Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, August 15, 1988

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, August 15, 1988
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
Tonio Burgos, a close political aide to New York Gov. Mario Cuomo for more than a decade, announces he will resign as director of the governor’s Executive Services Office. Burgos, 36 years old, said he will rejoin his family business... Three children of the late Sen. Robert Kennedy, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Kerry Kennedy and Douglas Kennedy, lend their support to United Farm Workers President C6sar Chavez. A doctor attending to Chavez, who had been on a water-only fast 24 days as of Aug. 10, said the 61-year-old Ch&yez is dangerously near kidney failure... The board of directors of SER-Jobs for Progress accepts the resignation of president Ed Franco. Pedro Viera, vice president of SER, a creation of the American Gl Forum and the League of United Latin American
Citizens, becomes acting president. . . David Ayala, 24, Joo6 Maldonado, 19, and Antonio Nieves, 23, save six children and two adults from a predawn Brooklyn, N.Y., fire that destroyed the homes of 30 people... Washington migrant farm workers Felipe Rodriguez-GutiOrrez, 42, his 11-year-old son, 8MkrBottft/^fttngul°, and his 15-year-old nephew, Jesiis Angulof die in Lodi, Calif., when a pickup truck they are sleeping in is purposely rarrpiad tov a despondent construction foreman. Michael 4£,3atr mro the parked
truck, left his car, stripped his clothes and walked in front of a speeding freight train. He was killed instantly... Firefighters in Bell Gardens, Calif., use crow bars and sledge hammers to free Rodolfo Mohoro from the inside of a chimney. Mohoro became stuck when he was unable to wake his sister and brother-in-law and he decided to get into their home by shinnying down the chimney.. â– 

GOP Promises Latino Influence, Not Numbers
Hispanic delegates participating in the Aug. 15-18 Republican National Convention in New Orleans will increase from 4.0% in 1984 to4.2%, and the Latino role will be a significant one, promise key Hispanic GOP officials.
At the July 18-21 Democratic convention in Atlanta this year, 6.8% of the delegates were Latina compared with 6.4% four years earlier.
“The thing that’s important this year is the caliber of Hispanics representing us,” Rudy Beserra, community liaison at the White House, told Weekly Report. “Although they’re small in numbers, the delegates this year are long on influence,”
Heritage Month Passes
A bill designating September as Hispanic Heritage Month beginning in 1989 went to President Reagan for his signature last week.
The measure, sponsored by Rep. Esteban Torres(D-Calif,), passed the House by voice vote Aug. 8 after approval by the Senate May 27, where it was sponsored by Sen. Paul Simon (D-lll.).
Simon said, “It is important that the nation be educated and made aware of the richness and the significance of the contributions of Hispanics... They are an essential part of our future.”
California delegate Dr. Tirso del Junco, longtime Reagan confidant and former chairman of the California Republican Party, agreed.
“Although the figures seem low, I feel that the Hispanic representation is fair,” he said. “When you consider the predominant number of Hispanics who have been brought upiin Democratic households, you realize that Republican Hispanics reflect a group that is steadily growing. Theyare more than proportionately represented at this year'sconvention.” The partys lone voting Hispanic in Congress, New Mexico Repi Manuel Luj£n, who is retiring from the House of Representatives this year after 20 years, foresaw the numbers increasing as Latinos “begin to realize that supporting Republican Party policies will benefit everybody.”
Unlike the Democratic National Committee, the Republican National Committee has never set a minimum Hispanic delegate goal for participation at its political conventiona “We just don’t make it a practice to separate out the statistics for racial and ethnic groups or target goals for participation at the Republican National Committee,” said one RNC staffer. At present there are no Hispanics serving on the 153-member RNC.
According to Ernest Olivaa RNC Hispanic community liaison, there are 15 Hispanics presently employed at the RNC, including seven affiliated with the Republican National
Hispanic Assembly, which is chaired by Catalina Villalpando of Washington, D.C.
continued on page 2
REPUBLICAN CONVENTION HISPANIC INVOLVEMENT
Del. Alt Total* Hisp.
Alaska 1 0 38 2.6%
Arizona 1 0 66 1.5
California 10 15 350 7.1
Colorado 1 1 72 2.8
D.C. 1 0 28 3.6
Florida 6 5 164 6.7
Hawaii 1 4 40 12.5
Iowa 0 1 74 1.4
Kansas 0 1 68 1.5
Kentucky 1 0 76 1.3
Louisiana 0 1 82 1.2
Massachusetts 0 2 104 1.9
Minnesota 1 1 62 3.2
Mississippi 0 1 62 1.6
Missouri 1 0 94 11.1
New Mexico 4 1 52 9.6
New York 1 0 272 0.4
Puerto Rico 11 10 28 75.0
Texas 6 3 22 4.1
Utah 1 1 52 33
Virginia 1 0 100 1.0
Wyoming 0 1 36 2.8
* As Of 8-8-88
Dei -Delegates; Alt -Alternates
Cavazos Becomes list Hispanic to be Named to Cabinet
President Reagan nominated Texas Tech University President Lauro Cavazos Aug. 9 to complete William Bennett’s term as U.S. Secretary of Education, making the 61-year-old Cavazos the first Hispanic to be named to a Cabinet position.
Bennett has announced that he would leave the $99,500 post Sept. 20. Cavazos, pending Senate approval, would then replace him for four months before a new administration moves into the White House.
Cavazos, a Democrat is the senior Hispanic university president in the country, having stepped into the position at Texas Tech in April 1980. With some 24,000 students on an
1,800 acre campus in Lubbock, Texas, it is the largest university run by a Hispanic.
Jos6 Garcia De Lara, national president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, which gave Cavazos an award this past July for his leadership in education, applauded the appointment He called Cavazos “eminently qualified and extremely well-liked.” Antonio Rigual, executive director of the Hispanic Association of Collegesand Universities, said, “We are very pleased. Dr. Cavazos has impeccable credentials”
They also agreed that the appointment was a political maneuver which will probably not deliver the Hispanic vote in Texas.
“ It won’t overcome the fact that Republicans have tremendous deficiencies in terms of Hispanics” said De Lara.
Cavazos served as dean of the school of medicine at Tufts University in Boston forfive years He received both a B.A and M.A from [Texas Tech and a Ph.D. in physiology from | Iowa State University in 1954.
The sixth-generation Mexican is married to the former Peggy Murdock. They have 10 children.
Cavazos had previously announced that he would resign from his $143,000 university position in July 1989 and return to teaching.
- Darryl Figueroa


Low Latino Infant Mortality Rate Tied to Family Support
The Hispanic infant mortality rate continues to perplex the medical com mu nity by remaining less than that for whites despite the much lower socioeconomic level of Hispanics, said a federal report released Aug. 4.
According to the National Commission to Prevent I nfant Mortality, 8.6 Hispanic infants died within their first year for every 1,000 live births as compared with 9.3 for whites in 1985. The 18.2 mortality rate for blacks was the highest of all groups Another health indicatorfor infants is low birth weight, which is closely related to infant mortality. The incidence of low birth weight among Hispanics, 6.2 per 1,000, was only slightly higher than the 5.6 rate for whites in 1985. The rate for blacks, 12.4, was the highest of all groups Experts attribute the more favorable infant
mortality rate among Hispanic women to a lower incidence of smoking and drug abuse, adequate nutrition and such factors as strong community and family support
Kathy Allen, coordinator of children’s issues for the General Accounting Office and one of the authors of the report, cautioned against the assumption that infant mortality is not an issue for Latinas.
"The figures may mask problems with data collection,” she warned. “We are concerned that underreporting of infant deaths occurs among Mexicans near the border who are afraid to give information to officials”
Additionally, she said, “the incidence of diabetes is higher among Hispanics This often results in babies too large for their gestational age. They wouldn’t classify as low-birth-weight infants; but they arerft healthy
either.”
Another data problem is that infant mortality rates for Hispanics were based on the reports of only 17 states and the District of Columbia Most Hispanic babies, 95.4% in 1985, were counted as white.
The report found that Hispanic women fared least well in terms of receiving medical care throughout their pregnancies Among them, 12.4% received late or no prenatal care, compared with 4.7% for whites and 10% for blacks.
Moreover, more Latinas lack health insurance than other groups About 28% of them had none, compared with 15% for whites and 21% for black women.
