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Hispanic link weekly report, July 25, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 25, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Prosecutors in the Wedtech trial say that the company cofounder, John Mariotta, paid a $75,000 bribe to U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia of New York to regain control of the company. Garcia has not been indicted in the far-reaching corruption trial... Richard Avena, former Southwestern regional director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, becomes the executive director of the Texas Civil Liberties Union... Colorado Gov. Roy Romer, Colorado Congress-woman Patricia Schroedar, Denver Mayor Federico Pefta and Denver Councilwoman Ramona Rodriguez attend the dedication of a statue at the state Capitol for the state’s first Congressional Medal
, of Honor recipient, Private Joe Martinez. Martinez died during : World War II at the age of 22... The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services honors Helen Miramontes, from San Jose, Calif., as one of 12 nurses performing outstanding work with AIDS patients . . Luis Sabines, president of the Miami-based Latin Chamber of Commerce, becomes the Hispanic with the longest stretch of road named after him in that city. The new 45-block Luis Sabines Way is 38 blocks longer than the street named after President Reagan... Westlake Village, Calif., residents Lett! Nuftez and Berci Limor, 11-year-olds, rescue 16-year-old lifeguard Robert Mungerfromapoolafterhe passed outgiving underwater swimming instructions . . Candido Ortiz, a 63-year-old janitor from East Harlem, claims a New York state lottery jackpot of $22 million. Ortiz’s winning method? - punching the back of his betting slip with a nail...

Press Says Cisneros Prime Senate Choice
San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros is a prime candidate for the U.S. Senate seat of fellow Democrat Lloyd Bentsen if the Dukakis/ Bentsen ticket wins in November, the Texas press speculates
Bentsen is running both forthe vice presidency and re-election to the Senate, permissible under Texas law. He is expected to retain his Senate seat easily.
After the January inauguration, Republican Gov. Bill Clements would make an interim appointment and later have to call a special election.
Cisneros aide Barbie Hemdndez told Weekly Report, “The mayor very recently said he would not seek higher office. In fact, (the Senate seat) has not even been discussed.”
Latino Joblessness Static
The Hispanic unemployment rate for June remained unchanged from May - 9% - the U.S. Department of Labor announced July
8. The department indicated that 809,060 Latinos were jobless last month.
Education Ranks as Top Issue
Hispanics’ biggest concerns - education and drug abuse - are shared by the general population, according to results of two surveys released this month.
When asked to identify the most significant issues in the Hispanic community, Latino elected and appointed officials nationwide placed access to higher education, high school dropouts and drug abuse at the top. In a second survey, voting-age residents queried through a Gallup poll mirrored this, ranking education and drug abuse as the most important issues in this year's presidential campaign.
The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials released July 13 results of questionnaires completed by 800 officials ranging from justices of the peace to congressmen.
In the Southwest and California, where Mexican Americans predominate, education-related issues were most prominent. Housing topped the list for officials in the Northeast, where the Hispanic population is largely Puerto Rican. In Florida, where Cuban Americans form the majority Hispanic group, civic leadership development was cited first. The survey respondents were not broken down according to ethnicity or gender.
TOP HISPANIC ISSUES
1. Higher Ed.
2. Dropouts
3. Drug Abuse
4. Child Poverty
5. Civic Leadership
\6. Government Employment
7. Job Discrimination
8. Health Care
9. Housing
10. Underclass
Ray Cortines, superintendent of schools for San Francisco Unified School District, said Mexican Americans may focus on education rather than housing because unlike Latinos on the East Coast Hispanics in the Southwest and California do not live in such crowded conditions Cortines told Weekly Report that children “who don’t have adequate housing don’t get an education.
“Since (California) Latinos will be the majority in the next decade, if they’re going to take leadership roles they’re going to have to be educated," Cortines said.
The legislative director for U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) said cuts in federal funding over 10 years have contributed to a lack of affordable housing in the New York City area “Any group that has a significant portion (of members) in the low- to moderate-income
j continued on page 2
HISPANIC OFFICIALS’ TOP FIVE ISSUES BY STATE
ARIZONA FLORIDA NEW MEXICO
1. Access to Higher Education 1. Civic Leadership Development 1. High Dropout Rate
2. High Dropout Rate 2. High Dropout Rate 2. Drug Abuse
3. Drug Abuse 3. Access to Higher Education 3. Government Employment
4. Civic Leadership Development 4. Affordable Housing 4. Children in Poverty
5. Children in Poverty 5. Government Employment 5. Employment Discrimination ,
CALIFORNIA ILLINOIS NEW YORK
'M. High Dropout Rate 1. High Dropout Rate 1. Affordable Housing
2. Access to Higher Education 2. Affordable Housing 2. High Dropout Rate
3. Drug Abuse 3. Access to Higher Education 3. Drug Abuse l
4. Civic Leadership Development 4. Employment Discrimination 4. Access to Higher Education
5. Children in Poverty 5. Inequality of Government Services 5. Increase of Low-Income, One-Parent Families
COLORADO NEW JERSEY TEXAS
1. High Dropout Rate 1. Affordable Housing 1. Access to Higher Education
2. Access to Higher Education 2. High Dropout Rate 2. High Dropout Rate
3. Civic Leadership Development 3. Drug Abuse 3. Drug Abuse
4. Children in Poverty 4. Children in Poverty 4. Indigent Health
5. Government Employment 5. Access to Higher Education 5. Children in Poverty
Source: NALEO


Texans Applaud Vice Presidential Nominee Bentsen
The choice of Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen as the running mate of Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis has met with the overwhelming support of Texa|s His panics.
San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros called the selection "an honor all Texans can share.” He also pledged to help the Dukakis-Bentsen ticket win in the Southwest.
Texas state Sen. Judy Zaffirini said, “It’s fabulous Bentsen has class Htfs energized south Texas He’ll ensure a huge turnout and he knows (Hispanics).”
Zaffirini’s enthusiasm was not dampened by reports that Bentsen has only one Hispanic on his Capitol Hill staff of 30. “That’s
the sort of thing that can be discussed and worked out,” she said.
Another fan was Mexican American Democrats Political Action Committee President Rub6n Bonilla “Bentsen has been an ally to Hispanics It gives us an entree to the White House.
“And it gives Hispanics the first proficient bilingual ticket,” Bonilla added. Dukakis and Bentsen both speak fluent Spanish. Bentsen grew up in Mission, Texas, among predominantly poor Mexican Americans
The national committeeperson for the Republican National Hispanic Assembly of Texas, Bob Baildn, was also pleased. “I think its great because it shows how important
the Hispanic vote of Texas is going to be.
“We welcome the Bentsen challenge,” he said, later admitting that it creates “an interesting situation/* for Bush. “With Bentsen on the ticket, there might not be newgrowth in Hispanic support for the Bush ticket, but we will maintain our30% support," he said.
Baildn projected that the Texas race would be decided in the Houston area He also predicted that young Hispanic Texans will vote for Bush while older ones will support Bentsen.
Nonetheless, he said, “If we have the choice between a president and vice president, which do you think we will go for?”
- Darryl Figueroa
Salvadoran Refugee Campaign Begins
A daylong rally July 16 drew some 200 Salvadoran refugees and their supporters in Washington, D.C., to formally kick off the national “No Human Being is lllegar campaign.
“This is an emergency call from Salvadoran refugees to Americans,” said national coordinator Sylvia Rosales. “They are saying, < ‘We need you to understand we are victims of war.’ ”
The “No Human Being is Illegal” campaign included a march supporting the Moakley-DeConcini bill, which has been pending in the Senate since July 1987. The bill would halt deportation of Salvadoran and Nicaraguan
$275,000 Honor Given
Having worked for 12 .years in Chicago finding affordable housing for Hispanics and other low-income groups, Hippiito Rot-din was ecstatic when he learned July 14 that his efforts were being recognized ini the form of a $275,000 fellowship from the' MacArthur Foundation.
The head of the Hispanic Housing Development Corporation, Rold&n told Weekly Report he was“flabbergasted” when told of the prize.
. Rold&n, 45, was among 31 individuals -six being minority- who received the $150,000 to $375,Q00, five-year “genius” grants. Although primarily scientists^ the winners hailed from alf walks of life, including a puppeteer and jazz drummer.
