. _ ^ay Barbaro
July 4,1988
3


COLLECTING
«'IC/.30’S WORK FORCE: The Chicago Mayor's Advisory
mmiss'.on on Latino Affairs has released a 35-page report, “An Assessment of the City’s Work Force: Who Are They?,” detailing the city’s hiring practices with regard to Hispanics. For a free copy, write to MACLA, City Hall, Room 703,121 N. LaSalle St, Chicago, III. 60602 (312) 744-4404.
HISPANICS IN LAW FIRMS: A survey showing minority representation in the nation’s largest law firms is contained in the February 1988 issue of The National Law Journal. To obtain a copy, send a check for $2 to The National Law Journal, attention Cheryl Nance, 111 Eighth Ave., Suite 900, New York, N.Y. 10011.
ENDOWMENT PROGRAMS: The National Endowment for the Humanities’ “Overview of Endowment Programs,” a 29-page brochure, summarizes federal funding opportunities which may be of interest to Hispanics For a free copy, write to NEH, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 786-0438.
PUERTO RICAN HOUSES: “Puerto Rican Houses in Sociohistorical Perspective,” a 320-page book by Carol F. Jopling, traces the historical development of the island's varied and colorful domestic architecture. Copious photographs and drawings appear. For a copy send $34.95 to the University of Tennessee Press, P.O. Box 6525, Ithaca, N.Y. 14850 (orders placed by July 31 are discounted 20%).
LANGUAGE AND MINORITIES: “Beyond Language. Social and Cultural Factors in Schooling Language Minority Students,” a 343-page book, offers perspectives and suggestions for educators to help minority students achieve academic success while sharing their cultural and linguistic heritage. For a copy send $10 (plus $1 tax and shipping) to EDAC-LA, California State University, Administration Building, Room 714,5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles, Calif. 90032 (213) 224-3676.
DROPOUT HANDBOOK: This 258-page handbook, “Keeping Students in School: A Guide to Effective Dropout Programs and Services,” discusses issues relating to high school dropouts. For a copy send $22.95 to Jossey-Bass Inc., Publishers, 350 Sensome St., San Francisco, Calif. 94104-1301 (415)433-1767.
SEGREGATION: Inquiries on the 50-page report titled “Racial Change & Desegregation in Large School Districts,” which shows that Hispanic students are increasingly segregated in public schools, should be directed to Philip Smith, National School Boards Association, 1680 Duke St, Alexandria, Va. 22314 (703) 838-6743. (No price was available.)
CONNECTING
CAMPAIGN ENCOURAGES VOTE
Congressmen Albert Bustamante and Esteban Torres, United Farm Workers President C6sar Ch&vez and National Council of La Raza President Raul Yzaguirre are among the noted Hispanics who will appear on a series of public service announcements aimed at encouraging Latinos to vote.
The 60-second announcements, sponsored by AT&T, were launched June 20. They will air until the Nov. 8 presidential election on the Spanish-language television network Univision.
Other Hispanics that will participate in the campaign, titled Vota, para que te respeten, are salsa singer Celia Cruz, Miami Dolphins football player Fuad Reveiz and Univision anchors Maria Elena Salinas and Jorge Ramos.
BISHOPS STRESS OUTREACH
The agressive proseiytism by fundamentalist denominations of Hispanics and Latino’s lack of access to quality education, health care and housing were the primary concerns expressed by California’s six H ispanic Catholic bishops in a pastoral letter released last month.
Titled “The Joy of Being Catholic,” the document emphasized the need of the church to reach out to Hispanics in that state. The pastoral letter addressed a problem of increasing concern for the church - the siphoning off of Hispanics by evangelical groups.
The six clergymen who signed the letter were Tomas Clavel, episcopal vicar for the Hispanic community in the Diocese of Orange County; Bishop Joseph Madera of Fresno; Auxiliary Bishops Juan Arzube and Armando Ochoa of Los Angeles; Auxiliary Bishop Gilbert Ch&vez of San Diego; and Auxiliary Bishop Alphonso Gallegos of Sacramento.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
U.S. Small Business Administration head James Abdnor names former White House staffer Grace Flores Hughes associate administrator for minority small business and capital development at the SBA.. Linda Wong, associate counsel for the Los Angeles office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and an expert in immigration law, will leave MALDEF this August. Wong will join California Tomorrow, a public policy group, as its executive director. . . Arturo Vargas, senior education policy analyst at the National Council of La Raza, leaves NCLR, effective in August. Vargas will join MALDEF as its California census coordinator...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
NEA CIVIL RIGHTS AWARDS New Orleans July 5
The National Education Association will hold a human and civil rights awards dinner. Awards to be given include the George I. Sanchez Memorial Award, the Award for Creative Leadership in Women’s Rights, and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Award.
Julie Warner (202) 822-7737
MINORITY RECRUITMENT CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. July 5-8 A conference will be sponsored by the American Council on Education and American Association of Colleges and Universities to help colleges improve their recruitment and retention of minority students. Participants will work in small groups with facilitators to make specific plans for their own campuses. Ann Davie (202) 939-9395
LULAC CONVENTION 4
Dallas July 5-10
The League of United Latin American Citizens will have Vice President George Bush address its delegates. Democratic presidential candidates Jesse Jackson and Michael Dukakis are expected also. Topics to be covered in workshops include the rising high school dropout rate among Hispanics and the significance of the census.
Joe Campos (214) 565-8522
IMMIGRATION STRATEGY MEETING Washington, D.C. July 6, 7
The National Immigration, Refugee & Citizenship Forum will hold a strategy meeting on immigration and related issues. The purpose is to strengthen consensus on policy and to organize more effective advocacy. Topics include the 1988 elections, English only and English Plus.
Amit Pandya (202) 544-0004
MULTICULTURAL FESTIVAL Boston July 8-10
Inquilinos Boricuas en Accion will hold a three-day multicultural festival celebrating the organization’s 20th anniversary. It will include music, dance, food and children’s events.
Wilma Col6n (617) 262-1342
LA RAZA CONFERENCE
July 4,1988
Albuquerque, N.M. July 10-13 The National Council of La Raza will hold a conference marking the organization’s 20th anniversary. Training sessions include computer networking and speakers^ training for English only debates. Workshop topics include the status of Hispanas in politics and Hispanic marketing.
Eileen Torres (202) 628-9600
COMING SOON
MANA CONFERENCE
Mexican American Women’s National Association Washington, D.C. July 21-24 Irma Maldonado (202) 822-7888
PANAMERICAN FESTIVAL Alexandria Department of Parks and Cultural Activities Alexandria, Va July 23 Jorge Lozano (703) 560-4038
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
THE CITY OF DALLAS, TEXAS has the following two positions open.
