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Hispanic link weekly report, July 18, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 18, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Florida Gov. Bob Martinez signs into law a standard-setting AIDS bill that provides for the quarantining of carriers who refuse to curtail their sexual or drug-related activities, education programs beginning in middle schools and establishes laws banning discrimination against people with AIDS in housing, insurance, employment and government services... Arizonans for Official English present to Secretary of State Jim Shumway petitions with 209,154 signatures. The petitions-130,000 were required - are to put on the November ballot a measure making English the state’s official language. . . Minnesota Judge Alberto Miera goes off his 57-day-old, water-only
REC’D. HR/CR
fast July 7. The Ramsey County judge said he stooped fasting because a state Supreme Court decision s.i|4fen4ing ntnOtbr a year also chastised 20 county judges for issuing a statement criticizing Miera... San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros leads Marshal Sergei Akhromeyev, the Soviet Union’s top military officer, on a tour of the Texas city... Several hundred law enforcement officers in a mile-long procession salute slain Tallahassee, Fla, police officer Ernest Ponce De Lebn, 40. The first officer killed in the line of duty in the 143-year history of the Tallahassee police department, Ponce De Leon was killed in a shootout with three escaped Maryland convicts... Oakland Athletics outfielder Jos6 Canseco leads the American League in votes from fans - 1,765,499 - to start in the All-Star Game...

Fall TV Series Tune Out Latinos
Less than a year after “La Bamba” and 'The Milagro Beanfield War” reportedly heralded a new era for Hispanics in Hollywood, the three major television networks are reducing the number of lead Hispanic actors and characters in prime-time programming.
Of the 21 new series plan ned for the 1988-89 season, only one features a Hispanic lead character - Tony Maldonado, an ex-gang member and head of a Guardian Angels-type group in the new ABC drama “Knightwatch.” The character is played by Benjamin Bratt, a San Francisco native of Peruvian descent.
In the 1987-88 season, the networks introduced five new Hispanic lead characters. They were in the series “I Married Dora” and “Ohara” (ABC), and “Trial and Error,” “Eisenhower and Lutz” and “Tour of Duty” (CBS). Only Ram6n Franco’s character as’ Private Alberto Ruiz is scheduled to return this fall on the latter show.
The “Knightwatch” and “Tour of Duty’ characters join the only other remaining lead Hispanic characters on network TV(all on NBC): Edward James Olmos and Saundra Santiago on “Miami Vice,” and Jimmy Smits on “LA Law.” Lorenzo Lamas and Ana Alicia return in
Bentsen Employs Just 1
Sea Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas), announced as the running mate of Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis July 12, represents a state with the second largest Hispanic population - 21%. But of 30 staffers at his Washington, D.C, office, Bentsen employs one Hispanic
Frances Murrah, Bentsen’s business manager, was quick to explain this is not the norm. “We have always had more people on staff that are of H ispanic extraction than that,” she said. She named four of last year’s staffers who have gone on to work in the Texas office or to work in the senator’s campaign office. The Latino this year is Ray Bonilla, a legislative assistant
Murrah denied the findings of a survey last year by the Harte-Hanks newspaper chain which found only one Hispanic staffer on Bentsen’s 1987 staff.
lead, non-Hispanic roles an CBS’ “Falcon Crest,” as does Tina Yothersin NBC’s“Family Ties.” (See Arts and Entertainment.)
The number of Latino lead actors and roles on prime-time television has remained steady at less than 5% of the total during the last five years.
Overall, six out of 66 shows that make up the announced 1988-89 series have one or more Hispanics in lead roles. At the beginning of the 1987-88 season, seven out of 66 shows had one or more Latino leads.
The number of lead Hispanic characters in the 1987-88 season was nine. The expected number for 1988-89 is five. All were or are portrayed by Hispanic actors.
The minimal appearance of Hispanic actors and characters has long been a concern of national Hispanic organizations. According to statistics released this year by the Los Angeles-based National Hispanic Media Coalition, Latinos have less than 2.4% of the 502 prime-time roles on television.
The NHMC, a grouping of organizations that includes the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, the actorsf group Nosotros and the Hispanic Public Relations Association, was founded in 1986 to, among other things, improve the visibility of Hispanics on TV and
in films. continued on page 2
7 U.S. Congressmen Criticize Bush Pledge
Vice President George Bush’s promise to name at least one Hispanic to his Cabinet if elected president in November, made July 6 in Dallas at the 59th annual convention of the League of United Latin American Citizens* drew immediate criticism from several members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus
Seven of the 11 voting Hispanic members of Congress-10 of whom are Democrats-responded to Bush’s “solemn pledge” with comments criticizing what they called a lack of interest in the Hispanic community until this election year.
New York Congressman Bob Garcia, a past chairman of the CHC, stated that the “administration has had ample opportunity to reach out to the Hispanic community. The only time they have done so is at election time.
“While I think the vice president is right when he says it is time to have a Hispanic in the Cabinet, I wonder why he did not make more of an effort to get President Reagan to make such an appointment,” Garcia concluded.
During its almost 8-year tenure in the White House, the administration made no Hispanic appointments at the Cabinet level.
Bills Would Give Rights to MarieUtos
Two bills that would give Marielito detainees1 constitutional rights, including a guarantee to legal representation, were introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives July 7.
Rep. Bill Kastenmeier(D-Wisc.) introduced a measure ensuring the Mariehboatlift Cubans would not be held in custody longer than 60 days after they qualify for release. It also calls for legal representation at a hearing before an administrative judge if a detainee release request is turned down.
Rafael Peftalver, 1987 chairman of the Florida State Commission on Hispanic Affairs, said, “That* s-a huge improvement over the existing mechanism where two INS officers... act as both judge and jailer.”
A more general bill applying to anyone in a situation similar to the MarieUtos' was intro-
duced by Rep. Patrick Swindall (R-Ga.). It recommends a new review system be established. Under Swindalf s bill any such detainees would be reclassified as deportable aliens, affording them rights similar to those under Kastenmeier’s legislation.
Since the U.S. Justice Department began the Cuban review program June 15 of last year, 1,898 of the 4,000 detainees have been released - 1,800 of them after prison riots in December. Sixteen more review panels were formed as a result of the riots, which occurred in Georgia and Louisiana.
Despite being approved for release, about 700 MarieUtos remain in custody because there are not family members or enough halfway houses willing to accept them, said INS officials.


Income Gap Between Hispanicsand Whites Widens
Despite an $887 increase in median household income for Hispanics between 1985 and 1986, the income gap grew between Hispanic and white households, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released July 5.
The median income of Anglo households rose by $1,267 to $26,175, placing them $7,825 above Hispanics, said the report Blacks continued to trail both groups.
According to the census survey, median household incomes were:
1986 1985
Hispanic $18,352 $17,465
Black 15,080 14,819
White 26,175 24,908
Before taxes and other deductions, total aggregate income for H ispanic households in 1986 was $126 billion.
Some $55 billion of that was generated by Hispanics in the West, where the Latino
population is concentrated. The South followed with $40 billion, almost twice the $23 billion income of Northeastern Latinos. Nearly $8 billion in aggregate incomecame from Hispanics in the Midwest Hispanics had the lowest per capita income
in 1986, $7,000. Median income for Hispanic married couples also was less than that of either black or white couples.
The report was based on a survey of 60,500 households, 5,418 of which were Hispanics. _ Darryl Figueroa
1986 CONSUMER INCOME CHARACTERISTICS
Hispanic Black White
Per Capita Income Median Income $ 7,000 $ 7,210 $11,670
Family 19,995 17,604 30,809
Married Couple 23,912 26,583 33,526
Female Headed, No Husband 9,432 9,300 15,716
Number of Families 4,403 7,096 55,676
Median Household* Income $18,352 $15,080 $26,175
Aggregate Household Income (billions) 126 201 2,476
Number of Households 5,418 9,922 77,284
* Including non-related persons
Source: "Money Income of Households Families and Persons in the United States: 1986"
Study Profiles Legalization Applicants
The first study to profile persons eligible for legalization under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 has concluded that this group has “significant service needs,” but draws no comparisons with the general population.
The broad survey was commissioned by the American Public Welfare Association to determine legalization applicants’ needs for public assistance, education, health and mental health services.
“Serving the Newly Legalized: TheirCharac-teristics and Current Needs” looks at applicants in California, Florida, Illinois, New York Oregon, Texas and Washington, D.C.
It found that 80% of Hispanic and Caribbean women legalization applicants in the sample who had given birth, had done so at home
continued from page 1
Earlier this year the coalition launched a campaign in support of the Paul Rodriguez/ Eddie V6lez situation comedy “Trial and Error,” which premiered on CBS March 15 with Span-isb-language simulcasts in six U.S. markets.