The MacArthur Fellowships, given without any stipulation as to how the money should: be spent, were devised eight years ago to allow talented people to develop their po-tential without being impeded by financial! constraints.
Besides his immediate concern of financing his children’s, college education, Rolddn; said he had not given much thought to what he would do with the money. He did say he would like to use a portion of the money as leverage for the creation of scholarships for Hispanic college students interested in neighborhood development
refugees for two years while the U.S. General Accounting Office conducts a study of human rights conditions in those countries.
Similar campaign events are scheduled for August in San Francisco and Los Angeles, said Rosales, who is also director of the Washington, D.G, office of the Central American Refugee Center. New York is also involved.
Most Salvadorans did not qualify for the Immigration Reform and Control Act’s legalization program because they have been here too short a time, she said.
U.S Immigration and Naturalization Service spokesperson Duke Austin said Salvadorans accounted for 153,500 of the 2.4 million legalization applications filed with INS as of June 24. He said the INS estimates that there are some 500,000 undocumented Salvadorans in the United States He said about
20.000 are apprehended annually and about
5.000 are expelled.
Such honorary campaign committee members as former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya, United Farm Workers President CdsarChdvez and UFW First Vice President Dolores Huerta are expected to join the Washington, D.C., group for a major promotional event in November. _ carry/ Figueroa
City Giving Cold Shoulder
In what it described as an effort to rid its community of undocumented workers, the City Council of Costa Mesa, Calif, voted 3-2 to have the city attorney research a possible ordinance prohibiting loitering in the city’s parks. In the same motion, on July 18, the , council ordered reserve police officers to ! increase their presence.
The action follows a July 5 meeting where Councilman Orville Amburgey cited citizen complaints about Latino men seeking day work at a downtown park. They were said to harass visitors. The city manager and the : city’s Human Relations Committee drew up separate lists of suggestions which were presented at last week’s meeting.
Hispanics form about 10% of Costa Mesa’s population.
Latino Leaders Key On Schools, Housing
continued from page 1
range in the inner city will be hit first,” said Frank Moore.
Florida state Sen. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen said she was surprised Cubans in Florida would consider development of civic leadership their highest priority. Still, she said, the survey reflected what the local community is preoccupied with.
“A lot of Hispanics in Florida are new to the country. We’re still in the middle of flexing our political muscle," Ros-Lehtinen said. “Fostering of skills needed for political leadership (is important) because we/re new to the game.”
The Gallup poll commissioned by the National Education Association asked more than 2,000 U.S. residents to rank the importance of 13 issues on a scale of 1 to 5. The quality of education was ranked at 4 or 5 by 78% of the sample. Three-quarters said drugs were a great concern.
Harry Pach6n, director of NALEO, said of his survey, “Candidates who address these key issues are more likely to get the growing and important Latino vote in 1988.”
- Sophia Nieves
Early Math Courses Vital
A study of 28,000 Maryland students in kindergarten through 12th grade indicates Anglo and Asian males do betteron standardized math tests than Hispanics, women and blacks because they are encouraged to take more math courses.
The report,“Participationand Performance of Women and Minorities in Mathematics,” was released July 12. It shows a strong correlation between mastering math curriculum and high test scores This finding conflicts with claims by the National Center for Fair and Open Testing that standardized tests are biased against women and minorities
By the end of elementary school, half of the Hispanic and black students have fallen so far below grade level,- they cannot keep pace with the regular math curriculum, according to the report.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Rafael Hern&ndez-Col6n, guest columnist
Bridging the Island, Mainland
There are stereotypes that prevent many Americans from seeing Puerto Ricans as we really are.
In Puerto Rico, with its 3.3 million population, we do not consider it unusual to see Puerto Ricans who are respected educators, renowned physicians, highly regarded bank presidents, distinguished jurists or pioneers in the world of theater.
Yet on the mainland, the 2.3 million Puerto Ricans are still vastly underrepresented in the upper echelons of these professions and others.
If Puerto Ricans on the mainland are to develop to full potential, we cannot be content to watch from the sidelines with little or no role in the vital economic and political decisions that affect our lives.
We in Puerto Rico care deeply about the serious social and economic needs that many Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics living on the mainland face today.
The national administration that takes office next January should' recognize the advantages of selecting Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics to top policy-making positions.
Hispanics appointed to foreign policy posts could help shape a far more effective and enlightened policy toward Latin America Hispanics chosen for domestic policy jobs would have a special sensitivity to the impact of federal decisions on the growing U.S Hispanic population.
CREATING A PUERTO RICAN AGENDA
We know political power will not be handed to our community- or any community- as a gift. That is why the Puerto Rican government has become involved in registering Puerto Rican mainland voters. The low rate of registration has allowed many fleeted officials to dismiss Puerto Ricans with one devastating word - non-voters.
The Puerto Rican governments involvement in a recent registration campaign in New York is responsible for90,000 new voters Now our task is to make sure that those who have signed up will show up in November- and keep coming out for primaries and general elections
Now we must appeal to both Democrats and Republicans to open the door further. Both parties must facilitate voter registration.
Puerto Rican elected officials from New York are joining us on the island- where our voting rate has been 84% or better in recent years - on July 25, Constitution Day, to mark a new alliance.
Our agenda for 1989 and beyond must include the creation of a national program to prevent dropouts It must include a serious federal commitment to provide decent housing.
SPANISH SHOULD BE AN ASSET
We must work with the Immigration and Naturalization Service to put a stop to those who demand that Puerto Ricans show them a green card.
Our agenda must seek to establish economic development programs for Hispanics, not only through available state and federal resources, but through the involvement of the private sector.
Our agenda must encompass a bilingual education incentive to promote excellence and equity. Now that the United States is waking up to the need for its citizens to learn more languages, the ability to speak and write in Spanish should be an asset, not an obstacle.
At the heart of America there is a vision, not a vocabulary. Today, that vision must be broad enough to take in not only those Americans born in English-speaking homes, but other citizens - from Puerto Rico or Poland or the Philippines or other places- who have learned English as a second language but who are second to none in their love of this country.
We ask an effective response to our agenda. We want - and we have earned - recognition by the press, political leaders, and the public.
(This is a summary of a speech given by Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez-Coion at the National Puerto Rican Coalition conference June 16 in Washington, D.C.)
Sinpelos enlalengua
HISPANIC CONNECTION: Although Latinos have failed to claim leading roles in either the Democratic or Republican presidential campaigns, both camps are well aware of the critical role el voto latino may play in November, particularly in such states as Texas and California.
They are straining hard for their “Hispanic connections.”
Democrats Michael D. and Lloyd B. are fluent Spanish speakers, and the Democrats are serving them up to us as“the first bilingual ticket in history.”
Republican George B. has been exploiting his Mexico-born daughter-in-law, Columba.
Thaddeus Garrett Jr., the highest ranking black in the Bush campaign, related a story to a New York Times reporter last month that he said the VP told him. It was about how his son Jeb and Columba’s son was teased at school about his dark complexion.
“What other President has ever been able to say, ‘My grandson has faced racial discrimination’?” Thaddeus asked.
What other President would want to?
On July 13, the day after Bentsen’s selection was announced, The Washington Post countered with:
“Bentsen was bilingual virtually from birth. His mother had two Mexican servants, Lupe and Consuela Rodriguez, who cooked and helped rear four kids. Mission (Bentsen’s birthplace on the Texas-Mexico border), now about 90 percent Hispanic, was predo* minantly Hispanic when Bentsen was a child and most of his playmates were Mexicans.’’
But the topper was reported by columnist Susan Yerkas in the San Antonio Light July 13. Barbara Bush had been campaigning for her husband there two days earlier. As Yerkes tells it
“The Second Lady suffered an embarrassing slip of the tongue while eating with top Hispanic Republicans at Mi Tierra Monday. George Bush cares about Hispanics, she told the group. Then, apparently referring to her daughter-in-law Columba, Jeb Bush’s Mexican-American wife who was also in the room, Barbara added, ‘We even own a few Hispanics.’”
Yerkes told Sin Pelos that Mrs. Bush turned white (her word) and stumbled to correct herself: “ ‘We have a few in our family.’ ”
Get the sombreros and sarapes ready, paisanos.