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 14
Responsible for providing administrative support to an Assistant City Manager, responding to phone calls and correspondence from citizens and City Councilmembers; coordinating council agenda materials and following up on requests for service; attending City Council and town hall meetings and staffing Council Committee meetings and Task Forces.
A Bachelor's Degree in Public Administration, Urban Affairs, Policy Analysis or a related field and four(4) years of related experience. A Master's Degree in Public Administration, U rban Affairs, Policy Analysis or a related fie Id wi II substitute for two (2) of the required years of experience. Salary range for this position is $25,788 to $29,832.
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER
ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER
Responsible for providing administrative assistance to the City Manager, serving as a liaison to City departments, citizens, and special interest groups; coordinating the transmittal of written information to the City council in preparation of weekly council meetings; coordinating support activities of aides and interns in the City Managers’ Office; participating in planning and defining objectives for firms which provide management consultant services to the City Manager’s Office; administering contracts; and handling special projects and programs.
A Bachelor's Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, Urban Affairs, or related field and five (5) years of related experience is required, including three (3) or more years experience as an Administrative Assistant, Management Assistant or related work involving policy analysis, budget construction, administration and supervision. A Master's Degree is preferred. Salary range is $40,220 to $48,348.
Submit a resume for the positions by Friday, July 29,1988 to:
Staffing Manager . Personnel Department 1500 Manila City Hall, Room 6AN Dallas, Texas 75201
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/H
SOCIOLOGIST- UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The Department of Sociology invites applications for a sociologist of religion who has a demonstrated record of teaching and research in the sociology of religion and American culture. This is a tenure-track position with rank and salary open. A Ph.D. before July 1989 is required.
If hired at a senior level, the person must have a distinguished research record. The successful candidate will be expected to teach courses fulfilling program requirements in the American Studies and Religious Studies Programs, but these courses may be taught in the Sociology Department. The appointment is allocated as a full time FTF position in sociology, but depending on the successful candidates desires, he or she may request a joint appointment in one of the other programs. The appointment begins July 1,1989.
Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and names of three references to: Gary Hamilton, Chair, Search Committee, department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616. Final Filing Date for applications is October 15, 1988.
The University of California is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of diversity among its faculty and staff. In that spirit, we are particularly interested in receiving applications from persons of underrepresented groups, including women, ethnic minorities, disabled veterans, Vietnam-era veterans, and handicapped persons.
ASSOCIATE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Associate Executive Director to manage personnel, administrative control, and program planning and evaluation fora multi-service agency with a $3.5 million budget.
Five years administrative experience in community service organization.
Send resume to: SDYCS, 3878 Old Town Avenue, Suite200B, San Diego, California92110.
GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Typesetting • Layout • Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483-7755.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
National nonprofit highly visible, public service organization with minority issues orientation seeks Executive Director. Excellent writing, speaking, fund raising skills, grass roots involvement experience, and good management background needed. Bicultural sensitivity, political awareness, creativity, diplomacy, initiative, reliability, loyalty, orderliness are essential. Computer expertise a plus. Send resume, references, writing sample and salary requirements to: LULAC, 110114th St NW, Suite 610, Washington, D.C. 20005.
SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLES COMMISSION OF IOWA
DIVISION ADMINISTRATOR
RESPONSIBILITIES: THE DIRECTOR SHALL ;
(1) Coordinate, assist and cooperate with the efforts of state departments and agencies, including, but not limited to: the fields of education, employment, health, housing, welfare, corrections, and recreation.
(2) Develop, coordinate, and assist other public and private organizations which serve 1 Latinos.
(3) Evaluate existing programs and proposed legislation affecting Latinos.
(4) Conduct a survey and prepare a report of the Latinos in Iowa.
(5) Required to work with the Commissioners. 1
(6) Appointed at the will of the Governor. i QUALIFICATIONS:
(1) BA required, MA/MS desirable; or three (3) years of responsible experience in public * or community relations with administrative I and supervisory responsibilities for two (2) i years.
(2) Must be bilingual/bicultural demonstrated outstanding communicative skills in ( both English and Spanish.
Screening date will begin July 15th. Position to be filled by August 15, 1988. Equal Opportunity Employer. Submit 3 letters of reference upon request Salary Range $24,4(X)
- $40,600.
Please send application & resume to:
Spanish Speaking Peoples Commission Lucas Building/Capital Complex
Des Moines, Iowa 50139 \
NALEO - National Hispanic civic affairs research and advocacy organization is accept? ing applications for the following positions: Research/Policy Analyst- excellent writing skills, some Capitol Hill experience helpful but not necessary. Spanish preferred but not required. SALARY high teens to low 20’s. Send writing sample and resume to708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
Administrative Assistant- unique position with diverse responsibilities. Must be detail oriented and take initiative. Some meeting planning experience helpful but not necessary. Data Base III required. SALARY mid to high teens. Send resume to: NALEO, 70.8 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
Administrative Assistant- special person is needed to coordinate all aspects of a service oriented toll-free hotline for immigrants. Self Starter. Spanish required. Lots of phone work. Salary low to mid teens. Please call 546-2536.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Executive Director sought for alternative school for Latino adults. Responsible for overall management. BA or M A preferred. Two years equivalent experience. Bilingual/Bicultural preferred.
Resume to: Instituto del Progreso Latino, 1919 S. Blue Island, Chicago, III. 60608.(312) 421-5429.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
FESTIVAL TIME: After a four-year absence from the United States, the TENAZ XIV International Festival of Chicano Latino Theatre takes place this week in San Antonio.
The festival, hosted by LosActoresde San Antonio, will be staged at the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center July 5-10, with the participation of a dozen companies from the United States, Mexico and Peru.
U.S. teatristas participating in the event include Teatro Latino de Minnesota (Minneapolis), Pregones Touring Puerto Rican Theater Collection (the Bronx), Culture Clash and Teatro de la Esperanza(San Francisco), Latino Chicago Theater Company, La Compahia de Teatro Alburquerque (Albuquerque), Teatro El Sol (Tucson), Teatro Bilingue de Houston and Teatro Espejo (Sacramento).
Most companies will perform pieces created collectively. Singleauthor plays in this year's schedule include Milcha Sdnchez Scott’s Roosters, Nicholas A. Patricca’s The Fifth Sun, Romolo Arellano’s Tito and Laura Rendon’s C/S Con Safos.
Begun in 1970 by Teatro Nacional de Aztlan - a grouping of
Hispanic theatercompanies- thefestival became a biannual event in 1984. In 1986, it was held in Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico.
