Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, August 1, 1988

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, August 1, 1988
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News
A Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee lookinjf^Ufi) covert foreign policy operations centering on retired Lt.Col. Oliver North says it will call to testify Jorge Mas Canosa, chairman of the Cuban American National Foundation. The testimony would be about entries in North’s diaries that mention Mas Canosa and an $80,000 payment... California Gov. George Deukmejian considers Orange County Supervisor Gaddi Vftsquez as a possible nominee for the vacant state treasurer's post... Florida state Rep. Arnhilda Gonzftlez-Quevedo, who created a stir two months ago when she switched to the Democratic Party, announces she will not seek a third term to the
/â–  TCtate House... Tim Floras, a founder of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement, dies of cancer in Denver at age 68 on July 8... IttEdgar Guerra and Felipe Becerra, two Los Angeles gang members, organize a car wash and raise $900 to help pay for the funeral expenses of 9-year-old Jorge Gonzftlez. Gonzalez was shot near his house, caught in the gunfire of rival gangs. . . Jury selection begins in the trial of Richard Ramirez, a 28-year-old charged with 13 murders and 30 related felonies. Ramirez is accused of being the Night Stalker, who terrorized Southern California in the summer of 1985... Marfa Gallardo, a 32-year-old mother of five from Miami, chases down in her van a 14-year-old who had just left a stolen automobile that crashed into a police car. After Gallardo flashed a badge - one belonging to a crossing guard - the boy gave up..
Vo I. 6 No. 30
HISPANK^NKWEEKLYREPORtII
Aug. 1, 1988
SVREP Charges It Was Duped by Sea Cranston
The Southwest Voter Registration Education Project is running at a $350,000 deficit and its officials blame much of it on U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.).
Willie Velasquez, founder of SVREP, alluded publicly to the conflict with Cranston during a speech in April at a Hispanic media conference in Dallas. “There is a battle building over who is going to deliver the Hispanic vote and for what reason. It is unwise to have political faith in someone else’s hands,” he said.
Since his June 15 death of cancer, Velasquez’s family and staff have talked of a connection between Cranston, financial troubles at SVREP and the fact that he died without life insurance.
Andy Hernandez, who has succeeded Velasquez as SVREP director, said it is operating a $1 million budget with only $650,000 in funding, a drop from nearly $1 million in 1984-85.
Velasquez’s widow, Jane, and others said that one cost-cutting measure taken by Ve&s-quez was to let SVREPs life insurance policies lapse.
Hern&ndez said Cranston pledged financial support to SVREP in 1986, mostly for expansion of its California operation. Instead, Cranston
'California state legislators and Los Angeles County officials took action last month to begin correcting the underrepresentation of Hispanics in government jobs. Assemblyman Pete Chacdn (D-San Diego) introduced a resolution to form a state-level task force, while Los Angeles County officials directed their staff to formulate a plan to help the county meet affirmative action goals in the hiring of Hispanics.
The Black Advocates in State Service, a state employees^ group, and the California State Personnel Board are opposed to Cha-c6n’s measure. The employees^ group wants the focus of the task force widened to include blacks^ concerns in the areas of job retention and disciplinary action. Despite this, the resolution to form the 14-member task force is expected to clear both chambers by late August according to Mike Reyna, a Chacdn staff member.
Reyna said Hispanics currently represent
helped start and diverted funds to a new voter registration group, the Center for Participation in Democracy, charged Herndndez.
“This is not a turf fight. It’s a question of whether or not Hispanic politics and the progress of its politics is going to rest in its own institutions, in its own leadership or in someone else’s good intentions.”
In response to Hernandez’s charge that $250,000 had been pledged to SVREP, Cranston issued a statement saying“I never promised any specific amount to Willie,” He said it would be foolish to do otherwise.
“He was a great man whom I greatly admired ..... It grieves me deeply that this misunderstanding has arisen.”
CPD, incorporated in July 1987, was until recently headed by Cranston’s son, Kim, who now sits on CPD’s 17-member board of directors. The new board chairperson is former California Supreme Court Judge Cruz Reynoso, who said he had recently spoken to some Latinos in the registration field who expressed concern that SVREP not be hurt by CPD.
“I think the; work of Southwest Voter is so important that I want to be sure myself that it not be hurt” He said he is arranging a meeting
13.7% of the state’s government labor force but are expected to form 23% of California’s private work force by 1990. He said 9,400 additional state jobs for Hispanics are needed by 1990 for them to reach parity.
Blacks represent 6.4% of the total labor force in California and 11.6% of the state government work force.
In Los Angeles County, a report prepared by the county’s Office of Affirmative Action Compliance found Hispanics were at population parity in only three of 38 departments. They make up 18% of the county employees and 27.6% of the county's population. The county board of supervisors voted unanimously June 12 to accept the results of the report despite opposition by black county employee groups, which charged the report was flawed.
The supervisors also directed the chief administrative officer and the affirmative action compliance officer to beg in1 work on a pian to correct the imbalance. - Sophia Nieves
between CPD and SVREP to work out such problems as the overlapping of both groups, in East Los Angeles, for example.
Los Angeles Councilwoman^aloria Molina is one who “absolutely’ believes CPD is hurting SVREP. She said she had spoken to Cranston about it
“Hispanics have to be empowered from within, not anointed from above,” she said. “ I don’t have the kind of confidence in that project that I do in SVREP that we will not be brokered later on.”
CPD operates on a $3.1 million budget, said spokesperson Suzanne Manriquez. A staff of nearly200 has been conducting voter registration out of six offices in Los Angeles and others in nine cities.
Rob Stein, who works with Cranston on voter registration through a Washington, D.C.,
continued on page 2
INS Proposal Extends Exemptions from Exam
In a move hailed by many civil rights groups, the U.Sl Immigration and Naturalization Service released at a July 21 press conference in Los Angeles proposed regulations that would exempt a large portion of legalization applicants from taking the English and civics exam required for the second step of the legalization process.
The regulations, already sent to the Office of Management and Budget forfinal approval and expected to be published in the Federal Register early this week, waive the test requirement for applicants under 16 and over 65 years of age. Those people who have completed high school, have a high school equivalency diploma or one year of study in a state-accredited school also would not have to take the test
Also provided for in the regulations is the development of a test that applicants can take at independent testing centers in lieu of the INS exam. No estimates were available on the number of people who may be affected.
Also released during the same week were booklets to be used as study guides for the exam. The booklets have been criticized by many immigrant advocates as too complicated.
Calif., LA. County Act on Hiring Parity


Poll Shows Hispanics Prefer Dukakis for President
Democratic presidential nominee Michael Dukakis has a considerable lead among Hispanics over soon-to-be Republican nominee Vice President George Bush -58% to 32% - according to poll results released July 18 in Atlanta by the Spanish-television network Univision.
The poll of 612 likely Hispanic voters showed that the Massachusetts governor was the overwhelming choice among all Hispanic subgroups except Cuban Americana A resounding 80% of the Cubans reported that Bush was their choice.
The survey, conducted by Bendixen & Law, a Washington, D.C. -based research firm, found:
BUSH DUKAKIS UN-
Cubans 80% 14% DECIDED 6%
Mexicans 27 64 9
Puerto Ricans 24 62 14
Central, South Americans 41 56 3
All Latinos 32 58 10
The decision by Dukakis tochoose Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen as his running mate had little effect on the preference of Latinos Given the hypothetical pairing of Bush and Wyoming Sen. Alan Simpson - someone the pollsters felt was the least known of the Republican vice presidential possibilities-56% of Hispanics opted for Dukakis/Bentsen as opposed to 30% for the Republican pair.
The survey was conducted July1-13through door-to-door and telephone interviews. It had a margin of error of plus or minus 4.7%.
- Felix Perez
SVREP Funding Dips $350,000
continued from page 1
group called USA Vote, which Cranston chairs^ acknowledged that Cranston has encouraged financial support of CPD, privately and publicly, but that he also did so for SVREP.
CPD has been registering Latino, black, Asian and young Anglo voters since January, said Manrfquez. Of the 139,000 so far registered, 28%, or 38,920, are Latinos.
Kim Cranston told Weekly Report, “There are 7.5 million people not registered to vote in California. There’s still a lot of work to be done.
“I felt there was a real need to focus oh training people to become effective community organizers and register voters I was not aware of any group that existed that was doing that particular thing.”
Juan Andrade, executive director of Midwest/ Northeast Voter Registration Education Project, said, “That’s an integral part of what organizations like ours do.”