“The central message for Hispanics is to try to increase their access to health care,” said Allen. _ Darryl Figueroa
4.2% of GOP Delegates Are Latinos
continued from page 1
At the convention, one Hispanic is serving in a policy and planning role. Richard Montoya co-chairs the Subcommittee on Family and Community of the Committee on Resolutions
States key to a Republican victory in November have low Hispanic delegate and alternate participation, based on 80%-complete tally available at press time.
Latinos made up an estimated 7.1% of California's delegation, 4.1% of Texas’and
The number of Hispanic businesses in Texas has grown by at least 27% in the past six years despite an oil-related slump in the early 1980s according to the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
“Just as big companies closed when the bottom went out of the oil industry, a lot of Hispanic businesses went, too. But we’re beginning to see more light” said Abel Quintels president of the USHCC and a Texas business owner.
“A Focus Report on Hispanic Business Enterprise in Texas” released by the chamber July 27, put the number of Hispanic-owned businesses at 80,000. It ranks Texas as number two, following Californis in Hispanic-
less than 1% of New York’s The percentage of voting Hispanic delegates from California will be approximately 5.7%, down from 15.3% in 1984. Texas has 5.4%, down from 9.2% in 1984. New York is projected to be only 0.4%, a drop from 3.7%.
Puerto Rico has one of its highest delegate representations ever, with a projected 21 delegates and alternates - more Hispanics than any state except California
- Diana Padilla
owned businesses and Hispanic business revenues
The report states that Hispanic business, although thriving in the area of small business “does so at a level which limits its access to wider markets”
Quintela said two contributing factors are lack of seed money and a need for diversification. He explained diversification is essential to obtaining contracts with large corporations and with the government
The counties in which Hispanic-owned businesses produced the most revenue are, in order of rank: Bexar, Harris, El Paso, Hidalgo, Dallas and Webb.
- Sophia Nieves
Suits on Voting Rights Spread to Dallas, N. Y.
The election process used by the city of Dallas to choose its mayor and two of its councilmen has come under fire from two Hispanic groups. The groups joined the original plaintiffs Aug. 2 in a lawsuit which maintains citywide elections are discriminatory.
The Ledbetter Neighborhood Association, which represents the largest concentration of Hispanics in the city, and the Texas Rural Legal Foundation joined with the two black plaintiffs in contending that the citywide balloting system violates the spirit of the 1964 Voting Rights Act.
The lawsuit before U.S. District Judge Jerry Buchmeyer also asks for a delay in the 1989 elections until the area can be broken down into 11 districts Currently, eight of the council-members are elected by district The suit recommends the mayor be selected by the counciimembers.
The lawsuit was first filed in May.
In another voting rights suit in the town of Hempstead, N.Y., the Center for Constitutional Rights has challenged the township’s at large election system for town board posts
The suit was filed Aug. 8-
Farm Workers Get Funds
Hispanic Firms Grow 27% in Texas
LATINO-OWNED FIRMS IN TEXAS: 1982,1988
No. Firms No. Firms Gross Receipts
Industry 1982 1988 1982 1988*
Agriculture 1,175 1,700 $66,272 $90,000
Construction 10,638 14,000 505,965 635,000
Finance 2,032 2,600 66,618 100,000
Manufacturing 522 700 326,932 410,000
Retail 13,733 17,000 1,239,086 1,800,000
Services 21,123 28,000 626,568 800,000
Transportation 4,181 5,400 180,080 225,000
Wholesale 414 600 232,934 300,000
Other 7,721 10,000 190,554 240,000
* USHCC estimate, plus or minus 5% Source; U.& Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
The Senate and the U.S. Labor Department took action Aug. 8 to provide assistance to the estimated 200,000 seasonal and migrant farm workers hurt by the drought.
The Senate approved, 92-0, a $3.9 billion farm aid bill that includes $5 million for farm workers as well as two food stamp provisions designed to provide further help. The money is to be channeled through the Federal Emergency Management Agency to the Job Training Partnership Act reserve account.
Labor Secretary Ann McLaughlin announced that up to $9.5 million would be pumped into existing state migrant worker programs to provide emergency relief. Another$300,000 was set aside by the Labor Department for additional emergency services.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Adam Gottingen Brizuela, guest columnist
The Indiscriminate Killer
The magnitude of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome tragedy in the United States has a great deal to do with prejudice.
No, the alien retro-virus that causes the immune system to fail does not seek out gay men, blacks, Latinos, Asians, Native Americans, prostitutes or IV drug abusers. The virus is unaware of these distinctions.
It is merely an efficient people-killer. This alien lives by feeding on human cells and only kills its hapless host incidentally.
But human prejudice has eased the way for the virus from the beginning. Although AIDS manifested itself in Central Africa as early as 1970, nothing was noted in the world press until several years later. After all, thousands of Africans die every year of simple diarrhea
When U.S. doctors began documenting a suspicious trend about 19S0, reporters became more interested. For a short time, there was a burst of media attention on the so-called Gay Related Immune Deficiency, or GRID.
Religious bigots called it“God’s pest control” while immunologists at the Centers for Disease Control and elsewhere struggled to identify the virus.
MONTHS, YEARS WASTED
Gay newspapers began to document the progression of the epidemic, noting that it was then striking down gay men, prostitutes and IV drug users almost exclusively. The only other high-risk groups identified were hemophiliacs and Haitians.
AIDS was and is a disease of the poor and underrepresented. When the CDC came to understand what we were facing - an incurable organism that could wipe out millions- it began to generate hundreds of reports and news releases to sound the alarm.
The Reagan administration moved with the speed of an anemic three-toed sloth to fund AIDS research. Traditional conservative contempt for homosexuals, coupled with the constraints of the most expensive military buildup in history, forced medical research to waste precious months, even years.
Two things are necessary to fight an epidemic: Money and information. Sadly, most state and local governments were scarcely better than Washington about providing the money. Information is largely the responsibility of the media. The government and journalism establishments displayed a lack of interest that borders on genocide. By 1986, thousands had died and hundreds of thousands were infected with the still-incurable virus.
A DEATH EVERY FOUR HOURS
In the last two years, Al DS has reached the front pages because the United States has awakened to what the CDC, medical researchers and gay activists have been saying for seven years.
How many lives could have been saved if we acted sooner?
The victims of AIDS, gay and non-gay, are disproportionately of color. Of the women and children with AIDS or sero-positive for the Al DS virus, the vast majority are blackor Hispanic. According to some experts, one Hispanic person is diagnosed with AIDS every two hours and another dies from it every four hours.
Latinos in California are responding to the AIDS crisis in growing numbers. Gay Hispanics such as Nicole Ramirez-Murray have done much to bridge the gap and inform the non-gay Hispanic community. One who has listened is California Assemblyman Peter Chac6n.
Nationally, barrio activists- still working with very limited resources - are spreading the word to those at risk in their communities.
Why should a white, middle-class heterosexual care about AIDS? Because Al DS does not care if it i nvades their cells or those of a black hooker or Chicano junkie. The virus will continue to eat us alive until we as a people put down our prejudices.
(Adam Gettinger-Brizuela is a free-lance writer who organized the People of Color AIDS Survival Effort in San Diego.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
POSTER PROBLEM: The New York City Schools badly need Spanish-speaking teachers and counselors and other workers. So the Board of Education launched a $75,000 Latino recruitment campaign July 21.
It had 3,400 posters printed in Spanish. Then someone caught a spelling error- con came out conn. So they whited out 3,400 rfs.
After all 3,400 signs were installed in city buses, two other boo-boos were discovered. There was the word ebanistero. Presumably they meant ebanista. Woodworker. And electricista came out electrecista.
Could it be they were just trying to prove how desperately they need bilingual help?
TILDETIFF: Meanwhile, in Miami, a nasty rumor was spreading that the new Dade County manager, Joaquin Avifto, was making ' the county spend $25,000 to replace all of the elements in its typewriters so his name would include the proper accents and a tilde.
Terry Robbins, leader of the Dade Americans United to Protect the English Language, caught wind of it and fired off a letter to The Miami News.
Now the rumor's laid to rest Aviho explains that he was asked if he wanted the governments typesetting equipment upgraded to spell his name correctly, but that he responded it wasn’t necessary. Long before he showed up, the county print shop had acquired typefaces that included accents and tildes.
Has anyone ever noticed how Linda Chavez’s name is printed on U.S. English’s stationery? Or is that a silly question?
FOOD FIGHTS: Two weeks ago we reported that the Orange County jail in California was refusing to serve jalapeho peppers to prisoners because it considered them potentially dangerous weapons.
