Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, July 11, 1988

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, July 11, 1988
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
The Minnesota Supreme Court suspends for a year without pay and censures for judicial misconduct Ramsey County District Judge Alberto Miera, the state’s first Hispanic judge. Miera, who as of July 5 had been on a water-only fast 55 days, was convicted in 1987 of forcing a kiss upon a court reporter, a male... Larry Amaya, one of the founders of California’s American Gl Forum and the creator of the Southern California Scholarship Foundation, dies July 1 of a heart atack. Amaya was 65 years old... The Aspira Educational Panel, composed of Hispanic educators and officials, chastises New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Green for what it says is his failure
to address the city’s Hispanic dropout rate... Paul Cejas, a member of the Dade County (Fla.) School Board for eight years and one of the county’s few prominent Cuban American Democrats, announces he will not seek re-election but will instead campaign for presidential candidate Michael Dukakis... Joseph Ferndndez, the CIA’s former station chief in Costa Rica, pleads not guilty to charges that he helped set up an unauthorized supply network for the Nicaraguan contras... The National Education Association confers on Virginia Sumaya, a first grade bilingual education teacher from Wichita, Kan., its George I. Sanchez Memorial Award at its conference in New Orleans... USA Today recognizes Annette Garza, of San Antonio, as its top female high school athlete of the year in Texas. Garza excels in volleyball and basketball...
^^^^^PANICUNKWEEKLYREPORT^^^^
Democratic Convention Promises Latino Visibility
Hispanic involvement in Democratic Party politics will be apparent at this year's Democratic National Convention, July 18-21 in Atlanta.
Overall, Hispanic representation will drop slightly at this year's convention, but those involved in the party promise Hispanic delegates in key states will make an impact.
Carmen Perez, chair of the Hispanic Caucus of the Democratic National Committee, states that although there seems to be less recognition of special interest groups in 1988, “the projected 358 Hispanic delegates and 73 alternates will play a visible role.”
At least 6.7% of the 4,210 delegates and 1,168 alternates are expected to be Hispanic. That figure is lower than the percentage of Hispanics who are registered Democrats -7.1% of the U.S. voting-age population. It marks a 0.3% decrease in the percentage of credentials given to Hispanics in 1984 and a 0.7% increase from 1980.
In 1984, the DNC had a minimum Hispanic
Who will win the right to the office of president of the United States this November? And how much influence will Hispanics have in Democratic and Republican party politics in this year's election? Weekly Report will examine these questions in a three-part series over the next several months.
Cuban Americans
The attitude of Cuban Americans toward Cuba is softening, but in comparison to the general public, they are more wary of resuming diplomatic relations, found a nationwide survey, released June 28.
You nger Cubans were the least concerned with Castro in their responses, according to the study’s author, William Watts. Eighty percent of them were in favor of discussions leading to a resumption of normal relations with the island nation. The total number of Cuban Americans polled was 200.
“The 18-to-29 age group was less ideological in its perception of Cuba and Cuba-U.S. relations and more prepared to see change,” said Watts.
Forty-one percent of the total Cuban Ameri-
delegate/alternate goal for the convention of 271 to 363 delegates and 92 alternates. According to the DNC, there are no goals being set this year.
States key to a Democratic victory in November will have influential Hispanic participation in Atlanta. Texas’ delegates and alternates are approximately 19% Hispanic and include San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros. California’s delegation is a projected 17% Hispanic and New York’s about 7%. These figures are lower than the minimum delegate/alternate goals which were set for Hispanic participation at the 1984 Democratic Party Convention.
Puerto Rico has one of its highest delegate representations ever, with approximately 60 delegates - more Hispanic delegates than every state but California. That’s up from the 53 delegates at the 1984 convention in San Francisco and up from 41 at the 1980 convention in New York.
All eleven voting Democratic Hispanics in Congress are delegates.
Former Colorado state Senator, Polly Baca, national DNC vice-chair, “had hoped for a greater participation by Hispanics” at this year's convention, but remains optimistic about future Hispanic involvement in the party.
The party has placed Hispanics in roles in policy and planning at the convention. Thirteen
Soften on Cuba
can sample were in favor of normalization of relations with Cuba, 47% were not. Slightly more than half of the other 1,038 U.S. residents contacted were in favor of starting talks.
The negative perception of Fidel Castro’s leadership has not waned among the general Cuban American community, according to the poll results. Almost 80% of Cuban Americans view Cuba unfavorably and 96% see Castro in that light.
The nationwide survey, the first on Cuba since 1977, was conducted by the Gallup Organization for Potomac Associates, a public policy research organization located at the John Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C.
- Sophia Nieves
Hispanics serve on all three of the party’s standing committees, including Hispanic co-chairs for each one. Texas Congressman Albert Bustamante, chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, co-chairs the credentials committee, with Olga Diaz, Isabella Garcia, Dora Oliva and Art Trujillo serving as appointed members Congressman Bill Richardson, of New Mexico^ co-chairs the platform committee, with Dina Beaumont, Fran Martinez- Bussie and Texasstate Legislator Lena
continued on page 2
Hispanic Convention Involvement
DEL* ALT.* TOTAL HISP.
Alaska 0 1 84 1.2%
Ariz. 4 3 55 12.7
Calif. 70 11 473 17.1
Colo. 8 3 70 15.7
Conn. 3 1 80 5
Fla. 4 1 199 2.5
Idaho 1 0 30 3.3
III. 11 4 258 5.8
Ind. 1 0 117 0.9
Iowa 2 0 78 2.6
Kan. 3 0 58 5.2
Ky. 1 0 83 1.2
La. 1 0 97 1.0
Md. 0 1 106 0.9
Mass. 3 1 152 2.6
Mich. 2 1 208 1.4
Minn. 2 0 117 1.7
Mo. 1 0 114 0.9
Mont 1 0 34 2.9
Nev. 1 1 28 7.1
N.J. 10 0 161 6.2
N.M. 14 5 38 50
N.Y. 21 6 377 7.2
Ohio 5 0 236 2.1
Ok la. 1 0 71 1.4
Ore. 0 2 69 2.9
Pa. 3 1 261 1.5
P.R. 60 17 78 98.7
Texas 41 11 273 19.0
Utah 1 0 36 2.7
Va. 2 0 111 1.8
Wash. 4 2 99 6.1
Wyo. 3 0 22 13.6
* DEL - Delegates; ALT. -Alternates


Latinos Most Likely to Live in Substandard Housing
Hispanics are more than twice as likely as non-Hispanics to live in old, substandard, overcrowded housing for which they pay beyond their means, according to a study released June 30 by the National Council of La Raza at Capitol Hill.
"We are in a crisis situation,” said NCLR Housing Policy Analyst Judy Canales, who co-authored the report.
The study also showed that only 43% of Latinos were homeowners in 1983 compared with 65% of the general population. While 57%, or 2.6 million, of Latino households lived in rented units, this was true for only 35% of non-Latinos.
Canales stressed the importance of home ownership. “It makes you more a part of a community."
Whether they own or rent, Hispanics tend to live in poorer quality units than non-Hispanics, said the report. One in six Hispanic households suffered rodent infestation while one in 10 had electrical or plumbing problems.
Also, few Latinos live in affordable housing, the study showed. One Hispanic household in 10 paid more than 70% of its income for housing in 1983. Almost five in 10 used over 30% for shelter.
Federal spending for new public assistance
rentals was cut from $30 billion in 1981 to $7.8 billion in 1987, according to the report.
The study said that “black renters were somewhat better served” by subsidized housing than are Hispanic. Less than one fourth of poor Hispanic or Anglo renters lived in subsidized housing in 1986, while 39% of blacks did.
U.S. Rep Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas), chairman of the House Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development, said in a statement issued June 30 that the “abominable” housing situation is the “result of shortsightedness by the Reagan administration.” _ Darryl Figueroa
Farm Workers: EPA Plan Insufficient
Hispanic farm workergroups sayan Environmental Protection Agency proposal put on the Federal Register July 6 does not go far enough in protecting agricultural workers from pesticide poisoning.
The agency, in its first expansion of pesticide regulations, called for, among other things, bilingual written warnings of toxicity, the closing of fields for 24-48 hours after use of certain chemicals and the supply of eyewash, soap, water and disposable towels for workers in fields where pesticides have been used and for those workers handling pesticides
“We are not interested in cosmetic changes” said Baldemar Velasquez, president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, an Ohio-based group representing 6,000 workers.