When the show was pulled after just three episodes, the coalition protested.
“The reason for the letter-writing campaign was not so much because it was the best show on television but because of what it represented,” said coalition President Armando Durdn. “ ‘Trial and Error1 was the first(television) show with Latino stars that portrayed positive roles and that was simulcast in Spanish.”
CORRECTION: A roundtable discussion on Capitol Hill with the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities June 22, referred to in Weekly Report’s July 4 issue, was sponsored by the Ana G. Mendez Foundation of Puerto Rico.
without medical assistance.
The survey was conducted in person and over the telephone with less than 50 applicants. The bulk of the information came from health care providers, staff of Qualified Designated Entities and employees of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
One of the report’s conclusions was that undocumented status led to jobs which result in health problems from working in substandard conditions.
“I found some surprising things regarding the health care system,” said Eliza May, project manager of the APWA’s Task Force on Immigration Reform. May said she found the high rate of hypertension among a population with a median age of 28 to be unusual.
- Sophia Nieves
According to a CBS spokesman, the network had little Hispanic reaction to the show’s April cancellation. “I expected to find a big protest, because thaf s what I was reading (in the media),” the spokesman told Weekly Report After a meeting in May with CBS Broadcast Group President Gene Jankowski, the coalition announced that the five remaining episodes of “Trial and Error” would be broadcast in June-July or September-October. Although CBS has not made an announcement, it is expected to do so.
It would not be unusual for the series, in which Rodriguez and Velez play incompatible roommates in an East Los Angeles apartment to return this summer. The networks are inclined to air cancelled shows as summer reruns for economic reasons. This month television viewers are watching rerun episodes of “I Married Dora,” which stars Elizabeth Pefta as an undocumented alien housekeeper who marries her employer to avoid deportation.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
DeLara Wins Election for LULAC President
Jos6 Garcia DeLara, a 48-year-old San Antonio contractor and Texas state director for the League of United Latin American Citizens, was elected national president of that organization July 10 at the 59th LULAC annual convention in Dallas.
In an upset DeLara won, 281 - 131, in a runoff against Raphael Acosta, a Houston businessman. DeLara beat two others in his bid for the one-year term as leader of the countrys largest Hispanic organization. Andr&s Tobar, of Washington, D.C., and Jose Velez, of Las Vegas, Nev., conceded to DeLara, freeing their votes to him in the final moments of the race.
DeLara succeeds Oscar Moran, a Republican Moran, a consultant, is from San Antonio.
Likely Republican presidential nominee Vice President George Bush, as well as Democratic presidential candidates Michael Dukakis and Jesse Jackson addressed some 5,000 to 6,000 people at the convention as both parties vie for Hispanics’ vote in this November's election.
DeLara’s victory is viewed as a sign that LULAC, a non-partisan organization, will move closer to backing the Democrats in this year’s national presidential race.
- Diana Padilla
Final Tally at 2.4 Million
The number of immigrants seeking legalization as of July 5 - the final official deadline for those who applied with the help of a Qualified Designated Entity - swelled to close to 2.4 million.
QDEs, the agencies that assisted immigrants in preparing their applications, were granted 60 extra days to process applications by the Immigration and Naturalization Service because of a final rush that preceded the original May 4 deadline.
New Fall TV Leads: Latinos 1 for 21
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Achy Obejas, guest columnist
Remembering Eddie
“This is not how we do this,” Eddie’s grandmother told me as | we gathered the family together, eating and talking on a Vj recent afternoon. “I prefer the religious part,” she said. “I &j don’t like the social part. This is not our custom.”
What she was trying to tell me was that she was uncomfortable with I the conversation. Yet, clearly, she needed to talk as much as anyone.
My family had come together for a somber occasion. Cousins and i!j friends, aunts and uncles, from Miami and Mexico and Chicago, we (j| gathered gloomily on a bright, sunny day to remember Eddie.
We were sitting in Bernard and Eva’s home It!| after the memorial services, and while the icioccasion called for nothing but sadness, rsj every now and then laughter would break jc| out, my cousin Marivitoldajoke(and it was a $ good one); Bernard teased one of Marivi’s i>! kids about not speaking Spanish. ,
These little signs of life, these false festivities, wwere cathartic. In all the tensions about >:| Eddie’s death, it was necessary that these a| valves release pressure somewhere. Eventually, they allowed for a 1ij sharing of truths that were both large and small, frightening and x comforting.
My cousin Eddie, a robust, handsome, peaceful young man, died no id ordinary death. His was deliberate and bloody, self-induced, with a ri<| shotgun and a long letter to the family that assured us all we were ro loved. Eddie, who in life had been tender to a fault, was thoughtful v;j even in death.
WHY?
I j In the aftermath of Eddie’s suicide, we are convinced about two ilthings: in death, he is at peace; in life, he was deeply troubled.
F|; Through a series of circumstances, as a boy Eddie was shuttled ojfrom one family member to another. Eventually, he settled with his wjgreat-aunt, my Tia Olga, and her husband, Alberto. To say they Drjthought Eddie was the cat’s pajamas is to severely understate their v^love for him.
rj They lived in a hamlet in northern Indiana, close to my parents’ io|home. That’s how I grew up with Eddie. He was big and strong, a fi!i starting quarterback at Wirt High School. He was funny and cute.
I ] I realize now, Eddie never knew how wonderful he really was.
T That was, of course, the root of his problem. It manifested itself in tfijdifferent ways. Later, I knew about the drugs. I knew from Tia Olga’s svjevasive pride about Eddie during my visits to her Miami Beach scjapartment that things were not fine in spite of Eddie’s lovely wife, in lidI spite of the bouncing new baby boy.
~ For the last 10 years, Eddie suffered from manic depression and (rDlother mental health problems. He was ordered on strict medication, tiift/hen word came that Eddie had killed himself, we were surprised by Hi ilhe method, but few of us were shocked by the deed.
DISTURBING PICTURE EMERGES ^V| What struck me as I sat in Bernard and Eva’s living room, sharing icistories about Eddie, is how much we all knew and how much we had jiilall sheltered each other. It was now, as we ignored the Cuban custom b of saying goodbye after interment, that we finally compared note& aj Eddie was paranoid. He had rages Might we have been able to do nc something to keep him from ending his life? No. We all did our best. N\ While the picture of Eddie that emerged was disturbing, it made its n own crazy sense. It told us we were desperately in need of love and of ctieach other.
7; The question marks will continue haunting my family.
Hi I’m not sure I ever told Eddie I loved him. I always took it for £ granted he knew. Should I have told him?
I was unusually quiet that day until finally, on the way home, ^unexpectedly the tears flowed like a spring.
M, Me, I just want to say something to my Tia Olga that will lift her C'i shoulders again, that will wipe that tight, awful look from her face.
Vi; (Achy Obejas, of Chicago, is a contributing columnist with the Hispanic Link News Service.)
qHispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pejos en la lengua
WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO ??? Remember Heniy Cisneros? You know, the fellow who four years ago was interviewed by Democratic presidential nominee Fritz Mondale as a potential running mate.
With four years more seasoning and strengthened credentials with his continued fine performance as San Antonio mayor, Cisneros appeared certain to get a harder look from the Democratic candidate and party this time around.
But Michael the Greek Dukakis and his advisers accepted party wisdom that one “ethnic” candidate on the ticket was enough. The Duke didn’t even turn an eye in Cisneros’ direction, instead choosing another Texan, Lloyd Bentsen.
Bentsen, in a state that’s 21% Hispanic, has been able to find only one Latino whtf s sufficiently qualified to work on his Washington staff of 30.
WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO ??? Remember Tony Castro? Nieman Fellow at Harvard. Talented author of the book “Chicano Power.” Columnist for the Los Angeles Herald Examiner. Staff writer for Sports Illustrated.
The Reader, a Los Angeles’ free weekly paper, recently carried an amazing story with his byline: “My Life as a Woman.”
It’s illustrated with photos of Castro in Levi’s, looking like the Marlboro man, and, two pages later, wearing lipstick, a full wig and a slit skirt.
In the article, Castro describes with both intimacy and detachment his financial and social slide. He was turned down for jobs at The Los Angeles Times, smaller dailies and even weeklies. Finally he went to work in a transvestite bar on Santa Monica Boulevard performing as a female impersonator, earning $150 on a good weekend. That*s counting tips stuffed down his fake cleavage.
Castro, the Reader prefaces his article, is successfully back at the typewriter. He wrote four episodes for NBC-TV’s Crime Story last year.