Now Latino prisoners there are filing suit, claiming the denial is “unreasonable punishment.” And from Florida comes the report that inmates in one of its jails won’t be served T-bone steaks every six weeks, per past custom. Why not? Prisoner Miguel Men6ndez stabbed Fidel Campos with a sharpened T-bone.
Myself, I’m a vegetarian. I’d rather be hit by a jalapeho.
EDDIE’S LOOPHOLE: Mouse hole I’ve heard of, but now there’s a Meese hole in our national political asylum policy.
Our departing Attorney General Ed Meese granted political asylum this month to three Chinese families who testified that they would be persecuted if they returned to China because they violated that nation’s “one couple, one child” law.
How do you suppose our Justice Department would respond to asylum pleas of Salvadorehos in the United States if El Salvador were to come up with a similar edict?
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting.. .
ALICIA SANDOVAL, National Education Association communications director, responding Aug. 10 to an AP reporter on the nomination of Lauro Cavazos as U.S. Secretary of Education:
“Ifs just a ploy to help get Bush elected and carry Texas. A classic case of tokenism... Cavazos is like a substitute teacher. He won’t have the clout to change anything in the little time he has.”
JULIO IGLESIAS, quoted by Achy Obejas in the August cover story of Hispanic magazine on Latino audiences in Chicago demanding that he speak and sing in Spanish:
"They want to hear everything at the same time. They’re so impassioned, but thafs very typically (Hispanic), isn’t it? The Americans, they just sit and enjoy it, they don’t make demands It’s hard. I’m singing in two very different cultures”
3


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
TEXAS BUSINESS: “A Focus Report on Hispanic Business Enterprise in Texas” offers statewide and county analyses of Latino-owned businesses, including types of businesses, sales and revenue. The 72-page report also contains demographic information and employment patterns To obtain a free copy, send requests to Preston Conner, Business Research, U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, 4900 Main St, Suite 700, Kansas City, Mo. 64112.
FELLOWS SOUGHT: W.K Kellogg Foundation seeks professionals who want to improve their leadership skills as candidates for the 1989 Kellogg National Fellowship Program. Applicants must be affiliated with a non-profit organization or be self-employed. The deadline is Dec. 19. For more information contact the foundation at 400 North Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 49017 (616) 968-1611.
IN FANT MORTALITY: A40-page report and an 80- page appendix that includes discussion of the inadequacies of data collection on Hispanic infant mortality is available free of charge by contacting the National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality, Switzer Building 330 C St. SW, Room 2006, Washington, D.C. 20201 (202) 472-1364.
POLITICAL POWER: Political power in the U.S. is following the population shift to the South and West, according to data in the Population Reference Bureau’s MUnited States Population Data Sheet” For a copy of the annual wall chad, send $2 (plus $1 handling) to PRB, 777 14th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 639-8040.
LINGUISTIC PLURALISM: The English Plus Information Clearinghouse was established to centralize information on language rights and language policy. Its newsletter, EPIC Events, is published bimonthly by the National Forum and the Joint National Committee for Languages, 227 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Suite 120, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 544-0004. Subscriptions are $12 per year.
CENSUS BUREAU CATALOG: The Census Bureau has issued a 392-page “Census Catalog and Guide: 1988” to help people locate and understand data from the bureau. The catalog covers vidually all census publications, computer tapes and other products from 1980 to 1987. In addition, a directory lists numerous telephone numbers and contacts For a copy send $19 to the Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
AIDS GROUP REFOCUSES
In response to the fact that the number of Latinos seeking its services last year jumped 89% and its requests for care from blacks grew 80%, the AIDS Project Los Angeles said last month it will undedake a number of steps to better serve the two communities
The largest AIDS service organization in Los Angeles County, the agency said it plans to increase the number of Spanish-speaking staff at its four treatment centers The group will step up its recruitment of Latinos and blacks to address what it calls the “changing face” of the deadly epidemic.
Currently, about a third of the agency's staff is Hispanic or black.
Other steps include the targeting of more programs at minority communities and subcontracting more education and training programs to Hispanics and blacks. Last year the group awarded 40% of its subcontracts to minorities.
LINKING JOB SEEKERS, EMPLOYERS
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has established a program to link employers and job seekers. The Legally Authorized Workers Program was created to help employers who may have lost workers due to the sanctions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.
The LAW Program works with comm unity-based organizations, state and local agencies to give the employer a pool of documented workers. In addition, the program hopes to increase the employment prospects of individuals referred through its community contacts
If an employer is interested in taking advantage of the program, he or she should call the U.S. Justice Department’s Office of Special Counsel at 1-800-265-7688, If it has not already done so, the LAW Program will attempt to establish a network of worker referral services in the employer's area Employers will also be advised on how to comply with the immigration law, including the filling out of forms.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
U.S. Labor Secretary Ann McLaughlin names Pedro Viera, acting president for SER-Jobs Tor Progress in Dallas, as a member of an advisory committee that will review the Job Training Partnership Act.. Jose Ruiz takes over as executive director of the Maryland Governor's Commission on Hispanic Affairs.. .
Calendar
THIS WEEK
AIDS MINORITY CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Aug. 15-17 A conference on the prevention of HIV and AIDS among minorities will be sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control. It is intended to provide administrators, community health educators and others with strategies. Information will be provided on funding, program development, implementation and evaluation. Model prevention programs for people in high-risk areas will also be reviewed.
AIDS Conference Office (202) 737-8062
GOLF CONVENTION
Kansas City, Kan. Aug. 15-19
This convention by the National Pan-American Golf
Association will include a dance, delegates’ meeting
and separate tournaments for juniors, seniors, ladies
and men.
Bob Soltero (816) 523-4586 AVIATION CONFERENCE 4
San Antonio Aug. 16-18
The National Hispanic Coalition of Federal Aviation Employees will conduct a training conference which will also mark its 10th anniversary. Workshop topics include the managers^ role in affirmative action, women in government and national recruitment efforts.
Carmen Quiles (312) 694-7753.
BILINGUAL SPECIAL EDUCATION Austin, Texas Aug. 18,19
The Bilingual Special Education Program at the University of Texas at Austin will co-sponsor a conference for educators with an emphasis on language assessment and instruction.
Shernaz Garcia (512) 471-6244
CONCERT
Washington, D.C. Aug. 21
The National Museum of American History will present a free outdoorconcert featuring Maria ysus Magnificos performing merengue and salsa music Smithsonian Visitor Information (202) 357-2700
COMING SOON
SPANISH CONTRIBUTION TO U.S.
Foundation for the Advancement of Hispanic-Americans
Washington, D.C. Aug. 24 Yves Gisse (202) 623-6869
LABOR MEETING
Labor Council for Latin American Advancement San Antonio Aug. 24-27 Alfredo Montoya (202) 347-4223
POSTAL WORKERS
Hispanic Organization of Postal Employees
Houston Aug. 26, 27
Moses Villalpando (713) 228-4673
HISPANIC FESTIVAL People Acting in Community Endeavors New Bedford, Mass. Sept 3,4 Jovanna Morales (607) 999-9920
PUERTO RICAN FESTIVAL, PARADE Puerto Rican Festival of Philadelphia Philadelphia Sept. 18-25 Diego Castellanos (215) 750-0132
Calendar will publish free announcements on events of interest to the Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items toe Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Aug. 15,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
SOCIOLOGIST- UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The Department of Sociology invites applications for a sociologist of religion who has a demonstrated record of teaching and research in the sociology of religion and American culture. This is a tenure-track position with rank and salary open. A Ph.D. before July 1989 is required.
If hired at a senior level, the person must have a distinguished research record. The successful candidate will be expected to teach courses fulfilling program requirements in the American Studies and Religious Studies Programs, but these courses may be taught in the Sociology Department. The appointment is allocated as a full time FTF position in sociology, but depending on the successful candidate's desires, he or she may request a joint appointment in one of the other programs. The appointment begins July 1,1989.
Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and names of three references to: Gary Hamilton, Chair, Search Committee,Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616. Final Filing Date for applications is October 15, 1988.
The University of California is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of diversity among its faculty and staff. In that spirit, we are particularly interested in receiving applications from persons of underrepresented groups, including women, ethnic minorities, disabled veterans, Vietnam-era veterans, and handicapped persons.
CO-ANCHOR/ PRODUCER
Looking for Producer and Co-Anchor for early and late weekday news. Some reporting. Lots of editing. Must be organized and not easily overwhelmed by workload in a nine-person operation. Good writer, positive attitude and sense of humor. No plastic people, please.