Rape Charges Dropped
Charges against five undocumented aliens imprisoned two months in connection with an alleged rape of a 15-year-old girl near San Diego were dropped June 30 by a municipal judge. The dismissal came after prosecutors said the girl’s family had information “favorable to the defendants.”
The dismissals are the latest twist in a case that has brought cries of discrimination from the area’s Latino community.
The five undocumented aliens, one of whom is a woman, were arrested the day the girl said the rape occurred, April 24. The girl said eight men and a woman forced her off her horse in the town of Poway, 40 miles north of San Diego. She said one of the men then raped her. She described the assailant as young, Mexican, Spanish-speaking and about 5 feet 7 inches tall.
The San Diego County Sheriffs Department and 12 Border Patrol agents then detained, for several hours, some 85 Latino men. The 85 were handcuffed, sprawled on a parking lot and questioned. None of the five later arrested were in the group.
Several groups labeled the sweep discriminatory. They also charged that the round-up, which used SWAT officers, happened because the girl’s parents are law enforcement officers.
“This is just not enough."
Dr. Thomas Lazar, of the United Farm Workers union, felt the regulations would better benefit states other than California, where agriculture is heaviest “California's guidelines are more strict than the new regulations and ours are already not sufficient,” he said.
According to the EPA there are an estimated 2.8 million farm workers in the nation, 50% of whom are Latino. - Darryl Figueroa
Hispanic Impact Predicted
continued from page 1
Guerrero serving as appointees Congressman Esteban Torres, of California, co-chairs the rules committee, with Illinois County Commissioner Irene Hernandez, Lou Moret and Jack Otero serving as members.
Former governor of New Mexico Toney Anaya was recently appointed as one of four convention co-chairs.
There are presently 23 Hispanics serving on the 382-member DNC.
According to DNC platform committee staff, the proposed ’88 platform reflects a much more general approach to issues of concern to Democrats than platforms submitted for approval at previous conventions. It is part of party strategy this year not to make so many specific promises to a variety of interest groups, but, says a platform committee staff member, this “will not diminish Democratic interest in Hispanic issues.” _ Diana Padilla
Language Rule Contested
A rule at the University of California, San Francisco, requiring food service workers to use English only or face a reprimand was challenged June 29 in a complaint filed at the San Francisco regional office of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission by the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.
The complaint was filed on behalf of 10 workers of the university’s department of nutrition and dietetics and Council 10 of the American Federation of Government Workers The rule, in effect at several departments at the university, has been in place since May 1987.
Minority Job Ruling Draws Mixed Reaction
The U.S. Supreme court made it easier for minorities and women to prove job discrimination in a ruling June 29 that elicited a mixed reaction from civil rights attorneys.
In an 8-0 decision, the court ruled plaintiffs can use statistics to support charges of job discrimination when promotion decisions are made on a subjective basis.
Another portion of the ruling, endorsed by four of the justices, caused concern by civil rights organizations that the court will make it easier for employers to combat charges of discrimination. In that opinion, authored by Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, it was held that instead of proving company policy is based on a necessary aspect of the job, an employer should only provide evidence“that its employment practices are based on legitimate business reasons.”
The ruling overturns a case involving a Texas woman, Clara Watson, who was passed over for supervisory positions four times. The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals had found irrelevant her statistical evidence.
Miamians Meet Reagan
Cuban American community leaders who met with President Reagan June 29 in Miami to express their dissatisfaction with what they see as a thaw in U.S. relations with the Castro regime were pleased with Reagan's reponse.
The three dozen Cuban exile leaders also appealed to Reagan on behalf of anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch.
The 61-year-old Bosch, who is considered a terrorist by theU.S.ImmigrationandNaturali-zation Service, has been in a Miami prison since February awaiting a hearing that could lead to his deportation to Cuba.
Also that day in Miami, some 250 Cubans rallied in support of Bosch and against normalization of relations with Cuba
“We would have preferred a more specific response, but we are satisfied that he knows and understands our concerns,” said state Sen. MeanaRos-Lehtinen(R-West Dade), who attended the meeting.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Carmen O. Perez, guest columnist
Cathi Villalpando, guest columnist
Why A Democrat?
Since 1986,1 have had the honor of serving as the chair of the Hispanic Caucus of the National Democratic Committee.
In that position, I have had the opportunity to travel and speak before many different Hispanic audiences.
Invariably, I am asked, “Why should I become active in the Democratic Party?” Often I find that this question is asked honestly, but with the unspoken question that really says, “Hey, what has the Democratic Party ever done for people like me?”
My reply is always the same. Hispanics, like all Americans, need to be involved in the political process that governs this country. If we are not, then we leave decisions about what will happen to us in the hands of those who may be insensitive, ignorant or biased.
But it is not enough to become involved. In politics, as in life, we are confronted with choices and limited resources. That’s why I answer the question of “Why the Democrats?” by talking about why I became a Democrat and what I think the Democratic Party can achieve in America.
The Democratic Party has been since its earliest days a hybrid of many competing ideas and constituencies. When Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr sailed the Hudson River in search of butterflies, they set in motion an organization that led Will Rogers to say more than a century later, “I belong to no organized party, I am a Democrat.”
DOING THE RIGHT THING
Yet, it is that dynamic mixture of idealism and politics which produced leaders such as Roosevelt, Truman and John F. Kennedy. And it is that same refusal to be quiet and to go along which led the party to confront its own shortcomings and to begin the process of reaching out to Hispanic voters.
I was attracted to the party during the campaign of Robert F. Kennedy some 20 years ago. I have stayed with the Democratic Party because it remains the party of “what you know” and not just “who you know.” It is a party that believes in hard work and principled action. The Democratic Party has often moved slowly in responding to the needs of Hispanics... but it has never stopped.
Unlike the Republican Party, which first discovered the white, male Southern voter, then the working woman voter, then the conservative black voter, and now finally the upwardly mobile Hispanic voter, the Democratic Party has struggled with itself and continued to reach out to Hispanics not just because of our votes, but, more fundamentajly, because it was and continues to be the right thing to do-
This month the Democratic Party meets in Atlanta to nominate the man who will become the next president of the United States. More than 350 Hispanic delegates will participate in that convention. That’s the largest number of Latino delegates at any convention of any major political party.
LOOK AT THE PAST
I wonder how many Hispanics will be in New Orleans as voting delegates with a choice in the future of the Republican Party?
Hispanics will play an increasing role in the future of this nation- in the arts, the sciences, in business and in politics. Whatever choice you may make in party affiliation, I urge you to look again at the past, when we so often endured as second-class citizens.
And I would ask that you remember who was there when Cesar Chavez marched in Delano, Calif., when bilingual education was unheard of, when voting rights in the Southwest weren’t worth the paper they were printed on. It was the Democratic Party that took up those struggles and that continues to define the agenda for the future of this nation.
For me the choice is clear. A Democratic vote is a vote fpr the future of my country and my family. It is a vote for those that have stood with me before it was the fashion to do so.
(Carmen Perez chairs the Hispanic Caucus of the Democratic National Committee and works for the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report July 11
Why A Republican?
It seemed natural for me, as a Hispanic growing up in southwest Texas, to become a Democrat. But it was the Republican Party that invited me to join and encouraged me to learn and appreciate this nation’s political system.
While in school in the late ’60s, I went to work for the GOP in Austin. My mentors were former Sen. John Tower of Texas and several Hispanics. They had begun to realize that the GOP and Hispanic community shared beliefs in conservativism, tradition, family values, a strong defense and respect in the classroom against abortion.
They taught me how to get our community politically involved and, most importantly, how to make the political system benefit our community. “Reaching out” to all Hispanic Americans was our first objective.
That rule helped me become a special assistant to President Reagan in the White House. And today, I am chairman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, a Republican National Committee arm.
During the past 10 years, the party and the RNHA have experienced some monumental changes. One such change was the creation by the RNC in 1986 of its Committee on Minority and Ethnic Participation.
The committee agreed that there were too few Hispanic spokespersons and grassroot campaigns. There was no effective message to our community.
‘NO MAS’
Last year the RNHA under a new set of leaders, began implementing a national strategy to encourage Hispanics to commit themselves to the party and to make the party commit itself to our concerns.
There have been misperceptions that Republicans are a party of the rich - just big-business oriented.