SECRETARY SUAREZ? In case any Mexican Americans are planning to send their resumes to Bushforthat promised” Hispanic” spot in his Cabinet, they can save themselves some postage, according to Nelson Horta, a reporter with Miami’s WCMQ radio.
Horta broadcast that Bush and Miami Mayor Xavier Suftrez cut a deal earlier this month, and Cuba-born Su&rez- who has agreed to campaign for the VP in California and Texas- will be appointed Secretary of Commerce, Or, if he prefers, Ambassador to Spain.
Both Su4rez and Bush deny any such tradeoffs.
TROPHY TIME: Yet another Latino has been singled out for national distinction this month.
Competing against the best candidates Florida, Illinois, Texas and other top-breeder states could offer, New York City building superintendent Antonio Gonzftlsz won the Philadelphia Zoo’s second annual Great American Roach-Off.
Gonzalez’s entry in the competition for the nation’s longest native-born cockroach was a beautiful chestnut brown and two inches long. Tony claims he caught the big bug by baiting his buildings with bananas and beer.
His prize: $1,000 and a lifetime supply of Combat
GOLDEN BROOM AWARD: San Diego’s KPBS-TV television producer Paul Espinosa, a frequent award winner and Ph.D. to boot forwarded to us a job vacancy announcement he received recentlylfor a maintenance position at WiPUGTV in'M iami,.
“Responsibilities include general cleaning of the building, offices, restrooms and parking lot. Duties include trash pick-up, mopping, waxing, vacuuming, dusting and...” .
Pablo wonders which one of his productions they saw.
r â–  .. . - Kay B&rbaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
July 25,1988
3


COLLECTING
MATH TEST SCORES: The National Science Foundation has released a report, “Participation and Performance of Women and Minorities in Mathematics,” explaining why Anglo males do better on tests than minority students. It is available free by writing the Montgomery County Public Schools, 850 Hungerford Drive, Rockville, Md. 20850.
FARM, RURAL AND URBAN POPULATIONS: “Rural and Rural Farm Population: 1987” Is a 42-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that gives racial and ethnic breakdowns. For a copy (specify P-27, No. 61) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price not available at press time.)
EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATION: The Aspen Institute has published the results of its conference, “ H ispanic Americans and the Business Community: Spotlight on Education.” The seven-page report focuses on the correlation between employment and education of Hispanics in the United States. For a copy, send $4.50 to the Aspen Institute, 1 Lincoln Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10023.
HISPANIC YOUTH DEVELOPMENT: A 16-page position paper, “Celebrating Differences,” developed by Quest International and its Hispanic Advisory Committee, focuses on the ways to provide better educational opportunities to Hispanic youth. For a copy send $3.50 to Quest International, Celebrating Differences, P.O. Box 26931, Columbus, Ohio 43226.
NEW MEXICAN CULTURE: “Flow of the River,” a 59-page book by the Hispanic Culture Foundation, celebrates New Mexico's heritage in a rich series of writings and color photographs that document Hispanic influence on arts and humanities. Writings appear in both English and Spanish. For a copy of the book, which will be available July 23, send $19.95 to HCF, P.O. Box 7279, Albuquerque, N.M. 87194, Attention Manuel Casillas.
MINORITIES’ EDUCATIONAL RECORD: “Minorities in the Educational Pipeline,” a 128-page special double issue of “Educational Record," the quarterly magazine of the American Council on Education, focuses on the current status of minorities in higher education in light of the recent national decline in enrollment. For single copies, send $7.50 to Publications Division,’ ACE, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036(202)939-9380. (Discounts are available on bulkorders.)
WORKING WOMEN: “No Way Out Working Poor Women in the United States," a 28-page report by the National Commission on Working Women, examines factors contributing to working Women’s poverty, presents a statistical profile of their condition and recommends strategies for change. For a copy, send $7.50 to the NCWW, 1325 G St. NW (LL), Washington, D.C. 20005.
CONNECTING
BANK AGREEMENT APPLAUDED
A coalition of 90 minority advocacy organizations called an agreement put forth by California First Bank in its bid to buy Union Bank in Los Angeles a sweeping blueprint that will provide financial opportunities for minorities into the 21 st century.
The agreement by California First, announced last month, includes
• A commitment over the next two years to provide $84 million in loans to low- and moderate-income neighborhoods;
• A goal that 60% of management appointments over the next five years will go to women or minorities;
• The appointment of three minorities and women to its board of directors in the next yean
• A target of 20% that all outside contracts be awarded to minority-and women-owned businesses over the next five years;
• A range of multilingual services; and
• The provision of free banking services, including checking accounts with no minimum balance or monthly fee.
Union is the state's fifth largest bank. California First, 77%-owned by the Bank of Tokyo, is No. 6
LEGAL NETWORK FORMS
The Hispanic National Bar Association has formed a national registry of Hispanic attorneys for Latinos interested in receiving culturally sensitive legal representation
The HNBA has begun running advertisementsonHispanic television and radio stations throughout the country to announce its Hispanic Legal Counseli ng Service: All| attorneys are H N BA members.
The Service was created by the HNBA for two reasons: giving Hispanics reluctant to use non-Hispanic attorneys an option, and generating business for Hispanic attorneys
Clients seeking representation are not charged for the referral service. They are given a free, initial consultation after being referred to an attorney in their area The client then decides whether he or she wants the attorneys service. To receive the service, people can call (305) 445-4545.
DELGADO CHOSEN AS FELLOW
Jane Delgado, president of the National Coalition of Hispanic j Health and Human Services Organizations, won one of the slots of the Kellogg National Fellowship Program, it was announced July 18.
[ Created by the Kellogg Foundation in 1980 to assist leaders increase their knowledge and skills in areas outside their field of expertise, the 43 fellows each receive a three-year, $35,000 grant to pursue a self-designated area of study. For those fellows working for non-profits, the foundation will fund 12.5%, or up to $24,000, of their salary.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
BUSINESS OWNERS’ CONFERENCE
Midland, Texas July 28-30
The Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers
of Commerce Convention will include seminars and
a trade show. It will also offer businesspersons an
opportunity to establish new contacts
Joe Morin 1-800-882-6222
GIFTED CHILDREN Pittsburgh July 28-30
Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted will hold a conference for teachers, parents and other education professionals to provide information on the special needs of gifted children. Among topics are counseling and parenting gifted minorities.
Elaine Waugh (513) 873-3490 4 -
FOLK FESTIVAL Lowell, Mass. July 29-31
The 50th National Folk Festival will feature free entertainment, including craft-making demonstrations music, dance and storytelling. Evening concerts include performances by Los Progonoros del Puerto and Son de Borinquen.
Lowell National Historical Park (617) 459-1000 HISPANIC FESTIVAL Wichita, Kansas July 30
The Hispanic Women’s Network and the Hispanic Awareness Council will hold a festival focusing on the theme of Hispanic art and culture. Proceeds will be used for scholarships and educational activities for the local Hispanic community.
Martha SAnchez (316) 267-9002
COMING SOON
AMERICAN Gl FORUM NATIONAL CONFERENCE
American Gl Forum
Corpus Christi, Texas Aug. 1-7
Cecil Lira (512) 887-1095
FARM LABOR CONVENTION Farm Labor Organizing Committee Toledo, Ohio Aug. 6 VOIker Grotefeld (419) 243-3456
MULTICULTURAL SEMINAR Indiana Department of Education . Indianapolis Aug. 14,15 Darlene Slady (317) 269-9477
LATIN LABOR MEETINGS
Labor Council for Latin American Advancement
San Antonio Aug. 25-27
Oscar Sdnchez (202) 347-4223
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
July 25.1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS
We offer you a tremendous opportunity to experience professional growth and satisfaction by serving in the Nation’s Capital Emergency Ambulance Bureau.
We offer
• A professional management team concerned with your personal and professional welfare.