Castro fans can read his account firsthand by sending $1.50 to the Reader, 12224 Victory Blvd., North Hollywood, Calif. 91606 and requesting the June 3 issue.
WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO ??? Remember manifest destiny? The English-only flock, which maintains that a constitutional amendment is necessary to make us “furiners” speak English, should take note that this year's winner and runner-up in the National Spelling Bee were both immigrant students.
Another“immigrant ingenuity’ story: When their father returned to Guadalajara, Mexico, five years ago, twins John and Tony G6mez- then 13-year-old seventh graders- convinced him to let them stay in their rented trailer outside San Bernardino, Calif.
He promised to visit them as he could, and he did. But keeping their situation a secret, they supervised themselves, found a series of jobs to pay the bills, and walked the five miles to school each day.
Last month, at 18, both graduated from San Bernardino’s Sierra High School Tony s entering the Navy and John is enrolling as a business major in college.
Now tell me you’ve got too big a load to carry.
WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO??? Writer Doug Martinez was busy the other day, putting together a prototype for a publication geared to the interests of older Hispanics. He needed to contact retired U.S. Admiral Horacio Rivero to update a profile written on the Ponce, Puerto Rico, native five years ago.
Martinez dialed an old California phone number he had for the admiral and was pleasantly surprised to find that Rivero, who served as Commander in Chief of NATO Forces between 1968-1972, was so easy to locate.
“I called to see if you’re stil'l living. . .,” Martinez started the conversation, fumbling for the n.ame of a city.
After a sufficient wait, the 78-year-old super-sailor informed him, with a happy lilt, “Well, I hope so.” - Kay B6rbaro
July 18,1988
3


COLLECTING
NON-PROFITS: “The (Fringe) Benefits of Working for a Nonprofit Organization,” a 50-page booklet by Community Resource Exchange, explains in easy-to-understand language employee benefits for small- to medium-sized non-profits. A 45-page companion volume, “Personnel Practices,” is a workbook for developing a personnel policies manual. For a copy, send $3 for postage and handling to CRE, 17 Murray St, Fourth Floor, New York, N.Y. 10007. “Personnel Practices” is available for$10. A copy of “Fringe Benefits” will be sent at no charge with every order of “Personnel Practices.”
VIDEO DOCUMENTARIES: Videocassette copies of the recently aired “Callejon sin sa//da,”a one-hour documentary on Hispanic high school dropouts, and *iQue sera de mi?” a one-hour documentary on projected Hispanic demographic trends up to the year 2000, are available for $15 each. For copies, send checks made payable to Univision, Attn.: Lourdes Alonso Fanjul, Producer, 2103 Coral Way, Miami, Fla. 33145.
RESUME BANK: Hispanic Business magazine seeks resumes from Hispanic professionals, MBA students and college juniors and seniors majoring in business, communications, computer science, engineering, finance, marketing and physical science to include in the Hispanic Business National Resume Database. Approved resumes will be made available to corporations. Send resumes to HBM, Attn.: National Resume Database, 360 S. Hope Ave., Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 92105.
ARTWORK SOUGHT: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund seeks artwork for inclusion in the organization’s ’87-’88 annual report. All forms of media are eligible- however, works should relate to Hispanic themes. A $500 first-place prize will be awarded. Deadline is Aug. 5. For more information contact Alicia Maldonado, Director of Communications, MALDEF Artists’ Selection, 634 S. Spring St, 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 (213) 629-2512.
PROFILING LEGALIZATION APPLICANTS: The American Public Welfare Association has commissioned a study of legalization applicants The 62-page report is available free by submitting a request to Eliza May, APWA,1125 15th St. NW, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20005.
CALIFORNIA JUDGES: A survey in the July issue of California Lawyer Magazine examines the racial and professional backgrounds of judges appointed by Gov. George Qeukmejian. To obtain a copy, send a request with $3 to California Lawyer Magazine, 1390 Market St., Suite 1016, San Francisco, Calif., 94102. After Aug. 1 the cost is $5.
CONNECTING
NEA CAUCUS ELECTS LATINA
Awilda Saldana, a 12th-grade English teacher from Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, and daughter of Commonwealth Secretary of Education Awilda Aponte Roque, was elected president of the Chicano-Hispano Caucus of the National Education Association at NEA’s representative assembly in New Orleans July 6. She succeeds Sara Flores of Killeen, Texas.
Arecord254 Hispanic delegates attended the four-day convention, in which 8,000 delegates participated.
Directors for six caucus regions were also elected. They were: Northeast: Victoria Rivera-Hargrave, Cardiff, N.J.; Mid-Atlantic: Evan-gelina Balmori, Danville, Va.; Southeast Eugenio Del Valle, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico; Midwest Elias Chapa, Ypsilanti, Mich.; West: Darlene Chavez, Tucson, Ariz.; and Pacific: David Hernandez, San Jose, Calif.
FIRM FUNDS DROPOUT PROJECT
RJR Nabisco, Inc., presented $50,000 to the National Council of La Raza for its project aimed at curbing the Hispanic dropout rate and increasing literacy. The grant was given to NCLR July 10 at its national convention in Albuquerque, N.M.
The Innovative Education Project’s staff works with community-based NCLR affiliates to help them demonstrate model education projects throughout the nation. Beginning as early as the elementary school level, the programs arrange tutors, develop materials and expose students to role models.
The Nabisco grant was the second installment of the firm’s three-year $150,000 pledge to NCLR’s project. As it did with the first $50,000 installment, NCLR will hold a competition asking for proposals from affiliates.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
Marilina Sanz, public policy coordinator at the National Puerto Rican Coalition in Washington, D.C., joins the Washington office of. New York Mayor Edward Koch as an assistant legislative representative. . . The Office of Hispanic Affairs within the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs sponsors a pilot student internship program for Hispanic students from three state colleges. The program, placing the students with state government agencies, runs throughout the summer. For more information contact Nelida Valentin at the Office of Hispanic Affairs, Department of Community Affairs, 101 S. Broad St. CN 815, Trenton, N.J. 08625-0815 (609) 984-3223.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
AIDS EDUCATION INSTITUTE Washington, D.C. July 21
The Mexican American Women’s National Association will hold an educational seminar on AIDS. It will cover such areas as basic information, implications for Hispanic women and their families, and operating local AIDS education campaigns. Among the scheduled speakers are Juan Ramos of the National Institute of Mental Health and Jane Delgado, president of the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations.
Carol Chaviria (202) 822-8788
WOMEN’S CONVENTION Washington, D.C. July 21-24 The Mexican American Women’s National Association will hold a conference focusing on political, social and minority issues. Workshops will deal (with teenage pregnancy, dropout rates, adult illite racy, child
abuse and domestic violence.
Irma Maldonado (202) 547-4440
YOUTH LEADERSHIP SESSION Georgetown, Texas July 21-24 The Lorenzo de Zavala Youth Legislative Session at Southwestern University will be held to give 250 Hispanic teens an opportunity to meet with college recruiters from 50 universities. The leadership training program uses a legislative debate format to cover a variety of topics.
Carmen Keltner(512) 863-1486
PANAMERICAN FESTIVAL Alexandria, Va July 23
The Alexandria Department of Recreation, Parks and Cultural Activities will hold a festival with a Bolivian theme. The event will include entertainment food, arts and crafts. Some of the proceeds will go to a drug rehabilitation clinic in Bolivia.
Jorge Lozano (703) 560-4038.
COMING SOON
BUSINESS OWNERS’ CONFERENCE Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers July 18,1988
of Commerce
Midland, Texas July 28-30
Joe Morin 1-800-882-6222
GIFTED CHILDREN CONFERENCE Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted Pittsburgh July 28-30 Elaine Waugh (513) 873-3490
FOLK FESTIVAL
National Council for the Traditional Arts Lowell, Mass. July 29-31 Lowell National Historical Park Visitors’ Center (617) 459-1000
AMERICAN Gl FORUM CONFERENCE American Gl Forum Corpus Christi, Texas Aug. 1-7 Cecil Lira (512) 887-1095
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
THE CITY OF DALLAS, TEXAS has the following two positions open.
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 14
Responsible for providing administrative support to an Assistant City Manager responding to phone calls and correspondence from citizens and City Councilmembers; coordinating . council agenda materials and following up on requests for service; attending City Council and town hall meetings and staffing Council Committee meetings and Task Forces.
A Bachelor’s Degree in Public Administration, Urban Affairs, Policy Analysis ora related field and four (4) years of related experience. A Master’s Degree in Public Administration, Urban Affairs, Policy Analysis or a related field will substitute for two (2) of the required years of experience. Salary range for this position is $25,788 to $29,832.