One must have a very short memory to forget that it was the cabinet Committee on Spanish-Speaking Affairs, created under President Richard Nixon, that gave us a foothold in the system.
In addition, the creation of the Small Business Administration and the Department of Commerce’s minority business development program has stimulated Hispanic business.
The other party has not changed its direction on Hispanic programs in 20 years. One reason: Democrats feel safe with the Hispanic vote. To that belief, I simply reply, “no mas." We are better educated and more sophisticated. Since the Voting Rights Act, we’ve realized the value of our vote.
With its new recognition within the party, the RNHA now works very closely with the current administration on small business issues, foreign policy, employment, immigration, the English-only amendments and education.
WE ARE THE FUTURE
Today, I find more Hispanics crossing over because of the leadership and positive outreach to Hispanics initiated by Vice President George Bush, Tower and Reagan. These men know the importance of business and economic development among our own people.
The Republican Party’s platform is based upon a sound economic future for all Americans. Bush, with his deep commitment to our families, our community and our country, has made education his priority campaign issue. In appreciation, the RNHA will take to the GOP Convention in August 50,000 new Hispanic Republican voters.
We are the community of the future for the Republican Party. We can have tremendous impact on its political, social and economic agendas.
having worked in Bush’s 1980 campaign for president in Texas, I know him as a leader committed to solving this nation’s domestic problems while maintaining the peace and respect this country enjoys today. And I know that under his leadership the GOP increasingly will become the Hispanic choice.
(Cathi Villalpando chairs the RNHA and is a partner and owner of Communications International in Washington, D.C.)
1988 o


COLLECTING
EDUCATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE: The ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Educational Digest draws together information on current issues ranging from teaching at-risk students to trends in urban and minority education. For a free copy, write to ERIC CUE, Institute for Urban and Minority Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027 (212) 678-3433.
EDUCATIONAL PUBLICATIONS: The National Council of La Raza’s Education Component has recently released numerous publications: “The Augustus F. Hawkins-Robert T. Stafford Elementary and Secondary School Improvement Amendments of 1988 and Hispanic Educational Concerns” (10-pages/$2.00); “Literacy in the Hispanic Community” (35-pages/$3.00); “Making Schools Work for Under-achieving Minorities: Some Promising Community Practices” (25-pages/$2.00); “Smart Start: The Community Collaborative for Early Childhood Development Act of 1988” (10-pages/$1.00). Write to Michelle Waldron, NCLR, 20 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600.
MINORITIES REPORT: “One-Tbird of a Nation,” the 46-page report of the Commission of Minority Participation in Education and American Life, is currently available. For a copy, send $8.00 to the American Council on Education, Publications Department, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036 ($7.00 per copy for orders of 10 more).
PESTICIDES: a 274-page Environmental Protection Agency proposal, titled “Worker Protection Standards for Agricultural Pesticides,” is open for a 90-day comment period. For a free copy, call or write the Docket Control Office, specifying Docket No. OPP-300164, Program Management Support Division, Office of Pesticide Program, E.P.A., Room 236, Crystal Mall II, 1921 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, Va. 22202 (703) 557-2805.
HOUSING: A 73-page report titled “The Hispanic Housing Crisis” is available for $7.50. Send a check or money order to the National Council of La Raza, Policy Analysis Center, 20 F St., NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600.
CUBAN AMERICANS: A survey on the attitudes of Cuban Americans toward Cuba is one of three polls concerning U.S. residents’ attitudes toward that country. To obtain a free copy of the survey conducted by The Gallup Organization for Potomac Associates, contact the author, William Watts, Potomac Associates, 1619 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
FILM FESTIVAL: The deadline for entries for the National Latino Film and Video Festival has been extended to July 15. The festival will be hosted by El Museo del Barrio in New York City Oct. 14-22. The non- refundable entry fee is $10. For more information contact Lillian Jimenez at (212) 292-0062.
CONNECTING
(Late news on what's occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
COMMUNITY ACTIVISTS HONORED
Three Hispanics, two of them women, will be among the 13 New York community activists that will receive awardsthis month from the Community Service Society of New York for their efforts to combat poverty through the non-profit organizations they serve.
The three honored with the Ellen Drurie Award are Elizabeth Colon, executive director of the Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors, Suleika Cabrera Drinane, executive director of the Institute for Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, and Zoilo Torres, a labor leader and president of the National Congress of Puerto Rican Rights.
Colon is being recognized for her work in voter mobilization. Cabrera Drinane’s provision of services to some 45,000 elderly Hispanics over the last eight years and Torres’ work in the resurgence of Puerto Rican and other Hispanic union laborers are the reasons for their being chosen.
Each recipient will receive $20,000 for their organizations to spend as they wish.
POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED
Nine Hispanics were among the 36 minority scholars chosen by the National Research Council, based in Washington, D.C., to receive yearlong postdoctoral fellowships, it was announced June 28.
The Hispanic fellows, six Mexican American and the rest Puerto Rican, will conduct advanced study on topics ranging from Spanish literature and Chicano history to mass communications and economica The fellowships were created nine years ago to allow scholars to do research without having to take on teaching responsibilities.
Four of the fellows will study in California, two in New York and one each Massachusetts, Michigan and New Jersey.
Information and applications for the 1989 fellowships will be available after Sept. 1 from NRC, Fellowship Office, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20418.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
Jose Matos-Real, executive director of the Chicago-based Latino Institute, announces his resignation, effective July 29. Matos-Real, citing personal reasons, has been the organization’s director since June 1987. . . The Internal Revenue Service announces the appointment of Richard Orosco as director of its Austin, Texas, district. Orosco, who has been with the IRS since 1966, will oversee a district that in 1987 paid $11.5 billion in taxes...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS City of Industry, Calif. July 16 The American G.l. Forum, Region 3, will hold a banquet to award scholarships to about 40 high school graduates. Tony Gallegos of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Fred Alvarez, an assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Education, will address members.
Ruben Treviso (213) 695-9040.
MINORITY BUSINESS CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. July 19
The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments will hold MAXACCESS, a conference designed to show minority business owners how to get govern-
ment contracts. Free seminars will include bonds, finance and insurance; marketing to local governments; construction contracting; and contract performance.
Carl Kalish (202) 223-6800
COMING SOON
AIDS EDUCATION INSTITUTE Mexican American Women’s National Association Washington, D.C. July 21 Carol Chaviria (202) 822-8788
MANA CONVENTION
Mexican American Women’s National Association Washington, D.C. July 21-24 Irma Maldonado (202) 547-4440
PANAMERICAN FESTIVAL Alexandria Department of Parks and Recreation Alexandria, Va. July 23 Jorge Lozano (703) 560-4038 July 11,1988
BUSINESS OWNERS’ CONFERENCE
Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers
of Commerce
Midland, Texas July 28-30
Joe Morin 1-800-882-6222
AMERICAN G.l. FORUM CONFERENCE American G.l. Forum Corpus Christi, Texas Aug. 1-7 Cecil Lira (512) 887-1095
LABOR MEETING
Labor Council for Latin American Advancement San Antonio Aug. 25-27 Oscar Sanchez (202) 347-4223
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005.
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE CITY OF DALLAS, TEXAS has the following two positions open.
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 14
Responsible for providing administrative support to an Assistant City Manager, responding to phone calls and correspondence from citizens and City Councilmembers; coordinating council agenda materials and following up on requests for service; attending City Council and town hall meetings and staffing Council Committee meetings and Task Forces.
A Bachelor's Degree in Public Administration, Urban Affairs, Policy Analysis ora related field and four (4) years of related experience. A Master's Degree in Public Administration, Urban Affairs, Policy Analysis or a related field will substitute for two(2) of the required years of experience. Salary range for this position is $25,788 to $29,832.
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER
ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER
Responsible for providing administrative assistance to the City Manager; serving as a liaison to City departments, citizens, and special interest groups; coordinating the transmittal of written information to the City council in preparation of weekly council meetings; coordinating support activities of aides and interns in the City Managers' Office; participating in planning and defining objectives for firms which provide management consultant services to the City Manager's Office; administering contracts; and handling special projects and programs.
A Bachelor's Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, Urban Affairs, or related field and five (5) years of related experience is required, including three (3) or more years experience as an Administrative Assistant, Management Assistant or related work involving policy analysis, budget construction, administration and supervision. A Master's Degree is preferred. Salary range is $40,220 to $48,348.