Herndndez charged that among Cranston’s agenda in funding CPD was to “win elections for himself and his friends.” Cranston narrowly
Five Mexican nationals filed a complaint with the San Bernardino, Calif., County Board of Supervisors July 18 seeking $10 million from the county Sheriffs Department. The complaint charges deputies used excessive force in their arrest
The FBI has begun an investigation into possible civil rights violations following the release of a five-minute videotape which apparently shows the men were beaten and clubbed without reason.
Brothers Jos6 and Victor Serrano and their father, Efron, along with Domingo Garcia and Javier Ruellas were involved in an altercation with sheriffs deputies shortly after 10 am. June 30. Deputies were responding to a complaint of loud music and men urinating and throwing beercans into an adjacent yard.
Carlos Judrez, legal counsel for the Institute for Social Justice/Congress for a United Community, a local civil rights group representing the five men, said that the “officers unlawfully came on the property of the individuals, battered and falsely arrested them, causing injuries.” The claim also asserts civil rights violations
After viewing the tape, Sheriff Floyd Tidwell
won re-election in 1986.â– 
The work of Southwest Voter is not threatened, though there has been a reduction in their voter campaigns and there have been no salary increases since 1984, said Hernandez. Nonetheless, the staff of 16 moved into larger offices July 22 and has registered 40,000 Latinos this year.
The public conflict has involved Velasquez’s family. His brother, George, promised Texas reporters a transcript of a taped conversation with then- hospitalized Willie, which apparently reflected Velasquez's belief that Cranston had undercut SVREP.
The family has since decided this would be inappropriate Jane said, “I have to go with what I feel Willie would have done. Willie was not a press conference type person."
Juan Andrade, who has done voter registration work for 20 years, believes this is a case of good intentions gone awry. “Often times people with good intentions come in and try to reinvent the wheel and end UP undermining what has taken years to create.”
- Darryl Figueroa
disputed the charges, claiming that the “officers used the proper amount of force.”
All but Jos6 Serrano were released with no charges. He was booked on resisting arrest and possession of a small amount of cocaine.
- Diana Padilla
Bush to Address Gl Forum
Vice President George Bush will be the keynote speaker at the American Gl Forum’s annual national convention Aug. 1-7 in Corpus Christi, Texas. He is scheduled to address the group Aug. 4.
While Democratic presidential nominee Michael Dukakis remained unconfirmed at press time as the second keynote speaker, his running mate, Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, is scheduled.
A number of other elected officials will appear during the eight-day convention, including Speaker of the House Jim Wright(D-Texas) and Texas Gov. Bill Clements.
Mario Diaz, current national chairman of the 40-year-old Forum, is expected to run unopposed for a second one-year term.
U.S. Tells L.A. County It Must Redraw Districts
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors may face the largest voting rights lawsuit ever brought against a local governmental body if it does not begin workon a redistricting plan to correct alleged discrim i nation against Latinos.
On July 26 the board voted down a measure, 3-2, that would have put a charter amendment on the November ballot adding two supervisorial seats.
“It was to our advantage they put together a plan that would maximize Latino strength,” said Alan Clayton, the state civil rights representative of the California League of United Latjn American Citizens He said if the board went to seven members it still would not automatically meet the test of the 1965 Voting Rights Act
There are five districts in the31% Hispanic county. No Latino has served as supervisor in the county’s 138-year history.
In a letter dated July 15, Assistant Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds gave the county until the end of last month to indicate what action it would take. Reynolds said in his letter that county officials must scrap present boundaries after the November election
The board voted July 19 to hire a local firm to provide population figures that could be used in realigning the districts, but did not take action on a redistricting plan.
In May the U.S. Justice Department sent a letterto the county indicating that by splitting the Latino Eastside vote among three districts in 1981, the supervisors prevented a Hispanic from gaining enough votes to win a seat
- Sophia Nieves
Gov. Picks Few Latinos
In California, a state that is home to the largest Hispanic population in the country, only 4.4% of judges appointed by Gov. Deukmejian during his 5 1/2 years in office are Latino.
A survey in the July issue of California Lawyer magazine studied the backgrounds of more than 500 judges Of these appointees 88.9% are Anglo, 4.4% are Hispanic, 3% are black and 3.7% Asian.
Video Prompts $10 Million Complaint
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Zita Arocha, guest columnist
Waging a Lifelong Struggle
My 4-year-old daughter can say manzana and pera. Apple and pear. She catches me by surprise and pronounces the words perfectly sometimes as we are driving to the grocery store or when she is playing happily with her toys in the bathtub. Yet, when I ask her a question in Spanish, she looks at me coyly and responds in English. It drives me crazy.
“6 Miranda, quieres ir al parqueT “Yes, Mommy, I really do,” she says.
I try again, “tMiranda, qua tipo de fruta quieres?”
Well, Mom, I want some cherries,” she says, smiling.
“Why don’t you answer me in Spanish?”
I ask. No response.
Sometimes, my husband, David Smith-Soto, and I will slip into Spanish, our native tongue, mistakenly thinking we can avoid Miranda’s keen ear.
That’s when her attention is usually riveted by our conversation. When we are done, she will comment on what we have said and ask cogent sometimes pesky questionsJn English, of course.
I want my daughter to grow up bilingual, as my husband and I did. It has been an invaluable tool in our professional development, and we both are proud of our Hispanic culture.
SURROUNDED BY SPANISH My family emigrated from Cuba to Tampa, Fla, in 1958, when I was 5 years old, and I grew up speaking Spanish at home. In school, I worked hard to retain my native language, studying Spanish in junior high and high school. In college, I majored in English and Spanish.
In my newspaper career, I have often gotten good stories because I was the only reporter who could speak the language.
My husband has had a similar experience, growing up in Costa Rica, the son of a Costa Rican mother and a U.S. father. Spanish set him apart from the U.S.-born journalists at The Miami Herald. Because of his bilingual ability, he eventually was promoted to deputy managing editor of El Miami Herald, a position he held for several years before we moved to Washington, D.C., three years ago.
When we lived in Miami, we were surrounded by Spanish. Most of our neighbors were Cuban. Miranda’s baby sitter, Berta, was a large,j warm Cuban mother of three who liked to watch Spanish soap operas on television. She fed Miranda black beans and rice and sprinkled her baby hair with Spanish violet water. My parents, who still live in Tampa, were frequent visitors to our Coral Gables home. For them, English is still a strange and difficult language.
HOW MUCH DO WE PUSH?
Now we live in suburban Maryland, in a mainly white, middle-class neighborhood of Volvos and manicured lawns. We are the only Hispanic family on our block. My daughter attends a small nursery school where there is an Oriental and one other foreign-born child.
Miranda’s only exposures to Spanish are Sesame Street, the Peruvian baby sitter who watches her three days a week while I work and occasional visits from her grandparents.
However, with some prodding, she can count to 20 in Spanish and knows her colors in Spanish. And when I read to her books like El ratoncito del campo y el ratoncito de la ciudad and La gallinita roja, she never stops me to ask what something means.
As we begin thinking about where to send Miranda to kindergarten, we discuss more and more how strenuously we should push her.
Do we send her to our monolingual, neighborhood elementary school or do we enroll her in a special school far from home where she will be taught both English and Spanish? Do we let her decide for herself when she is older whether she wants to study Spanish? Helping Miranda become bilingual, we have come to accept, is going to be a lifelong struggle.
(Zita Arocha, of Bethesda, Md, is a Washington Post reporter.)
Aug. 1,
Sin pelos en la lengua
MY TURN: Oh, those Democrats, they love us so. Did you notice how they all lauded us when they took their turns at the microphone at their Atlanta convention? And how the bilingual team of D&B trotted off to the Tex-Mex border as soon as the festivities were over to practicar their espahol in our barrrrrios?
I did, too. And it left me wondering. If they like us so much, how come they never let us have the spotlight to ourselves? If they can talk about us, how come we can’t talk about us?
On Tuesday night, Texas legislator Lena Guerrero and New Mexico Congressman Bill Richardson were both scheduled for prime-time appearances in front of the microphone. But that Rainbow Coalition man, Jesse, wanted the Jackson Five to sing their Daddy’s praises (which they did very well, I have to admit)-so the program planners bumped the brown out of Jesse’s Rainbow, if it was ever there in the first place.
Richardson, who had written a very nice speech on how the Reagan Administration killed public education, and even lost a few pounds so he’d look good on TV, got his turn at the mike the next night. But by that time, the network teams were tired of speeches and figured the public would rather listen to them be profound than hear some Latino from New Mexico. So we were done in again. Lena? Who knows what happened to her?
The Democratic National Committee established a “minority outreach program” for us Third World journalists this year, setting up special press conferences for us. So whom did we get to quiz? Some good, hard-working black and Latino party workers and others who made themselves readily available to us throughout the convention anyway. It would have been nice to have had Paul Kirk or Ann Richards or even Jassa there. But so it goes.