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER
ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER
Responsible for providing administrative assistance to the City Manager, serving as a liaison to City departments, citizens, and special interest groups; coordinating the transmittal of written information to the CityCouncil in preparation of weekly council meetings; coordinating support activities of aides and interns in the City Managers’ Office; participating in planning and defining objectives for firms which provide management consultant services to the City Manager’s Office; administering contracts; and handling special projects and programs.
A Bachelor’s Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, Urban Affairs, or related field and five (5) years of related experience is required, including three (3) or more years experience as an Administrative Assistant, Management Assistant or related work involving policy analysis, budget construction, administration and supervision. A Master’s Degree is preferred. Salary range is $40,220 to $48,348.
Submit a resume for the positions by Friday, July 29,1988 to:
Staffing Manager Personnel Department 1500 Manila City Hall, Room 6AN Dallas, Texas 75201
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/H
COORDINATOR OF PUBLIC POLICY
The National Puerto Rican Coalition, a Washington-based non-profit membership organization dedicated to the advancement of the Puerto Rican comm unity, has a vacancy for its position of Coordinator of Public Policy.
The Coordinator will be responsible for developing and operating a national advocacy program on issues of concern to the Puerto Rican community. The position will require contact with Congress and federal government agencies, as well as networking with other Hispanic and non-profit national organizations. Minimal travel may be required. Good writing skills a must; public speaking abilities highly desirable.
The selected individual must be a college graduate in a related discipline, preferably with a Master’s degree and with professional experience in public policy analysis. Must be bilingual in Spanish and English.
Immediate availability. Salary commensurate with experience, beginning in the high 20’s. Excellent benefits package, including fully paid life, medical and dental insurance. Please send resume to Ram6n E Daub6n, Vice President, NPRC., 1700 K St NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20006. (202)223-3915.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MD., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251 -2252.
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for I; executives and professionals. Mail or phone j: your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, f 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
S Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5
I pm. (ESI) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly : Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad
rates: 90 cents per word. Display rates: $45 M per column inch.
NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE Employment referal service for Hispanic pro-; l fessionals and students in the media Opportunities
II for internships; entry-level and advanced positions I in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and j other media, English or Spanish language.
| Contact Jocelyn Cdrdova, National Association 1 of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228.
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EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS
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• Thirteen Days Sick Leave Annually
• Thirteen Days Annual Leave Initially
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QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: All applicants for these positions must possess a high school diploma or a certificate of equivalency issued by a recognized department of education; possess a current valid driver’s permit, pass a physical examination and background investigation as determined by the Emergency Ambulance Bureau, be a state certified Emergency Medical Technician and be CPR(BLS) certified.
Please send Federal Standard Form 171 and copies of the following certifications; CPR (BLS); state certification and current valid driver’s license to JoAnn Johnson, D.C. Office of Personnel, 613 G Street N.W., Room 309, Washington, D.C. 20001. (202) 727-6427.
Salary Range: $21,913 - $27,628 pa- Career Service Positions(An Equal Opportunity Employer)
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Arts & Entertainment
NETWORK NEWS: Four programs with Latino actors in leads roles playing Hispanic characters are expected to be in network prime-time television schedules in the 1988-89 season.
Only one of the four- ABCs Knightwatch- is new. In the one-hour drama, scheduled for Thursdays at 8, Benjamin Bratt stars as Tony Maldonado, an ex-gang member and leader of a Guardian Angels-type of group. The series is produced by MGM Television.
Returning this year is NBCs LA La w(Thursdays at 10) and Miami Vice (Fridays at 10), and CBS’ Tour of Dufy(Saturdays at 9).
Scheduled opposite Miami Vice is CBS’ Falcon Crest, which features Latinos Lorenzo Lamas and Ana Alicia in lead, non-Hispanic roles. Tina Yothers, a Latina, is also seen in a lead, non-Hispanic role, in NBCs Family Ties (Sundays at 8).
The conflict between members of the Writers Guild of America and film and television producers has pushed the beginning of the 1988-89 fall season beyond the usual start-up dates in September and
October.
Back on the air this month for summer reruns is ABCs / Married Dora The sitcom, which stars Elizabeth Peha in the title role, will air Fridays at 8 through July.
Trinidad Silva’s co-star in the NBC pilot Home Free is Michael Warren, not Michael Davis, as reported here lastweek. The one-hour drama aired last week and could be brought back as a midseason replacement.
ONE LINERS: Luis Valdez’s 1981 film version of Zoot Suit screens July 21 as part of the city of San Antonio’s Movies at the Plaza Guadalupe series... Xavier Martinez is one of 80 painters in The Artists of California a Group Portrait in Mixed Media an exhibit organized by the Oakland Museum at the Laguna Art Museum, through July 24. . . The Warner Bros, film Stalingrad features singer/actor Fernando Allende in the role of Spanish Communist hero Ruben Ruiz Ibaurri... And Argentine sculptor Leopoldo Maler, director of a contemporary art center in Napa, Calif., has beenchosen to create an allegoric sculpture for the Summer Olympic Games in Seoul... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
JOURNALIST ON TRIAL: The trial of Demetria Martinez, a writer on religion for the Albuquerque Journal, began July 13 in New Mexico. Martinez is the first journalist in the nation to be indicted as a result of covering the sanctuary movement.
The 27-year-old was charged with fourcounts of inducing two pregnant Salvadoran women to enter the United States illegally from Mexico and transporting them from El Paso, Texas, to Albuquerque, N.M.
Also on trial was the Rev. Glen Remer-Thamert, who was additionally charged with nine counts of conspiracy, harboring illegal aliens and mail fraud. Prosecutors say Remer-Thamert was involved in a baby selling scheme.
Martinez’s attorney attempted to have the case dismissed because of failure by the U.S. Attorney’s Office to get U.S. Justice Department approval before indicting her, as is the rule when reporters are involved.
U.S. District Judge John Conway, who is hearing the case, ruled June 30 against the motion, saying it was insufficient grounds for case dismissal.
Martinez continues to write her religion column.
NAHJ PLANS: The planning committee of the National Hispanic Media Conference met July 9-10 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where the conference will be held in April 1989.
It issued a language policy for the conference that will include six Spanish-language workshops, three or four bilingual workshops and simultaneous translation of all major speaking engagements. One of the two plenary sessions will be presented in Spanish.
The committee also decided to draw up a contract between the standard groups involved in planning the conference, including the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences and the National Association of Hispanic Publications.
APPOINTMENTS AND SUCH: LosAngeles
neurosurgeon Edward Zapanta was elected to the Times Mirror board of directors. He is the only Hispanic on the 16-seat board. Times Mirror publishes such newspapers as The Los Angeles Times and New York News-day. ..
Felix Sanchez was appointed Hispanic media coordinator for the Democratic convention by the party’s Director of Communications, Mike McCurry. Sanchez was formerly a legislative aide to Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas), the Democratic vice presidential nominee chosen by presidential candidate Michael Dukakis. He will facilitate coverage of the convention to the Hispanic media...
Antonio Navarro was renominated by President Reagan to be a member of the Advisory Board for Radio Broadcasting to Cuba...
Sherri V&squez became editor this month of the bilingual weekly newspaper La Vox in Denver, replacing Tom&s Romero, who left to pursue other interests. Vasquez was formerly a researcher at The New York Times’ Madrid bureau and a free-lance reporter.