Send tape and resume to Dave EttL KAPP-TV 1610 South 24th Ave., Yakima, WA. 98902. Deadline for tapes and resumes is August 26, 1988. Absolutely no phone calls. EEO
ATTORNEY
Ayuda Inc. is seeking a full-time managing staff attorney. Applicants must be bilingual (Spanish/English), and have three to five years of experience in office practice in the areas of immigration, housing, domestic relations, and consumer affairs. Person selected will provide counsel and guidance to staff attorneys. Salary range: to $33,500. Employment to begin on September1,1988. Send resume to: Rebecca Cusic, Deputy Director, Ayuda Inc, 1736 Columbia Road NW, Washington, D.C. 20009.
MANAGER OF EDUCATIONAL & SPECIAL PROGRAMS
SALARY: $22 - $24,000 SITE: Washington, DC DUTIES: Develop and coordinate NAHJ programs of benefit to students and members, including a national writing contest, professional journalism awards and a scholarship program; work with journalism schools and associations to promote new training opportunities for Hispanic students and media professionals; help local Hispanic media associations develop their own programs; increase NAHJs participation in programs that enchance minority representation in the media QUALIFICATIONS: Demonstrated interest and experience in teaching or counseling students. Communications degree or media experience Strong writing and organizational skills. Public Speaking ability; fluency in Spanish & English. Willingness to travel Interest in serving the Hispanic community.
For more information, phone the NAHJ Office at (202) 783-6228.
NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE Employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media Opportunities for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media English or Spanish language. Contact Jocelyn Cdrdova, National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228.
JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Submissions are welcome for Weekly Reports “guest columnist” feature. Approx. 500 worda For writer's guidelines, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Guest Column, Hispanic Link5 Weekly R.eport, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
WEEKLY REPORT
WEEKLY REPORTS AVAILABLE: Hispanic Link has a limited number of unbound Weekly Report sets available: $18 for 18 issues in 1983, $53 for 53 issues in 1984, $52 for 52 issues in 1985, $50 each for 50 issues in 1986 and 1987. Order prepaid from Hispanic Link Back Copies, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MD., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
FEDERAL WORKERS
A Note of Appreciation from the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund.
With the strong assistance from many generous individuals, the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund was able to raise $35,000 in 1987 for much-needed scholarship support as a result of the 1987 Combined Federal Campaign. With your help, we hope to surpass this figure and assist a greater number of deserving Hispanic-American students across the nation.
In 1988, be a part of our effort aimed at recognizing and assisting some of the nation’s best and most talented minds. Please designate the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund on your Combined Federal Campaign.
NflSF
NATIONAL
HISPANIC
SCHOLARSHIP
FUND
Direct contributions can be made to: National Hispanic Scholarship Fund Post Office Box 748 San Francisco, California 94101 Contributions to NHSF are tax deductible
DEAR FRIEND:
On Sept 5 we will publish our five-year anniversary issue and on Sept. 12, our Hispanic Heritage Week edition.
These issues will reach our regular subscribers - now nearly 1,200 professionals j spread across 39 states and Puerto Rico -;and several hundred Hispanic leaders who ‘will attend various Hispanic Heritage Week functions nationally.
If you have a position or service to offer this expanded audience, we welcome your ad for either publication date. Our standard rates are 90 cents per word or$45 percolumn inch for display ads.
Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, Aug. 26, so please respond promptly.
P.S. If you are coordinating a Hispanic . Heritage Week function and would like copies of these issues, please call H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza at (202) 234-0280.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Ordered by â– ______________________________
Organization _________________________:___
Street ___________________________________
City, State & Zip________________________L
Area Code & Phone _______________
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 percolumn inch.
M
A
R
K
E
T
P
L
A
C
E
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts& Entertainment
SONG ROULETTE: Recordings by Emmanuel, Jose Jose and Rocio Jurado, among others, were distributed in the United States without authorization, a federal judge found recently.
According to a partial summary judgment handed down by a U.S. District Court on June 28, Bate Records Inc. infringed the copyrights of BMG Music by distributing the records manufactured in Mexico and imported into the U.S.
A complaint was filed by BMG Music in 1987.
Other Hispanic recording artists are in the news this week © East Los Angeles’ rock band Los Lobos plans to release the all-Spanish album La pistola yel corazon in October and promote the LP with a 10-city tour. It would be the band’s second Spanish album, following 1978’s Los Lobos del este de Los Angeles • Linda Ronstadt took a break last month from her Canciones de mi padre tour to tape an upcoming segment for public television’s
Sesame Street. She sang in Spanish, accompanied by mariachi puppets.
• Recovered after receiving treatment for leukemia in San Francisco, Spanish tenor Jose Carreras sang last month for 100,000 people at an outdoor benefit concert in Barcelona, Spain.
• Acheck signed byArgentinecroonerCarlosGardel, whodied53 years ago, will be auctioned in Montevideo, Uruguay, Aug. 13 by Camusso y Corbo. The check, for $300, was written in 1934 on an account in New York’s Citibank
• Puerto Rican singer Lunna will have a yearly date dedicated to her in her southern coastal hometown of Ponce. El dia de la Lunna sobre La Guancha, to be observed every Aug. 31, is dedicated to the first Ponce native to be nominated for a Grammy.
ONE LINERS: *A total of 24 Latin American artists - including 12 from Argentina - are part of Paper Vision II, an exhibit at the Bridgeport, Conn., Housatonic Museum of Art that continues through Aug. 26...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Southwest.”
POLITICAL RADIO: Florida Gov. Bob Martinez will speak directly to his constituents Aug 30 through a radio call-in program carried by 18 stations throughout the state, including WNWS in Miami.
“Live with the Governor” will begin with Martinez speaking out on an issue which listeners can respond to by calling 1-800-Gov-Flor. The show will air the last Tuesday of each month from 6:30 to 7:00 pm.
KUDOS: Manuel Galvdn, editorial board member of the Chicago Tribune, became the fourth Latino journalist to receive an invitation to join the 65-member Pulitzer Prize jury for 1989...
Bob Navarro becomes news director at KVEA-TV, Channel 52, a Telemundo station in Los Angeles This past May, the station received its third Emmy...
Alan Acosta becomes assistant metro editor at The Orange County (Calif.) Register. He was previously deputy regional editor at the Dallas Times Herald.
- Darryl Figueroa
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Diana Padilla
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118
Personal $108
Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
.SMOKING,,, ENGLISH Ojjtf
NON-SMOKmO

—ST
1 -X ^MORINS- 1 L-lOlYGUST 1
Nttf-SkieKiNt V votmoT \
\ \
I—I*

lAy name, is Linda aw I vWl btyonrEnjlisV >
Media Report
LATIN FILE: National Public Radio’s Latin File, an English-language daily show on Hispanics, began broadcasting Aug. 1 to about 40 NPR affiliate stations around the country, including those in New York Miami and San Francisco.
Its formal premiere wilt be during Hispanic Heritage Week in September.
The network has committed support to the 15-minute show through 1989, but community cal Is for its airing on local NPR stations would be greatly appreciated, said Latin File editor Isabel Alegria.
EMPOWERMENT: After one yearof study at Harvard University through a Nieman Fellowship, Frank del Olmo has resumed his weekly column and editorial writing at the Los Angeles Times. He told Weekly Report that the column will deal with Hispanic issues and foreign policy matters.