Submit a resume for the positions by Friday, July 29,1988 to:
Staffing Manager Personnel Department 1500 Manila City Hall, Room 6AN Dallas, Texas 75201
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/H
CITY OF PHOENIX
The City of Phoenix will open recruitment for the following positions in the field of Traffic Engineering on the dates indicated:
TRAFFIC ENGINEERING SUPERVISOR: 7/11/88 - $39,874 - $56,493. Requires 5 years experience in traffic engineering in a technical capacity, including 1 year supervisory experience and a BS in Engineering, including courses in traffic and/or transportation engineering.
TRAFFIC ENGINEER II: 7/11/88-$30,992-$44,054. Requiresl year experience in traffic engineering and a BS in Engineering, including courses in traffic and/or transportation engineering.
TRAFFIC ENGINEER III: 7/5/88-$36,088-$51,189. Requires3 years experience in traffic engineering including 1 yearatthe level of, or equivalent to, aTraffic Engineer II anda BS in Engineering, including courses in traffic and/or transportation engineering.
To request application, call (602) 262-6277 or write: City of Phoenix, Personnel Department, 135 North 2nd Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85003.
AA/EEO/H Employer
ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR Ill-Contract Compliance $2,272.00 per Month ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR Ill-Certification $2,272,000 per Month
Both positions require a Bachelor's Degree in Business or Public Admin, or a closely related field and 4 years or resp. admin, experience or8 years or progressively resp. admin, experience. A Master's Degree may substitute for up to 2 years of the experience requirement.
For the Contract Compliance position, there is a preference forcandidates with minority and women-owned business (M/WBE) program contract compliance experience.
For the Certification position, there is a preference for M/WBE program certification experience.
Apply in person at MARICOPA COUNTY Personnel Department 111 & Third Avenue, Phoenix by July 15,1988.
NALEO - National Hispanic civic affairs research and advocacy organization is accepting applications for the following positions: Research/Policy Analyst- excellent writing skills, some Capitol Hill experience helpful but not necessary. Spanish preferred but not required. SALARY high teens to low 20’s. Send writing sample and resume to708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
Administrative Assistant- unique position with diverse responsibilities. Must be detail oriented and take initiative. Some meeting planning experience helpful but not necessary. Data Base ill required. SALARY mid to high teens. Send resume to: NALEO, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
Administrative Assistant- special person is needed to coordinate all aspects of a service oriented toll-free hotline for immigrants. Self Starter. Spanish required. Lots of phone work. Salary low to mid teens. Please call 546-2536.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Executive Director sought for alternative school for Latino adults. Responsible for overall management. B.A. or M.A. preferred. Two years equivalent experience. Bilingual/Bicultural preferred.
Resume to: Instituto del Progreso Lafino, 1919 S. Blue Island, Chicago, III. 60608. (312) 421-5429.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
National nonprofit, highly visible, public service organization with minority issues orientation seeks Executive Director. Excellent writing, speaking, fund raising skills, grass roots involvement experience, and good management background needed. Bicultural sensitivity, political awareness, creativity, diplomacy, initiative, reliability, loyalty, orderliness are essential. Computer expertise a plus. Send resume, references, writing sample and salary requirements t GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Typesetting • Layout • barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483-7755.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Ordered by _______>
Organization ______
Street________
City, State & Zip__
Area Code & Phone
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts & Entertainment
ON TH E TUBE: A network pilot show with a Latino in a starring role and a new Spanish-language version of MTV debut this week on national television.
The pilot episode of Home Free, which stars Trinidad Silva and Michael Davis, airs July 13 at 8 p.m. on NBC. The program, produced by MTM, is not included in the network’s announced lineup. Silva plays Eddie Fuentes, who cooks and cleans house for the show’s unique family of five boys and their foster father (Davis).
"What I like about the character,” Silva told Weekly Report, “is that he knows that life is beautiful. Eddie is a sensitive person like so many sensitive Hispanic men out there (that) nobody knows about.”
MTV Intemacional, a one-hour, Spanish-language version of the music television cable channel, makes its debut on the Telemundo network July 1. The show, from MTV Networks, features English-and Spanish-language music videos introduced by deejays Daisy Fuentes and Eddie Trucco.
Telemundo recently premiered two Spanish-language afternoon game shows. Uno nunca sabe and Adivinelo con sehas are produced by intertelEstan in affiliation with Barry & Enright Productions.
In a related item, the Spanish-language cable television network Galavisidn, takes an all-news, advertiser-supported format in Sep* tember, thus completi#gjts conversion from a pay channel to a free, basic channel.
The 24-hour, Monday through Friday, news and information format - to be known as ECO- premieres Sept. 1.
The ECO format will reportedly include a 20-minute, hard news segment at the top of each hour, plus a talk show, hosted by a roster of Mexican journalists, for the rest of the hour.
All of the ECO programming will be beamed by satellite from Mexico City, with pre-taped reports from seven bureaus across the United States. Galavision reaches an estimated one million Hispanic households throughout the United States and Puerto Rico.
On weekends, Galavision will retain its current movies and sports format - with added commercial interruptions.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
HISPANICSINTIME: The July 11 issue of Time magazine devotes about half its editorial pages to a celebration of Hispanic culture, specifically how it is effecting mainstream culture.
The 30-page spread looks at the Latino influence in the fields of art, design, fashion, cinema, theater, cuisine and books. Coverage is predominantly upbeat Perhaps “unavoidably’ so, says Time’s state department correspondent Ricardo Chavira.
“I think the issue is trying to show that Hispanics are more than a problem, that they have something (positive) to bring,” said Chavira.
Nevertheless, in a full-page section on language, even a brief mention of the English-only movement is noticeably absent, as is any coverage of the fields of politics, business or religion.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420Street NW Washington, D C. 20005 (202) 2340280 or 2340737
Publisher Hector Ericksen- Mendoza Editor Felix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Diana Padilla, Angela Walker Graphics/ Production: Carlos Amen, Zoila Elias
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues):
I restitutions/ agencies $118
Personal $108
Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week Multiple use rates on request
World correspondent Guy Garcia, who suggested the special section to editors in February, said no lobbying was required to get the story in. Instead, editors afforded it the entire culture section of the magazine.
“It’s supposed to be uplifting and positive. Latin culture is that way,” said Garcia, adding, “ Everyone knows the downside.”
The highlight of the special section is a five-page profile of Edward James Olmos, a mural of whom was created in East Los Angeles just for the cover. There is also a shorter spot on salsa singer/actor Ruben Blades.
There is a music round-up and an overview of Latino artists as well as a people section with a Playgirl type shot of Esai Morales and a two-page spread on movies with some spicy quotes from Rita Moreno.
In every section, there is a recurring theme - the diversity of the Latino culture. It is not only emphasized, but glorified. It is impossible to define Hispanic art, music or fashion, readers are warned.
“The fact is that Times devoted so much time and space to it. It has a political impli-
cation,” said Garcia.
The finale is an essay by Richard Rodriguez, who enraged so many Hispanics with the anti-bilingual education stance he took in his 1982 autobiographical novel “Hunger of Memory: The Education of Richard Rodriguez.” “Considering that” said Chavira, “I was pleasantly surprised.”
The other writers/reporters are a mix of Time’s Latino staffers who usually cover other areas - Cristina Garcia (Miami bureau chief), Nelida Gonzalez Cutler (international), Edward Gomez (international), Janice Castro (business), Richard Lacayo (law and art) - and Anglos covering their regular beats.
“I hope it wakes people up to this profound phenomenon,” said Garcia. “ I don’t think its a cultural flash in the pan.”
Offering one example,he said, “There have always been Latin actors. But it is only recently that they don’t change their names... They are not making excuses anymore.”