In other theater news, Sanchez-Scotfs Roosters continues its run at the Los Angeles TheaterCenter-directed by Jose Luis Valenzuela - through July8. A production of the same play by Los Actores de San Antonio- to be seen July 5 as part of the TEA/AZfestival-was staged at the Guadalupe June 9-26.
A production of Federico Garcia Lorca’s Bodas de Sangre, seen in March as part of Miami’s III Hispanic Theatre Festival, returns to that city’s Minorca Playhouse this week. Co-produced by Teatro Avante and the Florida Shakespeare Festival, the tragedy plays July 8-24.
Speaking of Garcia Lorca: a new play about the Granadine poet, by Spanish playwright Jose Antonio Rial, has opened at New Yorks Public Theater. The Death of Garcia Lorca, translated to English by Julio Marzan, plays through mid-July.
And three plays by Argentine playwright Eduardo Pavlovsky, produced by Los Angeles' Stages company, were seen through June 27 as part of New Yorks first International Festival of the Arts.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
NAHJ BOARD MEETS: San Francisco will be the site of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ 1990 conference, the group’s board of director’s decided at its meeting June 25-26 in San Diego.
The 1990 conference is tentatively scheduled for April 11-14. NAHJ’s 1989 conference will be held in San Juan, Puerto Rico, April 19-22.
The meeting, attended by all except one of the group’s 16 officers, was the first presided over by president Evelyn Herndndez, a reporter for New York Newsday.
At its next board meeting, to be held in Baltimore this October, NAHJ’s directors will meet with representatives from the National Association of Black Journalists. The two groups and the Asian-American Journalists Association are in the preliminary stages of planning a joint conference for 1991.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc 1420 ‘N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 2340280 or 2340737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix Perez
Reporting Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Diana Padilla, Angela Walker Graphic^ Production Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week Multiple use rates on request
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WATCHDOGS SOUGHT: David Medina, an assistant city editor at The Miami News, announced at NAHJ’s San Diego meeting that he is seeking monitors across the country for the association’s issues committee. Those interested should contact Medina by July 8.
The committee, co-chaired by Medina and KERA-TV, Dallas, reporter Rosalind Soliz, grew out of a concern that NAHJ was not adequately prepared to keep an eye out for and respond to instances when Hispanics are slighted by print or broadcast media.
Anyone wishing to serve as a monitor can reach Medina at The Miami News, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla 33101 (305) 376-3131.
ELECTIONS: The Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., elected June 23 as its new president Phil Garcia, United Press International reporter. The Washington Post reporter Carlos Sanchez became vice president.
FELLOWSHIPS: California Tomorrow, a quarterly magazine that covers the state’s
changing population, is offering an 18-month fellowship at its San Francisco office. The fellow would work as co-editor for $1,200 per month. Contact Rhonda Trotter, California Tomorrow, 849 S. Broadway, Room 831, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 (213) 623-6231.
The American Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation is accepting applications for its Minority Fellowships for those interested in managerial positions at newspapers.
The fellowship consists of seminars on such topics as newsroom leadership, newspaper design and labor relations. Application deadline is July 15. Contact Ardis Pruess at the AN PA Foundation, The Newspaper Center, Box 17407 Dulles Airport Washington, D.C. 20041 (703)648-1000.
MOVES: Lucienne Lopez Loman, manager of career programs for two years at the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, left her post June 30. Education programs manager Jocelyn Cdrdova moves into the position.
- Felix Perez
/ FEU21 CUATPO De JUU !


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R\::.\.i'IJ, n 1\l ...,,. Making The NeWs This Week President Reagan presents to Nav , y Cmdr. Everett Alverez and four other active and retired military personnel medals honoring the thousands of U.S . servicemen who have been prisoners of war at one time or another since 1917. Alverez's captivity in Vietnam was the second longest. .. Los Angeles City Planning Commission President Dan Garcia, 41, announces he will step down from his position i n September. Garcia had been on the commission 12 years . . . Viola Lopez, the first female labor com missioner of New Mexico, receives, along with 29 other women, the Governor's Award for Outstanding New Mexican Women... The U.S . State Department denounces the decision of Mexico to release a Puerto Rican separatist wanted by the United States for escaping from a federal prison . Mexico rejected a U .S. extradition request, saying that Morales was a "political fighter. " ... Newsweek magazine honors Arzie Galvez, an assistant high school principal in Denver, and Juan Cordova, an 11-year-old from Mesa, Calif., as two of its 51 unsung heroes. Galvez was recognized for his efforts to convince Mexican American studentsto stay in school. Cordova helped police break up a lunch-money extortion ring . . . Waking to the sound of breaking glass and an explosion, 26-year-old Richard Castro rescues Irma Uriarte and 11 members of her household from their burning home. To alert the family about the fire, which occurred at 5:30a.m., Castro smashed into the house with a fire extinguisher ... HISPANI KLY R July4, 1988 Latino Attorneys Losing Ground As the Hispanic community grows, the number of Hispanic attorneys as a percentage of the population is dropping alarmingly, said National Hispanic Bar Association President Michael Martinez. The U .S. Department of Census put the number of Hispanic attorneys in 1980 at 9,0002% of the tota l attorney population. Seven years later, the U.S. Bureau of Labor estimated their number at 12,000-still2% of the nation' s attorneys. Meanwhile, the total Hispanic population grew from 14.4 million to 18. 8 m i llion between 1980 and 1987. " As our population grows we're losing attor neys at the rate of one-fifth of one percent a year, " said Martinez. He said this reflected government figures from 1980 through 1985. A 1987 survey of Hispanic representation in the country's most prestigious law firms by continued on page 2 Students Segregated in Urban Schools The typical Hispanic student in a U .S. public school is found in an intensely segregated metropolitan area classroom where a disproportionate number of students are poor and where academic ratings are low, found a report released June 22 in Chicago by the National School Boards Association. "In the top 25 school districts, Hispanic students are even more (highly) concentrated than are blacks," said Gary Orfield, a University of Chicago professor who co-authored the study. In U.S . public schools, the number of Latino students swelled by 1 03% between 1968 and 1986. The number of black students grew by 5% during this period, while white student rates fell16%, according to the report. Orfield attributed the high concentration of Hispanics primarily to their rapid population growth. Conversely, the study, titled" Racial Change and Desegregation in Large School Districts," attributed the low numbers of white students in urban districts primarily to the declining white birth rate . Among the 60 largest school districts, the 10 worst for Hispanic segregation were New York City, Los Angeles, San Antonio, Chicago, Houston, Brownsville, Texas , Newark, N . J . , Oakland, Calif., Philadelphia and San Francisco . Almost 70% of Los Angeles' Hispanic students are in highly segregated schools, in New York 68%, in Chicago 50% , and in Dade County, Fla .. 