Then, to remind us what short memories some liberals have, we stopped by the posh Mexico-themed reception hosted by Congressman Tony Coalho at Atlanta’s landmark railroad building. There, amid the fruit arrangements at each buffet table were lovely bouquets of table grapes.
Dutifully, United Farm Workers’ never-tiring, ever-vigilant VP Dolores Huerta was busily removing the offending fruit and telling people that Tony should know better, that the United Farm Workers have been boycotting grapes for so long, and that Tony's California district includes one of the nation’s largest and poorest groupsiof farm workers who have supported him so loyally.
Twice she went through the receiving line to admonish Coelho. The second time she even borrowed a sombrero from the decorations to disguise herself, only to be thwarted by smiling Tip O’Neill, who didn’t want her to spoil a good party.
Coelho, of Portuguese descent, was denied membership to the Congressional Hispanic Caucus some years ago because the powers-that-were (I think it was Bobby Garcia of New York) didn’t consider Portuguese as Hispanic enough. Bill Richardson changed the ruled when he served as caucus chairman a couple years back, and let him in.
Oh me, oh my. If politics ain’t applesauce, it’s grape jelly.
Kay BArbaro
MARGA GOMEZ, San Francisco comedienne, introducing herself at the Mexican American Women’s National Association conference in Washington, D.C., July 21:
“My mother is Puerto Rican, my father was Cuban, and my best friends are Mexican, which makes me (long pause) confusedl” RICHARD OLSON, Orange County, Calif., sheriffs lieutenant, quoted in the June 14 Los Angeles Times on his jaiTs reluctance to serve spicy Mexican food, including jalapeho peppers, to inmate's:' “What you’ve got to think of any time you put something on those tables is that ifs a potential weapon. We run security in the jails How would you like to have one of those things stuck in your eye?”
1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
CALIFORNIA JUDGES: A survey in the July issue of California Lawyer Magazine examines the racial and professional backgrounds of judges appointed by Gov. George Deukmejian. To obtain a copy, send a request with $3 to California Lawyer Magazine, 1390 Market St, Suite 1016, San Francisco^ Calif, 94102. After Aug. 1 the cost is $5.
EDUCATION JOURNAL: Floricanto Press' 44-page “Hispanic Journal of Education, Commentary and Reviews” focuses on general issues affecting the education, particularly higher education, of Hispanics. For a subscription to the quarterly journal and the monthly La Red/The Net, send$49 (institutions), $39(individuals) to Floricanto Press, 16161 Ventura Blvd., Suite 830, Encino, Calif. 91436-2604 (818) 990-1885.
FILM/VIDEO COMPETITION: Universal Television, the National Hispanic Media Coalition, the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences and Columbia College will accept original scripts for competition in their Hispanic Film/Video Program. The deadline for submissions is Sept. 16. For more information write or call Hispanic Film/Video Program, c/o Columbia College, 925 N. La Brea Ave., Hollywood, Calif. 90038 (818) 777-8005.
CALL FOR PAPERS: The Wight Art Gallery at the University of California at Los Angeles will consider articles for the catalog and supplemental publications related to the exhibition “Chicano Art Resistance and Affirmation.” Abstracts of proposed papers must be submitted no laterthan Sept. 1. For more information contactTeresa McKenna, CARA Editorial Board, Wight Art Gallery, UCLA, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 90024-1620 (213) 825-1461.
ARIZONA BUSINESS: A 10-page report prepared by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s Business Research Department on Arizona Hispanic businesses indicates that with 8,500 Hispanic firms in the state, the Arizona Hispanic business sector ranks sixth nationwide. Fora free copy of the report write to Business Research Department, USHCC, 4900 Main St, Suite 700, Kansas City, Mo. 64112.
ISSUES POLL: A 38-page “Issues Poll" conducted by the Midwest/ Northeast Voter Registration Education Project during its Midwest Hispanic Leadership Conference questioned 337 Hispanic conference participants about Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis and former aspirant Jesse Jackson. For a copy, send $2.50 to MNVREP, 431 S. Dearborn, #1103, Chicago, III. 60605, Attn: Juan Andrade.
DEPARTMENT TARGETS OLDER WORKERS
The Asociacion Nacional Pro-Personas Mayores received a $9.3 million grant to develop part-time services for unemployed, low-income workers, primarily Hispanic, U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Ann McLaughlin announced last month.
The Los Angeles-based organization operates programs in San Diego and Orange County, Calif, Tucson, Ariz, Miami and Tampa, Fla, Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, San Antonio, Laredo and Corpus Christi, Texas, and Washington, D.C, among other cities
In addition to employment services, the Labor Department’s Senior Community Service Employment Program also provides nutrition programs health and home care, recreation and transportation.
DEMOCRATS MEET
Some 300 Hispanics from nearly 40 states and Puerto Rico participated in the National Hispanic Democrats founding convention held July 17 in Atlanta. The function preceded by a day the beginning of the Democratic National Convention in that same city.
Some of the more notable speakersatthe Washington, D.C.-based voter registration and education groups daylong convention were U.S, Rep. Tony Coelho of California who as majority whip holds the Houses third most powerful position, Rep Esteban Torres of California co-chair of NHD, and Carmen P6rez, chair of the Hispanic caucus of the Democratic National Committee.
Making its debut last November, NHD will be sponsoring voter registration drives in communities with large Hispanic populations before the November elections
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
U.S. Department of Agriculture Assistant Secretary John Franke presents the department’s Minority Contractor of the Year Award to Miranda Associates a consulting firm housed in Washington, D.C, and owned by Lourdes Miranda.. Victor Merced, executive director of the Oregon Council for Hispanic Advancement in Portland, wins a fellowship from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation's Kellogg National Fellowship Program. The three-year, $35,000 fellowship is designed to allow leaders from various walks of life to enhance their skills and knowledge in a new area... The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund sets up its Employer Education Project hotline for California employers interested in the sanctions and anti-discrimination provisions of the Immigration, Reform and Control Act The number for the yearlong service is (213) 629-2731...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
FESTIVAL LATINO New York Aug. 3-27
Joseph Papp and the New York Shakespeare Festival will present 26 films and six stage productions from throughout Latin America. The event will include a tribute to Argentine cinema.
Bilingual Festival Information (212) 598-7155
IMMIGRATION LAW Chicago Aug. 4
The Chicago Committee on Immigrant Protection will sponsora conference on immigration policy and issues surrounding the second phase of the federal immigration law. Workshops on refugees, cultural adaptation, sanctuary and health care and social services for immigrants will also be held.
David Marzahl (312) 435-4500
FARM WORKERS CONFERENCE 4
Toledo, Ohio Aug. 6
Cesar Ch&vez will be among the speakers addressing the Farm Labor'Organizing Committee's constitutional convention. Convention delegates will be meeting to vote on proposals that will shape the organization during the next three years.
Volker Grotefeld (419) 243-3456
COMING SOON
MULTICULTURAL SEMINAR Indiana Department of Education Indianapolis Aug. 14,15 Darlene Slady (317) 269-9477
AVIATION TRAINING
National Hispanic Coalition of Federal Aviation San Antonio Aug. 14-20 Carmen Ouiles (312) 694-7753
YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
California Superintendent’s Advisory Council on
Hispanic Affairs
Sacramento Aug. 14-20
Maria Luisa Ochoa (916) 445-1670
GOLF CONVENTION
Aug. 1,1988
National Pan-American Golf Association Kansas City, Kans. Aug. 15-19 Bob Soltero (816) 523-4586
AIDS MINORITY CONFERENCE Centers for Disease Control Washington, D.C. Aug. 24 Dale Perkins (202) 347-0390
SPANISH CONTRIBUTION TO U-S.
Foundation for the Advancement of Hispanic-Americans
Washington, D.C. Aug. 24 Yves Gisse (202) 623-6889
LABOR MEETING
Labor Council for Latin American Advancement San Antonio Aug, 24-27 Alfredo Montoya (202) 347-4223
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS
We offer you a tremendous opportunity to experience professional-growth and satisfaction by serving in the Nation's Capital Emergency Ambulance Bureau.
We offer
• A professional management team concerned with your personal and professional welfare.