ALSO AT TIME INC.: Writer Ron Arias has a cover story on Costa Rica in the July 11 issue of People magazine. - Darryl Figueroa
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week The Minnesota Supreme Court suspends for a year without pay and censures for judicial misconduct Ramsey County District Judge Alberto Miera, the state's first Hispanic judge. Miera, who as of July 5 had been on a water-only fast 55 days, was convicted in 1987 of forcing a kiss upon a court reporter, a male ... Larry Amaya, one of the founders of California' s American Gl Forum and the creator of the Southern California Scholarship Foundation, dies July 1 of a heart atacls. Amaya was 65 years old . . . The Aspira Educational Panel, composed of Hispanic educators and officials, chastises New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Green for what it says is his failure to address the city's Hispanic dropout rate ... Paul Cejas, a member of the Dade County(Fia. ) School Board for eight years and one of the county's few prominent Cuban American Democrats, announces he will not seek re-election but will instead campaign for presidential candidate Michael Dukakis .. . Joseph Fernandez, the CIA's former station chief in Costa Rica, pleads not guilty to charges that he helped set up an unauthorized supply network for the Nicaraguan contras ... The National Education Association confers on Virginia Sumaya, a first grade bilingual education teacher from Wichita, Kan., its George I. Sanchez Memorial Award at its conference in New Orleans . .. USA Today recognizes Annette Garza, of San Antonio, as its top female high school athlete of the year in Texas. Garza excels in volleyball and basketball ... Vol. 6 No. 27 HISPANIC LINK WEE Democratic Convention Promises Latino Visibility Hispanic involvement in Democratic Party politics will be apparent at this year's Demo cratic National Convention, July 18-21 in Atlanta. Overall , Hispanic representation will drop slightly at this year's convention, but those involved in the party promise Hispanic dele .gates in key states will make an impact. Carmen Perez, chair of the Hispanic Caucus of the Democratic National Committee, states that although there seems to be less recognition of special interest groups in 1988, "the pro jected 358 Hispanic delegates and 73 alter nates will play a visible role." At least 6.7% of the 4 ,210 delegates and 1,168 alternates are expected to be . Hispanic. That figure is lower than the percentage of Hispanics who are registered Democrats-7 . 1% of the U . S . voting-age population. It marks a 0.3% decrease in the percentage of credentials given to Hispanics in 1984 and a 0 . 7% increase from 1980. In 1984, the DNC had a minimum Hispanic Who will win the right to the office of president of the United States this November? And how much influence will Hispanics have in Democratic and Republican party politics in this year's election? Weekly Re port will examine these questions in a threepart series over the next several months. delegate/alternate goal for the convention of 271 to 363 delegates and 92 alternates. According to the DNC, there are no goals being set this year. States key to a Democratic victory in Novenr ber will have influential Hispanic participation in Atlanta . Texas ' delegates and alternates are approximately 19% Hispanic and include San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros. Cali fornia's delegation is a projected 17% Hispanic and New York's about 7%. These figures are lower than the minimum delegate/alternate goals which were set for Hispanic participation at the 1984 Democratic Party Conven tion. Puerto Rico has one of its highest delegate representations ever, with approximately 60 delegates .,. more Hispanic delegates than every state but California. Thafs up from the 53 delegates at the 1984 convention in San Francisco and up from 41 at the 1980 con vention in New York. All eleven voting Democratic Hispanics in Congress are delegates. Former Colorado state Senator, Polly Baca , national DNC vice-chair, " had hoped for a greater participation by Hispanics" at this year's convention, but remains optimistic about future Hispanic involvement in the party. The party has placed Hispanics in roles in policy and planning at the convention . Thirteen Cuban Americans Soften on Cuba The attitude of Cuban Americans toward Cuba is softening, but in comparison to the general public, they are more wary of resuming diplomatic relations, found a nationwide sur veyreleased June 28. Younger Cubans were the least concerned with Castro in their responses, according to the study's author, William Watts. Eighty percent of them were in favor of discussions leading to a resumption of normal relations with the island nation. The total number of Cuban Americans polled was 200. " The . 18-to-29 age group was less ideo logical in its perception of Cuba and CubaU.S. relations and more prepared to see change,'' said Watts. Forty-one percent of the total Cuban American sample were in favor of normalization of relations with Cuba, 47% were not. Slightly more than half of the other 1,038 U.S . residents contacted were in favor of starting talks . . The negative perception of Fidel Castro' s leadership has not waned among the general Cuban American community, according to the poll results. Almost 80% of Cuban Ameri cans view Cuba unfavorably and 96% see Castro in that light. The nationwide survey, the first on Cuba since 1977, was conducted by the Gallup Organization for Potomac Associates , a public policy research organization located at the John Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D . C . Sophia Nieves Hispanics serve on all three of the party's standing committees, including Hispanic co chairs for each one. Texas Congressman Albert Bustamante, chairman of the Congres sional Hispanic Caucus, co-chairs the credentials committee, with Olga Diaz , Isabella Garcia , Dora Oliva and Art Trujillo serving as appointed members. Congressman Bill Rich ardson , of New Mexico, co-chairs the platform committee, with Dina Beaumont, Fran Mar tinezBussie and Texas state Legislator Lena continued o n page 2 Hispanic Convention Involvement DEL* ALT.* TOTAL HISP. Alaska 0 1 84 1.2% Ariz. 4 3 55 12. 7 Calif. 70 11 473 17. 1 Colo. 8 3 70 15. 7 Conn. 3 1 80 5 Fla. 4 1 199 2 . 5 Idaho 1 0 30 3 . 3 Ill. 11 4 258 5 . 8 Ind . 1 0 117 0 . 9 Iowa 2 0 78 2 . 6 Kan. 3 0 58 5 . 2 Ky. 1 0 83 1 . 2 La. 1 0 97 1.0 Md. 0 1 106 0 . 9 Mass. 3 1 152 2 . 6 Mich. 2 1 208 1.4 Minn. 2 0 117 1 . 7 Mo. 1 0 114 0 . 9 Mont. 1 0 34 2 . 9 Nev. 1 1 28 7.1 N.J. 10 0 161 6 . 2 N.M. 14 5 38 50 N.Y. 21 6 377 7.2 Ohio 5 0 236 2 . 1 Okla. 1 0 71 1.4 Ore. 0 2 69 2.9 Pa. 3 1 261 1 . 5 P.R. 60 17 78 98.7 Texas 41 11 273 19.0 Utah 1 0 36 2.7 Va. 2 0 111 1 . 8 Wash. 4 2 99 6 . 1 Wyo. 3 0 22 13.6 * DEL-Delegates; AL T Alternates

PAGE 2

Latinos Most Likely to Live in Substandard Housing Hispanics are more than twice as likely as nonHispanics to live in old, substandard, overcrowded housing for which they pay beyond their means, according to a study released June 30 by the National Council of La Raza at Capitol Hill. '"We are in a crisis situation, " said NCLR Hou si ng Policy Analyst Judy Canales, who co-authored the report. The study also showed that only 43% of Latinos were homeowners in 1983 compared with 65% of the general population. While 57%, or 2 . 6 million, of Latino households lived in rented units, this was true for only 35% of nonLatinos. Canales stressed the importance of home ownership. "It makes you more a part . of a community." Whether they own or rent, Hispanics tend to live in poorer quality units than non Hispanics, said the report. One in six His panic households suffered rodent infestation while one in 10 had electrical or plumbing problems. Also, few Latinos live in affordable housing, the study showed . One Hispanic household in 1 0 paid more than 70% of its income for housing in 1983. Almost five in 1 0 used over 30% for shelter. Federal spending for new public assistance Farm Workers: EPA Plan Insufficient His panic farm workergroups say an Environmental Protection Agency proposal put on the Federal Register July 6 does not go far enough in protecting agricultural workers from pesticide poisoning. The agency, in its first expansion of pesticide regulations, called for, among other things, bilingual written warnings of toxicity, the closing of fields for 24 hours after use of certain chemicals and the supply of eyewash, soap, water and disposable towels for workers in fields where pesticides have been used and for those workers handling pesticides. 2 " We are not interested in cosmetic changes," said Baldemar Velasquez, president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, an Ohiobased group representing 6,000 workers. Rape Charges Dropped Charges against five undocumented aliens imprisoned two months in connection with an alleged rape of a 15-yearold girl near San Diego were dropped June 30 by a municipal judge. The dismissal came after prosecutors said the girl's family had infor mation "favorable to the defendants." The dismissals are the latest twist in a case that has brought cries of discrimination from the area ' s Latino community. The five undocumented aliens, one of whom is a woman, were arrested the day the girl said the rape occurred, April24. The girl said eight men and a woman forced her off her horse in the town of Poway , 40 miles north of San Diego. She said one of the men then raped her. She described the assailant as young, Mexican, Spanish-speak ing and about 5 feet 7 inches tall . The San Diego County Sheriffs Depart ment and 12 Border Patrol agents then detained, for several hours, some 85 Latino men . The 85 were handcuffed, sprawled on a parking lot and questioned. None of the five later arrested were in the group. Several groups labeled the sweep dis criminatory. They also charged that the round-up, which used SWAT officers, hap pened because the girl' s parents are law enforcement officers. "This is just not enough." Dr. Thomas Lazar , of the United Farm Work ers union, felt the regulations would better benefit states other than California, where agriculture is heaviest. "California ' s guidelines are more strict than the new regulations and ours are already not sufficient, " he said. According to the EPA, there are an estimated 2 . 