in his third column since returning in late
' July, he wrote:
“I am troubled by (Sen. Alan) Cranston’s decision to start his own voter registration group (in California). The goal is admirable, but Cranston and his aides may have undermined the Southwest (Voter Registration) project, however inadvertently. And there is a subtle but important difference between the two approaches: Cranston, like any politician, just wants to get out his voters; the Southwest project does that, but it also works for something more- the long-term empowerment of Latinos
“Anglos rarely notice it, but there is a not-always-friendly rivalry between Latinos from California and Texas. Although, I’m a native Californian, I have always thought Tejanos were a bit tougher politically, probably because the discrimination they faced in Texas was more overt than in laid-back California
“Now we Californians can do something for Tejanos We must urge our senior senator to use his considerable clout and fund-raising skills to preserve an important resource for Latinos not just in Texas, but throughout the
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making T he News This Week Tonio Burgos, a close political aide to New York Gov. Mario Cuomo for more than a decade, announces he will resign as director of the governor's Executive Services Office . Burgos, 36 years old, said he will rejoin his family business ... Three children of the late Sen . Robert Kennedy, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend , Kerry Kennedy and Douglas Kennedy, lend their support to United Farm Workers President Cesar Chavez. A doctor attending to Chavez , who had been on a water-only fast 24 days as of Aug . 1 0, said the 61-year-old Chavez is dangerously near kidney failure.. . The board of directors of SEA-Jobs for Progress accepts the resignation of president Ed Franco , Pedro Viera, vice president of SEA, a creation of the American Gl Forum and . the League of United Latin American . Citizens, becomes acting president. . . D avi d Ayala, 24, Joce Maldonado, 19, and Antonio Niev es, 23, save six childre n and two adults from a predawn Brooklyn , N .Y., fire that destroyed the homes of 30 people ... Washington migrant farm workers Felipe Rodrfguez Gutierrez, 42, his son, and his 15-year-old nephew, Jesus AntJ\Jnr,' d'ie m Lod1, Calif., when a pickup truck they are sleeping in is rtrTtfltU!Jtxa despondent construction foreman. Michael NeiMitJ the parked truck, left his car, stripped his clothes and walke d i n front of a speeding freight train . He was killed instantly ... F irefi ghters in Bell Gardens, Calif., use crow bars and sledge hammers to free Rodolfo Mohoro from the inside of a chimney. Mohoro became stuck when he was unable to wake his sister and brotheri n-la w an d he decided to get into their home by shinnying down the chimney ... 1:jiiiiiiiiiii Vol. 6 No, 32 HISPANIC LINK WEE GOP Promises Latino Influence, Not Numbers Hispanic delegates participating in the Aug. 15 Republican National Convention in New Orleans will increase from 4 . 0% in 1984 to4. 2%, and the Latino role will be a significant one, promise key Hispanic GOP officials . California delegate Dr. Tirso del Junco, longtime Reagan confidant and former chair man of the California Republican Party , agreed. Hispanic Assembly, which is ch a i red by Catalina Villalpando of Washington, D.C. At the July 18-21 Democratic convention in Atlanta this year, 6.8% of the delegates were Latino, compared with 6.4% four years earlier. "The thing that's important this year is the caliber of Mispanics representing us, " Rudy Beserra, community liaison at the White House, told Weekly Report. "Although they're small in numbers, the delegates this year are long on influence, " Heritage Month Passes A bill designating September as Hispanic Heritage Month beginning in 1989 went to President Reagan for his signature last week. The measure, sponsored by Rep. Esteban Torres(D-Calif,), passed the House by voice vote Aug. 8 after approval by the Senate May 27, where it was sponsored by Sen. Paul Simon (D-Ill.). Simon said, "It is important that the nation be educated and made aware of the richness and the significance of the contributions of Hispanics ... They are an essential part of our future. " "Although the figures seem low, I feel that the Hispanic representation is fair, " he said . "When you consider the predominant number of Hispanics who have been brought upli n Democratic households, you realize that Re ' publican Hispanics reflect a group that is steadily growing. They are more than propor tionately represented at this year's convention :' The party's lone voting Hispanic in Congress, . New Mexico Rep. Manuel Lujan, who is retiring from the House of Representatives this year after20 years, foresaw the numbers increasing as Latinos "begin to realize that supporting Republican Party policies will benefit everybody. " Unlike the Democratic National Committee, the Republican National Committee has never set a minimum Hispanic delegate goal for participation at its political conventions. "We just don't make it a practice to separate out the statistics for racial and ethnic groups or target goals for participation at the Republican National Committee," said one RNC staffer. At present there are no Hispanics serving on the 153-member RNC. According to Ernest Olivas, RNC Hispanic community liaison, there are 15 Hispanics presently employed at the RNC, including seven affiliated with the Republican National con! i n ued on page 2 REPUBLICAN CONVENTION HISPANIC Del. A l t. Total" Hlsp. Alaska 1 0 38 2 . 6% Arizona 1 0 66 1.5 California 10 1 5 350 7 . 1 Colorado 1 1 72 2.8 D . C . 1 0 28 3.6 Florida 6 5 164 6 . 7 Hawaii 1 4 40 12. 5 Iowa 0 1 74 1 . 4 Kansas 0 1 68 1.5 Kentucky 1 0 76 1.3 Louisiana 0 1 82 1 . 2 Massachusetts 0 2 104 1.9 Minnesota 1 1 62 3 . 2 l Mississippi 0 1 62 1.6 I Missouri 1 0 94 \ 1 . 1 l New Mexico 4 1 52 9.6 New York 1 0 272 0.4 PuertQ Rico 11 10 28 75. 0 Texas 6 3 22 4 . 1 Utah 1 1 52 3.8 Virginia 1 0 100 1.0 Wyoming 0 1 36 2.8 * As of 8-8-88 Del . -Delegates; Alt -A l ternates Cavazos Becomes 1 i st:Hispanicto be Named to Cabinet President Reagan nominated Texas Tech University President Lauro Cavazos Aug . 9 to complete William Bennett's term as U.S . Se cretary of Education, making the 61-year-old Cavazos the first Hispanic to be named to a Cabinet position. Bennett has announced that he would leave the $99,500 post Sept. 20. Cavazos, pending Senate approval , would then replace him for four months before a new administration moves into the White House. Cavazos, a Democrat, is the senior Hispanic university president in the country, having stepped into the position at Texas Tech in April1980. With some 24,000 students on an 1,800 acre campus in Lubbock, Texas, it is the largest university run by a Hispanic. Jose Garcia De Lara, national president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, which gave Cavazos an award this past July for his leadership in education, applauded the appointment. He called Cavazos "eminently qualified and extremely well-liked. " Antonio Rigual, executive director of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Univer sities, said, "We are very pleased Dr. Cavazos has impeccable credentials." They also agreed that the appointment was a political maneuver which will probably not deliver the Hispanic vote in Texas . "It won't overcome the f act that Republ icans have tremendous def icien c i e s i n terms of Hispanics," said De Lara . Cavazos served as dean o f the school of medicine at Tufts University in Boston for f i ve years. He received both a B.A and M.A. from ! Texas Tech and a Ph.D . in physiology from . ! Iowa State University in 1954. . The sixth-generation M exi c an is married to the former Peggy Murdock. They have 1 o children. Cavazos had previously announced that he would resign from his $143,000 university position in July 1989 and return to teaching. Darryl Figueroa

PAGE 2

' Low Latino Infant Mortality Rate Tied to Family Support The Hispanic infant mortality rate continues to perplex the medical community by remain ing less than that for whites despite the much lower socioeconomic level of Hispanics, said a federal , report released Aug. 4. According to the National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality,8.6 Hispanic infants died within their first year for every 1 ,000 live births as compared with 9.3 for whites in 1985. The 18.2 mortality rate for blacks was the highest of all groups. Another health indicator for infants is low birth weight, which is closely related to infant mortality . The incidence of low birth weight among Hispanics, 6.2 per 1 ,000, was only slightly higher than the 5.6 rate for whites in 1985. The rate for blacks, 1 2.4, was the highest of all groups. Experts attribute the more favorable infant mortality rate among Hispanic women to a lower incidence of smoking and drug abuse, adequate nutrition and such factors as strong community and family support. Kathy Allen, coordinator of children's issues for the General Accounting Office and one of the authors of the report, cautioned against the assumption that infant mortality is not an issue for Latinas. "The figures may mask problems with data collection," she warned. "We are con cerned that underreporting of infant deaths occurs among Mexicans near the border who are afraid to give information to officials." Additionally, she said, "the incidence of diabetes is higher among Hispanics. This often results in babies too large for their gestational age . They wouldn't classify as low-birth-weight infants, but they aren't healthy 4.2/o of GOP Delegates Are Latinos continued from page 1 At the convention, one Hispanic is serving in a policy and planning role. Richard Montoya co-cha irs the Subcommittee on Family and Community of the Committee on Resolutions. States key to a Republican victory in Novem ber have low Hispanic delegate and alternate participation, based on 80%-complete tally available at press time . Latinos made up an estimated 7.1% of California ' s delegation, 4.1% of Texas'and less than 1% of New York's. The percentage of voting Hispanic delegates from California will be approximately 5.7%, down from 15. 3% in 1984. Texas has 5.4%, down frvm 9.2% in 1984. New York is pro jected to be only0.4%, a drop from 3 . 