• Top pay BENEFITS
• A generous Retirement Plan
• Promotional Opportunities
• Health, Dental and Optical Insurance available for Employee and Dependents
• Deferred Compensation Program
• Thirteen Days Sick Leave Annually
• Thirteen Days Annual Leave Initially
• Ten Paid Holidays (plus Presidential Inaugurations)
• Tuition Assistance
• Military Credit Toward Retirement
QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: All applicants for these positions must possess a high school diploma or a certificate of equivalency issued by a recognized department of education; possess a current valid driver's permit, pass a physical examination and background investigation as determined by the Emergency Ambulance Bureau, be a state certified Emergency Medical Technician and be CPR(BLS) certified
Please send Federal Standard Form 171 and copies of the following certifications; CPR (BLS); state certification and current valid driver's license to JoAnn Johnson, D.C. Office of Personnel, 613 G Street N.W., Room 309, Washington, D.C. 20001. (202) 727-6427.
Salary Rang#: $21,913 - $27,628 pa- Career Service Positions(An Equal Opportunity Employer)
RESIDENCY
Any person accepting one of these positions must become a District of Columbia resident within 180 days of appointment and maintain such residency for the duration of District government employment
The Department of Housing and Community Development offers assistance to new District of Columbia government employees seeking housing in Washington, D.C.
FEDERAL WORKERS
A Note of Appreciation from the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund.
With the strong assistance from many generous individuals, the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund was able to raise $35,000 in 1987 for much-needed scholarship support as a result of the 1987 Combined Federal Campaign With your help, we hope to surpass this figure and assist a greater number of deserving Hispanic-American students across the nation.
In 1988, be a part of our effort aimed at recognizing and assisting some of the nation's best and most talented minds. Please designate the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund on your Combined Federal Campaign.
ISHSF
NATIONAL
HISPANIC
SCHOLARSHIP
FUND
Direct contributions can be made to: National Hispanic Scholarship Fund Post Office Box 748 San Francisco, California 94101 Contributions to NHSF are tax deductible
LIBRARY ASSISTANT I Ann. #: 7021-9A-LIB- Salary: $18,553 This is paraprofessional library work in varied phases of library activity serving a diverse population. The work involves performance of routine circulation desk duties. Duties include operating a computer terminal in working with patron and book information, registering patrons for library cards, maintaining records and files, preparing statistical and other reports and other related duties.
Requires two years of college credit (60 semester hours or 90 quarter hours) and six months experience in general library procedures Refer to announcement for preferred qualifications All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 PM on AUGUST 11,1988. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired onl\fl.
ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 14th St. North, Arlington, VA 22201 EOE/MFH
ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST
The Center for Community Change in Washington. D.C.. isseeking applicants for the position of organizational development specialist Applicants must have experience in working with local nonprofit, grass roots advocacy and community development organization.
The position is based in Washington, D.C., with a salary range of low to mid thirties(depend-ing upon experience). Deadline for resumes is August 15.
For more information contact Garland Yates, Eastern Regional Director, Center for Community Change (202) 342-0594.
SOCIAL SCIENCES BIBLIOGRAPHER
The Stanford University Libraries seek a Social Sciences Bibliographer responsible for providing support for research programs in economics, psychology, sociology and related interdisciplinary fields.
Responsibilities include: conventional book selection in subject fields; some scheduled general reference; advanced consultation and liaison with faculty and graduate students in subject areas, including MRDFs and online resources.
Qualifications: MLS or equivalent graduate training in social sciences; analytical and communication skills; knowledge of Western European language(s) preferred; experience in academic library and teaching or instruction desirable; knowledge of MRDFs and data analysis desirable. Assistant ($27,000 -$37,200) or Associate Librarian ($29,700 -$41,400) depending on experience and qualifications
Send letter of application, resum A and names and addresses of 3 professional references by October 15,1988, to Irene Yeh, Assistant Library Personnel Officer, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, CA 94305-6004. Cite #328- HL, on all correspondence. EEO/AAE
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234*0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Submissions are welcome for Weekly Report's "guest columnist" feature. Approx 500 words. For writer's guidelines, send self addressed, stamped envelope to: Guest Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Ordered by _ Organization
Street
City, State & Zip.
Area Code & Phone
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
THE NATION’S A STAGE: Major Hispanic theater events coincide this month in New York, Texas and California
Beginning this week is the 12th edition of Festival Latino in New York, the reputed “largest Latino cultural event in the United States."
The core of the festival is made up of events at the city’s Public Theater, but related events include music, film and TV presentations from latin America Spain and the United States
This year, New York will host companies from Mexico (Compahia Nacionai de Teatro), Argentina (Luis Brandoni, Marta Bianchi and their company), Costa Rica (Compahia Nacionai de Teatro) and Spain (La Zaranda). as well as a city debut by Cuban actors Mario Balmaseda and Pedro Renteria
The two Cubans will perform Mosquito by South African playwright Athol Fugard. Several of the performances in Spanish, scheduled
from Aug. 3 to 10, will be translated to English.
Coincidentally, the Only U.S. theater piece in the event is a work in progress that’s part of this week’s Hispanjc Playwrights Project in Costa Mesa, Calif.
Charles G6mez’s Bang Bang Blues, about the experiences of a network news team in Nicaragua, travels to the Public at the end of the month. The play, along with Lyriette Serrano Bonaparte’s Broken Bough, and Rafael Lima’s Simply Maria, will have workshops and be staged in public readings as part of the Costa Mesa event.
This is the third year for the HPP, which will be housed Aug. 2 to 14 at the city’s South Coast Repertory theater.
This week sees the conclusion of the third edition of the Chamizal Zarzuela Festival in El Paso.
Wrapping up the festival are performances of El barberillo de lavapibs by Albuquerque’s /Viva Zarzuela1 company (Aug. 1-2); La tempestad by the University of Texas at El Paso opera company (Aug. 3-4); and Mollnos de viento by New York’s Thalia Spanish Theater (Aug. 5-7).
Media Report
CAPITAL TV: Hispanics and most TV station managers believe the coverage of Latinos by the four major commercial stations in the nation’s capital is inadequate, found a study released July 24 by The American University in Washington, D.C.
The metro area Hispanic community, estimated to number200,000-250,000, feels it is either invisible or negatively portrayed on WJLA, WRC, WTTG, WUSA “The Hispanic community is thirsty for information about itself,” said Lucienne Loman, former career programs manager at the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.
Among, the four stations, there is only one Hispanic on-air journalist WRCs Lynda Lopez, from Los Fresnos Valley, Texas.
Many station officials placed partial blame on the silence of Latinos. Executives at WRC-TV, the only station to defend its coverage as adequate, said they had never received
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link Naws Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Diana Padilla.
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues): institutions/agencies $118
Personal $108
Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request..
complaints from the Hispanic community about the amount or quality or coverage.
Hispanics felt the issue should be addressed by hiring more Latinos or personnel who are Spanish speaking and culturally sensitive.
The 72-page report, titled “The Missing Minorities,” is available for $4.00 from: The American University, School of Communications, Lincoln Furber, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20016 (202) 885-1200.
VISTA EXPANSION: Viata magazine added this month the Star-Free Press in Ventura, Calif., to the list of newspapers carrying the supplement. Its circulation is now 1.3 million.
Vista offices are being beefed up in preparation for its switch from monthly to weekly publication in September, which coincides with its three-year anniversary. New bureaus in Los Angeles and New York City have been established, headed respectively by Ray Estrada and John Garcia At the magazine’s Coral Gables, Fla, headquarters; Judith Faerron becomes managing editor. Her predecessor, Renato Perez, is now a senior editor.
PULITZER UPDATE: After receiving complaints from the Hispanic Naws Madia Association of Washington, D.C., and other Latino groups the Pulitzer Prize Board invited three Hispanic journalists to serve as jury members .next year. No Hispanics sat on the 66-member jury this year. Though the board will not publicly announce its65-member jury for 1969 until January, David Medina, assistant city editor at The Miami News, Norma Sosa, managing editor at the Corpus Christ! Caller Times, and Ernie Sotomayor, associate editor at the Dallas Times-Hsrald, are the invited trio.
WILLIE ISSUE: Willie Veldsquez graces the June 29 cover of The Texas Observer, an Austin-based weekly, which includes a 10-page section covering Willie and Southwest Voter Registration Education Project. A story by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros is also included.
Those interested in receiving the issue may send $3 to: The Texas Observer at P.O. Box 49019, Austin, Texas 78765 (512) 477-0746.