- Darryl Figueroa
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Reporting Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Diana Padilla, Angela Walker Graphic^Production Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias
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Benjamin Bratt, right, who plays Tony Maldonado on the 1988-89 ABC series “Knightwatch.” With him is Dan Franklin, playing the role of Calvin Garvey. (See lead story and Arts and Entertainment)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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REC' D . HR/CR Making The News This Week fast July 7. The Ramsey County judge said fasting because a state Supreme Court decision a year also chastised 20 county judges for issuing a statement criticizing Miera ... San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros leads Marshal Sergei Akhromeyev , the Soviet Union's top military officer, on a tour of the Texas city . .. Several hundred law enforce merit officers in a mile-long procession salute slain Tallahassee, Fla, police officer Ernest Ponce De Le6n, 40. The first officer killed in the line of duty in the 143-year history of the Tallahassee police department, Ponce De Leon was killed in a shootout with three escaped Maryland convicts . . . Oakland Athletics outfielder Jose Canseco leads the American League in votes from fans-1,765,499-to start in the All-Star Game . . . Florida Gov . Bob Mart ,lnez signs into law a standard-setting AIDS bill that provides for the quarantining of carriers who refuse to curtail their sexual or drug-related activities, education programs beginning in middle schools and establishes laws banning discrimination against people with AIDS in housing , insurance , employment and government services . . . Arizonans for Official English present to Secretary of State Jim Shumway petitions with 209,154 signatures . The petitions130,000 were required-are to put on the November ballot a measure making English the state's official language . . . Minnesota Judge Alberto Miera goes off his 57-day-old, water-only Vol. 6 No. 28 LINK WEEKL Fall TV Series Tune Out Latinos Less than a year after "La Bamba ' ' and "The Milagro Bean field War" reportedly heralded a new era for Hispanics in Hollywood, the three major television networks are reducing the number of lead Hispanic actors and charac ters in prime-time programming . Of the21 new series planned for the 1988 89 season, only one features a Hispanic lead character Tony Maldonado, an ex-gang member and head of a Guardian Angels-type group in the new ABC drama" Knightwatch." The character is played by Benjamin Bratt , a San Francisco native of Peruvian descent. In the 1987 season, the networks intro duced five new Hispanic lead characters. They were in the series "I Married Dora" and "Ohara" (ABC), and "Trial and Error," " Eisen hower and Lutz" and "Tour of Duty" (CBS) . Only Ramon Franco ' s character as Private Alberto Ruiz is scheduled to return this fall on the latter show. The"Knightwatch " and"Tourof Duty" charac ters join the only other remaining lead Hispanic characters on network TV(all on NBC): Edward James Olmos and Saundra Santiago on"Miami Vice, " and Jimmy Smits on "L.A. Law. " Lorenzo Lamas and Ana Alicia return in Bentsen Employs Just 1 lead, non-Hispanic roles an CBS' "Falcon Crest," as does Tina Yothers in NBC's " Family Ties." (See Arts and Entertainment.) The number of Latino lead actors and roles on prime-time television has remained steady at less than 5% of the total during the last five years. Overall, six out of 66 shows that make up the announced 1988-89 series have one or more Hispanics in lead roles. At the beginning of the 1987 season , seven out of 66 shows had one or more Latino leads. The number of lead Hispanic characters in the 1987 season was nine. The expected number for 1988 is five. All were or are portrayed by Hispanic actors . The minimal appearance of Hispanic actors and characters has long been a concern of national Hispanic organizations. According to statistics released this year by the Los Angeles-based National Hispanic Media Coalition, Latinos have less than 2.4% of the 502 prime-time roles on television . The NHMC , a grouping of organizations that includes the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, the actors' group Nosotros and the Hispanic Public Relations Association, was founded in 1986 to, among other things, improve the visibility of Hispanics on TV and in films . continued on pag e 2 7 U.S. Congressmen Criticize Bush Pledge Vice President George Bush's promise to name at least one Hispanic to his Cabinet if elected president in November, made July 6 in Dallas at the 59th annual conventi on of the League of United Latin American Citizens, drew immediate criticism from several mem bers of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. Seven of the 11 voting Hispanic members of Congress-1 0 of whom are Democratsresponded to Bush's " solemn pledge" with comments criticizing what they called a lack of interest in the Hispanic community until this election year. New York Congressman Bob Garcia, a past' chairman of the CHC, stated that the "administration has had ample opportunity to reach out to the Hispanic community. The only time they have done so is at election time. " While I think the vice president is r ight when he says it is time to have a Hispanic in the Cabinet, I wonder why he did not make more of an effort to get President Reagan to make such an appointment, " Garcia con cluded . During its almost 8-year tenure in the White House, the administration made no Hispanic appointments at the Cabinet level. Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas), announced as the running mate of Democratic presi dential candidate Michael Dukakis .k.lly 12, represents a state with the second . largest Hispanic population 21% . 'But of 30 staffers at his Washington, D.C, office, Bentsen employs one Hispanic. Bills Would Give Rights to Marielitos Frances Murrah, Bentsen's business manager, was quick to explain this is not the norm. "We have always had more people on staff that are of Hispanic extraction than that," she said . She named four of last year's staffers who have gone on to work in the Texas office or to work in the senator's campaign office. The Latino this year is Ray Bonilla, a legislative assistant. Murrah denied the findings of a survey last year by the Harte-Hanks newspaper chain which found only one Hispanic staffer on Bentsen's 1987 staff. Two bills that would give Marie/ito detainees ' constitutional rights, including a guarantee to legal representation, were introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives July 7 . Rep . Bill Kaste;'lmeier(DWisc . ) introduced a measure ensuring the Marief.boatlift Cubans would not be held in custody longer than 60 days after they qualify for release . It also calls for legal representation at a hearing before an administrative judge if a detainee release request is turned down. Rafael Peiialver, 1987 chairman of the Florida State Commission on Hispanic Affairs, said, "Thafsa huge improvement over the existing mechanism where two INS officers ... act as both judge and jailer." A more general bill applying to anyone in a situation similar to the Marielitos ' was intro-duced by Rep . Patrick Swindall (RGa.). It recommends a new review system be estab lished. Under Swindatrs bill any such detainees would be reclassified as deportable aliens, affording them rights similar to those under Kastenmeier's legislation . Since the U .S. Justice Department began the Cuban review program June 15 of last year, 1,898 ofthe4,000 detainees have been released-1 ,800 of them after prison riots in December. Sixteen more review panels were formed as a result of the riots, which occurred in Georgia and Louisiana. Despite being approved for release , about 700 Marielitos remain in custody because there are not family members or enough halfway houses willing to accept them, said INS officials.

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ln_come .Gap Between Hispanics and Whites Widens Despite an $887 increase in median houS& hold income for Hispanics between 1985 and 1986, the income gap grew between Hispanic and white households, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released JulyS. population is concentrated. The South followed with $40 billion, almost twice the $23 billion income of Northeastern Latinos. Nearly$8 billion in aggregate income came from Hispanics in the Midwest Hispanics had the lowest per capita income in 1986, $7,000. Median income for His panic married couples also was less than that of either black or white couples. The report was based on a survey of 60,500 households, 5,418 of which were Hispanics. -Darryl Figueroa The median income of Anglo households rose by $1,267 to $26,175, placing them $7,825 above Hispanics, said the report Blacks continued to trail both groups. 1986 CONSUMER INCOME CHARACTERISTICS According to the census survey, median household incomes were: Hispanic Black White 1986 $18,352 15,080 26,175 1985 $17,465 14,819 24,908 Before taxes and other deductions, total aggregate income for Hispanic households in 1986 was $126 billion. Per Capita Income Median Income Family Married Couple Female Headed, No Husband Number of Families Median Household* Income Aggregate Household Income (billions) Number of Households * Including non-related persons Hispanic $ 7,000 19,995 23,912 9,432 4,403 $18,352 126 5,418 Black $ 7,210 17,604 26,583 9,300 7,096 $15,080 201 9,922 White $11,670 30,809 33,526 15,716 55,676 $26,175 2,476 77,284 Some $55 billion of that was generated by Hispanics in the West, where the Latino Source: "Money Income of Households, Families, and Persons in the United States: 1986" Study Profiles Legalization Applicants The first study to profile persons eligible for legalization under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 has concluded that this group has "significant service needs," but draws no comparisons with the general population. The broad survey was commissioned by the American Public Welfare Association to determine legalization applicants' needs for public assistance, education, health and mental health services. "Serving the Newly Legalized: Their Charac teristics and Current Needs" looks at applicants in California, Florida, Illinois, New York, Oregon, Texas and Washington, D.C. It found that 80% of Hispanic and Caribbean women legalization applicants in the sample who had given birth, had done so at