42%. the studv showed. Orfield and Franklin Monfort, at the University of Wisconsin, analyzed data on 219 school districts. Darryl Figueroa 1986 Student Population, Enrollment Shifts: '68-'86 DISTRICT HISPANIC WHITE BLACK ASIAN New York City 319,899 208,057 360,242 57,873 Shift +11% -26% +5% +5% l-os Angeles 326,941 104,260 106,944 47,663 Shift +36% -37% -4% +4% Chicago 109,474 60,678 244,271 12,329 Sh ift +17% -27% +5% +2% D ade County 101,442 59,087 80,322 2,741 Shift +25% -40% +9% +1% Hol)ston 72,860 32,937 82,763 5,885 Shift +24% -37% +10% +3% San Diego 21, 041 47,986 19,998 18,791 Shift +9% -32% +7% +15% Philadelphia 16,764 45,862 118,506 5,780 Shift +7% -15% +5% +3% So urce : " Racial Chan ge and Desegregation in Large School Di s tricts" b y the National School Board s Association. U.S. English's Chavez Chairs Migrant . Panel Linda Chavez was appointed chairperson of the newly formed National Commission on Migrant Education by President Reagan June 24. Chavez , president of U . S . English, was one of four persons chosen by the president to serve on the 12-member body. The commission will study all aspects of current migrant education programs and consider whether a national center for migrant affairs should be formed. It will also conduct a special two-year review of the migrant student record-transfer system . In responding to the criticism that U . S . English ' s education stance might hinder Chavez's effectiveness on the commission, Tom OJson, director of public affairs for U . S . English, said that Chavez does not oppose bilingual education, adding that she would just like "more flexibility." The commission, funded at $2 million for three years, was mandated by a recently passed education bill. Jim Lyons, counsel to the National As sociation on Bilingual Education, said the appointment was " like appointing the imperial wizard of the Ku Klux Klan to a commission on civil rights." -Angela Walker Bush to Address LULAC Vice President George Bush will address delegates to the League of United Latin American Citizens convention in Dallas July 6 . Jesse Jackson and Democratic presidential candidate Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis are also expected to speak. LULAC will conduct its own presidential election, with four candidates-Andres Tobar of Washington, D.C., Jose Garcia De Lara of Texas, Jose Velez of Nevada and Raphael Acosta ofTexas-seeking to replace its outgoing president, Oscar Moran. The convention, July 5-10, is expected to draw 5 ,000 to 6,000 delegates from around the country , according to spokesperson Richard Sambrano. Dallas Mayor Annette Strauss and AI Gonzalez, Dallas City councilman, will also address those attending.

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Fla. English Plus B at tles O f ficial Language Measure Florida's English Plus organization has initiated a campaign to defeat a ballot measure that would make English Florida's official language. Formed two months ago, the group is drawing financial support from Unidos, a loosely connected, local coalition of Hispanic o rga nizations. Jon Weber, recently named executive director of English Plus , declined t o state how much money has been raised or how much they expect to raise. Weber said funds would be used to tell voters the initiative, if passed, will hurt tourism and the state's ability to compete econo m i cally. On June 21 a fund-raising appeal for English Plus was broadcast for 13 hours over Spanish-language radio and television stations in Florida , garnering $50,000. The group has an office in Miami and plans to open another in Tampa . "I think ifs important for the voters to understand this is not a Hispanic issue, " Weber said . " lfs about how we can best get people proficient in English . How does this (measure) accomplish this? It doesn' t." Thus far, the state has validated 253,700 of the 470,000 signatures turned in r>y Florida English to put the proposal on the November 8 ballot. Both organizations consider it likely the remaining 86,300 of the 340,000 signatures needed by the Aug. Law Schools Contribute to Scarcity co ntinued fro m page 1 the National Law Journal pa ints a grimmer pictur e . Of the 250 largest firms employing 100 attorneys or more, 98 firms had no His panics, according to the survey published in February. Overall , Hispanics made up less than 1 % of attorneys employed by the largest firms . The reasons given for t .he underrepresentation include overreliance on law school admissions tests, the prohibitive costs of a legal education, the incr easing scarcity of grants to students and stereotyping. Gilberta de Jesus, executive director of the Council on Legal Education Opportunities in Washington, D.C., said law schools rely too heavily on results of the Law School Admissions Test , rather than focusing on how students fared as undergraduates. "If they use this as a primary predictor, we're going to have problems," deJesussaid. Martinez, from Salt Lake City, said lack of role models in law school is also a factor. "Out of 6,000 law professors (on the mainland), 35 are Hispanic. Only 16 are tenured faculty. " The majority of the law professors-24-are Mexican American , said Michael Olivas, a law professor at the University of Houston. When looking for a position with a firm , Hispanic attorneys are confronted by the widespread belief that Latinos are interested only in " non-intellectual" specialties such as family law , said Martinez, who represents the 4 ,500-member NHBA. Martinez also said, " The American Bar Association has not done anything to assist Hispanics in getting into the law profession." The ABA began a year-long program in May to begin to alleviate the problem Hispanics and other minorities have in obtaining sub stantial contracts and in being hired by major firms . The Minority Counsel Demonstration Project brings together 11 Fortune 500 companies, six Anglo/owned law firms and 20 minority-owned firms, five of them Hispanic . The companies committed to using the services of minority firms when possible, and Anglo-owned firms promised to put minorities on these corporate cases. S ophia Nieves Chi . Hiring Record Stays Below Par with the hiring and retention of Hispanics , and that the city's Affirmative Action Council dev i se a system of accountability for those not complying. Diana Padilla 9 deadline will be validated. Pat Fulton, Flori da English's director of communications, explained the amendment is needed in a state that is home to 75 language groups. She said , " English has been the language of government. There ' s been no question ... except in the past 15 years." She said her group intends to put together a legislative package that will include a request for exceptions on the use of English in i nstances involving cases of health, safety and justice. It wo . uld advocate English language proficiency tests for doctors and lawyers and promote more funding for Englishlanguage classes. Sophia Nieves Capitol Hill Meetings Emphasize Education Latino education leaders presented their concerns to key government and agency off i cials at three separate meetings on Capitol Hill June 21-22. The U.S . Senate Republican Task Force on Hispanic Affairs listened June 21 to testimony on education and literacy from five Latino experts on its 50-member bipartisan advisory committee, which was organized in April. Among those who testified were Edward Franco , president of National SEA-Jobs for Progress . The following day , the Congressional His panic Caucus focused its attent ion on the status of Hispanics in higher education. About ten Hispanic college presidents and others spoke to the five CHC members who were present, including chairman Rep . Albert Bustamante ( D-Texas). CHC also sponsored later that day a round table discussion with the San Antonio-based Hispanic Association of Colleges and Univer sities, which represents 70 Hispanic institutions, with senate aides and U.S. Education Department officials. " It was a historic occasion," said HACU Executive Director Antonio Rigual , who was present at the June22 meetings. "We hope it is the beginning of a partnership between the different groups to facilitate access for Hispanics. " -Darryl Figueroa A report released by the Chicago Mayor's Advisory .Commission on Latino Affairs last month finds that although the number of Hispanics employed by the city is rising, aggressive steps must be taken to retain and hire a number to reach parity. The report states that over the past five years , Chicago' s Hispanic work force has increased from 3 . 