- Darryl Figueroa
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Le__ 'ltate House ... Tim Flores, a founder of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement, dies of cancer in Denver at a9e 68 on July 8 ... A Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee lookin covert lledgar Guerra and Felipe Becerra, two Los Angeles gang members, organize a car wash and raise $900 to help pay for the funeral expenses of 9-year-old Jorge Gonzalez. Gonzalez was shot near his house, caught in the gunfire of rival gangs. . . Jury selection begins in the trial of Richard Ramirez, a 28-year-old charged with 13 murders and 30 related felonies. Ramirez is accused of being the Night Stalker, who terrorized Southern California in the summer of 1985 ... Marla Gallardo, a 32-year-old mother of five from Miami, chases down in her van a 14-year-old who had just left a stolen automobile that crashed into a police car. After Gallardo flashed a badge-one belonging to a crossing guard-the boy gave up . . . foreign policy operations centering on retired Lt. Col. Oliver. N .orth says it will call to testify Jorge Mas Canosa, chairman of the Cuban American National Foundation. The testimony would be about entries in North's diaries that mention Mas Canosa and an $80,000 payment. .. California Gov . George Deukmejlan considers Orange County Supervisor Gaddl Vasque:ot as a possible nominee for the vacant state treasurer's post. .. Florida state Rep . Arnhllda Gonz&lez. Quevedo, who created . a stir two months ago when she switched to the Democratic Party, announces she will not seek a third term to the Vol. 6 No. 30 HISPANI EEKL Aug. 1,1988 SVREPCharges HWas Duped by Sen. Cranston The Southwest Voter Registration Education Project is running at a $350,000 deficit and its officials blame much of it on U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.). Willie Velasquez, founder of SVREP, alluded publicly to the conflict with Cranston during a speech in April at a Hispanic media conference in Dallas. "There is a battle building over who is going to deliver the Hispanic vote and for what reason. It is unwise to have political faith in someone else's hands," he said. Since his June 15 death of cancer, Velas quez's family and staff have talked of a con nection between Cranston, financial troubles at SVREP and the fact that he died without life insurance. Andy Hernandez, who has succeeded Vela& quez as SVREP director, said it is operating a $1 million budget with only $650,000 in fund ing, a drop from nearly$1 million in 1984-85. Velasquez's widow, Jane, and others said that one cost-cutting measure taken by Vela& quez was to let SVREPs life insurance policies lapse. Hernandez said Cranston pledged financial support to SVREP in 1986, mostly for expansion of its California operation. Instead, Cranston helped start and diverted funds to a new voter registration group, the Center for Parti cipation in Democracy, charged Hernandez. "This is not a turf fight. lfs a question of whether or not Hispanic politics and the progress of its politics is going to rest in its own institutions, in its own leadership or in someone else's good intentions." In response to Hernandez's charge that $250,000 had been pledged to SVREP, Gran& ton issUed a statement saying," I never promised any specific amount to Willie," He said it would be foolish to do otherwise. "He was a great man whom I greatly admired . . . . It grieves me .deeply that this misunder standing has arisen." CPO, incorporated in July 1987, was until recently headed by Cranston's son, Kim, who now sits on CPD's 17-member board of direc tors. The new board chairperson is former California Supreme Court Judge Cruz Reynoso, who said he had recently spoken to some Latinos in the registration field who expressed concern that SVREP not be hurt by CPO. "I tl;link the work of Southwest Voter is so important that I want to be sure myself that it not be l'lurt" He said he is arranging a meeting Calif., LA. County Act on Hiring Parity California state legislators and Los Angeles County officials took action last month to begin correcting the underrepresentation of Hispanics in government jobs. Assemblyman Pete Chac6n (D-San Diego) introduced a resolution to form a state-level task force, while Los Angeles County officials directed their staff to formulate a plan to help the county meet affirmative action goals in the hiring of Hispanics. The Black Advocates in State Service, a state employees' group, and the California State Personnel Board are opposed to Cha c6n's measure. The employees' group wants the focus of the task force widened to include blacks' concerns in the areas of job retention and disciplinary action. Despite this, the resolution to form the 14-member task force is expected to clear both chambers by late August, according to Mike Reyna, a Chac6n staff member. Reyna said Hispanics currently represent 13 . 7% of the state's government labor force but are expected to form 23% of California's private work force by 1990. He said 9,400 additional state jobs for Hispanics are needed by 1990 for them to reach parity . Blacks represent 6.4% of the total labor force in California and 11.6% of the state government work force. In Los Angeles County, a report prepared by the county's Office of Affirmative Action Compliance found Hispanics were at population parity in only three of 38 departments. They make up 18% of the county employees and 27.6% ofthecounty's population. The county board of supervisors voted unanimously June 12 to accept the results of the report despite opposition by black county employee groups, which charged the report was flawed. The supervisors also directed the chief administrative officer and the affirmative action compliance officer to begin I work ' on a • plan to correct the imbalance. Sophia Nieves between CPO and SVREP to work out such problems as the overlapping of both groups, in East Los Angeles, for example. Los Angeles Councilwoman .Gloria Molina is one who "absolutely'' believes CPO is hurting SVREP. She said she had spoken to Cranston about it. "Hispanics have to be empowered from within, not anointed from above," she said . " I don't have the kind of confidence in that project that I do in SVREP that we will not be broke red later on." CPO operates on a $3.1 million budget, said spokesperson Suzanne Manriquez . A staff of nearly200 has been conducting voter registration out of six offices in Los Angeles and others in nine cities. Rob Stein, who works with Cranston on voter registration through a Washington, D .C., continued on page 2 INS Proposal Extends Exemptions from Exam In a move hailed by many civil rights groups, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service released at a July 21 press conference in Los Angeles proposed regulations that would exempt a large portion of legalization applicants from taking the English and civics exam re quired for the second step of the legalization process. The regulations, already sent to the Office of Management and Budget fo r final approval and expected to be published in the Federal Register early this week, wai v e the test re quirement for applicants under 16 and over 65 years of age. Those people who have completed high school, have a high school equivalency diploma or one year of study in a state-accredited school als . o would not have to take the test. Also provided for in the regulations is the development of a test that applicants can take at independent testing centers in lieu of the INS exam. No estimates were available on the number of people who may be affected Also released during the same week were booklets to be used as study guides for the exam. The booklets have been criticized by many immigrant advocates as too complicated .

PAGE 2

Poll Shows Hispanics Prefer Dukakis for President Democratic presidential nominee Michael Dukakis has a considerable lead among Hispanics over Republican nominee Vice President George Bush 58% to 32% according to poll results released July 18 in Atlanta by the Spanish television network Univision. The poll of 612 likely Hispanic voters showed that the Massachusetts governor was the overwhelming choice among all Hispanic subgroups except Cuban Americans. A resounding 80% of the Cubans reported that Bush was their choice. The survey, conducted by Bendixen & Law, a Washington, D.C. -based research firm, found: BUSH DUKAKIS UNDECIDED Cubans 80% 14% 6% Mexicans 27 64 9 Puerto Ricans 24 62 14 Central, South Americans 41 56 3 All Latinos 32 58 10 SVREP Funding Dips $350,000 continued from page 1 group called USA Vote, which Cranston chairs, acknowledged that Cranston has encouraged financial support of CPO; privately and publicly, but that he also did so for SVREP. CPO has been registering Latino, black, Asian and young Anglo voters since January, said Manriquez. Of the 139,000 so far regis tered, 28%, or 38,920, are Latfnos. Kim Cranston told Weekly Report; "There are 7.5 million people not registered to vote in California. There's still a lot of work to be done. "I felt there was a real need to focus training people to become effective com munity organizers and register voters. I was not aware of any group that existed that was doing that particular thing." Juan Andrade, executive director of MidwesV Northeast Voter Registration Education ject, said, "Thafs an integral part of what organizations like ours do." Hernandez charged that among Cranston's agenda in funding CPO was to "win electi . ons for himself and his friends." Cranston narrowly won re-election in 1986. ' The work of Southwest Voter is not threatened, though there has been a reduction in their voter campaigns and there have been no salary increases since 1984, said Hernandez. Nonetheless, the staff of 16 moved into larger offices July 22 and has registered 40,000 Latinos this year. The public conflict has involved Velasquez's family. His brother , George, promised Texas reporters a transcript of a taped conversation with thenhospitalized Willie, which apparently reflected Velasquez's belief that Cranston had undercut SVREP. The familyhas since decided this would be inappropriate . Jane said, "I have to go with what I feel Willie would have done. Willie was not a press conference type person." Juan Andrade, who has done voter work for 20 years, believes this is a case of good intentions gone