home without medical assistance. The survey was conducted in person and over the telephone with less than 50 ap plicants. The bulk of the information came from health care providers, staff of Qualified Designated Entities and employees of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. One of the reporfs conclusions was that undocumented status led to jobs which result in health problems from working in substandard conditions. "I found some surprising things regarding the health care system," said Eliza May, project manager of the APWA's Task Force on Im migration Reform. May said she found the high rate of hypertension among a population with a median age of 28 to be unusual. Sophia Nieves New Fall TV Leads: Latinos 1 for 21 continued from page 1 Earlier this year the coalition launched a campaign in support of the Paul RodrigueZ/ Eddie Velez situation comedy"Trial and Error," which premiered on CBS March 15 with Span is!)language simulcasts in six U.S. markets. When the show was pulled after just three episodes, the coalition protested. "The reason for the letter-writing campaign was not so much because it was the best show on television but because of what it represented:' said coalition President Armando Dur6n. "'Trial and Error' was the first(television) show with Latino stars that portrayed positive roles and that was simulcast in Spanish." CORRECTION: A roundtable discussion on Capitol Hill with the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities June 22, referred to in Weekly Report's July 4 issue, was sponsored by the Ana G. Mendez Foundation of Puerto Rico. 2 According to a CBS SPokesman, the network had little Hispanic reaction to the show's April cancellation. "I expected to find a big protest, because thafs what I was reading(in the media)," the spokesman told Weekly Report After a meeting in May with CBS Broadcast Group President Gene Jankowski, the coalition announced that the five remaining episodes of "Trial and Error'' would be in June-July or September-October. Although CBS has not made an announcement, it is expected to do so. It would not be unusual for the series, in which Rodriguez and Velez play incompatible roommates in an East Los Angeles apartment, to return this summer. The networks are inclined to air cancelled shows as summer reruns for economic reasons. This month television viewers are watching rerun episodes of "I Married Dora," which stars Elizabeth Peiia as an undocumented alien housekeeper who marries her employer to avoid deportation. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Delara Wins Election for LULAC President Jose Garcia Delara, a 48-year-old San Antonio contractor and Texas state director for the League of United Latin American Citizens, was elected national president of that organization July 10 at the 59th LULAC annual convention in Dallas. In an upset Delara won, 281-131, in a runoff against Raphael Acosta, a Houston businessman. Delara beat two others in his bid for the one-year term as leader of the country's largest Hispanic organization. Andres Tobar, of Washington, D.C., and Jose Velez, of Las Vegas, Nev., conceded to Delara, freeing their votes to him in the final moments of the race. Delara succeeds Oscar Moran, a Republican. Moran, a consultant, is from San Antonio. Likely Republican presidential nominee Vice President George Bush, as well as Democratic presidential candidates Michael Dukakis and Jesse Jackson addressed some 5,000 to 6,000 people at the convention as both parties vie for Hispanics' vote in this November's election. Delara's victory is viewed as a sign that LULAC, a non-partisan organization, will move closer to backing the Democrats in this year's national presidential race. Diana Padilla Final Tally at 2.4 Million The number of immigrants seeking legalization as of July 5 -the final official deadline for those who applied with the help of a Qualified Designated Entityswelled to close to 2.4 million. ODEs, the agencies that assisted immigrants in preparing their applications, were granted 60 extra days to process applications by the Immigration and Naturalization Service be cause of a final rush that preceded the May 4 deadline. Hispanic Link Weekly Report l )

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Achy Obejas, guest columnist Remembering Eddie " This is not how we doth is," Eddie'sgrandmothertold me as Ni we gathered the family together, eating and talking on a 'i afternoon. "I prefer the religious part," she said. "I b; don t hke the social part. This is not our custom." i What she was trying to tell me was that she was uncomfortable with t: the conversation. Yet, clearly , she needed to talk as much as anyone. i My fam1ly had come together fora somber occasion. Cousins and 1!1 friends, aunts and uncles, from Miami and Mexico and Chicago we o! gathered gloomily on a bright, sunny day to remember Eddie. ' i We were sitting in Bernard and Eva's home lt! after the memorial services, and while the 1q occasion called for nothing but sadness, 1!1 every now and then laughter would break 'c. out; my cousin Marivi told a joke (and it was a lll good one) ; Bernard teased one of Marivi's about not speaking Spanish. . I ' These little signs of life, these false festivities, were cathartic . In all the tensions about lll Eddie ' s death, it was necessary that these Ill\ release pressure somewhere. Eventually, they allowed for a "11 shanng of truths that were both large and small, frightening and ::x1 comforting. My cousin Eddie, a robust, handsome, peaceful young man, died no '111 ordinary death . His was deliberate and bloody, self-induced , with a r!;l shotgun and a long letter to the family that assured us all we were rcj l oved. Eddie , who in life had been tender to a fault, was thoughtful even in death . WHY? I I In the aftermath of Eddie's suicide, we are convinced about two in, t hings: in death, he is at peace ; in life, he was deeply troubled. fi Through a series of circumstances, as a boy Eddie was shuttled ojlrom one family member to another. Eventually, he settled with his :tljgreat-aunt , my Tia Olga, and her husband, Alberto. To say they ot[ihought Eddie was the cafs pajamas is to severely understate their for him . r:( They lived in a hamlet in northern Indiana, close to my parents' 15home . Thafs how I grew up with Eddie . He was big and strong, a s!,s tarting quarterback at Wirt High School. He was funny and cute. 1! I realize now, Eddie never knew how wonderful he really was. iT 1 That was, of course , the root of his problem. It manifested itself in tti!d ifferent ways . Later, I knew about the drugs. I knew from Tia Olga's pride about Eddie during my visits to her Miami Beach eci apartment that things were not fine in spite of Eddie's lovely wife, in riq spite of the bouncing new baby boy . 1=q For the last 10 years, Eddie suffered from manic depression and ll'l'iOther mental health problems. He was ordered on strict medication . ,.,[IVhen word came that Eddie had killed himself, we were surprised by e11he method, but few of us were shocked by the deed. , DISTURBING PICTURE EMERGES 1\ii What struck me as I sat in Bernard and Eva' s living room , sharing 1o's tories about Eddie, is how much we all knew and how much we had shelte r ed each other. It was now, as we ignored the Cuban custom e ' o f saying goodbye after interment, that we finally compared notes. a Eddie was paranoid . He had rages. Might we have been able to do rtJi s omething to keep him from ending his life? No. We all did our best. f' . While the picture of Eddie that emerged was disturbing, it made its crazy sense. It told us we were desperately in need of love and of other. Ti The question marks will continue haunting my family . t1i I'm not sure I ever told Eddie I loved him. I always took it for .ergranted he knew. Should I have told him? I was unusually quiet that day until finally, on the way home , :t•1unexpectedly the tears flowed like a spring. Me, I just want to say something to my Tia Olga that will lift her again , that will wipe that tight, awful look from her face. (Achy Obejas, of Chicago , is a contributing columnist with the 2 H ispanic Link News Service.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO ??? Remember Henry Cisneros? You know, The .. tellow who four years ago was interviewed by Democratic presidential nominee Fritz Mondale as a potential running mate. With four years more seasoning and strengthened credentials with his continued fine performance as San Antonio mayor, Cisneros appeared certain to get a harder look from the Democratic candidate and party this time around. But Michael the Greek Dukakls and his advisers accepted party wisdom that one "ethnic" candidate on the ticket was enough. The Duke didn't even turn an eye in Cisneros' direction, instead choosing another Texan, Lloyd Bentsen. Bentsen, in a state thafs 21% Hispanic, has been able to find only one Latino whds sufficiently qualified to work on his Washington staff of 30. WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO??? Remember Tony Castro? Nieman Fellow at Harvard. Talented author of the book "Chicano Power." Columnist for the Los Angeles Herald Examiner . Staff writer for Sports Illustrated. The Reader, a Los Angeles' free weekly paper, recently carried an amazing story with h i s byline: "My Life as a Woman . " lfs illustrated with photos of Castro in Levi's, looking like the Marlboro man, and, two pages later , wearing lipstick, a full wig and a slit skirt. In the article , Castro describes with both intimacy and detachment his financial and social slide . He was turned down for jobs at The Los Angeles Times, smaller dailies and even weeklies. Finally he went to work in a transvestite bar on Santa Monica Boulevard performing as a female impersonator, earning $150 on a good weekend . Thafs counting tips stuffed down his fake cleavage. Castro, the Reader prefaces his article , is successfully back at the typewriter . He wrote four episodes for NBC-TVs Crime Story last year . Castro fans can read his account firsthand by sending $1.50 to the Reader, 12224 Victory Blvd. , North Hollywood, Calif. 91606 and requesting the June 3 issue . WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO ??? Remember manifest destiny? The Englisll-only flock, which maintains that a constitutional amendment is necessary to make us "furiners" speak English, should take note that this year's winner and runner-up in the National Spelling Bee were both immigrant students. Another"immigrant ingenuity" story: When their father returned to Guadalajara, Mexico, five years ago, twins John and Tony G6mez-then 13-year-old seventh graders-convinced him to let them stay in their rented trailer outside San Bernardino, Calif. He promised to visit them as he could, and he did. But keeping their situation a secret, they supervised themselves, found a series of jobs to pay the bills, and walked the five miles to school each day. Last month , at 18, both graduated from San Bernardino's Sierra High School Tony's entering the Navy and John is enrolling as a business major in college. Now tell me you ' ve got too big a load to carry . WHAT EVER HAPPEN ED TO??? Writer Doug Martinez was busy the other day, putting tooether a prototype for a publication geared to the interests of older Hispanics. He needed to contact retired U.S. Admiral Horacio Rivero to update a profile written on the Ponce, Puerto Rico, nativ13 five years ago. Martinez dialed an old California phone number he had for the admiral and was pleasantly surprised to find that Rivero, who served as Commander in Chief of NATO Forces between 19681972, was so easy to locate. " I called to see if you're stiJI J living ... ," Martinez started the conversation, fumbling for the n;:lme of a city. After a sufficient wait, the 78-year-old super-sailor informed him, with happy lilt, "Well, I hope so. " Kay Barbaro Q 1ispanic Link Weekly Report July 18, 1988 3 '