8 million farm workers in the nation, 50% of whom are Latino. -Darryl Figueroa Hispanic Impact Predicted continued from page 1 Guerrero serving as appointees. Congressman Esteban Torres , of California , co-chairs the rules committee, with Illinois County Com missioner Irene Hernandez, Lou Moret and Jack Otero serving as members. Former governor of New Mexico Toney Anaya was recently appointed as one of four convention co-chairs . There are presently 23 Hispanics serving on the 382-member DNC . According to DNC platform committee staff , the proposed '88 platform reflects a much more general approach to issues of concern to Democrats than platforms submitted for approval at previous conventions. It is part of party strategy this year not to make so many specific promises to a variety of interest groups, but, says a platform committee staff member, this " will not diminish Democratic interest in Hispanic issues. " _Diana Padilla Language Rule Contested A rule at the University of California, San Francisco, requiring food service workers to use English only or face a reprimand was challenged June 29 in a complaint filed at the San Francisco regional office of the U.S . Equal Employment Opportunity Commission by the American Civil Liberties Union of North ern California and the Mexican Amer ican Legal Defense and Educational Fund . . The complaint was filed on behalf of 10 workers of the university's department of nutrition and dietetics and Council1 0 of the American Federation of Government Workers. The rule , in effect at several departments at the university, has been in place since May 1987. rentals was cut from $30 billion in 1981 to $7.8 billion in 1987, according to the report. The study said that "black renters were somewhat better served" by subsidized housing than are Hispanic. Less than one fourth of poor Hispanic or Anglo renters lived in subsidized housing in 1986, while 39% of blacks did. U.S. Rep . Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas), chair man of the House Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development, said in a statement issued June 30 that the" abomi nable " housing situation is the "result of shortsightedness by the Reagan adminis tration. " Darryl Figueroa Minority Job Ruling Draws Mixed Reaction The U.S. Supreme court made it easier for minorities and women to prove job discrimi nation in a ruling June 29 that elicited a mixed reaction from civil rights attorneys. In an 8 decision, the court ruled plaintiffs can use statistics to support charges of job discrimination when promotion decisions are made on a subjective basis . Another portion of the ruling, endorsed by four of the justices, caused concern by civil rights organizations that the court will make it easier for employers to combat charges of discrimination. In that opinion, authored by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, it was held that instead of proving company policy is based on a necessary aspect of the job, an employer should only provide evidence"that its employment practices are based on legiti mate business reasons." The ruling overturns a case involving a Texas woman , Clara Watson, who was passed over for supervisory positions four times. The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals had found irrelevant her statistical evidence. Miamians Meet Reagan Cuban American community leaders who met with President Reagan June 29 in Miami to express their dissatisfaction with what they see as a thaw in U . S . relations with the Castro regime were pleased with Reagan ' s reponse. The three dozen Cuban exile leaders also appealed to Reagan on behalf of anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch . The 61-yearold Bosch, who is considered a terrorist by theU.S . ImmigrationandNaturali zation Service , has been in a Miami prison since February awaiting a hearing that could lead to his deportation to Cuba. Also that day in Miami, some 250 Cubans rallied in support of Bosch and against normal ization of relations with Cuba. " We would have preferred a more specific response, but we are satisfied that he knows and understands our concerns, " said state Sen . lleanaRos-Lehtinen(RWest Dade), who attended the meeting. Hispanic link Weekly Report .

PAGE 3

Carmen 0. Perez, guest columnist Why A Democrat? Since 1986, I have had the honor of serving as the chair of the Hispanic Caucus of the National Democratic Committee. In that position, I have had the opportunity to travel and speak before many different Hispanic audiences. Invariably , I am asked , "Why should I become active in the Democratic Party'? " Often I find that this question is asked honestly, but with the unspoken question that really says, "Hey, what has the Democratic Party ever done for people like me? " My reply is always the same. Hispanics, like all Americans, need to be involved in the political process that governs this country. If we are not, then we leave decisions about what will happen to us in the hands of those who may be insensitive, ignorant or biased. But it is not enough to become involved. In politics, as in life, we are confronted with choices and limited resources . That ' s why I answer the question of"Why the Democrats?" by talking about why I became a Democrat and what I think the Democratic Party can achieve in America. The Democratic Party has been since its earliest days a hybrid of many competing ideas and constituencies. When Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr sailed the Hudson River in search of butterflies, they set in motion an organization that led Will Rogers to say more than a century later, "I belong to no organized party, I am a Democrat. " DOING THE RIGHT THING Yet, it is that dynamic mixture of idealism and politics which produced leaders such as Roosevelt , Truman and John F. Kennedy. And it is that same refusal to be quiet and to go along which led the party to confront its own shortcomings and to begin the process of reaching out to Hispanic voters. I was attracted to the party during the campaign of Robert F . Kennedy some 20 years ago. I have stayed with the Democratic Party because it remains the party of " what you know " and not just "who you know. " It is a party that believes in hard work and principled action. The Democratic Party has often moved slowly in responding to the needs of Hispanics ... but it has never stopped. Unlike the Republican Party, which first discovered the white, male Southern voter, then the working woman voter, then the conservative black voter, and now finally the upwardly mobile Hispanic voter, the Democratic Party has struggled with itself and continued to reach out to Hispanics not just because of our votes, but, more fundamentally, because it was and continues to be the right thing to do. This month the Democratic Party meets in Atlanta to nominate the man who will become the next president of the United States. More than 350 Hispanic delegates will participate in that convention. That's the largest number of Latino delegates at any convention of any major political party. LOOK AT THE PAST I wonder how many Hispanics will be in New Orleans as voting delegates with a choice in the future of the Republican Party'? Hispanics will play an increasing role in the future of this nation-in the arts, the sciences, in business and in politics. Whatever choice you may make in party affiliation, I urge you to look again at the past , when we so often endured as second-class citizens. And I would ask that you remember who was there when Cesar Chavez marched in Delano, Calif., when bilingual education was unheard of , when voting rights in the Southwest weren't worth the paper they were printed on . It was the Democratic Party that took up those struggles and that continues to define the agenda for the future of this nation. For me the choice is clear. A Democratic vote is a vote fprthe future of my country and my family . It is a vote for those that have stood with me before it was the fashion to do so . (Ca rmen Perez chairs the Hispanic Caucus of the Democratic National Committee and works for the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.) Cathi Villalpando, guest columnist Why A Republican? It seemed natural for me, as a Hispanic growing up in southwest Texas, to become a Democrat. But it was the Republican Party that invited me to join and encouraged me to learn and appreciate this nation's political system. While in school in the late'60s, I went to work for the GOP in Austin . My mentor s were. former Sen . John Tower of Texas and several Hispanics . They had begun to realize that the GOP and Hispanic community shared beliefs in conservativism , tradition, family values , a strong defense and respect in the classroom against abortion. They taught me how to get our community politically involved and, most importantly, how to make the political system benefit our community. " Reaching out'' to all Hispanic Americans was our first objective. That rule helped me become a special assistant to President Reagan in the White House. And today, I am chairman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, a Republican National Committee arm. During the past 10 years, the party and the RNHA have experienced some monumental changes. One such change was the creation by the RNC in 1986 of its Committee on Minority and Ethnic Participation . The committee agreed that there were too few Hispanic spokes persons and grassroot campaigns. There was no effecti ve message to our community. 