8 % to 6 . 12%. "An Assessment of the City's Work Force : Who are They'?" says that Chicago must seek to roughly double the current number of its Hispanic employees. The ideal figure, according to the commission, is approximately 11 . 6% -the percentage of Hispanics in the work force nationally. Pepsico Charged With Language Bias The commission recommends, among other things, that Chicago' s Personnel Department seek to develop culturally sensitive hiring and retention programs, that acting Mayor Eugene Sawyer meet with the Affirmative Action Council chairman on a monthly basis to assess the compliance of department heads 2 In a case touted as " . . . an American success story gone awry," the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed a lawsuit in Pima County, Ariz. , Super ior Court June 1 5, charging Pepsico Inc. with discriminating against an employee on the basis of his language ability. The suit was filed after the Arizona State Civil Rights Division found " reasonable cause to believe that an unlawful employment p r ac tice ... occurred." MALDEF is working with private attorney Richard Martinez to gain Rafael Lugo' s reinstatement and backpay. Despite a termination report stating that Lugo , a production technician with the Tucsonbased Santa Rita/Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. for 14 years, was a cooperative employee with satisfactory job knowledge, an excellent attendance record and a superior quality of work, he was terminated in May 1987 a iter a newly hired engineer complained that Lugo' s English was insufficient to perform his duties. Shortly before being fired, Lugo, who was a legal immigrant, had received an " A " in an . English as a Second Language course. Jose Roberto Juarez, MALDEF director of . Employment, said , "People need to know how harmful English-only sentiments can be ... Hopefully , this suit will prevent other employers from taking similar discriminatory actions." Hispanic Link Weekly Report .

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Lawrence Thomases, guest columnist Anita When Anita came to Boston, we were too happy being together to worry about technicalities. So it was only later 1 learned she had arrived in the country on a 1 0-day permit. The 10 days already expired by the time Anita reached Boston . Soon 1 0 became 20 and days became months . The permit gradually became just a memento, the down payment on a citizenship plan that required far more credentials than we could ever hope to have. Anita claimed to be unconcerned about overstaying her allotted time. There was a hint of daring to it She took pride in leaving home young while her brothers and sisters settled down in the same barrio where they were raised. She was secretly pleased, even, that we didn't consider a marriage license essential . Still, Anita paid a price for living outside the law . Without the almighty green card, her job options were narrow and grim. Despite her nonchalance and my avoidance of the subject-we shared the fear that she could be apprehended at any time . HOPE CAME AND WENT Anita found work in a neighborhood laundry run by a man named Azim . She stood all day writing out tickets at the front counter, where she was spared the heavy work, but not the monotony, of those who washed or pressed or folded clothes in back. Azim paid his workers at best the minimum wage. Anita made a few friends among those who were able to endure Azim for more than a few days. One was a woman named Elisa, who claimed to be from Puerto Rico. Anita gave her occasional sewing lessons , and a few days before Elisa left for home-having met her goal of saving $1 ,000she came by with a lamp she had bought Anita in appreciation. Just before she left, she told us. "I'm really Guatemalan . " She began to sob, and it was some time before we could turn her attention back to the happy family reunion that awaited her . Though it had meant her survival, she couldn't forgive herself for lying. Every so often came a small sign of hope for Anita . One friend, who worked in a hospital, said he might be able to fabricate a false birth certificate; another was supposedly onto a magical Social Security number that could be us&d with impvnity. Neither plan ever materialized . . That left the great unspoken solution : marriage. But we were young and frowned at convention. What we couldn't admit was our uncertainty that we could make it through a lifetime together. Somehow Anita managed -to adjust to her job, and Azim ' s antics were mentioned less and less, Anita became one of the few workers he was fond of. Once he even told her that he didn't know what he would do without her. KINDNESS LIMITED TO WORDS But such kindness didn't go past words . On the day she left, after more than a year on the job, his only recognition was a few extra cents and a cursory goodbye. Eventually we formalized our marriage, an act which helped Anita resolve her immigration status. But new problems ensued . The time came to see a divorce lawyer , Our wedding bands consigned to a r;Jrawer at home, citizenship then seemed the smallest of concerns. I haven ' t seen Anita in a long time now. Sometimes I think back to rainy afternoons in that tiny flat when I'd brew coffee in our two-cup Pot a nd wait for Anita to come home, hoping her time at work hadn ' t brvlsed her spirit too badly. Our world was smaller anq simpler then . Villains like Azim and federal agents were easy to identify, Maybe we needed a commo11 thread to survive ; maybe love runs its course as surely as a visa. Somehow the explanations don't seem to matter much any more . (Lawrence J. Thomases, of Brighton, Mass . , is editor of El Boletin, the newsletter for Centro Presente, a Central American refugee aid agency in Boston) Sin pelos en Ia lengua WATERFALL: Hispanic Link experienced a waterfall the other weekend . Editor Felix Perez and I walked into the office on a Sunday night to discover the spectacle at its height Unfortunately, there were no dancing, bombilating crystal waters. No grandeur. No majesty. Just a case of undiscovered backed-up plumbing. It didn't move me as Yosemite Falls has in years past. But it did stir me to sort some soggy notes and papers. Among them: GERALDO'S LINT: Among the yellowing (even before the flood) newsclips were such gems as: In May, a Miami ,disk jockey wanted to send the listener who came up with the best subjectfor Geraldo Rivera's incredible talk show some of Geraldo's lint. Rivera graciously cooperated, mailing KLSX morning man Phil Hendrie an envelope filled with lintfrom two loads in his drier, he explained. The winning entry: Should fat people work in bakeries? There has to be a better one than that. If you have an idea and mail