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COLLECTING NON-PROFITS: "The (Fringe) Benefits of Working for a Nonprofit Organization , " a 50-page booklet by Community Resource Exchange, explains in easy-to-understand language employee benefits for smallto mediumsized non-profits. A 45-page companion volume, "Personnel Practices," is a workbook for developing a personnel policies manual. For a copy, send $3 for postage and handling to CAE, 17 Murray St., Fourth Floor, New York, N.Y. 10007. "Personnel Practices" is availablefor$1 o. Acopyof"Fringe Benefits" will be sent at no charge with every order of "Personnel Practices." VIDEO DOCUMENTARIES: Videocassette copies ott he recently aired "Cal/ej6n sin salida," a one-hour documentary on Hispanic high school dropouts,.and "i. Que sera de mi?," a one-hour documentary on projected Hispanic demographic trends up to the year 2000, are available for $15 each. For copies, send checks made payable to Univision, Attn.: Lourdes Alonso Fanjul, Producer, 21 03 Coral Way, Miami, Fla. 33145. RESUME BANK: Hispanic Business magazine seeks resumes from Hispanic professionals, IV!BA students and college juniors and seniors majoring in business, communications, computer science, engineering, finance, marketing and physical science to include in the Hispanic Business National Re$ume Database. Approved resumes will be made available to corporations. Send resumes to HBM, Attn.: National Resume Database, 360 S. Hope Ave . , Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 921 05. ARTWORK SOUGHT: The MexiGan American Legal Defense and Educational Fund seeks artwork for inclusion i n the organization's '87 -'88 annual report. All forms of media are eligiblehowever, works should relate to Hispanic themes. A $500 first-place prize will be awarded. Deadline is Aug. 5. For more information contact Alicia Maldonado, Director of Communications, MALDEF Artists' Selection, 634 S. Spring St., 11th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 (213) 629-2512. PROFILING LEGALIZATION APPLICANTS: The American Public Welfare Association has commissioned a study of legalization applicants. The 62-page report is available free by submitting a request to Eliza May, APWA,1125 15th St. NW, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20005. CALIFORNIA JUDGES: A survey in the July issue of California Lawyer Magazine examines the racial and professional backgrounds of judges appointed by Gov. George Qeukmejian. To obtain a copy, send a request with $3 to California Lawyer Magazine, 1390 Market St., Suite 1016, San Francisco, Calif., 94102. After Aug. 1 t he cost is$5. NEA CAUCUS ELECTS LATINA Awilda Saldana, a 12th-grade English teacher from Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, and daughter of Commonwealth Secretary of Education , A wilda Aponte Roque, was elected president of the Chicano-H ispano Caucus of t he National Education Association at NEA's representative , assembly in New Orleans July 6 . She succeeds Sara Flores of Killeen , Texas . A record 254 Hispanic delegates attended the four-day convention , in which 8,000 delegates participated. Directors for six caucus regions were also elected. They were: Northeast: Victoria RiveraHargrave, Cardiff, N .J.; Mid-Atlantic: Evan gelina Balmori, Danville, Va.; Southeast Eugenio Del Valle , Mayaguez, Puerto Rico; Midwest: Elias Chapa, Ypsilanti, Mich. ; West: Darlene Chavez, Tucson, Ariz.; and Pacific: David Hernandez, San Jose, Calif. FIRM FUNDS DROPOUT PROJECT RJR Nabisco, Inc . , presented $50,000 to the National Council of La Raza for its project aimed at curbing the Hispanic dropout rate and increasing literacy. The grant was given to NCLR July 10 at its national convention in Albuquerque, N.M. The Innovative Education Project's staff works with community based NCLR affiliates to help them demonstrate model education projects throughout the nation . Beginning as early as the elementary school level, the programs arrange tutors, develop materials and expose students to role models. The Nabisco grant was the second installment of the firm's three year $150,000 pledge to NCLR's project. As it did with the first $50,000 installment, NCLR will hold a competition asking for proposals from affiliates. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES ! Marilina Sanz, publ i c policy coordinator at the National Puerto 1 Rican Coalition in Washington, D .C., joins the Washington office of . j. New York Mayor Edward Koch as an assistant legislative represent a-: . tive. . . The Office of Hispanic Affairs within the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs sponsors a pilot student internship program for Hispanic students from three state colleges. The program, placing the student s with state government agencies, runs throughout the summer. For more information contact Nelida Valentin at the Office of Hispanic Affairs, Department of Community Affairs, 101 S. Broad St. CN 815, Trenton, N .J. 08625-0815 (609) 984-3223. Calendar abuse and domestic violence . Irma Maldonado (202) 547-4440 of Commerce Midland , Texas July 28-30 Joe Morin 1 -800-882-6222 THIS WEEK AIDS EDUCATION INSTITUTE Washington , D . C . July 21 The Mexican American Women's National Association will hold an educational seminar on AIDS . It will cover such areas as basic information, impl 1ications for Hispanic women and their families, and operating local AIDS education campaigns. Among the sched uled speakers are Juan Ramos of the Institute of Mental Health and Jane Delgado, pre sident of the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations. I Carol Chaviria (202) 822-8788 WOMEN' S CONVENTION Washington, D.C. July 21-24 The Mexican American Women's National ssociation will hold a conference focusing on politl i cal, social and minority issues. Workshops will deal with teen . a:e pregnancy, dropout rates, adult illite racy, child YOUTH LEADERSHIP SESSION Georgetown, Texas July 21-24 The Lorenzo de Zavala Youth Legislative Session at Southwestern University will be held to give 250 Hispanic teens an opportunity to meet with college recruiters from 50 universities . The leadership training program uses a legislative debate format to cover a variety of topics. Carmen Keltner (512) 863-1486 PANAMERICAN FESTIVAL Alexandria, Va. July 23 The Alexandria Department of Recreation, Parks and Cuitural Activities will hold a festival with a Bolivian theme. The event will include entertainment food, arts and crafts. Some of the proceeds will go to a drug rehabili tation clinic in Bolivia . Jorge Lozano (703) 560-4038. COMING SOON BUSINESS OWNERS' CONFERENCE Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers July 18,1988 GIFTED CHILDREN CONFERENCE Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted Pittsburgh July 28-30 Elaine Waugh (513) 873-3490 FOLK FESTIVAL National Council for the Tradi t ional Arts Lowell, Mass . July 29-31 Lowell National Historical Park Visitors' Center , (617) 459-1 ooo I AMERICAN Gl FORUM CONFERENCE t American Gl Forum f Corpus Christi , Texas Aug . 1-7 i Cecil Lira (51 2) 887-1 095 l Calendar will announce events of interest to the f national Hispanic community. Items should be i received two Fridays before publication date. Please J include name , date, location, contact name and , phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, 1 Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. N .W., : Washington, D . C . 20005. • Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS THE CITY OF DALLAS, TEXAS has the following two positions open . OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 14 Responsible for providing administrative support to an Assistant City Manager, responding to phone calls and correspondence from citizens and City Councilmembers; coordinating council agenda materials and following up on requests for service ; attending City Council . and town hall meetings and staffing Council Committee meetings and Task Forces . A Bachelor's Degree in Public Administration, Urban Affairs, Policy Analysis or a related field and four(4) years of related experience . A Master's Degree in Public Administration, Urban Affairs, Policy Analysis or a related field will substitute for two(2) of the required years of experience . Salary range for this position is $25, 788 to $29,832 . OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER Responsible for providing administrative assistance to the City Manager, serving as a liaison to City departments, citizens, and special interest groups; coordinating the transmittal of written information to the City Council in preparation of weekly council meetings; coordinating support activities of aides and interns in the City Managers' Office; participating in planning and defining objectives for firms which provide management consultant services to the City Manager's Office ; administering contracts ; and handling special projects and programs. A Bachelor's Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration , Urban Affairs, or related field and five(5) years of related experience is required , including three(3) or more years experience as an Administrative Assistant, Management Assistant or related work involving policy analysis, budget construction , administration and supervision. A Master's Degree is preferred . Salary range is $40,220 to $48,348 . Submit a resume tor the positions by Friday , July 29, 1988 to : Staffing Manager Personnel Department 1500 Marilla City Hall, Room 6AN Dallas , Texas 75201 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/H PERSONNEL MANAGERS COORDINATOR OF PUBLIC POLICY The National Puerto Rican Coalition, a Wash ington-based non-profit membership organization dedicated to the advancement of the Puerto Rican community, has a vacancy for its position of Coordinator of Public Policy . The Coordinator will be responsible tor de veroping and operating a national advocacy program on issues of concern to the Puerto Rican community. The position will require contact with Congress and federal government agencies, as well as networking with other 1 Hispanic and non-profit national organizations. Minimal travel may be required. Good writing skills a must ; public speaking abilities highly desirable . The selected individual must be a college graduate in a related discipline, preferably with a Master's degree and with professional ex perience in public policy analysis. Must be bilingual in Spanish and English . Immediate availability . Salary commensurate 1 with experience, beginning in the high 20's. Excellent benefits package , including fully paid life, medical and dental insurance . Please send resume to Ram6n E. Daub6n, Vice President, NPRC., 1700 K St. NW , Suite 500, Washington, D . C . 