7%. Puerto Rico has one of its highest delegate representations ever, with a projected 21 delegates and alternates-more Hispanics than any state except California Diana Padilla Hispanic Firms Grow 27/o in Texas The number of Hispanic businesses in Texas has grown by at least 27% in the past six years despite an oil-related slump in the early 1980s, according to the U.S. Hispanic Chamber . of Commerce. "Just as big companies closed when the bottom went out of the oil industry, a lot of Hispanic businesses went, too . But we're beginning to see more light," said Abel Quintela, president of the USHCC and a Texas business owner. "A Focus Report on Hispanic Business Enterprise in Texas," released by the chamber July 27, put the number of Hispanic-owned businesses at 80,000 . It ranks Texas as number two, following California, in Hispanicowned businesses and Hispanic business revenues. The report states that Hispanic : business , although thriving in the area of small business, "does so at a level which limits its access to wider markets." Quintela said two contributing factors are lack of seed money and a need for diver sification. He explained diversification is essential to obtaining contracts with large . corporations and with the government The counties in which Hispanic-owned businesses produced the most revenue are, in order of rank: Bexar, Harris, El Paso, Hidalgo, Dallas and Webb. Sophia Nieves LATINC>OWNED FIRMS IN TEXAS: 1982,1988 No. Firms No. Firms Gross Receipts Industry 1982 1988 1982 1988* Agriculture 1,175 1,700 . $66,272 $90,000 Construction 10,638 14,000 505,965 635,000 Finance 2,032 2,600 66,618 100,000 Manufacturing 522 700 326,932 410,000 Retail 13,733 17,000 1,239,086 1,800,000 Services 21,123 28,000 626,568 800,000 Transportation 4,181 5,400 180,080 225,000 Wholesale 414 600 232,934 300,000 Other 7 , 721 10,000 190,554 240,000 • USHCC estimate, plus or minus 5% Source ; U .S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 2 either." Another data problem is that infant mortality rates for Hispanics were based on the reports of only 17 states and the District of Columbia Most His panic babies, 95.4% in 1985, were counted as white. The report found that Hispanic women fared least well in terms of receiving medical care throughout their pregnancieS. Among them, 12.4% received late or no prenatal care, compared with 4.7% for whites and 1 0% for blacks. Moreover, more Latinas lack health in surance than other groups. About 28% of them had none, compared with 15% for whites and 21% for black women. "The central message for Hispanics is to try to increase their access to health care," said Allen. -Darryl Figueroa Suits on Voting Rights Spread to Da lias, N.Y. The election process used by the city of Dallas to choose its mayor and two of its councilmen has come under fire from two Hispanic groups. The groups joined the original plaintiffs Aug. 2 in a lawsuit which maintains citywide elections are discriminatory. The Ledbetter Neighborhood Association, which represents the largest concentration of Hispanics in the city, and the Texas Rural Legal Foundation joined with the two black plaintiffs in contending that the citywide ballot ing system violates the spirit of the 1964 Voting Rights Act. The lawsuit before U.S. District Judge Jerry Buchmeyer also asks for a delay in the 1989 elections until the area can be broken down into 11 districts. Currently, eight of the council members are elected by district. The suit recommends the mayor be selected by the councilmembers. The lawsuit was first filed in May. In another voting rights suit in the town of Hempstead, N.Y., the Center for Constitutional Rights has challenged the township's at large election system for town board posts. The suit was filed Aug. a. . Farm Workers Get Funds The Senate and the U.S. Labor Department took action Aug. 8 to provide assistance to the estimated 200,000 seasonal and migrant farm workers hurt by the drought. The Senate approved, 92-0, a $3.9 billion farm aid bill that includes $5 million for farm workers as well as two food stamp provisions designed to provide further help . The money is to be channeled through the Federal Emer gency Management Agency to the Job Training Partnership Act reserve account. Labor Secretary Ann McLaughlin announced that up to $9.5 million would be pumped into existing state migrant worker programs to provide emergency relief. Another$300,000 was set aside by the Labor Department for additional emergency services. , Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Adam Gettinger-Brizuela, guest co lumnist The Indiscriminate Killer-The magnitude of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome tragedy in the United States has a great deal to do with prejudice. No, the alien retro-virus that causes the immune system to fail does not seek out gay men , blacks, Latinos, Asians , Native Americans , prostitutes or IV drug abusers . The virus is una w are of these distinctions. It is merely an efficient people-killer . This alien lives by f eeding on human cells and only kills its hapless host incidentally. But human prejudice has eased the way for the virus from the beginning. Although AIDS manifested itself in Central Africa as early as 1970, nothing was noted in the world press until several years later. After all, thousands of Africans die every year of simple diarrhea. When U.S. doctors began documenting a suspicious trend about 1980, reporters be came more interested. For a short time, there was a burst of media attention on the ' so-called Gay Related Immune Deficiency, or GRID . Religious bigots called it"God's pest control" while immunologists at the Centers for Disease Control and elsewhere struggled to identify the virus. MONTHS, YEARS WASTED Gay newspapers began to document the progression of the epidemic, noting that it was then striking down gay men , prostitutes and IV drug users almost exclusively . The only other high-risk groups identified were hemophiliacs and Haitians. AI OS was and is ad isease of the poor and unde rrepresented. When the CDC came to understand what we were facing an incurable organism that could wipe out millionsit began to generate hundreds of reports and news releases to sound the alarm. The Reagan administration moved with the speed of an anemic three-toed sloth to fund AIDS research. Traditional conservative contempt for homosexuals, coupled with the constraints of the most expensive military buildup in history, forced medical resear c h to waste precious months, even years. Two things are necessary to fight an epidemic: Money and information. Sadly, most state and local governments were scarcely better than Washington about providing the money. Information is largely the responsibility of the media . The government and journalism establishments displayed a lack of interest that borders on genocide. By 1986, thousands had died and hundreds of thousands were infected with the virus. A DEATH EVERY FOUR,HOURS In the last two years, AIDS has reached the front pages b e cause the United States has awakened to what the CDC, medical researche rs and gay activists have been saying for seven years . How many lives could have been saved if we acted so oner? The victims of AIDS , gay and non-gay, are disproport iona te ly of color. Of the women and children with AIDS or sero-pos itive for the AIDS virus, the vast majority are black or Hispanic. Accordi n g to some experts, one Hispanic person is diagnosed with AI OS every t wo hours and another dies from it every four hours. Latinos in California are responding to the AIDS c r isis in growing numbers. Gay Hispanics such as Nicole Ramirez -Mur ray have done much to bridge the gap and inform the non-gay Hispani c community. One who has listened is California Assemblyman Peter Chacon. Nationally, barrio activistsstill working with very limi t ed resources -are spreading the word to those at risk in their communities. Why should a white, middle-class heterosexual care about AIDS? Because AIDS does not care if it invades their cells or those of a black hooker or Chicano junkie. The virus will continue to eat us alive until we as a people put down our prejudices. (Adam Gettinger-Brizuela is a free-lance writer who organized the j . Effort in San Diego. ) \ Sin pelos en /a . lengua POSTER PROBLEM: The New York City Schools badly need Spanish-speaking teachers and counselors and other workers. So the Board of Education launched a $75,000 Latino recruitment campaign July 21. It had 3,400 posters printed in Spanish . Then someone caught a spelling error-con came out conn. So they whited out 3,400 n's. After all3,400 signs were installed in city buses, two other boo boos were discovered. There was the word ebanistero. Presumably they meant ebanista . Woodworker. And electricista came out electrecista Could it be they were just trying to prove how desperately they need bilingual help? TILDE TIFF: Meanwhile, in Miami, a nastyrumorwasspreading that the new Dade County manager, Joaquin Avin6, was making ' the county spend $25,000 to replace all of the elements in its typewriters so his name would include the proper accents and a tilde. Terry Robbins, leader of the Dade Americans United to Protect the English Language, caught wind of it and fired off a letter to The Miami News. Now the rumor's laid to rest Avin6 explains that he was asked if he wanted the governmenfs typesetting equipment upgraded to spell his name correctly, but that he responded it wasn't necessary . Long before he showed up, the county print shop had acquired typefaces that included accents and tildes. Has anyone ever noticed how Linda Chavez's name is printed on U . S . English's stationery? Or is that a silly question? F O OD FIGHTS: Two weeks ago we reported that the Orange County jail in California was refusing to serve jalapeno peppers to prison ers because it considered them potentially dangerous weapons. Now La tino prisoners there are filing suit, claiming the denial is " unreasonable punishment." And from Florida comes the report that inmates in one of its jails won ' t be served T-bone steaks every six weeks, per past custom. Why not? Prisoner Miguel Menendez stabbed Fidel Campos with a sharpened T-bone . Myself, I ' m a vegetarian . I'd rather be hit by a jalapeno. EDDIE' S LOOPHOLE: Mouse hole I've heard of, but. now there's a Meese hole in our national political asylum policy. Our departing Attorney General Ed Meese granted political asylum this month to three Chinese families who testified that they would be persecuted if they returned to China because they violated that nation ' s "one couple, one child" law. How do you suppose our Justice Department would respond to asylum pleas of Salvadorenos in the United States if El Salvador were to come up with a similar edict? Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • ALICIA SANDOVAL, National Education Association communica tions director , responding Aug . 10 to an AP reporter on the nomination of Lauro Cavazos as U.S . Secretary of Education : "Irs just a ploy to help get Bush elected and carry Texas. A classic case of tokenism. . . Cavazos is like a substitute teacher. He won't have the clout to change anything in the little time he has." JUliO IGLESIAS, quoted by Achy Obejas in the August cover story of Hispanic magazine on Latino audiences in Chicago demanding that he speak and sing in Spanish: " They want to hear everything at the same time. They're so impassioned, but thars very typically (Hispanic), isn't it? The Americans, they just sit and enjoy it, they don' t make demands. It's hard. I'm singing in two very different cultures. " 3 Aua. 15, 1988