it to me, I promise to forward it directly to Geraldo, and mail you, as a reward, a memento of Hispanic Link's "Waterfall of Summer '88." POLITICAL SHUFFLE: In Show Low, Ariz . , Diana Lara, 39, and Leon Taylor, 71, tied in their city council race May30, tallying275 votes apiece . Instead of conducting a run-off, they meandered down to the Show Low jailhouse and cut cards to decide re. enacting an 1876 game that gave the town its name. Lara drew the deuce of clubs for a four-year term-on the council, not in the cooler . ADD AN AD TRIO: 1) A full-page display ad in one tasteless Los Angeles newspaper offered this . "Cinco de Mayo fiesta " enticement at the Eagle bar. "CHEAP MARGARITAS & PRETTY SENORITAS (OR IS IT THE OTHER WAY AROUND). " 2) The Crystal Cathedral, Southern California's Community Church, paid big bucks for an L.A. Times ad urging readers to attend its Father's Day services and visit with the inspirational Garfield High School calculus teacher whose story was told in the movie "Stand and Deliver." "Meet Jamie Escalante," it invited. Any relation to Jaime? (The ad also said "who's life was docu mented ... ") Tsk tsk. Whatever happened to1copy editors and proofreaders? 3) As part of their daily routine, columnists are paid fancy salaries to stereotype and/or insult Latinos. Georgie Anne Geyer and Mike Royko are two who come immediately to mind. Most recently, we have New York Daily News columnist Jimmy 1 Breslin identifying Latinos involved in the Wedtech case by their ethnic origin : "Hispanic," "Colombian-born" orinthecaseof John Marriota, "of Puerto Rican descent but white as paper." Breslin pins no ethnic labels on Wedtech "players" of Italian, Irish and Jewish heritage whom he mentions, however. What can one do about it? At best, we're allowed a letter to the editor, usually trimmed and always, of course, unpaid . The Colombian government tried to counter such press bias June 6 with an ad in the Washington Post thatfilled nearly a page. Using the Vietnam veteran's memorial wall as a model, it ran the names of many of the "thousands of Colombians who have died fighting against the international drug terrorists" -the victims included Supreme Court members, senators, judges, prosecutors, army officers and journalists. Smear'em with innuendo and let'em buy an ad to straighten out the record . What a way for establishment media to do business. Do you suppose the mainland media ad folks are hitting up Rafael Hernandez Col6n and Miguel de Ia Madrid, too? QUIZ: The Washington Post, by the way, has only one-repeat onefull-time reporter or editor who is Hispanic . Can you name any large-size daily in the nation with a worse record? If so, let me know and I'll pass the information along to Ben Brad lee. He can use it to defend his record . K 8 b -ay ar aro Hispanic Link Weekly Report July 4, 1988 3

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COI .. LF. CTING ; 11Cf . . WORK FORCE: The Chicago Mayor's Advisory rTI.Tli s,;:o n on La t ino Aff a irs has released a 35-page report, "An Assessment of the City's Work Force: Who Are They?," detailing the city's hi ring practices with regard to Hispanics. For a free copy, write to MAC LA, City Hall, Room 703, 121 N. LaSalle St., Chicago, Ill. 60602 (312) 744-4404. HISPANICS IN LAW FIRMS: A survey showing minority represen t a tion in the nation's largest law firms is contained in the February 1988 issue of The National Law Journal. To obtain a copy, send a check for $2 to The National Law Journal, attention Cheryl Nance, 1 1 1 Eighth Ave., Suite 900, New York, N.Y . 10011. ENDOWMENT PROGRAMS: The National Endowment for the Humanities' "Overview of Endowment Programs," a 29-page brochure , summarizes federal funding opportunities which may be of interest to Hispanics. For a free copy, write to NEH, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C . 20506 (202) 786. PUERTO RICAN HOUSES: "Puerto Rican Houses in Sociohistorical Perspective," a 320-page book by Carol F. Jopling, traces the historical development of the island's varied and colorful domestic architecture. Copious photographs and drawings appear. For a copy send $34.95 to the University of Tennessee Press , P .O. Box 6525, Ithaca, N . Y . 14850 (orders placed by July 31 are discounted 20%). LANGUAGE AND MINORITIES: "Beyond Language: Social and Cultural Factors in Schooling Language Minority Students," a 343-page book, offers perspectives and suggestions for educators to help minority students achieve academic success while sharing their cultural and linguistic heritage. Foracopysend$10(plus$1 tax and shipping) to EDAG-LA, California State University, Administration Building, Room 714,5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles, Calif. 90032 (213) 224. DROPOUT HANDBOOK: . This 258-page handbook, " Keeping Students in School: A Guide to Effective Dropout Programs and Services," discusses issues relating to high school dropouts. For a copy send $22.95 to JosseyBass Inc., Publishers, 350 Sen some St., San Francisco, Calif. 94104 (415) 433. SEGREGATION: Inquiries on the 50-page report titled "Racial Change & Desegregation in Large School Districts, " which shows that Hispanic students are increasingly segregated in public schools, should be directed to Philip Smith, National School Boards Association, 1680 Duke St., Alexandria, Va. 22314 (703) 838 43. (No price was available . ) Dallas July 5-10 CAMPAIGN ENCOURAGES VOTE Congressmen Albert Bustamante and Esteban Torres, United Farm Workers President Cesar Chavez and National Council of La Raza President Raul Yzaguirre are among the noted Hispanics who will appear on a series of public service announcements aimed at encouraging Latinos to vote. The 60-second announcements, sponsored by AT&T, were launched June 20. They will air until the Nov. 8 presidential election on the Spanish-language television network Univision. Other His panics that will participate in the campaign, titled Vota, para que te respeten, are salsa singer Celia Cruz, Miami Dolphins football player Fuad Reveiz and Univision anchors Maria Elena Salinas and Jorge Ramos. BISHOPS STRESS OUTREACH The agressive proselytism by fundamentalist denominations of HispanicS and Latino's lack of access to quality education, health care and housing were the primary concerns expressed by California's six Hispanic Catholic bishops in a pastoral letter released last month. Titled "The Joy of Being Catholic," the document emphasized the need of the church to reach out to Hispanics in that state. The pastoral letter addressed a problem of increasing concern for the church -the siphoning off of Hispanics by evangelical groups. The six clergymen who signed the letter were Tomas Clave! , episcopal vicar for the Hispanic community in the Diocese of Orange County; Bishop Joseph Madera of Fresno; Auxiliary Bishops Juan Arzube and Armando Ochoa of Los Angeles; Auxiliary Bishop Gilbert Chavez of San Diego; and Auxiliary Bishop Alphonso Gallegos of Sacramento. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES U . S . Small Business Administration head James Abdnor names former White House staffer Grace Flores Hughes assoc iate adminis trator for minority small business and capital development at the SBA .. Linda Wong, associate counsel for the Los Angeles office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and an expert in immigration law, will leave MALDEF this August Wong will join California Tomorrow, a public policy group, as its executive director. . . Arturo Vargas , senior education policy analyst at the National Council of La Raza, leaves NCLR, effective in August Vargas will join MALDEF as its California census coordinator ... Albuquerque, N.M. July 10-13 Calendar THIS WEEK NEA CIVIL RIGHTS AWARDS New Orleans July 5 The League of United Latin American Citizens will have Vice President George Bush address its dele gates. Democratic presidential candidates Jesse Jackson and Michael Dukakis are expected also . Topics to be covered in workshops include the rising high school dropout rate among Hispanics and the significance of the census. The National Council of La Raza will hold a conference marking the organization's 20th anniversary . Training sessions include computer networking and speakers' training for English only debates. Workshop topics include the status of Hispanas in politics and His panic marketing. Eileen Torres (202) 628-9600 The National Education Association will hold a human and civil rights awards dinner. Awards to be given include the George I. Sanchez Memorial Award, the Award for Creative Leadership in Women ' s Rights, and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Award. Julie Warner (202) 822 MINORITY RECRUITMENT CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. July 5-8 A conference will be sponsored by the American Council on Education and American Association of Colleges and Universities to help colleges improve their recruitment and retention of minority students. Participants will work in small groups with facilitators to make specific plans for their own campuses. Ann Davie (202) 939 LULAC CONVENTION 4 Joe Campos (214) 565-8522 IMMIGRATION STRATEGY MEETING Washington, D .C. July 6, 7 The National Immigration, Refugee & Citizenship Forum will hold a strategy meeting on immigration and related issues . The purpose is to strengthen consensus on policy and to organize more effective advocacy. Topics include the 1988 elections, English only and English Plus . . A mit Pandya (202) 544-0004 MULTICULTURAL FESTIVAL Boston July 8-10 lnquilinos Boricuas en Accion will hold a three-day multicultural festival celebrating the organization's 20th anniversary. It will include music, dance, food and children's events. Wilma Colon (617) 262-1342 LA RAZA CONFERENCE July 4 , 1988 COMING SOON MANA CONFERENCE Mexican American Women' s National Association Washington, D .C. July 21 Irma Maldonado (202) 822-7888 PANAMERICAN FESTIVAL Alexandria Department of Parks and Cultural Activities Alexandria, Va. July 23 Jorge Lozano (703) 560-4038 Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date . Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to : Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW , Wash ington, D.C. 20005. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE .. CLASSIFIEDS THE CITY OF DALLAS, TEXAS has the following two positions open . OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 14 Responsible for providing administrative support to an Assistant City Manager, responding to phone call s and correspondence from citizens and City Councilmembers; coordinating council agenda materials and following up on requests for servi c e ; attending City Council a nd town hall meetings and staffing Council Committee meetings and Task Forces. A Ba c helor's Degree in Public Administration, Urban Affairs, Policy Analysis or a re lated field and f our (4) years of related experience. A Master's Degree in Public Administration, Urban Affairs , Policy Analysis or a related field will substitutefortwo(2) of the required years of e x p erience. Salary range for this position is $25,788 to $29,832. OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER Responsible for providing administrative assistance to the City Manager; serving as a liaison to City departments, c itizens, and special interest groups; coordinating the transmittal of written information to the City council in preparation of weekly council meetings; coordinating support a c tivities of aides and interns in the City Managers' Office; participating in planning and defining objectives for firms which provide management consultant services to the City Manager's Office; administering contracts; and handling special projec ts and programs. A Bachelor's Degree in Public Adm i nistration, Business Administration, Urban Affairs , or related field and five (5) years of related experience is required, including three(3) or more years experience as an Administrative Assistant , Management Assistant or related work involving pol ic y analysis, budget constructi on , administration and supervision. A Master's Degree is preferred. Salary range is $40,220 to $48,348. Submit a resume for the positions by Friday , July 29 , 1988 to: Staffing Manager . Personnel Department 1500 Marilla City Hall, Room 6AN Dallas, Texas 75201 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M!F/ H SOCIOLOGISTUN IV. OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS . The Department of Sociology invites applications for a sociologist of religion who has a demonstrated record of teaching and research in the sociology of relig i on and American culture. This is a tenuretrack position with rank and salary open. A Ph . D . before July 1989 is required. If hired at a senior level, the person must have a distinguished research record. The s uc cessful candidate will be expected to teach courses fulfilling p rogram requirements i n th e American Studies and Religious Studies Programs , but these courses may be taught in the Sociology Department. The appointment is allocated as a full time FTF position in sociology, but depending on the successful candidates desires, he or she may request a joint appointment in one of the other programs. The appointment begins July 1, 1989. Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae , and names of three references to: Gary Hamilton, Chair , Search Committee, department of Sociology, University of California, Davis , Davis , California 95616. Final Filing Date for applications is0ctober15, 1988. The University of California is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a stro ng institutional commitment to the achievement of diversity among its faculty and staff. In that spirit , we are p a rti cularly interested in receiving applications from persons of underrepresented groups, including women, ethnic minorities, disabled veterans, Vietnam era veterans, and handicapped persons. ASSOCIATE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Associate Executive Director to manage pers onnel, administrative control, and program planning and evaluation for a agency with a $3. 5 million budget. Five ye ars administrative experience in com munity service organization. Send resume to: SDYCS , 3878 Old Town Avenue, Suite200B, San Diego, California9211 0. GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D .C., provides: • Design e Typesetting e Lay out • Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20010 (202) 483 7755. Hi s pani c Link Weekly Report EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR National nonprofit highly visible, public service organization with minority issues orientation seeks Executive Director. Excellent writing, speaking, fund raising skills, grass roots involvement experience, and good management back ground needed. Bicultural sensitivity, political awareness , creativity, diplomacy, initiative , relia bility , loyalty, orderliness are essential. Computer expertise a plus. Send resume, references, writing sample and salary requirements to: LULAC , 1101 14th St. NW, Suite 610, Washington, D.C. 20005. SPANISH SPEAKING PEOPLES COMMISSION OF IOWA DIVISION ADMINISTRATOR RESPONSIBILITIES : THE DIRECTOR SHALL: (1) Coordinate, assist and cooperate with the efforts of state departments and agencies, including, but not limited to: the fields of education , employment health , housing, wei fare, corrections, and recreation . (2) Develop, coordinate, and assist other public and private organizations which serve Latinos. (3) Evaluate existing programs and proposed legislation