'NO MAS' Last year the RNHA, under a new set of leaders, began implementing a national strategy to encourage Hispanics to commit themselves to the party and to make the party commit itself to our concerns. There have been misperceptions that Republicans are a party of the rich-just big -business oriented. One must have a very short memory to forget that it was the cabinet Committee on Spanish-Speaking Affairs, created under President Richard Nixon, that gave us a foothold in the system . In addition, the creation of the Small Business Administration and the Department of Commerce's minority business development program has stimulated Hispanic business. The other party has not changed its direction on Hispanic programs in 20 years . One reason : Democrats feel safe with the His panic vote. To that belief, I simply reply , " no mas." We are better educated and more sophisticated. Since the Voting Rights Act , we ' ve realized the value of our vote . With its new recognition within the party, the RNHA now works very closely with the current administration on small business issues, foreign policy , employment, immigration , the English-only amendments and education. WE ARE THE FUTURE Today, I find more Hispanics crossing over because of the leadership and positive outreach to Hispanics initiated by Vice President George Bush , Tower and Reagan. These men know the importance of business and economic development among our own people. The Republican Party's platform is based upon a sound economic future for all Americans. Bush , with his deep commitment to our families, our community and our country, has made education his priority campaign issue. In appreciation, the RNHA will take to the GOP Convention in August 50,000 new Hispanic Republican voters. We are the community of the future for the Republican Party . We can have tremendous impact on its political, social and economic agendas. 11aving worked in Bush' s 1980 campaign for president in Texas , 1 know him as a leader committed to solving this nation's domestic problems while maintaining the peace and respect this country enjoys today. And I know that under his leadership the GOP increasingly will become the Hispanic choice. (Cathi Villalpando chairs the RNHA and is a partner and owner of Communications International in Washington , D.C.) Hi spanic Lin k Weekly R e port July11,1988 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING EDUCATIONAL CLEARINGHOUSE: The ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Educational Digest draws together information on current issues ranging from teaching at-risk students to trends in urban and minority education. For a free copy, write to ERIC CUE, Institute for Urban and Minority Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y . 10027 (212) 678-3433. EDUCATIONAL PUBLICATIONS: The National Council of La Raza's Education Component has recently released numerous p:..bli cations: " The Augustus F . Hawkins-Robert T. Stafford Elementary and Secondary School Improvement Amendments of 1988 and Hispanic Educational Concerns" (1 0 -pages/$2. 00); "Literacy in the Hispanic Community" (35-pages/$3.00); "Making Schools Work for Under-achieving Minorities: Some Promising Community Practices" (25-pages/$2.00); "Smart Start: The .Community Collaborative for Early Childhood Development Act of 1988" (1 0-pages/$1.00). Write to Michelle Waldron, NCLR, 20 F St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20001 (202) 628-9600. MINORITIES REPORT: "One-Third of a Nation," the 46-page report of the Commission of Minority Participation in Education and American Life, is currently available. For a copy, send $8.00 to the American Council on Education, Publications Department, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D .C. 20036 ($7 .00 per copy for orders of 10 more). PESTICIDES: a 274-page Environmental Protection Agency proposal, titled "Worker Protection Standards for Agricultural Pesticides," is open for a 90-day comment period. For a free copy, call or the Docket Control Office, specifying Docket No. OPP-300164, Program Management Support Division, Office of Pesticide Program, E.P.A., Room 236, Crystal Mall II, 1921 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, Va . 22202 (703) 557-2805. HOUSING: A 73-page report titled " The Hispanic Housing Crisis" is available for $7.50. Send a check or money order to the National Council of La Raza, Policy Analysis Center, 20 F St., NW, Second Floor, Washington, D . C . 20001 (202) 628-9600. CUBAN AMERICANS: A survey on the attitudes of Cuban Americans toward Cuba is one of three polls concerning U.S. residents' attitudes toward that country. To obtain a free copy of the survey conducted by The Gallup Organization for Potomac Associates, contact the author, William Watts, Potomac Associates, 1 619 Massa chusetts Ave . NW, Washington, D.C. 20036. FILM FESTIVAL: The deadline for entries for the National Latino Film and Video Festival has been extended to July 15. The festival will be hosted by El Museo del Barrio in New York City Oct. 14-22. The non-refundable entry.fee is $10. For more information contact Lillian Jimenez at (212) 292-0062. CONNECTING (Late news on what's occurring within the U.S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) COMMUNITY ACTIVISTS HONORED Three Hispanics, two of them women, will be among the 13 New York zommunity activists that will receive awards this month from the Community Service Society of New York for their efforts to combat . poverty through the non-profit organizations they serve. The three honored with the Ellen Drurie Award are Elizabeth Colon, executive director of the Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors, Suleika Cabrera Drinane, executive director of the Institute for Puerto Rican/Hispanic Elderly, and Zoilo Torres, a labor leader and president of the National Congress of Puerto Rican Rights. Colon is being recognized for her work in voter mobilization. Cabrera Drinane's provision of services to some 45,000 elderly Hispanics over the last eight years and Torres' work in the resurgence of Puerto Rican and other Hispanic union laborers are the reasons for their being chosen. Each recipient will receive$20,000 fortheirorganizations to spend as they wish . POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED Nine Hispanics were among the 36 minority scholars chosen by the National Research Council, based in Washington, D.C., to receive yearlong postdoctoral fellowships, it was announced June 28. The Hispanic fellows, six Mexican American and the rest Puerto Rican, will conduct advanced study on topics ranging from Spanish literature and Chicano history to mass communications and economics. The fellowships were created nine years ago to allow scholars to do research without having to take on teaching responsibilities. Four of the fellows will study in California, two in New York and one each Massachusetts, Michigan and New Jersey. Information and applications for the 1989 fellowships will be available after Sept. 1 from NRC, Fellowship Office, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D . C . 20418. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Jose MatosReal, executive director of the Chicago-based Latino Institute, announces his resignation, effective July 29. MatosReal, citing personal reasons, has been the organization's director since June 1987. . . The Internal Revenue Service announces the appointment of Richard Orosco as director of its Austin, Texas, district. Orosco, who has been with the IRS since 1966, will oversee a district that in 1987 paid $11.5 billion in taxes. . . Calendar men! contracts. Free seminars will include bonds, finance and insurance; marketing to local govern ments; COilS! ruction contracting; and contract per formance. BUSINESS OWNERS' CONFERENCE Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce Midland, Texas July 28-30 Joe Morin 1-800-882-6222 THIS WEEK SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS City qf Industry, Calif. July 16 The American G.l. Forum, Region 3, will hold a banquet to award scholarships to about 40 high school graduates. Tony Gallegos of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Fred Alvarez, an assistant secretary of the U .S. Department of Education, will address members. Ruben Treviso (213) 695-9040. MINORITY BUSINESS CONFERENCE Washington, D .C. July 19 The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments will hold MAXACCESS, a conference designed to show minority business owners how to get govern-4 Carl Kalish (202) 223-6800 COMING SOON AIDS EDUCATION INSTITUTE Mex ican American Women ' s National Association Washington, D.C. July 21 Carol Chaviria (202) 822-8788 MANA CONVENTION Mexican American Women's National Association Washington, D.C. July 21-24 Irma Maldonado (202) 547-4440 PANAMERICAN FESTIVAL Alexandria Department of Parks and Recreation Alexandria, Va. July 23 Jorge Lozano (703) 560-4038 July 11, 1988 AMERICAN G.l. FORUM CONFERENCE American G.l. Forum Corpus Christi , Texas Aug. 1-7 Cecil Lira (512) 887-1095 LABOR MEETING Labor Council for Latin American Advancement San Antonio Aug. 25-27 Oscar Sanchez (202) 347-4223 Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date . Please include name , date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Hispanic Link Weekly Rep o rt

PAGE 5

THE CITY OF DALLAS, TEXAS has the following two positions open. OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 14 Responsible for providing administrative support to an Assistant City Manager, responding to phone calls and correspondence from citizens and City Councilmembers; coordinating council agenda materials and following up on requests for service; attending City Council . and town hall meetings and staffing Council Committee meetings and Task Forces . A Bachelor's Degree in Public Administration, Urban Affairs, Policy Analysis or a related field and four(4) years of related experience. A Master's Degree in Public Administration, Urban Affairs, Policy Analysis or a related field will substitutefortwo(2) of the required years of experience. Salary range for this position is $25,788 to $29,832. OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER Responsible for providing administrative assistance to the City Manager, serving as a liaison to City departments, citizens, and special interest groups; coordinating the transmittal of written information to the City council in preparation of weekly council meetings; coordinating support activities of aides and interns in the City Managers' Office; participating in planning and defining objectives for firms which provide management consultant services to the City Manager's Office; administering contracts; and handling special projects and programs . A Bachelor's Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, Urban Affairs, or related field and five(S) years of related experience is required, including three(3) or more years experience as an Administrative Assistant, Management