• Top pay BENEFITS
• A generous Retirement Plan
• Promotional Opportunities
• Health, Dental and Optical Insurance available for Employee and Dependents
• Deferred Compensation Program
• Thirteen Days Sick Leave Annually
• Thirteen Days Annual Leave Initially
• Ten Paid Holidays (plus Presidential Inaugurations)
• Tuition Assistance
• Military Credit Toward Retirement
QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: All applicants for these positions must possess a high school diploma or a certificate of equivalency issued by a recognized department of education; possess a current valid driver’s permit, pass a physical examination and background investigation as determined by the Emergency Ambulance Bureau, be a state certified Emergency Medical Technician and be CPR (BLS) certified.
Please send Federal Standard Form 171 and copies of the following certifications; CPR (BLS); state certification and current valid driver’s license to JoAnn Johnson, D.C. Office of Personnel, 613 G Street N.W., Room 309, Washington, D.C. 20001. (202) 727-6427.
Salary Range: $21,913- $27,628 pa - Career Service Positions (An Equal Opportunity Employei)
RESIDENCY
Any person accepting one of these positions must become a District of Columbia resident within 180 days of appointment and maintain such residency for the duration of District government employment
The Department of Housing and Community Development offers assistance to new District of Columbia government employees seeking housing in Washington, D.C.
ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST
The Center for Community Change in Washington. D.C.. is seeking applicantsforthe position of organizational development specialist Applicants must have experience in working with local nonprofit, grass roots advocacy and community development organization The position is based in Washington, D.C., with a salary range of low to mid thirties(depend-ing upon experience). Deadline for resumes is August 15.
For more information contact Garland Yates, Eastern Regional Director, Center for Community Change (202) 342-0594.
ASSOCIATE COUNSEL MALDEF, a national civil rights organization, seeks attorney to fill the position of Associate Counsel for its San Francisco office. The Associate Counsel will conduct litigation, direct all activities of the San Francisco office and be responsible for supervising all litigation, programs and personnel. Req: licensed attorney with a minimum of 6 years legal experience (3 years civil rights law in the areas of education or immigration and 3 years litigation experience in federal and state practice); supervision and management skills; bilingual in English/Spanish. Send resume, writing sample and 3 references to E. Richard Larson, MALDEF, 634 Sa Spring St, 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90014 by Augusts, 1988.
WEEKLY REPORT WEEKLY REPORTS AVAILABLE: Hispanic Link has a limited number of unbound Weekly Report sets available: $18 for 16 issues in 1983, $53 for 53 issues in 1984, $52 for 52 issues in 1985, $50 each for 50 issues in 1986 and 1987. Order prepaid from Hispanic Link Back Copies, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
ASSOCIATE PRODUCER-NEWS DEPARTMENT Duties include assisting news management with writing/copying news copy, videotape production, editing news reports, coordination of tapes and on-air tape production, coordination between control room and tape room. Work schedule likely to include evenings and weekends Prefer applicants with college degree in journalism and/or equivalent experience in TV journalism and/or production.
To apply contact Personnel Department WPLG/TV, 3900 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FI. 33137 (305) 325-2302.
BILINGUAL EDUCATIONAL ADVOCATE Advocates forChildren(AFC) has an immediate job opening for a BILINGUAL (Spanlsh/Engllsh) EDUCATIONAL ADVOCATE. AFC is a nonprofit organization representing New York City public school students on an individual and class basis
Job qualifications include: college degree (equivalent experience will be considered), fluency in written and oral Spanish and English, good writing skills, ability to make oral presentations, experience in case management and a commitment to young people. Previous experience in advocacy, or with the New York City school system, is preferred.
Please send resume and writing sample by August 15,1988 to: Norma Rollins, Advocates for Children, 24-16 Bridge Plaza South, Long Island City, N.Y., 11101.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Director Computing Facility
Reporting to an Assoc. Dean for Academic Affairs, you will be responsible for managing a staff of 12-15 professionals, and managing the ongoing development implementation and maintenance/replacement of computing systems that support the research, teaching and administrative functions of our Graduate School of Business. You will assume primary responsibility for all Computing Facility Operations, including assessing computing needs, defining strategy, and implementing plans; ensuring implementation of school and University computing policies; planning and budgeting the operating expenses and capital expenditures; overseeing the purchasing of computer equipment; controlling the processes by which hardware and software are acquired, implemented and maintained; ensuring the adequacy of system security and backup, networking reliability and equipment inventories and providing a positive working environment with respect to communication and professional development
QUALIFICATIONS: Must have strong managerial, supervisoryand professional skills with a well-rounded technical computing background and familiarity with multi-vendor, multiuser environment Ability to manage a large staff and experience in managing large budgets under conditions of rapid technological change necessary. Working knowledge of DEC computing environments (TOPS-20 and VMS), MS-DOS and Apple Macintosh computing environments, local area networks, computer programming in high level language (such as FORTRAN) and data base languages required. Strong verbal and written communication skills are essential. Salary$3,966-$6,022/month.
Send resume to: Dept JEF/54729-HL, Stanford University Personnel Services, Old Pavilion, Stanford, CA 94305-61 lOi An equal opportunity employer through affirmative action.
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Arts & Entertainment
BIG SCREEN NEWS: Actress Rita Moreno has become coexecutive producerofthefilm Hearts on Fire, planned aS the first ever film written, produced and directed by Latinas.
The film is a fictionalized account of the making of the 1954 movie Salt of the Earth, about a 15-month strike by zinc miners in Silver City, N.M. Union leader Juan Chac6n, who led the 1950 strike, had a starring role in the film produced by Hollywood filmmakers and “blacklistecf’ by the U.S. House of Representatives’ Un-American Activities Committee.
The other executive producer of Hearts on Fire is Marine Dominguez, a Silver City native. The script has been written by Silvia Morales, who will make her feature directing debut with the Saldeterre Productions project. Moreno will star in the picture with Edward James Olmos, Ed Asner and Patty Duke.
Ironically, production of the film has been halted by another strike-the ongoing Writers Guild of Arnsrisaconflict. The film is expected for release in 1989.jggffif$. HR/CR
In a related item, F/sfs of Steel, which stars Carles Palomino and Henry Silva, has completed oriociiMIJbhotography in Hawaii and is now in post-productioofoLo&AngWes. The film, from Fists of Stool Productions, is due for release in October.
Two Hollywood films are moving south of the border this month. One is the upcoming James Bond saga, License Revoked, in which model Talisa Soto plays femme fatale Lupe Lamora opposite Timothy Dalton. The movie is now rolling in Mexico’s Estudios Churubuscos.
Also filming in Mexico is Jerico, starring Marlon Brando, to be shot on locations in the state of Morelos.
Images in the Shadows, a History of Spanish Cinema, began June 30 with a salute to director Vicente Aranda |lt nunsithrdughl Aug 12.
ONE LINER: NBC will air the pilot for Universal Television’s The Cheech Show, starring Richard “Cheech” Marin, July 29 at 9 p.m.
— Antonio Mejias-Rentas
—I mi i in 1 ■
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UNION CITES HISPANICS: In the battle between the Washington/Baltimore Newspaper Guild (AFL-CIO) and The Washington Post over a discrimination complaint filed July 13, the low number of His panics on the Post staff was singled out In charging that the Post has discriminated on the basis of sex, age, race and national, origin in compensation, hiring andpromptions, among other points, the union said Hispanics comprise “only 1% of the Post work force.”, Guild negotiator Sandi Polaski said the minority count in the newsroom was 12%, based on a 1985 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission report, which the Post is required to file.
Polaski said a study conducted by Assistant Managing Editor/ Metro Milton Coleman showed that there were 48 black reporters, five Asian Americans, three Hispanics and two American Indians on their news staff in 1986.
Of the three Latino reporters currently at the Post, one is full time.
This is the first time a suit has been filed against the Post which includes Hispanics. “We wanted to be as inclusive as possible,” Polaski said.
The Washington Posts news personnel director, Tom Lippman, told Weekly Report he was instructed by Executive Editor Ben Bradlee not to give out personnel statistics for the newsroom.
However, Vice President and Business Manager Ted Lutz said Hispanics comprise 1 - 1.5% of the overall Washington Post staff.
Post General Counsel Bo Jones refuted the union’s figures. He said"Minority professionals in the newsroom have grown from9% to 15% since 1980.”