20006. (202) 223-3915. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery 1 County, Md. , are available on a continuous 1 basis. Call (301) 251. Let Hispanic Link help you in your search tor executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS ; Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (EST) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 90 cents per word Display rates : $45 per column inch . NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE Employment referalservice for Hispanic pro fessionals and students in the media. Opportunities for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and 1 other media, English or Spanish language . Contact Jocelyn C6rdova, National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228. JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Sub missions are welcome for Weekly Reporfs "guest columnisf' feature . Approx. 500 words. For writer's guidelines, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Guest Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005. WEEKLY REPORT WEEKLY REPORTS AVAILABLE: Hispanic Link has a limited number of unbound Weekly 1 Report sets available : $18 tor 18 issues in • t 1983, $53 tor 53 issues in 1984, $52 tor 52 issues in 1985, $50 each tor 50 issues in 1986 . and 1987. Order prepaid from Hispanic Link Back Copies, 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D . C . 20005. Hispanic Link Weekly Report We offer you a tremendous opportunity to experience professional growth and satisfaction by serving in the Nation's Capital Emergency Ambulance Bureau . We offer e A professional management team concerned with your personal and professional welfare. • Top pay BENEFITS e A generous Retirement Plim e Promotional Opportunities e Health, Dental and Optical Insurance available tor Employee and Dependents e Deferred Compensation Program e Thirteen Days Sick Leave Annually e Thirteen Days Annual Leave Initially e Ten Paid Holidays (plus Presidential Inaugurations) e Tuition Assistance e Military Credit Toward Retirement QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: All applicants for these positions must possess a high school diploma or a certificate of equivalency issued by a recognized department of education; possess a current valid driver's permit, pass a physical examination and background investigation as determined by the Emergency Ambulance Bureau, be a state certified Emergency Medical Technician and be CPR (BLS) certified Please send Federal Standard Form 171 and copies of the following certifications; CPR (BLS); state certification and current valid driver's license to JoAnn Johnson, D.C. Office of Personnel , 613 G Street N.W., Room 309, Washington, D . C . 20001. (202) 727-6427. Salary Range: $21 ,913-$27,628 pa-Career Service Positions(An Equal Opportunity RESIDENCY Any person accepting one of these positions must become aDistrict of Columbia resident within 180 days of appointment and maintain such residency tor the duration of District government employment. The Department of Housing and Community Development offers assistance to new District of Columbia government employees seeking housing in Washington , D . C . 5

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Arts & Entertainment October. Back on the air this month for summer reruns is ABC's I Married Dora The sitcom, which stars Elizabeth Peiia in the title role, will air Fridays at 8 through July. NETWORK NEWS: Four programs with Latino actors in leads roles playing Hispanic characters are expected to be in network prime-time television schedules in the 1988-89 season. Trinidad Silva's co-star in the NBC pilot Home Free is Michael Warren, not Michael Davis, as reported here last week. The one-hour drama aired last week and could be brought back as a midseason replacement. Only one of the four-ABC's Knightwatch-is new . In the one-hour drama, scheduled for Thursdays at 8, Benjamin Bratt stars as Tony Maldonado, an ex-gang member and leader of a Guardian Angels type of group. The series is produced by MGM Television. ONE LINERS: Luis Valdez's 1981 film version of Zoot Suit screens July 21 as part of the city of San Antonio's Movies at the Plaza Guadalupe series ... Xavier Martinez is one of 80 painters in The Artists of California, a Group Portrait in Mixed Media, an exhibit organized by the Oakland Museum at the Laguna Art Museum, through July 24. . . The Warner Bros. film Stalingrad features singer/actor Fernando Allende in the role of Spanish Communist hero Ruben Ruiz lbaurri ... And Argentine sculptor Leopoldo Maier, director of a contemporary art center in Napa, Calif., has been chosen to create an allegoric sculpture for the Summer Olympic Games in Seoul. . . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Returning this year is NBC's LA Law(Thursdays at 1 0) and Miami Vice (Fridays at 1 0), and CBS' Tour of Duty (Saturdays at 9). Scheduled opposite Miami Vice is CBS' Falcon Crest, which features Latinos Lorenzo Lamas and Ana Alicia in lead, non-Hispanic roles . Tina Yothers, a Latina, is also seen in a lead, non-Hispanic role, in NBC's Family Ties (Sundays at 8). The conflict between members of the Writers Guild of America and film and television producers has pushed the beginning of the 1988-89 fall season beyond the usual start-up dates in September and Media Report JOURNALIST ON TRIAL: The trial of Demetria Martinez, a writer on religion for the Albuquerque Journal, began July 13 in New Mexico. Martinez is the first journalist in the nation to be indicted as a result of covering the sanctuary movement. The 27 -year-old was charged with four counts of inducing two pregnant Salvadoran women to enter the United States illegally from Mexico and transporting them from El Paso, Texas, to Albuquerque, N.M. Also on trial was the Rev. Glen Remer Thamert, who was additionally charged with nine counts of conspiracy, harboring illegal aliens and mail fraud. Prosecutors say Remer Thamert was involved in a baby selling scheme . Martinez's attorney attempted to have the case dismissed because of failure by the U.S. Attorney's Office to get U.S. Justice Depart ment approval before indicting her, as is the rule when reporters are involved. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link NService Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234()737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Feli x Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Diana Padilla, Angela Walker Gr.aphic&'Productiort Car1os Arriel\ Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (50 issues): lnstitutlonll(agencies $118 Personal $1 08 Trial (13 issues) $30 U.S. District Judge john Conway, who is hearing the case, ruled June 30 against the motion , saying it was insufficient grounds for case dismissal. Martinez continues to write her religion column. NAHJ PLANS: The planning committee of the National Hispanic Media Conference met July9-1 0 in SanJuan, Puerto Rico, where the conference will be held in April 1989. It issued a language policy for the conference that will include six Spanish-language work shops, three or four bilingual workshops and simultaneous translation of all major speaking engagements. One of the two plenary sessions will be presented in Spanish. The committee also decided to draw up a contract between the standard groups involved in planning the conference, including the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts. and Sciences and the National Association of . Hispanic Publications. APPOINTMENTSANDSUCH: LosAngeles neurosurgeon Edward Zapanta was elected to the Times Mirror board of directors. He is the only Hispanic on the 16-seat board. Times Mirror publishes such newspapers as The Los Angeles Times and New York New .. d•y ... Felix Sanchez was appointed Hispanic media coordinator for the Democratic con vention by 1he party's Director of Communi cations, Mike McCI,Jrry. Sanchez was formerly a legislative aide to Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D Texas), the Democratic vice presidential nominee chosen by preSidential candidate Michael Dukakis. He will facilitate coverage of the coovention to -the Hispanic media ... Antonio Navarro was renominated by Pre sident Reagan to be a member of the Advisory Board for Radio Broadcasting-to Cuba .•• Sherri Vasquez became editor this month of the bilingual weekly newspaper La Voz in Denver, replacing Tomas Romero, who left to pursue other interests. Vasquez was formerly a researcher at The New York Times' Madrid bureau and a free-lance reporter. Darryl Figueroa CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word Display ads ar e $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday \Mil run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week use r.ates on request Benjamin Bratt, right, who plays Tony Maldonado on the 1988 ABC series" Knightwatch." With him is Dan Franklin, playing the role of Calvin Garvey. (See lead story and_ Arts and Entertainment) Hispanic link Weekly Report