Assistant or related work involving policy analysis, budget construction, administration and supervision . A Master's Degree is preferred . Salary range is $40,220 to $48,348. Submit a resume for the positions by Friday , July 29, 1988 to: Staffing Manager Personnel Department 1500 Marilla City Hall , Room 6AN Dallas , Texas 75201 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/H CITY OF PHOENIX The City of Phoenix will open recruitment for the following positions in the field of Traffic Engineering on the dates indicated: TRAFFIC ENGINEERING SUPERVISOR: 7/11/88-$39,874-$56,493. Requires 5 years experience in traffic engineering in a technical capacity, including 1 year supervisory experience and a BS in Engineering, including courses in traffic and/or transportation engineering. TRAFFIC ENGINEER II: 7/11/88-$30,992-$44,054. Requires 1 year in traffic engineering and a BS in Engineering, including courses in traffic and/or transportation engineering. TRAFFIC ENGINEER Ill: 7/5/88-$36,088-$51,189. Requires3 years experience in traffic engineering including 1 year at the level of, or equivalent to, a Traffic Engineer II and a BS in Engineering, including courses in traffic and/or transportation engineering. To request application, call(602) 262-6277 or write: City of Phoenix, Personnel Department, 135 North 2nd Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85003. ANEEO/H Employer ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR Ill Contract Compliance $2,272 .00 per Month ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR Ill Certification $2,272.000 per Month Both positions require a Bachelor's Degree in Business or Public Admin . or a closely related field and4 years or resp. ad min. experience ora years or progressively resp. ad min . experience. A Master's Degree may substitute for up to 2 years of the experience requirement. For the Contract Compliance position, there is a preference for candidates with minority and womenowned business (M/WBE) program con tract compliance experience. For the Certification position, there is a pre ference for M/WBE program certification ex perience. Apply in person at MARICOPA COUNTY Per sonnel Department 111 S. Third Avenue, Phoenix by July 15, 1988. NALEONational Hispanic civic affairs research and advocacy organization is accept ing applications for the following positions: Research/Policy Analyst-excellent writing skills, some Capitol Hill experience helpful but not necessary. Spanish preferred but not required. SALARY high teens to low 20's. Send writing sample and resume to 708G St. SE, Washington, D .C. 20003. Administrative Assistant-unique position with diverse responsibilities. Must be detail oriented and take initiative . Some meeting planning experience helpful but not necessary. Data Base Ill required . SALARY mid to high teens. Send resume to: NALEO, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C . 20003. Administrative Assistantspecial person is needed to coordinate all aspects of a service oriented toiHree hotline for immigrants. Self Starter. Spanish required . Lots of phone work. Salary low to mid teens. Please call 546-2536. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Executive Director sought for alternative school for Latino adults . Responsible foroverall management. B.A. or M . A . preferred. Two years equivalent experience. Bilingual/Bicultural preferred. Resume to: Institute del Progreso Lafino, 1919 S. Blue Island, Chicago, Ill. 60608. (312) 421-5429. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR National nonprofit, highly visible, public service organization with minority issues orientation seeks Executive Director. Excellent writing, speaking, fund raising ski lis, grass roots involve ment experience, and good management back ground needed. Bicultural sensitivity, political awareness, creativity, diplomacy, initiative, reli& bility, loyalty, orderlinessareessential . Computer expertise a plus . Send resume, references, writing sample and salary requirements to: LULAC, 1101 14th St. NW, Suite 610, Washington, D.C. 20005. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or (202) 234. Ad copy received (mall or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C. , provides: e Design e Typesetting • Lay out e I::Jarrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20010 (202) 483-7755. Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephooe number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Ordered by Organization Street --------------City, State & Zip--------Area Code & Phone --------5

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment Telemundo recently premiered two Spanish-language afternoon game shows. Uno nunc a sa be and Adivinelo con seflas are produced by interteiEstan in affiliation with Barry & Enright Productions. ON THE TUBE: A network pilot show with a Latino in a starring role and a new Spanish-language version of MTV debut this week on national t e lev ision. 1 n a related item, the Spanish-language cable television network Galavisi6n, takes an format in Sep tember, thus completi-its conversion from a pay channel to a free, basic channel. The pilot episode of Home Free, which stars Trinidad Silva and Michael D a vis , airs July 13 at8 p. m . on NBC. The program, produced by MTM, is not included in the network' s announced lineup. Silva plays Eddie Fuentes, who cooks and cleans house for the show' s unique family of five boys and their foster father (Davis) . The 24-hour, Monday through Friday , news and information format to be known as ECOpremieres Sept. 1 . "What I like about the character," Silva told Weekly Report, "is that he knows that life is beautiful. Eddie is a sensitive person like so many sensitive Hispanic men out there (that) nobody knows about. " The ECO format will reportedly include a 20-minute, hard news segment at the top of each hour, plus a talk show, hosted by a roster of Mexican journalists, for the rest of the hour. All of the ECO programmJng will be beamed by satellite from Mexico City, with pre-taped reports from seven bureaus across the United States . Galavisi6n reaches an estimated one million Hispanic households throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. MTV lnternacional, a one-hour, Spanish-language version of the music television cable channel, makes its debut on the Telemundo network July 1. The show, from MTV Networks, features English and Spanish-language music videos introduced by deejays Daisy Fuentes and Eddie Trucco. On weekends, Galavisi6n will retain its current movies and sports format-with added commercial interruptions. Media Report HISPANICS IN TIME: TheJuly11 issue of Time magazine devotes about half its editorial pages to a celebration of Hispanic culture, specifically how it is affecting mainstream culture. The 30-page spread looks at the Latino influence in the fields of art, design, fashion, cinema, theater, cuisine and books. Coverage is predominantly upbeat Perhaps " unavoidably" so , says Time's state department correspondent Ricardo Chavira. " I think the issue is trying to show that Hispanics are more than a problem, that they have something (positive) to bring," said Chavira. Nevertheless, in a full-page section on lan guage, even a brief mention of the English only movement is noticeably absent, as is any coverage of the fields of politics, business or religion. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nati o nal o f Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW . Washington, D.C. 200os (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. H ec tor Eri cksenMendoza Edit or. F e lix Perez R e p o rting: A ntonio MejiasRentas, Darryl Figueroa Sophia Nieves. Dian a Padilla, Angela Walker Graphic&' Productiorc Carlos Arrien, Z oila Elias No portion of Hisp anic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced o r broadcast in any form without advance permi ssion. Annual subscription (50 issues): lnstitutions,'agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 ce nts per word Disp l ay ads are $45 per column inch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday o f same week u se rates o n requ es t World correspondent Guy Garcia, who sug gested the special section to editors in February, said no lobbying was required to get the story in. Instead, editors afforded it the entire culture section of the magazine. "lfs supposed to be uplifting and positive. Latin culture is that way," said Garcia, adding, "Everyone knows the downside." The highlight of the special section is a five page profile of Edward James Olmos, a mural of whom was created In East Los Angeles just for the cover. There is also a shorter spot on sa/sa singer/actor Ruben Blades. There is a music round-up and an overview of Latino artists as well as a people section with a Playgirl type shot of Esai Morales and a two-page spread on movies with some spicy quotes from Rita Moreno. In every section, there is a recurring theme -the diversity of the Latino culture. It is not only emphasized, but glorified. It is impossible to define Hispanic art, music or fashion, read ers are warned. "The fact is that Times devoted so much time and space to it. It has a political impli --Antonio Mejias-Rentas cation," said Garcia . The finale is an essay by Richard Rodriguez, who enraged so many Hispanics with the anti-bilingual education stance he took in his 1982 autobiographical novel ' 'Hunger of Memory: The Education of Richard Rodr iguez." considering that," said Chavira, "I was pleas antly surprised." The other writers/reporters are a mix of Time's Latino staffers who usually cover other areas-Cristina Garcia(Miami bureau chief), Nelida Gonzalez Cutler (international), Edward Gomez (international) , Janice Castro (business), Richard Lacayo (law and art) and Anglos covering their regular beats. " I hope it wakes people up to this profound phenomenon," said Garcia. "I don't think its a cultural flash in the pan . " Offering one example, he said, "There have always been Latin actors. But it is only recently that they don't change their names. . . They are not making excuses anymore." ALSO AT Tl ME INC.: Writer Ron Arias has a cover story on Costa Rica in the July 11 issue of People magazine. Darryl Figueroa "Bienvenidos a Atlanta." Hispanic link Weekly Report