Of the new|1987 hires in the newsroom, Hispanics accounted for 6.5%, Jones said. This would include reporters, photographers and editors, but Jones did not have a breakdown
Ten percent of the 1988 news interns were Latino, said Jones. Interns spend 10 weeks at the Post
While both the Gu IM and Tha Washington Post agree that the staff should reflect the representation in the community, the union believes that to be 10% for Latinos. Jones believed the Poet followed the figure compiled by the 1980 census, though he said they have no quotaa
The 1980 census numbered Hispanics as 3.1% of the Washington, D.C., metro area population. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there was an estimated|9-6% undercount of Hispanics at that time.
ThelGuildlrepresents 1,400 news, editorial, advertising, business and circulation department employees
ANOTHER UNION RATTLE: A Latina editor is among four employees illegally fired by the Sacramentof Calif.) Union in October 1987. A National Labor Relations Board officer ruled June 30 that they must be rehired with back pay and interest
Ana Sandoval and three members of the Newspaper Guilds bargaining committee were fired after urging the newspaper's advertisers to support them.
- Darryl Figueroa
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Making The News This Week of Honor recipient, Private Joe Martinez. Martinez died during ! World War II at the age of 22. . . The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services honors Helen MiramonteS, from San Jose, Calif., as one of 12 nurses performing outstanding work with AIDS patients. . . Luis Sabine&, president of the Miami-based Latin Chamber of Commerce, becomes the Hispanic with the longest stretch of road named after him in that city. The new 45-block Luis Sabines Way is 38 blocks longer than the street named after President Reagan ... Westlake Village, Calif., residents Letti Nuflez and Berci Limor, 11-yearolds, rescue 16-yearold lifeguard Robert Munger from a pool after he passed out giving underwater swimming instructions. . . Candido Ortiz, a 63-yearold janitor from East Harlem, claims a New York state lottery jackpot of $22 million. Ortiz's winning method?-punching the back of his betting slip with a ... Prosecutors in the Wedtech trial say that the company co founder, John Marlotta, paid a $75,000 bribe to U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia of New York to regain control of the company. Garcia has not been indicted in the far-reaching corruption trial ... Richard Avena, former Southwestern regional director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, becomes the executive director of the Texas Civil Liberties Union ... Colorado Gov. Roy Romer, Colorado Congress woman Patricia Schroeder, Denver Mayor Federico Pel'la and Denver Councilwoman Ramona Rodriguez attend the dedication of a statue at the state Capitol for the state's first Congressional Medal =No.•• HISPANI EEKL ly 25, 1988 Press Says Cisneros Prime Senate Choice ; Education Ranks as Top San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros is a prime candidate for the U.S. Senate seat of fellow Democrat Lloyd Bentsen if the Dykakisl Bentsen ticket wins in November, the Texas press speculates. Bentsen is running both for the vice pres idency and re-election to the Senate; per missible under Texas law. He is expected to retain his Senate seat easily . After the January inauguration, Republican Gov. Bill Clements would make an interim appointment and later have to call aspec,:ial .election. Cisneros aide Barbie Hernandez told Weekly Report, "The mayor very recently said he would not seek higher office. In fact, (the Senate seat) has not even been dis cussed." Latino Joblessness Static The Hispanic unemployment rate for June remained unchanged from May9% the u.s. Department of Labor announced Jyly 8 , The department indicated that 809,000 L..atlnos were jobless last month. Hispanics' biggest concerns-education and drug abuse-are shared by the general population, according to results of two surveys released this month. When asked to identify the most significant issues in the Hispanic community, Latino . elected arid appointed officials nationwide placed access to higher , education, high school dropouts and drug abuse at the top. In a second survey, voting-age residents queried through a Gallup poll mirrored this, ranking education and drug abuse as the most impor tant issues in this presidential campaign. The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials released July 13 results of questionnaires completed by 800 officials ranging _ f(om justices of the peace to congressmen. In the Southwest and California, where Mexican Americans predominate, education related issues were most prominent. Housing topped the list for officials in the Northeast, where the Hispanic population is largely Puertl; Rican . In Florida, where Cuban Americans form the majority Hispanic group, civic leader ship development was cited first. The survey respondents were not broken down according to ethnicity or gender. TOP HISPANIC ISSUES 1. Higher Ed. 2.Dropouts 3. Drug Abuse 4. Child Poverty 5. Civic ' Leadership \6. Government E'mi>I<>Yment 1 : Job Discrimination 8 . Health Care 9. Housing 1 o : Uiiderclass Ray Cortinas, superintendent of schools for San Francisco Unified School District, said Mexican Americans mayfocus on education rather than housing because unlike Latinos on the East Coast, Hispanics in the Southwest and California do not live in such crowded conditions. Cortines told Weekly Report that children "who don't have adequate housing don't get an education. "Since (California) Latinos will be the majority in the next decade, if they're going to take leadership roles, they're going to have to be educated," Cortines said. The legislative director for U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) said cuts in federal funding over 1 0 years have contributed to a lack of affordable housing in the New York City area "Any group that has a significant portion (of members) in the lowto moderate-income 1 on page 2 HISPANIC OFFICIALS' TOP FIVE ISSUES BY S"TATE ARIZONA FLORIDA NEW MEXICO 1. Access to Higher Education 2. High Dropout Rate 3. Drug Abuse 4. Civic Leadership Development 5. Children in Poverty CALIFORNIA 1. High Dropout Rate 2. Access to Higher Education 3. Drug Abuse 4. Civic Leadership Development 5. Children in Poverty COLORADO 1. High Dropout Rate 2. Access to Higher Education 3. Civic Leadership Development 4. Children in Poverty 5. Government Employment Source: NALEO 1. Civic Leadership Development 1 . High Dropout Rate 2. High Dropout Rate 2 . Drug Abuse 3. Access to Higher Education 3. Government Employment 4. Affordable Housing 4. Children in Poverty 5. Government Employment 5. Employment Discrimination ILLINOIS NEW YORK 1 . High Dropout Rate 1. Affordable Housing 2. Affordable Housing 2. High Dropout Rate 3. Access to Higher Education 3. Drug Abuse 4. Employment Discrimination 4. Access to Higher Education 5. Inequality of Government Services 5. Increase of Low-Income, One-Parent Families NEW JERSEY TEXAS 1. Affordable Housing 1. Access to Higher Education 2 . High Dropout Rate 2. High Dropout Rate 3. Drug_ Abuse 3. Drug Abuse 4. Children in Poverty 4. Indigent Health 5 . Access to Higher Education 5. Children in Poverty

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Texans Applaud Vice Presidential Nominee Bentsen The choice of Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen as the running mate of Democratic presi dential candidate Michael Dukakis has met with the overwhelming support of TexaJS Hispanics. San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros called the selection "an honor all Texans can share: He also pledged to help the Dukaki& ticket win in the Southwest. Texas state Sen . Judy Zaffirini said, ' 'lfs fabulous. Bentsen has class. He's energized south Texas. He'll ensure a huge turnout and he knows (Hispanics).". Zaffirini's enthusiasm was not dampened by reports that Bentsen has only one Hi& panic on his Capitol Hill staff of 30. "Thafs the sort of thing that can be discussed and ' worked out, " she said Another fan was Mexican American Democrats' Political Action Committee Pr& sident Ruben Bonilla "Bentsen has been an ally to Hispanics. It gives us an entree to the White House . "And it gives Hispanics the first proficient bilingual ticket," Bonilla added . Dukakis and Bentsen both speak fluent Spanish. Bentsen grew up in Mission, Texas, among predominantly poor Mexican Americans . The national committeeperson for the Republican National Hispanic Assembly of Texas, Bob Bai16n, was also pleased. "I think ifs great because it shows how important Salvadoran Refugee Campaign Begins A daylong rally July 16 drew some 200 Salvadoran refugees and their supporters in Washington, D .C., to formally kick off the nationai"No Human Being is lllegar campaign. "This is an emergency call from Salvadoran refugees to Americans," said national co ordinator Sylvia Rosales . "They are saying, : iwe need you to understand we are victims of war:" The" No Human Being is Illegal" campaign included a march supporting the Moakley DeConcini bill, which has been pending in the . Senate since July 1987. The bill .would halt deportation of Salvadoran and Nicaraguan $275,000 Having wor k e d-:'forl2 i ir{ Chic . ago finding affordable housing for Hispanics and other low-income groups, Hipolito Rol dan was when he learned July 14.