affecting Latinos. (4) Conduct a survey and prepare a report of the Latinos in Iowa. (5) Required to work with the Commissioners. (6) Appointed at the will of the QUALIFICATIONS: (1) BA required, MNMS desirable; or three (3) years of responsible e xperience in public or community relations with administrative and supervisory responsibilities for two (2) years. (2) Must be bilingual/bicultural demon strated outstanding communicative skills in both English and Spanish . Screening date will begin July 15th. Position to be filled by August 15, 1988. Equal Opportunity Employer. Submit 3 letters of reference upon request Salary Range $24,400 -$40,600. Please send application & resume to: Spanish Speaking Peoples Commission Lucas Building/Capital Complex Des Moines, Iowa 50139 NALEO -National Hispanic civic affairs research and advocacy organization is accept ' ing applications for the following positions: Research/Policy Analystexcellent writing skills , some Capitol Hill experience helpful but not necessary. Spanish preferred but not required. SALARY high teens to low 20's. Send writing sample and resume to 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C . 20003. Administrative Assistant-unique position with diverse responsibilities. Must be detail oriented and take initiative. Some meeting planning experience helpful but not necessary. Data Base Ill required. SALARY mid to high teens. Send resume to: NALEO, 70.8 G St. SE , Washington, D.C . 20003. Administrative Assistantspecial person is needed to coordinate all aspects of a service orientedtoiHree hotlineforimmigrants. Self Starter. Spanish required. Lots of phone work. Salary low to mid teens. Please call 546. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Director sought for alternative school for Latino adults. Responsible for overall management. B.A. or M.A. preferred. Two years equivalent experience. Bilingual/Bicultural preferred. Resume to: lnstituto del Progreso Latino, 1919 S. Blue Island , Chicago, Ill. 60608. (312) 421 5429. 5

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Arts & Entertainment Hispanic theater companies-the festival became a biannual event in 1984. In 1986, it was held in Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. FESTIVAL TIME: After a four-year absence from the United States, the TENAZ XIV International Festival of Chicano Latino Theatre takes place this week in San Antonio. In other theater news, Sanchez-Scotfs Roosters continues its run at the Los Angeles Theater Center-directed by Jose buis Valenzuela -through July8. A production of the same play by LosActores de San Antonio-to be seen July5 as part of the TENAZfestival-wasstaged at the Guadalupe June 9-26. The festival , hosted by Los Actores de San Antonio, will be staged at the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center July 5-10, with the participation of a dozen companies from the United States, Mexico and Peru . U . S .teatristas participating in the event include Teatro Latino de Minnesota (Minneapolis), Pregones Touring Puerto Rican Theater Collection (the Bronx), Culture Clash and Teatro de Ia Esperanza(San Franc1sco), Latino Chicago Theater Company, La Compaflia de Alburquerque ( Albuquerque), Teatro El Sol (Tucson) , Teatro A production of Federico Garcia Lorca's Bodas de Sangre , seen in March as part of Miami ' s Ill Hispanic Theatre Festival, returns to that city's Minorca Playhouse this week. Co-produced by Tearro Avante and the Florida Shakespeare Festival, the tragedy plays July 8-24. Btltngue de Houston and Teatro Espejo (Sacramento). Speaking of Garcia Lorca : a new play about the Granadine poet, by Spanish Jose Antonio Rial , has opened at New York's Public Theater. The Death of Garcia Lorca, translated to English by Julio Marzan, plays through mid-July. Most companies w i ll perform pieces created collectively. Singleauthor plays in this year's schedule include Milcha Sanchez Scott' s Roosters, Nicholas A. Patricca's The Fifth Sun , RomoloArellano's Tito and Laura Rendon' s C I S Con Safos. And three plays by Argentine playwright Eduardo Pavlovsky, pro duced by Los Angeles' Stages company, were seen through June 27 as part of New York's first International Festival of the Arts . Begun in 1970 by Teatro Nacional de Aztlan -a grouping of -Antonio Mejias Rentas _Media Report NAHJ BOARD MEETS: San Francisco will be the site of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists' 1990 conference, the group' s board of director's decided at its meeting June 25-26 in San Diego. The 1 990 conference is tentatively scheduled for April11-14. NAHJ's 1989 conference will be held in San Juan, Puerto Rico, April19-22. The meeting, attended by all except one of the group' s 16 officers, was the first presided over by p r esident Evelyn Hernandez, a reporter for New York Newsday. At its next board meeting, to be held in Baltimore this October, NAHJ's directors will meet with representatives from the National Association of Black Journalists. The two groups and the Asian-American Journalists Association are in the preliminary stages of planning a joint conference for 1991 . HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publicat i on of Hispanic Link NService Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 2340737 Publisher. . Hector Erickser>-Mendoza Editor. Feli x Perez Reporting: Antoni o Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, D iana Padilla, Angela Walker Graphie&'Productiort Carlos Anien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hi spanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broad cas t in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): lnstitution!l/agencies $118 Personal S1 08 Trial (13 issues! $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Fridayofsameweek MuHiple use rat es on request 6 WATCHDOGS SOUGHT: David Medina, an assistant city editor at The Miami News, announced at NAHJ's San Diego meeting that he is seeking monitors across the countiy for the association's issues committee . . Those interested should contact Medina by July 8. The committee, co-chaired by Medina and KERATV, Dallas , reporter Rosalind Soliz , grew out of a concern that NAHJ was not adequately prepared to keep an eye out for and respond to instances when Hispanics are slighted by print or broadcast media. Anyone wishing to serve as a monitor can reach Medina at The Miami News, 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla. 33101 (305) 376-3131. ELECTIONS: The Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D .C., elected June 23 as its new president Phil Garcia, United Press International reporter. The Washington Post reporter Carlos Sanchez became vice president. FELLOWSHIPS: California Tomorrow, a quarterly magazine that covers the state' s changing population, is offering an 18-month fellowship at its San Francisco office. The fellow would work as co-editor for $1 ,200 per month. Contact Rhonda Trotter, California Tomorrow , 849 S . Broadway, Room 831, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 (213) 623-6231. The American Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation is accepting appli cations for its Minority Fellowships for those interested in managerial positions at news papers. The fellowship consists of seminars on such topics as newsroom leadership, news paper design and labor relations. Application deadline is July 15. Contact Ardis Pruess at the ANPA Foundation , The Newspaper Center, Box _17407 Dulles Airport, Washington, D . C . 20041 (703) 648-1 000. MOVES: Lucienne Lopez Loman, manager of career programs for two years at the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, left herpostJune30. Education programs manager Jocelyn Cordova moves into the position. Felix Perez /FELIZ CUAT\20 DG-0UL-\0 /