PAGE 4

COLLECTING TEXAS BUSINESS: "A Focus Report on Hispanic Business Enterprise in Texas" offers statewide and county analyses of Latino owned businesses, including types of businesses, sales and revenue . The 72-page report also contains demographic information and employment patterns. To obtain a free copy, send requests to Preston Conner, Business Research, U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, 4900 Main St, Suite 700; Kansas City, Mo. 64112. FELLOWS SOUGHT: W.K Kellogg Foundation seeks professionals who want to improve their leadership skills as candidates for the 1989 Kellogg National Fellowship Program . Applicants must be affiliated with a non-profit organization or be self-employed. The deadline is Dec. 19. For more information contact the foundation at 400 North Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 49017 (616) 968-1611. INFANTMORTALITY: A40-pagereportandan80-pageappendix that includes discussion of the inadequacies of data collection on Hispanic infant mortality is available free of charge by contacting the National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality , Switzer Building, 330 C St. SW, Room 2006, Washington, D.C. 20201 (202)472-1364. POLITICAL POWER: Political power in the U.S. is following the population shift to the South and West, according to data in the Population Reference Bureau's "United States Population Data Sheet" For a copy of the annual wall chart, send $2 (plus $1 handling) to PRB , 777 14th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 639-8040. . LINGUISTIC PLURALISM: The English Plus Information Clearing house was established to centralize information on language rights and language policy. Its newsletter, EPIC Events, is published . bimonthly by the National Forum and the Joint National Committee for Languages, 227 Massachusetts Ave. N E, Suite 120, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 544 -0004. Subscriptions are $12 per year. CENSUS BUREAU CATALOG: The Census Bureau has issued a 392-page "Census Catalog and Guide: 1988" to help people locate and understand data from the bureau. The catalog covers virtually all census publications, computer tapes and other products from 1980 to 1987. In addition, a directory lists numerous telephone numbers and contacts. For a copy send $19 to the Superintendent of Documents, U . S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. San Antonio Aug . 16-18 CONNECTING AIDS GROUP REFOCUSES In response to the fact that the number of Latinos seeking its services last year jumped 89% and its requests for care from blacks grew 80%, the AIDS Project Los Angeles said last month it will undertake a number of steps to better serve the two communities. The largest AIDS service organization in Los Angeles County, the agency said it plans to increase the number of Spanish-speaking staff at its four treatment centers. The group will step up its recruitment of Latinos and blacks to address what it calls the "changing face" of the deadly epidemic. Currently, about a third of the agency's staff is Hispanic or black. Other steps include the targeting of more programs at minority communities and subcontracting more education and training programs to Hispanics and blacks. Last year the group awarded 40% of its subcontracts to minorities. LINKING JOB SEEKERS, EMPLOYERS The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has established a program to link employers and job seekers. The Legally Authorized Workers Program was created to help employers who may have lost workers due to the sanctions of the lmmig;ation Reform and Control Act of 1986. The LAW Program wor ks with community-based organizations, state and local agencies to give the employer a pool of documented workers . In addition, the program hopes to increase the employment prospects of individuals referred through its community contacts. If an employer is interested in taking advantage of the program, he or she should call the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Special Counsel at 1-800-255-7688. If it has not already done so, the LAW Program will attempt to establish a network of worker referral services in the employer's area Employers will also be advised on .how to comply with the immigration law, including the filling out of forms. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES U . S . Labor Secretary Ann Mclaughlin names Pedro Viera, acting president for SER-Jobs for Progress in Dallas, as a member of an ' advisory committee that will review the Job Training Partnership Act .. Jose Ruiz takes over as executive director of the Maryland Governor's ; Commission on Hispa nic Affairs ... Calendar THIS WEEK The National Hispanic Coalition of Federal Aviation Employees will conduct a training conference which will also mark its 1Oth anniversary. Worksh o p topics include the managers' role in affirmative ac t ion, women in government a n d national recruitment efforts. Washington, D . C . Aug . 24 Yves Gisse (202) 623-6869 LABOR MEETING Labor Council for Latin American Advancement San Antonio Aug . 24-27 Alfredo Montoya (202) 347-4223 AIDS MINORITY CONFERENCE Washington , D . C . Aug . 15-17 A conference on the prevention of HIV and AIDS among minorities will be sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control . It is intended to provide adminis trators, community health ed .ucators and others with strategies. Information will be provided on funding , program development, implementation and evaluation . Model prevention programs for people in high-risk areas will also be reviewed . AIDS Conference Office (202) 737-8062 GOLF CONVENTION Kansas City, Kan. Aug . 15-19 This convention by the National Pan-American Golf Association will include a dance, delega!as' meeting and separate tournaments for juniors, seniors, ladies and men . Bob Soltero (816) 523-4586 AVIATION CONFERENCE 4 Carmen Quiles (312) 694-7753. BILINGUAL SPECIAL EDUCATION Austin , Texa s Aug.' 18, 19 The Bilingual Special Education Program at the University of Texas at Austin will co-sponsor a conference for educators with an emphasis on language assessment and instruction. Shernaz Garcia (512) 471-6244 CONCERT Washington, D . C . Aug. 21 The National Museum of American History will present a free outdoor concert featuring Maria y sus Magnificos performing merengue and salsa music. Smithsonian Visitor Information (202) 357-2700 COMING SOON SPANISH CONTRIBUTION TO U.S. Foundation for the Advancement of Hispanic-Ame ricans Aug . 15, 1988 POSTAL WORKERS Hispanic Organization of Postal Employees Houston Aug . 26, 27 Moses Villalpando (713) 228-4673 HIS PA NIC FESTIVAL People Acting in Community Endeavors New Bedford, Mass. Sept 3, 4 Jovanna Mora les (607) 999-9920 PUERTO RICAN FESTIVAL, PARADE Puerto Rican Festival of Philadelphia Philadelphia Sept. 18-25 Diego Castellanos (215) 750-0132 Calendar will publish free announcements on events of interest to the H ispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D . C . 20005. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

________ ________ SOCIOLOGIST-UNIV. OFCALIFORNIA, DAVIS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS . The Department of Sociology invites applications for a sociologist of religion who has a demonstrated record of teaching and research in the sociology of religion and American culture. This is a tenure-track position with rank and salary open. A Ph.D. before July 1989 is required . _ If hired at a senior level , the person must have a distinguished research record. The successful candidate will be expected to teach courses fulfilling program requirements in the American Studies and Religious Studies Programs, but these courses may be taught in the Soc i ology Department. Th.e appointment is allocated as a full time FTF position in sociology , but depending on the successful candidates desires, he or she may request a joint appointment in one of the other programs . The appointment begins July 1 , 1989. Applicants should send letter of application , curriculum vitae, and names of three references to : Gary Hamilton , Chair, Search Committee , 'Department of Sociology , University of California, Davis , Davis , California 95616. Final Filing Date forappiications is0ctober15, 1988. The University of California is an equal opportunity / affirmative action employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of diversity among its faculty and staff. In that spirit, we are particularly interested in receiving applications from persons of underrepresented groups, including women , ethnic minorities , disabled veterans, Vietnam era veterans , and handicapped persons. Co-ANCHOR/PRODUCER Looking tor Producer and Anchor tor early and late weekday news . Some reporting . Lots of editing . Must be organized and not easily overwhelmed by workload in a nine-person operation. Good writer, positive attitude and sense of humor. No plastic people, please . Send tape and resume to Dave Ettl , KAPP-TV 1610 South 24th Ave., Yakima, WA 98902. Deadline tor tapes and resumes is August 26, 1988. Absolutely no phone calls. EEO ATTORNEY Ayuda Inc . is seeking a full-time managing staff attorney . Applicants must be bilingual (Spanish/English), and have three to five years of experience in office practice in the areas of immigration , housing, domestic relations. and consumer affairs. Person selected will provide counsel and guidance to staff attorneys . Salary range : to $33,500. Employment to begin on September 1, 1988. Send resume to: Rebecca Cusic, Deputy Director , Ayuda Inc., 1736 Columbia Road NW, Washington , D.C. 20009. MANAGER OF EDUCATIONAL & SPECIAL PROGRAMS SALARY: $22 • $24.000 SITE: Washington, DC NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE Employment referral service for Hispanic tessionals and students In the media Opportunities for internships. entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers. magazines. television. radio and other media, English or Spanish language . Contact Jocelyn C6rdova, National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783. JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Sub missions are welcome tor Weekly Report's "guest columnisf' feature. Approx. 