awry. "Often times peopl e with good intentions come in and try to reinvent the wheel and end up undermining what has taken years to create." Darryl Figueroa Video Prompts $10 Million Complaint Five Mexican nationals filed a complaint with the Sari Bernardino, Calif., County Board of Supervisors July 18 seeking $10 million from the -county Sheriffs Department. The complaint charges deputies used excessive force in their arrest The FBI has begun an investigation into possible civil rights violations following the release of a five-minute videotape which ap parently shows the men were beaten and clubbed without reason. Brothers Jose and Victor Serrano and their father, Efron, along with Domingo Garcia and Javier Rue lias were involved in an altercation with sheriffs deputies shortly after 10 am. June 30. Deputies were responding to a complaint of loud music and men urinating and throwing beer cans into an adjacent yard. Carlos Juarez, legal counsel for the Institute for Social Justice/Congress for a United Com munity, a local civil rights group representing the five men, said that the "officers unlawfully came on the property of the individuals, battered and falsely arrested them, causing injuries." The claim also asserts civil rights violations. After viewing the tape, Sheriff Floyd Tidwell 2 disputed the charges, claiming that the "officers used the proper amount of All but Jose Serrano were released with no charges. He was booked on resisting arrest and possession of a small amount of cocaine. Diana Padilla Bush to Address Gl Forum Vice President George Bush will be the keynote speaker at the American Gl Forum's annual national convention Aug. 1-7 in Corpus Christi, Texas. He is scheduled to address the group Aug. 4. While Democratic presidential nominee Michael Dukakis remained unconfirmed at press time as the second keynote speaker, his running mate, Texas Sen . lloyd Bentsen, is scheduled A number of other elected officials will appear during the eight-day convention, eluding Speaker of the House Jim Wright (D Texas) and Texas Gov. Bill Clements. Mario Diaz, current national chairman of the . 40-year-old Forum, is expected to run unopposed for a second one-year term. The decision by Dukakis to choose Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen as his running mate had little effect on the preference of Latinos. Given the hypothetical pairing of Bush and Wyoming Sen. Alan Simpsonsomeone the pollsters felt was the least known of the Republican vice presidential possibilities-56% of Hispanics opted for DukakisiBentsen as opposed to 30% for the Republican pair. The surveywasconductedJuly1-13 through and telephone interviews. It had a margin of error of plus or minus 4.7%. Felix Perez U.S. Tells L.A. County It Must Redraw Districts The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors may face the largest voting rights lawsuit ever brought against a local governmental body if it does not begin work on a redistricting plan to correct alleged discrimination against Latinos. On July 26 the board voted down a measure, 3-2, that would have put a charter amendment on the November ballot adding two super visorial seats. "It was to our advantage they put together a plan that would maximize Latino strength," said Alan Clayton, the state civil rights re presentative of the California League of United Latin American Citizens. He said if the board went to seven members, it still would not automatically meet the test of the 1965 Voting Rights Act There are five districts in the31% Hispanic county . No Latino has served as supervisor in the county's 138-year history. In a letter dated July 15, Assistant Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds gave the county until the end of last month to indicate what action it would take. Reynolds said in his letter that county officials must scrap present boundaries after the November election. The board voted July 19 to hire a local firm foi:irovide population figures that could be used in realigning the districts, but did not take action on a redistricting plan. In May the U .S. Justice Department sent a letter to the county indicating that by splitting the Latino Eastside vote among three districts in 1981, the supervisors prevented a Hispanic from gaining enough votes to win a seat Sophia Nieves Gov. Picks Few Latinos In California, a state that is home to the largest Hispanic population in the country, only 4.4% of judges appointed by Gov. Deukmejian during his 5 1/2 years in office are . Latino. A survey in the July issue of California lawyer magazine studied the backgrounds of more than 500 judges. Of these appointees 88.9% are Anglo,4.4% are Hispanic, 3% are black and 3.7% Asian. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Zita Arocha, guest columnist Waging a Lifelong Struggle My 4-year-old daughter can say manzana and pera Apple and pear. She catches me by surprise and pronounces the words perfectly sometimes as we are driving to the grocery store or when she is playing happily with her toys in the bathtub. Yet, when I ask her a question in Spanish, she looks at me coyly and responds in English. It drives me crazy . " (,Miranda, quieres ira/ parque?" "Yes, Mommy, I really do," she says. I try again. "<.Miranda, que tipo de fruta quieres?" Well, Mom, I want some cherries," she says, smilil'lg. "Why don't you answer me in Spanish?" I ask . No response. Sometimes, my husband, David Smith-Soto, and I will slip into Spanish, our native tongue, mistakenly thinking we can avoid Miranda's keen ear. Thafs when her attention is usually riveted by our conversation. When we are done, she will comment on what we have said and ask cogent, sometimes pesky questions.ln Eng lish, of course. I want my daughter to grow up bilingual, as my husband and I did. It has been an invaluable tool in our professional development, and we both are proud of our Hispanic culture. SURROUNDED BY SPANISH My family emigrated from Cuba to Tampa, Fla, in 1958, when I was 5 years old, and I grew up speaking Spanish at home. In school, I worked hard to retain my native language, studying Spanish in junior high and high school. In college, I majored in English and Spanish. In my newspaper career, l . have often gotten good stories because 1 was the only reporter who could speak the language. My husband has had a similar experience, growing up in Costa Rica, the son of a Costa Rican mother and a U.S. father. Spanish set him apart from the U.S.-born journalists at The Miami Herald. Because of his bilingual ability , he eventually was promoted to deputy managing editor of El Miami Herald, a position he held for several years before we moved to Washington, D.C., three years ago. When we lived in Miami, we were surrounded by Spanish. Most of . our neighbors were Cuban. Miranda's baby sitter, Berta, was a large, : warm Cuban mother of three who liked to watch Spanish soap operas on television . She fed Miranda black beans and rice and sprinkled her baby hair with Spanish violet water. My parents, who still live in Tampa, were frequent visitors to our Coral Gables home. For them. English is still a strange and difficult language. HOW MUCH DO WE PUSH? Now we live in suburban Maryland, in a mainly white, middle-class neighborhood of Volvos and manicured lawns. We are the only Hispanic family on our block. My daughter attends a small nursery school where there is an Oriental and one other foreign-born child. Miranda's only exposures to Spanish are Sesame Street, the Peruvian baby sitter who watches her three days a week while 1 work and occasional visits from her grandparents. However, with some prodding, she can count to 20 in Spanish and knows her colors in Spanish. And when I read to her books like El Sin pelos en Ia lengua MY TURN: Oh, those Democrats, they love us so. Did you notice how they all lauded us when they took their turns at the microphorre at their Atlanta convention? And how the bilingual team of D&B trotted off to the Tex-Mex border as soon as the festivities were over to practicar their espanol in our barrrrrios? I did, too. And it left me wondering. If they like us so much, how come they never let us have the spotlight to ourselves? If they can talk about us, how come we can't talk about us? On Tuesday night, Texas legislator Lena Guerrero and New Mexico Congressman Bill Richardson were both scheduled for prime-time appearances in front of the microphone. But that Rainbow Coalition man, Jesse, wanted the Jackson Five to sing their Daddy's praises(which they did very well, I have to admit)-so the program planners bumped the brown out of Jesse's Rainbow, if it was ever there in the first place. Richardson, who had written a very nice speech on how the Reagan Administration killed public education , and even lost a few pounds so he'd look good on TV, got his turn at the mike the next night. But by that time, the network teams were tired of speeches and figured the public would rather listen to them be profound than hear some Latino from New Mexico. So we were done in again. Lena? Who knows what happened to her? The Democratic National Committee established a "minority outreach program" for us Third World journalists this year, setting up special press conferences for us. So whom did we get to quiz? Some good, hard-working black and Latino party workers and others who made themselves readily available to us throughout the convention anyway. It would have been nice to have had Paul Kirk or Ann Richards or even Jesse there. But so it goes. Then, to remind us what short memories some liberals have, we stopped by the posh Mexico-themed reception hosted by Congress man Tony Coe.lho at Atlanta's landmark railroad building. There, amid th . e fruit arrangements at each buffet table were lovely bouquets of table grapes. Dutifully, United Farm Workers' never-tiring, ever-v igilant VP Dolores Huerta was busily removing the offending fruit and telling people that Tony should know better, that the United Farm Workers have been boycotting grapes for so long, and that Tony's California district includes one of the nation's largest and poorest groups t of farm workers who have supported him so loyally. Twice she went through the receiving line to admonish Coelho. The second time she even borrowed a sombrero from the decorations to disguise herself, only to be thwarted by smiling Tip 0' Nelli, who didn't want her to spoil a good party. Coelho, of Portuguese descent, was denied membership to the Congressional Hispanic Caucus some years ago because the powers-that-were (I think it was Bobby Garcia of New York) didn't consider Portuguese as Hispanic enough. Bill Richardson changed the ruled when he served as caucus chairman a couple years back, and let him in. Oh me, oh my. If politics ain't applesauce, ifs grape jelly. Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • ratoncito del campo y el ratoncito de Ia ciudad and La gallinita roja, MARGA GOMEZ, San Francisco comedienne, introducing herself she never stops me to ask what something means. at the Mexican American Women's National Association conference As we begin thinking about where to send Miranda to kindergarten, in Washington, D.C., July 21: we discuss more and more how strenuously we should push her. "My mother is Puerto Rican, my father was Cuban, and my best Do we send her to our monolingual, neighborhood elementary friends are Mexican, which makes me(long pause) confused. " school or do we enroll her in a special school far from home where RICHARD OLSON, Orange County, Calif., sheriffs lieutenant, she will be taught both English and Spanish? Do we let her decide for quoted in the June 14 Los Angeles Times on his jaifs reluctance to herself when she is older whether she wants to study Spar) ish? serve spicy Mexican food, including jalapeno peppers, to inmallfs: Helping Miranda become bilingual, we have come to accept, is going "What you've got to think of any time you put something on those to be a lifelong struggle. tables is that it's a potential weapon. We run security in the jails How (Zita Arocha, of Bethesda, Md., is a Washington Post reporter.) would you like to have one of those things stuck in your eye?" Hispanic Link Weekly Report Aug. 1 , 1 988 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING CALIFORNIA JUDGES: A survey in the July issue of California Lawyer examines the racial and professional backgrounds of judges appointed by Gov. George Deukmejian. To obtain a copy, send a request with $3 to California Lawyer Magazine, 1390 Market St., Suite 1016, San Francisco, Calif., 94102. After Aug . 1 the cost is$5. EDUCATION JOURNAL: Floricanto Press' 44-page "Hispanic Journal of Education, Commentary and Reviews" focuses on general issues affecting the education, particularly higher education, of Hispanics . For a subscription to the quarterly journal and the monthly La Red/The Net, send $49 (institutions), $39 (individuals) to Florican to Press, 16161 Ventura Blvd., Suite 830, Encino, Calif . 91436-2504 (818) 990-1885. FILM/VIDEO COMPETITION: Universal Televis i on, the National Hispanic Medi a Coalition, the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences and Columbia College will accept original scripts for competition in their Hispanic Film/Video Program. The deadline for submissions is Sept. 16. For more information write or call Hispanic Film/Video Program, c/o Columbia College, 925 N. La Brea Ave., Hollywood, Calif. 90038 (818) 777-8005. CALL FOR PAPERS: The Wight Art Gallery at the University of California at Los Angeles wil l consider articles for the catalog and supplemental publications related to the exhibition "Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation." Abstracts of proposed papers must be submitted no later than Sept. 1 . For more information contact Teresa McKenna, CARA Editorial Board, Wight Art Gallery , UCLA, 405 Hilgard Ave . , Los Angeles, Calif . 90024-1620 (213) 825-1461. ARIZONA BUSINESS: A 10-page report prepared by the U .S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce's Business Research Department on Arizona Hispanic businesses indicates that, with 8,500 Hispanic firms in the state, the A r izona Hispanic business sector ranks sixth nationwide . For a free copy of the report, write to Business Research Department, USHCC, 4900 Main St., Suite 700, Kansas City, Mo. 64112. ISSUES POLL: A 38-page " Issues Polr' conducted by the Midwest/ Northeast Voter Registration Education Project during its Midwest Hispanic Leadership Conference questioned337 Hispanic conference participants about Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis and former aspirant Jesse Jackson. For a copy, send $2.50 to MNVREP, 431 S . Dearborn,# 1103, Chicago, Ill. 60605, Attn : Juan Andrade . Toledo, Ohio Aug . 6 52 5 CONNECTING DEPARTMENT TARGETS OLDER WORKER& The Asociaci6n Nacional Pro-Personas Mayores received a $9.3 million grant to develop part-time services for unemployed, low income workers, primarily Hispanic, U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Ann Mclaughlin announced last month. The Los Angeles-based organization operates programs in San Diego and Orange County, Tucson, Ariz., Miami and Tampa, Fla. , Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, San Antonio, Laredo and Corpus Christi, Texas, and Washington , among other cities. In addition to employment services, the Labor Departmenfs Senior Community Service Employment Program also provides nutrition programs, health and home care, recreation and transportation . DEMOCRATS MEET Some 300 Hispanics from nearly 40 states and Puerto Rico participated in the National Hispanic Democrats founding convention held July 17 in Atlanta. The function preceded by a day the beginning of the Democratic National Convention in that same city. Some of the more notable speakers at the Washington , D.C. -based voter registration and education group's daylong convention were U.S. Rep. Tony Coelho of California, who as majority whip holds the House's third most powerful position, Rep. Esteban Torres of California, co-chair of NHD, and Carmen Perez, chair of the Hispanic caucus of the Democratic National Committee. Making its debut last November, NHD will be sponsoring voter registration drives in communities with large Hispanic populations before the November elections. . OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES U.S. Department of Agriculture Assistant Secretary John Franke presents the departmenfs Minority Contractor of the Year Award to Miranda Associates, a consulting firm housed in Washington, and owned by Lourdes Miranda .. Victor Merced, executive director of the Oregon Council for Hispanic Advancement in Portland, wins a fellowship from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation's Kellogg National Fellowship Program. The three-year , $35,000 fellowship is designed to allow leaders from various walks of life to enhance their skills and knowledge in a new area ... The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund sets up its Employer Education Project hotline for California employers interested in the sanctions and anti-dis crimination provisions of the Immigration, Reform and Control Act The number for the yearlong service is (213) 629-2731 ... Calendar Cesar Chavez will be among the speakers addressing the Farm Labor"Organizing Committee's constitutional convention . Convention delegates will be meeting to vote on proposals that will shape the organization during the next three years . National Pall'American Golf Association Kansas City, Kans. Aug. 15-19 Bob Soltero (816) 523-4586 AIDS MtNORITY CONFERENCE Centers for Disease Control Washington, D .C. Aug . 24 THIS WEEK FESTIVAL LATINO New York Aug. 3 Joseph Papp and the New York Shakespeare Festival will present 26 film s and six stage productions from throughout Latin America . The event will include a tribute to Argentine cinema. Bilingual Festival Information (212) 598 IMMIGRATION LAW Chicago Aug . 4 The Chicago Committee on Immigrant Protection will sponsor a conference on immigration policy and issues surrounding the second phase of the federal immigration law. Workshops on refugees, cultural adaptation, sanctuary and health care and social services for immigrants will also be held. David Marzahl (312) 435 FARM WORKERS CONFERENCE 4 Volker Grotefeld (419) 243-3456 COMING SOON MULTICULTURAL SEMINAR Indiana Department of Education Indianapolis Aug . 14, 15 Darlene Slady (317) 269 AVIATION TRAINING National Hispanic Coalition of Federal Aviation San Antonio Aug. 14 Carmen Quiles(312) 694 YOUTH LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE California Superintendenfs Advisory Council on Hispanic Affairs Sacramento Aug . 14 Maria Luisa Ochoa (916) 4451670 GOLF CONVENTION Aug . 1 , 1988 Dale Perkins (202) 347-{)390 SPANISH CONTRIBUTION TO U.S. Foundation for the Advancement of Hispanic Americans Washington, D.C. Aug. 24 Yves Gisse (202) 623-6889 LABOR MEETING Labor Council for Latin American Advancement San Antonio Aug. 24 Alfredo Montoya (202) 347-4223 Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name. date. location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Wash ington, D . C . 20005. Hispanic link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS We offer you a tremendous opportunity to experience professional growth and satisfaction by serving in the Nation's Capital Emergency Ambulance Bureau. We offer • A professional management team concerned with your personal and professional welfare. • Top pay BENEFITS • A generous Retirement Plan • Promotional Opportunities • Health, Dental and Optical Insurance available for Employee and Dependents • Deferred Compensation Program • Thirteen Days Sick Leave Annually • Thirteen Days Annual Leave Initially • Ten Paid Holidays (plus Presidential Inaugurations) • Tuition Assistance • Military Credit Toward Retirement QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: All applicants for these positions must possess a high school diploma or a certificate of equivalency issued by a recognized department of education; possess a current valid driver's permit, pass a physical examination and background investigation as determined by the Emergency Ambulance Bureau, be a state certified Emergency Medical Technician and be CPR (BLS) certified. Please send Federal Standard Form 171 and copies of the following certifications; CPR ( BLS); state certification and current valid driver's license to JoAnn Johnson, D.C. Office of Personnel, 613 G Street N.W., Room 309, Washington, D .C. 20001. (202) 727-6427 . Salary Flange: $21,913-$27,628 pa-Career Service Positions(An Equal Opportunity Employer) RESIDENCY Any person accepting one of these positions must become a District of Columbia resident within 180 days of appointment and maintain such residency for the duration of District government employment The Department of Housing and Community Development offers assistance to new District of Columbia government employees seeking housing in Washington , D.c . FEDERAL WORKERS A Note of Appreciation from the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund. With the . strong assistance from many generous individuals. the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund was able to raise $35,000 in 1987 for much-needed scholarship support as a result of the 1987 Combined Federal Campaign With your help, we hope to surpass this figure and assist a greater number of deserving Hispanic-American students across the nation. In 1988, be a part of our effort aimed at recognizing and assisting some of the nation's best and most talented minds. Please de signate the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund on your Combined Federal Campaign . ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST The Center for Community Change in Wash inaton. D . C .• is seeking applicants for the pOsition of organizational development specialist Applicants must have experience in working with local nonprofit, grass roots advocacy and community development organization. The position is based in Washington, D.C., with a salary range of low to mid thirties( depend ing upon experience). Deadline for resumes is August 15. For more information contact Garland Yates, Eastern Regional Director, Center for Community Change (202) 342'0594. LIBRARY ASSISTANT I Ann.#: 7021ALIB-Salary: $18,553 This is paraprofessionallibrarywork in varied phases of library activity serving a diverse popu lation. The work involves performance of routine circulation desk duties. Duties include operating a computer terminal in working with patron and book information, registering patrons for library cards. maintaining records and files, preparing statistical and other reports and other related duties. Requires two years of college credit (60 semester hours or 90 quarter hours) and six months experience in general library procedures. Refertoannouncement for preferred qualifications. All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed offlciaJ Arlington County application form will not be accepted Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00PM on AUGUST 11, 1988. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or TOO (703) 284 (hearing impaired only). ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 14th St. North, Arlington, VA 22201 EOE/MFH SOCIAL SCIENCES BIBUOGRAPHER The Stanford University Libraries seek a Social Sciences Bibliographer responsible for providing support for research programs in economics, psychology, sociology andre lated interdisciplinary fields. Responsibilities include: conventional book selection in subject fields; some scheduled general reference; advanced consultation and liaison with faculty and graduate students in subject areas. including MRDFs and O(lline resources. Qualifications: MLS or equivalent; graduate training in social sciences; analytical and communication skills; knowledge of Western European language(s) preferred; experience in academic library and teaching or instruction desirable; knowledge of MRDFs and data analysis desirable. Assistant ($27,000 $37,200) or Associate Librarian ($29,700$41 ,400) depending on experience and qualifications. Send letter of application, resume and names and addresses of 3 professional re ferences by October 15, 1988, to Irene Yeh, Assistant Library Personnel Officer, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, CA 943056004. Cite#328HL, on all correspondence. EEO/A'AE NfSF NATIONAL HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP FUND Direct contributions can be made to: National Hispanic Scholarship Fund Post Office Box 748 DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mall or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be In Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. San Francisco, California 94101 Contributions to NHSF are tax deductible JOUFINALISTS/CFIEA TIVE WFIITEFIS: Sub missions are welcome for Weekly Report's "guest columnisf' feature. Approx. 500 words. For writer's gu idelines, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to : Guest Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column Inch. Ordered by Organization Street-------------City, State & Zip--------Area Code & Phone --------5

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment from Aug. 3 to 10, will be translated to English. Coincidentally , theonly U.S.' th 'eater piece in the event is a work in progress that's.,part of this week' & Hispanic PlaYWrights Project in THE NATION'S A STAGE: Major His pa ni c theater events coincid . e this month in New York. Texas a nd California Costa Mesa, Calif. ' , ' " '' Charles G6mez's Bang Sang Blues. about the experiences of a network news team in Nicaragua, travels to the Public at the end of the month. the alcjng witt:! Lynette .S,Emario Bonaparte's Broken Bough, and Rafael Lima's , Simply Maria, will have workshops and be staged in public readings as part of the Costa Mesa event. Beginning this week is the 12th edition o f Festival Latino in New York, the reputed "largest Latin o c ul tura l e vent in the United States." The core of the festiva l is made u p o f e v e nts at the city's Public Theater, but related events include mu sic. film and TV presentations from latin America, Spain and the Uni ted States. This is the third year for the HPP, which will be housed Aug . 2 to 14 at the city's South Coast Repertory theater. This year, New York wi ll host companies f rom Mexico (Campania Nacional de Teatro). Argentina (luis Marta Bianchi and their company), Costa Rica ( Compania N acional de Teatro) and Spain (La Zaranda). as well as a city debut by Cuban actors Mario Balmaseda and Pedro Renteria This week sees the conclusion of the third edition of the Chamizal Zarzue/a Festival in El Paso. Wrapping up the festival are performances of El barberillo de lavapies by Albuquerque's ;Viva Zarzvela! company (Aug. 1); La tempestad by the University of Texas at El Paso opera company(Aug. 3); and Molinos de viento by Nev ( York's Thalia Spanish Theater (Aug. 5 7). The two Cubans will perform Mosquitn by South African playwright Atttol Fugard Several of the performance s in Spanish, scheduled ' Media Report CAPITAL TV: Hispanics and most TV sta tion managers believe the coverage o f Lati nos b y the four major commercial station s in t he nation's capital is i nad equate, found a s t u dy released July 24 by The American University in Washington, D.C. The metro area Hispanic commun i ty, es timated to number200,000-250,000, fee l s it is either invisible or negatively portra yed on WJLA, WRC, WTTG, WUSA. "The H i spani c community is thirsty for informat i o n abou t itself," said Lucienne loman, forme r c areer programs manager at the National Association of Htap•nlc Journalists. Among. the four stations, there i s o nl y o ne Hispanic Oil' air journalist, WAC's l yn d a L6pez, from Los Fresnos Valley, Texas. Many station officials placed partial b l a me on the silence of Latinos. E xecutives at WAGTV, the only station t o defend its co v era g e as adequate, said they h ad n ever rec e i v ed HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A natio n a l p u b lication o f Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234.0280 or 234.0737 Publ ish er. Hector Eri cksen-M endoza E d i tor. F el i x P e r ez Report ing: Ant onio Mej ias-R e nt as, Darryl Figue roa, Sophia N i eves. D i a n a P ad ill a . G r a phi c s/ Pr oduction : Ca r los A rrien , Zoila Elias No portio n of H i span ic Lin k Weekly Report m a y be r e produc e d or broadcast in a n y fo rm without a dv a n ce permission Annual subacrlptlon (50 Issues): $ 11 8 Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 complaints from the Hispanic community about the amount or quality or coverage . Hispanics felt the issue should be addressed by hiring more Latinos or personnel who are Spanish speaking and culturally sensitive. The 72-page report, titled "The Missing Minorities , " is available for $4.00 from: The American University, School of Communications, lincoln Furber, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW , Washington, D.C. 20016 (202) 885 1200. VISTA EXPANSION: Vlata magazine added this month the Star-Free Press in Ventura, ' Calif., to the list of newspapers carrying the supplement. Its circulation is .now 1.3 million. Vista offices are being beefed up in pre paration for its switch from monthly to weekly publicatio n in September, which coincides with its three-year anniversary . New bureaus in los Angeles and New York City have been established, headed respectively by Ray Estrada and John Garcia. At the magazine's Coral Gables, Fla, headquarters, Judith Faerron becomes managing editor. Her pre decessor, Renato Perez, is now a sen . ior editor. I ' ' I l . • •. -,.-----------.......... .. UPDATE: Afterreceivingcorl'l' plaints from the Hispanic News MMtia A• socletlon of Washington, D.C., and other Latino groups, the Pulitzer Prize 8oeN invited three Hispanic journalists to serve as jury meA'Ibers ,next year. No Hispanics sat on the 66-m .einber jury thiS year. Though the board will not publicly announce its65 member jury . for 198a until January, David Medina, assistant city editor at The Miami News, Norma Sosa, managing editor at the Corpus Christi Caller Titnes, and Ernie Sotomayor, associate editor at the Defies Time• Herald, are the invited trio. WI.LLIE ISSUE: Willie Velasquez graces the June 29 cover of The Texas o-.rver, an Austill' based weekly, which includes a 1 apage section covering Willie and Southwest Vot'r Registration Education Project A story by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros is also included. Thoae interested in receiving the issue mayaend$3 to: TheTexasObeerverat P.O. Box 49019, Austin, Texas 787.65 (512) 477 0746. Darryl Figueroa CO R POR ATE CL A SSIFIED: A d rates 90 c ents per word. Displa y a d s are $45 per col umn inch. Ads placed by Tuesda y wi ll run in Weekly R eport m ai led Fr i d a y of sam e week. M ultipl e use rates on r e qu e st.. , "No big star. But he brings some folks_ into the tent." if • 6 Hispanic Link Weekly Report