\ that his efforts were being recognized in l the form of a $275,000 fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation , The head of the Hispanic Housing Develop ment Corporation, Roldan told Weekly Report he was "flabbergasted' when told of the prize . . Roldan , 45, was among 31 individuals six being minority-who received the $150,000 refugees for two years while the U.S. General Accounting Office conducts a study of human rights conditions in those countries. Similar campaign events are scheduled for August in San Francisco and Los Angeles, said Rosales, who is also director of the Washington, D.C. office of the Central American Refugee Center . New York is also involved . Most Salvadorans did not qualify for the Immigration Reform and Control Acfs legalization program because they have been here . too short a time, she said. U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service spokesperson Duke Austin said Salvadorans accounted for 153,500 of the 2.4 million legalization applications filed with INS as of June 24. He said the INS estimates that there are some 500,000 undocumented Sal vadorans in the United States. He said about 20,000 are apprehended annually and about ' 5,000 are expelled. Such honorary campaign committee mem bers as former New Mexico Gov. Tpney Anaya, United Farm Workers President Cesar Chavez and U FW First Vice President Dolores Huerta are expected to join the Washington, D.C., group for a major promotional event in November. . -Darryl Figueroa City Giving Cold Shoulder to $375,QOO, fiv&year "genius" grants . In what it described as an effort to rid its 2 Although primarily scienti_sts, the winners community of undocumented workers, the hailed from airwalks of life, including a City Council of Costa Mesa, voted 3 to puppeteer and jazz drummer. have the city attorney research a possible The MacArthur Fellowships, given .without ordinance prohibiting loitering in the city's any stipulation as to how the money should : parks. In the same motion , on July 18, the be spent, were devised eight years ago to council ordered reserve police officers to allow talented people to develop their PO'\ increase their presence. tential without being impeded by financial i i The action follows a July 5 meeting where constraints . . Councilman Orville Amburgey cited citizen Besides his immediate concern of financing i • complaints about Latino men seeking day his children • s . college education, Roldan ; ' work at a downtown park. They were said to said he had not given much thought to what . harass visitors. The city manager and the . he would do with the money. He did say he city's Human Relations Committee drew up would like to use a portion of the money as separate lists of suggestions which . were leverage for the creation of scholarships for presented at last week's meeting. Hispanic college students interested in neigl:l: Hispanics form about 1 0% of Costa_Mesa' _ s _ _ borhood development. population. the Hispanic vote of Texas is going to be. "We welcome the Bentsen challenge," he said, later admitting that it creates "an interesting situation " for Bush. "With Bentsen on the ticket, there might not be new growth in Hispanic support for the Bush ticket. but we will maintain our30% support," he said . Bail6n projected that the Texas race would be decided in the Houston area He also predicted that young Hispanic Texans will vote for Bush while older ones will support Bentsen . Nonetheless, he said, "If we have the choice between a president and vice presi dent, which do you think we will go for?" Darryl Figueroa Latino Leaders Key On Schools, Housing continued from page 1 range in the inner city will be hit first," said Frank Moore. Florida state Sen . Ileana Ros Lehtinen said she was surprised Cubans in Florida would consider development of civic leadership their highest priority . Still , she said, the survey reflected what the local community is preoc cu pied with. " A lot of Hispanics in Florida are new to the country. We ' re still in the middle of flexing our poiitical muscle," Ro&Lehtinen said. "Foster" ing of skills needed for politicalleadership(is important) because we're new to the game." The Gallup poll commissioned by the National Education Association asked more than 2,000 U.S. residents to rank the importance of 13 issues on a scale of 1 to 5 . The quality of education was ranked at 4 or 5 by 78% of the sample . Three-quarters said drugs were a great concern . ' Harry Pach6n, director of NALEO, said of his surv ey, "Candidates who address these key issues are more likely to get the growing and important Latino vote in 1988." Sophia Nieves Early Math Courses Vital A study of 28 ,000 Maryland students in kindergarten through 12th grade indicates Anglo and Asian males do better on standard ized math te sts than Hispanics, women and blacks because they are encouraged to take more math courses . The report," Participation and Performance of Women and Minorities in Mathematics," was released July 12 . It shows a strong correlation between mastering math curricu lum and high test scores. This finding conflicts with claims by the National Center for Fair and Open Testing that standardized tests are biased against women and minorities. By the end of elementary school, half of the Hispanic and black students have fallen so far below grade level; they cannot : keep pace with the regular math curriculum, ac cording to the report . Hispanic Link Weekly Report I 1 j !

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Rafael Hernandez-Col 6n, guest columnist Bridging the Island, Mainland There are stereotype s that prevent many Americans from seeing Puerto Ricans as we really are. In Puerto Rico , with its 3.3 million population , we do not consider it unusual t o see Puerto R icans who a r e respected educators renowned highly regard ed bank presidents, jurists or Pioneers m the world of theater. Yet on the mainland, t he 2 . 3 million Puerto Ricans are still vastly underrepresented in the upper echelons Qf these professions and . If Puerto R ic ans on th e mainland are to develop to full we cannot be content to watch from the sidelines with little or no role in the vital economic and political decisions that affect our lives. We in Puerto Rico care deeply about the serious social and econ omic needs that many Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics living on the mainland face today. The national ad,.;,in . istrat ion that takes office next January should ' recognize the advantages of selec tin g Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics to top policy-maki ng pos iti ons. • Hispanics appointed t o foreign policy posts could help shape a far more effective and enlighte ned policy toward Latin America Hispanics chosen for domestic polic y j obs would have a special sensitivity to impact offederal decisi ons on the growing U.S Hispanic population . , CREATING A PUERTO RICAN AGENDA We know political power will not be handed to our community-or any community-as a gift . That is why the Puerto Rican government has become involved in registering Puerto Rican mainland voters. The low rate of registrati on has allowed many elected officials to dismiss Puerto Ricans wit h one w ord-no,;v oters. The Puerto Rican govemmenfs involvement in a recent registration campaign in New York is responsible for90,000 new voters. Now our task is to make sure that th ose who have signed up will show up in November-and keep coming out for primaries and general elections. Now we must appeal to both Democrats and Republicans to open the door further. Both parties must facilitate voter registration . Puerto Rican elected officials , from New '(ork are joining us on the . islandwhere our voting rate has been 84% or better in recent years on July 25, Constitution Day, to mark a new alliance. Our agenda for 1989 and beyond must include the creation of a national program to prevent dropouts. It must include a serious federal commitment to provid e decent housing. SPANISH SHOULD BE AN ASSET We m ' ust work with the Immigration and Naturalization Service to put a stop to those who demand that Puerto Ricans show them a green card . Our agenda must seek to establish economic development programs . for Hispanics, not only throug h avai lable state and federal resources, but through the involveme nt of t he private sector. Our agenda must encompas s a bilingual education incentive to promote excellence and equity. Now that the United States is waking up to the need for its citizens to learn more languages, the ability to speak and write in Spanish s hould be an asset, not an obstacle. At the heart of America there is a v isi on, not a vocabulary. Today, that vision must be broad enough to take in not only those Americans born in English-speaking homes, but other citizens-from Puerto Rico or Poland or the Philipp ines or other places-who have learned English as a second language but who are second to none in their love of this country . We ask an effective respons e to our agenda. We want-and we have earned -recognition by the press, political leaders, and the public . (This is a summary of a speech given by Puerto Rico Gov . Rafael ' HernfmdezCol6n at the National Puerto Rican Coalition conference June 16 in Washington, D.C.) . Sin en Ia lengua HISPANIC CONNECTION: Although Latinos have failed to claim leading roles . in either the Democratic or Republican presi dential campaigns ; both camps are well aware of the critical role el voto Iatino may play in November , particularly in such states as Texas and California. They are straining hard for their "Hispanic connections." Democrats Michael D. and Uoyd B. are fluent Spanish . speakers, and the Democrats are serving them up to us as " the first bilingual ticket in history." Republican George B. has been exploiting his Mexico-born daughter-in-law , Columba. Thaddeus Garrett Jr., the highest ranking black in the Bush campaign, related a story to a New York Times reporter last month that he said the VP told him. It was about how his son Jeb and Columba ' s son was teased at school about his dark complexion. "What other President has ever been able to say, 'My grandson has faced racial d i scrimination'?" Thaddeus asked. What other President would want to? On July 13, the day after Bentsen's selection was announced, The Washington Post countered with: . " Bentsen was bilingual virtually from birth . His mother had two Mexican servants, Lupe and Consuela Rodriguez, who cooked and helped rear four kids. Mission (Bentsen's birthplace on the Texas-Mexico border), now about 90 percent Hispanic, was predo minantly Hispanic . when Bentsen was a child and most of his playmates were Mexicans." . But the topper was reported by columnist Susan Yerkes in the San Antonio Light July 13 . Barbara Bush had been campaigning for her husband there two days earlier . As Yerkes tells it " The Second Lady suffered an embarrassing slip of the tongue while eating with top Hispanic Republicans at Mi Tierra Monday. George Bush cares.jibout Hispanics, she told the group. Then, apparently referring to her daughter-in-law Columba, Jeb Bush's Mexican-American wife who was also in the room, Barbara added, 'We even own a few Hispanics .'" Yerkes told Sin Pelosthat Mrs. Bush turned white(herword) and stumbled to correct herself: " ' We have a few in our family.' " Get the sombreros and sarapes ready, paisanos. SECRETARY SUAREZ? In case any Mexican Americans are planning to send their resumes to Bush for that promised" Hispanic" spot in his Cabinet, they can save themselves some postage, according to Nelson HQrta, a reporter with Mia mrs WCMQ radio. Horta broadcast that Bush and Miami Mayor Xavier Su6rez cut a deal earlier this month, and Cuba-born Suarezwho has agreed to campaign for the VP in California and Texaswill be appointed Secretary of Commerce. Or, if he prefers, Ambassador to Spain. Both Suarez and Bush deny any such tradeoffs. TROPHY TIME: Yet another Latino has been singled out for national distinction this month. Competing against the best candidates Florida, Illinois, Texas and other top-breeder states could offer, New York City building superintendent Antonio won the Philadelphia Zoo's second annual Great American Roach-Off. Gonzalez's entry in the competition for the nation's longest r1ativ&born cockroach was a beautiful chestnut brown and two inches long. Tony claims he caught the big bug by baiting his buildings with bananas and beer. His prize: $1,000 and a lifetime supply of Combat GOLDEN BROOM AWARD: San Diego ' s KPB8-TV television producer Paul Espinosa, a frequent award winner and Ph.D . to boot, forwarded to us a job vacancy announcement he received recently/for a maintenance position at in i Miami.. "Responsibilities include general cleaning of the building, offices, rest rooms and parking lot. Duties include trash pick-up, mopping, . waxing, vacuuming, dusting and ... " . \ Pablo wonders which one of his productions they saw. Kay Barbaro Hispanic Link Weekly Report July 25, 1988

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COLLECTING MATH TEST SCORES: The National Science Foundation has released a report, "Participation and Performance of Women and Minorities in Mathematics," explaining why Anglo males do better on tests than minority students. It is available free by writing the Montgomery County Public Schools, 850 Hungerford Drive, Rockville, Md. 20850. . FARM, RURAL AND URBAN POPULATIONS: "Rural and Rural Farm Population: 1987" is a 42page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that gives racial and ethnic breakdowns. For a copy (specify P.27, No. 61) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783. (Price not available at press time.) EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATION: The Aspen Institute has published the results of Its conference, "Hispanic Americans and the Business Community: Spotlight on Education." The seven-page report focuses on the correlation between employment and education of Hispanics in the United States. For a copy, send $4.50 to the Aspen Institute, 1 Lincoln Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10023. HISPANIC YOUTH DEVELOPMENT: A 16page position paper, "Celebrating Differences," developed by Quest International and its Hispanic Advisory Committee, focuses on the ways to provide better educational opportunities to Hispanic youth. For a copy send $3 . 50 to Quest International, Celebrating Differences, P . O . Box 26931, Columbus, Ohio 43226. NEW MEXICAN CULTURE: "Flow of the River," a 59page book by the Hispanic Culture Foundation, celebrates New Mexicds heritage in a rich series of writings and color photographs that document Hispanic influence on arts and humanities . Writings appear in both English and Spanish . For a copy of the book, which will be available July 23, send $19 .95 to HCF, P.O. Box 7279, Albuquerque, N.M. 87194, Attention Manuel Casillas . MINORITIES' EDUCATIONAL RECORD: "Minorities in the Edu cational Pipeline," a 128 page special double issue of" Educational Record," the quarterly magazine of the American Council on Education, focuses on the current status of minorities in higher education in light of the recent national decline in enrollment. For single copies, send $7.50 to Publications Division, ' ACE, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D . C . 20036 (202) 939. (Discounts are available on bulk orders.) CONNECTING BANK AGREEMENT APPLAUDED A coalition of 90 minority advocacy organizations called an agree ment put forth by California First Bank In Its bid to buy Union Bank in Los Angeles a sweeping blueprint that will provide financial oppor tunities for minorities Into the 21st century . The agreement by California First, announced last month, !ncludes: e A commitment over the next two years to provide $84 million in loans to lowand moderate-Income neighborhoods; e A goal that 60% of management appointments over the next five ' years will go to women or minorities; e The appointment of three minorities ahd women to its board of directors in the next year; . • A target of 20% that all outside contracts be awarded to minority and women-owned businesses over the next five years; • A range of multilingual services; and • The provision of free banking services, including checking accounts with no minimum balance or monthly fee. Union Is the state's fifth larc:Jest bank. California First, 77%-owned by the Bank of Tokyo, is No. 6 LEGAL NETWORK FORMS The Hispanic National Bar Association has formed a national registry of Hispanic attorneys for Latinos interested in receiving culturally sensitive legal representation. . The HNBA has begun running advertisements > onHispanic television and radio stations throughout the country to announce its Hispanic Legal Counseling Service : Alii attorneys are H N BA members. The Service was created by the HNBA for two reasons: giving Hispanics reluctant to use non-Hispanic attorneys an option, and generating business for Hispanic attorneys. Clients seeking representation are not charged for the referral service. They are given a fre .e, initial consultation after being referred to an attorney in their area The client then decides whether he or she wants the attorney's service. To receive the service, people can call (305) 445. DELGADO CHOSEN AS FELLOW Jane Delgado, president of the National Coalition of Hispanic . Health and Human Services Organizations, won one of the slots of the 1 National Fellowship Program, it was announced July 18. WORKING WOMEN: "No Way Out: Working Poor Wome . n in the -1 . . cr.eated by the Kellogg Foundation in 1980 to assist leaders United States," a 28-page report by the National Commission on ; increase their knowledge and skills in areas outside their field of Working Women, examines factors contributing to working women's ; expertise, the 43 fellows each receive a three-year, $35,000 grant to poverty, presents a statistical profile of their condition and recommends pursue a self designated area of study. For those fellows working for strategies for change. For a copy, send $7.50 to the NCWW, 1325 G non-profits, the foundation will fund 12.5%, or up to$24,000, of their NW (LL) , __ . ' 8alary. Calendar THIS WEEK BUSINESS OWNERS' CONFERENCE Midland, Texas July 28 The Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce Convention will include seminars and a trade show. It will also offer businesspersons an opportunity to establish new contacts. Joe Morin 1 GIFTED CHILDREN Pittsburgh July 28 Supporting Emotional Needs of Gifted will hold a conference for teachers. parents and other education professionals to provide information on the special needs of gifted children. Among topics are counseling and parenting gifted minorities. Elaine Waugh (513) 873 4 FOLK FESTIVAL Lowell, Mass. July 29 The 50th National Folk Festival will feature free entertainment, including craft-making demonstrations, music, dance and storytelling. Evening concerts include performances by Los Pregoneros del Puerto and Son de Borinquen. Lowell National Historical Park (617) 459 HISPANIC FESTIVAL Wichita, Kansas July 30 The Hispanic Women's Ne . twork and the Hispanic Awareness Council will hold a festival focusing on the theme of Hispanic art and culture. Proceeds will be used for scholarships and educational activities foF the local Hispanic community. Martha Sanchez (316) 267 COMING SOON .. AMERICAN Gl FORUM NATIONAL CONFERENCE American Gl Forum Corpus Christi, Texas Aug. 1 Cecil Lira(512) 887 July 25. 