500 words. For write(s guidelines. send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Guest Column, Hispanic Link ' Weekly Report , 1420 N St. NW , Washington , D . C . 20005. WEEKLY REPORT WEEKLY REPORTS AVAILABLE: Hispanic Link has a limited number of unbound Weekly Report sets available: $18 for 18 issues in 1983, $53 for 53 issues in 1984, $52 for 52 issues in 1985, $50 each for 50 issues in 1986 and 1987. Order prepaid from Hispanic Link Back Copies, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. FEDERAL WORKERS A Note of Appreciation from the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund. With the strong assistance from many generous individuals. the National Hispanic , Scholarship Fund was able to raise $35,000 in 1987 tor much-needed scholarship support as a result of the 1987 Combined Federal Campaign. With your help, we hope to surpass this figure and assist a greater number of deserving Hispanic-American students across the nation . In 1988, be a part of our effort aimed at recognizing and assisting some of the nation's best and most talented minds. Please de signate the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund on your Combined Federal Campaign. NISF NATIONAL HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP FUND Direct contributions can be made to: National Hispanic Scholarship Fund Post Office Box 7 48 San Francisco , California 94101 Contribut i ons to NHSF are tax deductible DEAR FRIEND: On Sept. 5 we will publish our five-year anniversary issue and on Sept. 12, our His panic Heritage week edition. These issues will reach our regular sub scribers now nearly 1 ,200 professionals : spread across .39 states and Puerto Rico t and . several hundred Hispanic leaders who : will attend various Hispanic Herita .ge Week : functions nationally . If you have a position or service toofferthis expanded audience, we welcome your ad for either publication date. Our standard rates are90 cents per word or$45 per column inch for display ads . . Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, . Aug. 26, so please respond promptly. P . S . . If you are coordinating a Hispanic ; Heritage Week function and would like copies of these issues, please call Hector Ericksen Mendoza at (202) 234-0280. DUTIES : Develop and coordinate NAHJ programs of benefit to students and members. including a national writing contest, profes: sional journalism awards and a scholarship program ; work with journalism schools and associations to promote new training oppor tunities tor Hispanic students and media professionals ; help local Hispanic media as sociations develop their own programs; in crease NAHJs participation in programs that enchance minority representation in the media DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280: Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. QUALIFICATIONS: Demonstrated interest and experience in teaching or counseling students . Communications degree or media experience . Strong writing and organizational skills . Public Speaking ability; . fluency in Spanish & English . Willingness to travel . In terest in serving the Hispanic community. For more information, phone the NAHJ Office at (202) 783-6228. Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city , state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone • number, 1 word) . Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch . Ordered by Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & Zip _________ _ Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment Sesame Street. She sang in Spanish, accompanied by mariachi puppets. SONG ROULETTE: Recordings by Emmanuel, Jose Jose and Rocio Jurado, among others, were distributed in the United States without authorization, a federal judge found recently. • Recovered after receiving treatment for leukemia in San Francisco, Spanish tenor Jose Carreras sang last month for 1 00,000 people at an outdoor benefit concert in Barcelona, Spain. • A check signed by Argentine crooner Carlos Garde I, who died 53 years ago, will be auctioned in Montevideo, Uruguay, Aug. 13 by Camusso y Corbo. The check, for $300, was written in 1934 on an account in New York's Citibank. According to a partial summary judgment handed down by a U.S. District Court on June 28, Bate Records Inc. infringed the copyrights of BMG Music by distributing the records manufactured in Mexico and imported into the U .S. A complaint was filed by BMG Music in 1987. Other Hispanic recording artists are in the news this week e East Los Angeles' rock band Los Lobos plans to release the all Spanish album La pistola y el coraz6n in October and promote the LP with a 1 D-eity tour. It would be the band's second Spanish album, following 1978's Los Lobos del este de Los Angeles. • Puerto Rican singer Lunna will have a yearly date dedicated to her in her southern coastal hometown of Ponce. El dia de Ia Lunna sobre La Guancha, to be observed every Aug. 31 , is dedicated to the first Ponce native to be nominated for a Grammy. • Linda Ronstadt took a break last month from her Canciones de mi padre tour to tape an upcoming segment for public television's ONE LINERS: A total of 24 Latin American artistsincluding 12 from Argentina are part of Paper Vision II, an exhibit at the Bridgeport, Conn., Housatonic Museum of Art that continues through Aug. 26 ... -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media ' July, he wrote: R e P 0 rt "I am troubled by (Sen. Alan) Cranston's decision to start his own voter registration Southwest." POLITICAL RADIO: Florida Gov. Bob .Martinez will speak directly to his constituents Aug. 30 through a radio call-in program carried by 18 stations throughout the state, including WNWS in Miami. lATIN FILE: National Public Radio's latin File, an English-language daily show on Hispanics, began broadcasting Aug. 1 to about 40 NPR affiliate stations around the country, including those in New York, Miami and San Francisco. Its formal premiere will be during Hispanic Heritage Week in September. The network has committed support to the 15-minute show through 1989, but community calls for its airing on local N PR stations would be greatly appreciated, said Latin File editor Isabel Alegria. EMPOWERMENT: Afteroneyearofstudy at Harvard University through a Nieman Fellow ship, Frank del Olmo has resumed his weekly column and editorial writing at the Los Angeles Times. He told Weekly Report that the column will deal with Hispanic issues and foreign policy matters. 6 in !lis third column since returning in late HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Waehington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234.0280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. F e li x Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejia& Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa. Sophia Nieves , D ia na Padilla. Graphics/ Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): InstitutionS/agencies $118 Personal $1 08 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPO RATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word . Display ads are $45 per column inch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run i n Weekly Report mailed Friday of sa me week. Multiple use rates on request. group (in California). The goal is admirable, but Cranston and his aides may have under mined the Southwest (Voter Registration) project , however inadvertently . And there is a subtle but important difference between the two approaches: Cranston, like any politician, just wants to get out his voters; the South west project does that, but it also works for more-the long-term emp0werment of Latinos . "Anglos rarely notice it, but there is a not alwaJ'Sfriendly rivalry between Latinos from California and Texas. Although, I'm a native Californian, I have always thought Tejanos were a bit tougher politically, probably b& cause the discrimination they faced in Texas was more overt than in laid-back California "Now we Californians can do something for Tejanos. We must urge ou.r senior senator to use his considerable clout and fund-raising skills to preserve an important resource for Latinos not just in Texas, but throughout the "Live with the Governor" will begin with Martinez speaking out on an issue which listeners can respond to by calling 1 Gov-Fior. The show will air the last Tuesday of each month from 6 :30 to 7:00 pm. KUDOS: Mal')uel Galvan, editorial board member of the Chicago Tribune, became the fourth Latino journalist to receive an invitation to join the 65-member Pulitzer Prize jury for 1989 ... Bob Navarro becomes news director at KVEA TV, Channel 52, a Telemundo station in Los Angeles. This past May, the station received its third Emmy ... Alan Acosta becomes assistant metro editor at The Orange County(Calif.) Register. He was previously deputy regional editor at the Dallas Times Herald. Figueroa My name IS unda S'ttd I yi,\\ be yoQr lf!9lish spe&kirJ9 host<:sS ••• Hispanic Link Weekly Report