1988 . . . ------'-' ......... FARM LABOR CONVENTION Farm Labor Organizing Committee Toledo , Ohio Aug. 6 Volker Grotefeld (419) 243 MULTICULTURAL SEMINAR Indiana Department of Education . Indianapolis Aug . 14, 15 Darlene Slady (317) 269 77 LATIN LABOR MEETINGS Labor Council for Latin American Advancement San Antonio Aug. 25 Oscar Sanchez (202) 347 Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location , contact name and phone number . Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Wash ington, D .C. 20005. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST We offer you a tremendous opportunity to experience professional growth and satisfaction by serving in the Nation's Capital Emergency Ambulance Bureau. The Center for Community Change in Wash lnaton, D.C .. is seeking applicants fort he position of organlutlonal development apeclallat. Applicants must have experience in working with local nonprofit, grass roots advocacy and community development organization. We offer • A professional management team concerned with your personal and professional welfare. • Top pay BENEFITS • A generous Retirement Plan • Promotional Opportunities • Health, Dental and . Optical Insurance available for Employee and Dependents The position Is based In Washington, D.C., with a salary rsnge of low to mid thirties( depend Ing upon experience). Deadline for resumes is August 15. • Deferred Compensation Program • Thirteen Days Sick Leave Annually • Thirteen Days Annual Leave Initially • Ten Paid Holidays (plus Presidential Inaugurations) For more Information contact Garland Yates, Eastern Regional Director, Center for Community Change (202) 342. • Tuition Assistance • Military Credit Toward Retirement QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: All applicants for these positions must possess a high school diploma or a certificate of equivalency issued by a recognized department of education; po . ssess a current valid driver's permit, pass a physical examination and background Investigation as determined by the Emergency Ambulance Bureau, be a state certiffed Emergency Medical Technician and be CPR (BLS) certified ASSOCIATE COUNSEL MALDEF, a national civil rights organization, seeks attorney to. fill the position of Associate Counsel for Its San Frsnclaco offiCe. The Associate Counsel will conduCt litigation, direct all activities of the San Francisco office and be responsible for supervising all litigation, programs and per sonnel Req: licensed attorney with a minimum of 6 years legal experience (3. years civil rights law in the areas of education or Immigration and 3 years litigation experl . ence In f . ederal and state practice); supervision and management skills; bilingual In English/Spanish. Send r& sume, writing sample and 3 references to E. Richard Larson, MALDEF, 634 So. Spring St, 11th Floor, LosAngeles,CA 90014 byAugust5, 1988. Please send Federal Standard Form 171 and copies of the following certifications; CPR ( BLS); state certification and current valid driver's license to JoAnn Johnson, D.C. Office of Personnel, 613 G Street N.W., Room 309, Washington, D.C. 20001 . (202) 727. Salary Range: $21,913-$27,628 paCareer Service Positions(An Equal Opportunity Employer) RESIDENCY Any person accepting one of these positions must become a District ofColumbia resident within 180 days of appointment and maintain such residency for the duration of District government employment The Department of Housing and Community Development offers . assistance to new . District of Columbia government employees seeking housing in Washington, D .C. WEEKLY REPORT WEEKLYREPORTSAVAILABLE: Hispanic Link has a limited number of unbound Weekly Report sets available: $18 for 18 issues in 1983 , $53 for 53 Issues In 1984, $52 for 52 issues in 1985, $50 each for 50 Issues in 1986 and 1987 . Order prepaid from Hispanic Link Back Copies, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. ASSOCIATE PRODUCER NEWS DEPARTMENT Duties include assisting news management with writing/copying news copy, videotape production, editing news reports, coordination of tapes and on-aidape production, coordination between control room and tape room. Work schedule likely to Include evenings and weekends. Prefer applicants with college degree in jour nalism and/ or equivalent experience In TV journalism and/or production. To apply contact Personnel Department, WPLG/TV, 3900 Biscayne Blvd, Fl. 33137 (305) 325. . BIUNGUAL EDUCATIONAL ADVOCATE Director Computing Facility Reporting to an Assoc . Dean for Academic Affairs, you will be responsible for managing a staff of 12 professionals, and managing the ongoing development, lmpleme . ntatlon and maintenance/replacement of computing systems that support the research, teaching and administrative functions of our Graduate School of Business. You will assume primary responsibility for all Computing Facility Operations, Including assessing computing needs, defining strategy, and Implementing plans; ensuring implementation of schoolanq University computing policies; planning and budgeting the operating expenees and capital expenditures; overseeing the purchasing of computer equipment; controlling the processes by which hardware and software are acquired, Implemented and maintained; ensuring the adequacy of system security and backup, networking rel_labllity and equipment Inventories and . providing a positive working environment with respect to communiCation and professional development QUALIFICATIONS: Must have strong managerial, supervisory and professional skills with a welfrounded technical computing background and familiarity with multi-vendor, multi user environment Ability to manage a large staff and experience In managing large budgets under. conditions of rapid technological change necessary. Working knowledge of DEC computing environments (TOP5-20 and VMS), M&DOS and Apple Macintosh computing environments, local area networks, computer programming In high level language (such as FORTRAN) and data base languages required Strong verbal and written communication Salary$3,966-$6,022/month. -----------Send resume to: Dept JEF/54i29HL, Stanford University Personnel Services, Old Pavilion, Stanford, CA 94305 o : An equal opportunity employer through affirmative action. AdvocatesforChildren(AFQhasan Immediate 1 L--:------....,....,.,.,.,.,.....,...,...,...,...,...,..., .... JOb opening for a BILINGUAL (Spanish/EngliSh) ' . EDUCATIONAL ADVOCATE. AFC is a nonDEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a . profit organization representing New York City 1 national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed public school students on an individual and 1 of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad In Marketplace, please complete and class basis. . attach your ad copy and mall to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N Sl NW, Washington, D.C. Jo. b qualifications c?llege degree . 20005 or phone (202) 234 or(202) Ad copy received (mall or phone) by 5 p.m (E1) Tuesday will be In Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. 1n wntten and oral Spanish and English , good : writing skills, ability to make oral presentations, , experience in case management, and a commitment to young people. Previous experience In advOC!!CY, or with the New York City school . system, is Please send resume and writing sample by August 15, 1 ,988 to: Norma Rollins, Advocates for Children, 24 Bridge Plaza South, Long N':'. 11101. Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & :z:lp code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request DISPLAY ClASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders. varied type sizes) $45 per column irich. Ordered by Organization Street ----r:::_------'-----City, State & Zip ___ ...;.._ ____ _ Area Code & Phone --------5

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Arts & Entertainment I of the film has been halted by another strikethe ongoing Writers Gulitl of Ainerlwonflict. The film is expected for release in HR/CK BIG SCREEN NEWS: Actress Rita Moreno has become co executive producer of the film Hearts on Fire, planned as the first ever film written, produced and directed by Latinas . In a related item, f:YfiSot Steel, which stars Carlos Palomino and . Henry Silva, has griqci18ft8'hotography in Hawaii and is now in The film, from Fleta of St .. l Productions, is due for release in October. Two Hollywood films are moving south of the border this month. The film is a fictionalized account of the making of the 1954 movie Salt of the Earth, about a 15-month strike by zinc miners in Silver City, N.M. Union leader Juan Chac6n, who led the 1950 strike, had a starring role in the film produced by Hollywood filmmakers and "blacklisted' by the U.S. House of Representatives' Un-American One is the upcoming James Bond saga, License Revoked, in which model Talisa Soto plays femme fatale Lupe Lamora opposite Timothy Dalton. The movie is now rolling in Mexico's Estudios Churubuscos. Also filming in Mex . ico is Jerico, starring Marion Brando, to be shot on locations in the state of Morelos. Activities Committee. . Images in the ShadowS, a History ofSpanish Ju'!_e 30 with a salute to director Vicente Aranda lit r,uns; thr-Mendoza Editor. Fel ix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Re ntas, Darryl FiguerOa, Sophia Nieves, Diana Padilla GF.