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Hispanic link weekly report, August 22, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, August 22, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
First Lady Nancy Reagan presides over a White House ceremony to honor Mr. and Mrs. Mario Jimenez, from Whittier, Calif., and five other families for being selected by the Great American Families Awards Program... Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, the Democratic vice presidential candidate, and U.S. Treasurer Katherine Ortega keynote a San Antonio fund-raising banquet in honor of Willie Velasquez, the late founder of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project... Colorado Gov. Roy Romer names County Judge Alex Martinez of Pueblo to fill a vacant state district judgeship... Texas Gov. Bill Clements names four Latinos - Maria Delgado of San Antonio, Esther Alvarez of Fort Worth, Olivia Besteiro of Brownsville
and Israel Vdsquez of Laguna Vista- to a 33-member panel that will recommend improvements in the state’s juvenile justice and delinquency programs... New York Gov. Mario Cuomo appoints state Assemblyman Jos6 Serrano to an 11-member commission that will study the distribution of state funds to local school districts... The National Minority AIDS Council honors Eunice Diaz, director of community affairs at White Medical Center in Cerritos, Calif. Diaz and four other minorities were recognized at a Washington, D.C., ceremony for their services to combat AIDS... Indo-Hispanic quarterback Jim Plunkett, who led the Los Angeles Raiders to Super Bowl victories in 1981 and 1984, is cut after a 16-year professional career. Plunkett 40, amassed 25,882 career yards and was named Super Bowl XVs Most Valuable Player...
v^°x<>^(C^ISPAn!^UN^WEEKL.Y REPORTtP)^—
Hispanic Theater Booming, Entering Mainstream
A current boom in U.S. Hispanic theater is spawning the creation of a new, critically acclaimed Latino dramaturgy made up of English-language plays, often commissioned and performed by the nation’s leading mainstream producers.
That new Hispanic dramaturgy consistently shows up at increasingly important theater events around the country, with titles such as “Cuba and His Teddy Bear,” “Roosters^’ and “Bang Bang Blues.”
The latter - Charles Gdmez’s true-to-life comedy about a U.S. news team in Nicaragua - premieres in New York this week. It epitomizes the new dramatic literature: It is written in English but with liberal doses of Spanish. Its author, a participant in this year’s third Hispanic Playwrights Project in Costa Mesa, Calif., is a 39-year-old, U.S.-born Hispanic.
Leading names among contemporary Hispanic playwrights include Luis Valdez, whose work with the nation’s venerable Teatro Campesino in San Juan Bautista, Calif., preceded his current fame, and Carlos Morton, whose play “The Many Deaths of Danny Rosales” won the 1986 Hispanic Playwrights Festival Award at the New York Shakespeare Festival.
Among the younger playwrights, Milcha Sanchez-Scott is considered a prominent figure, and her play “Roosters” is quickly
becoming one of the most-often produced Hispanic plays in the country.
“Roosters” was developed at Intar, a 22-year-old New York-based Hispanic company that since 1979 has produced plays in the English language exclusively.
“We have to produce in English because that is the language our young playwrights can write in,” says Max Ferr£, the company's founder and artistic director.
Puerto Rican Miguel Piftero is one of the better known playwrights of his generation. His play “Short Eyes” won the New York Drama Critics Award for Best American Play in 1974. Piftero died earlier this year at the age of 41.
The current boom can be attributed partly to the general healthy state of “regional” theater throughout the country that survives with a big boost from corporate grants. It is pulling the focus away from New York’s Broadway district to respected professional companies like San Diego’s Old Globe Theater.
In 1981, the Globe founded Teatro Meta, a bilingual arm that produces theater workshops for junior high school students and bilingual productions of classics and contemporary Latin American theater. This year, the Globe premiered “The Boiler Room,” a new work in English by New York Puerto Rican Reuben Gonz&lez.
The healthy state of Hispanic theater in the United States is nurtured by the Ford Foundation - with grants exceeding $3 million, one of the nation’s largest supporters of Hispanic theater- which has just published Joanne Pottlitzer’s extensive and thorough report titled “Hispanic Theater in the United States.”
In 1985 Pottlitzer, a respected director, translator and presenter of Latin American theater in this country, surveyed some 150 institutions connected with Hispanic theater. Her data, updated in 1987, lists 101 theater groups, 28 presenting organizations, and 16 service organizations that support Latino theater in the country.
The new Hispanic theater differs greatly -stylistically and thematically- from the works of the teatro movimientos that appeared in the ’60s, from Albuquerque, N.M., to San Juan, Puerto Rico. Hispanic theaterfrom that
continued on page 2
Fla English Gets on Ballot
An eleventh hour effort by proponents of the initiative to make English Florida’s official language netted them the 904 votes they lacked to qualify the measure for the Nov. 8 ballot The total number of signatures needed statewide - 342,939 - was also met.
A week before the Aug. 9 deadline, Florida English was told by the secretary of state's office that a miscount had left the group short of the minimum needed in one of 10 congressional districts
If the proposal for a constitutional amendment is passed by the voters, Florida would become the 14th state to make English its official language, requiring all official business be conducted in English. Similar initiatives have also qualified for ballots in Arizona and Colorado.
According to a survey of 800 Florida voters commissioned by U.S. English in June 1987, 86% of them favored the constitutional amendment In Arizona a U.S. English poll taken in March 1988 found 61% of those sampled approved of making English the state’s official language. In a June! poll conducted for the Denver Post 64% of Coloradans gave their approval.
Jackson to Take On Ch&vez’s Fast
United Farm Workers President Cesar Chdvez, suffering from dizziness, high blood pressure and cramps because of his fast met with the Rev. Jesse Jackson Aug. 14.
Jackson visited with the 61-year-old Ch&vez at his bedside in UFW headquarters in Delano, Calif.
At a press conference after his visit Jackson said he was going to fast for three days to continue the pressure against table grapes once Ch&vez discontinued his fast. As of Aug. 17, Chavez had been on his water-only fast for 32 days. He has lost more than 30 pounds, or 17% of "his weight when he started.
Despite Chavez’s high spirits, three doctors
attending him issued a statement saying, “We are extremely concerned about the possibility of irreversible damage.”
Jackson told a rally of 3,000 Chavez supporters that Ch&vez intended to end his fast“in a few days.” But UFW spokesperson Lorena Parlee said Chavez had “given us no indication of it.”
The UFWs4-year-old boycott is aimed at five pesticides used for grapes. Parlee said Ch&vez decided to fast as penance for what he thought was too little effort on his part to ban the pesticides. “The fast is basically aimed at people who care. He is saying, ‘ Hey, this is what’s happening and we ought to take responsibility.’ ”


Recent Rulings-3 of4- Extend Legalization Period
All but one of four recent court decisions in lawsuits against the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service for alleged illegalities: in implementing the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 have strengthened the right of thousands of undocumented immigrants to a legalization extension.
The lone limiting ruling was issued by U.S. District Judge Stanley Sporkin in Washington, D.C., who July 22 partly overturned his May 4 decision extending the application deadline to Aug. 31.
He had initially ruled in March that the I NS acted contrary to the intent of Congress by barring applicants who legally entered the United States before January 1982 and overstayed their visas.
Sporkin said in his July 22 ruling that the late applicants may not bejentitled lto(full legalization! because he is no longer sure
of the power of the court to extend the deadline.
issuetumsonaJune17 U.S.Supreme decision which Sporkin interpreted an that courts do not have the power and deadlines imposed by Congress However, in a similar case, U.S. District Judge Edward Garcia ruled in Sacramento Aug 9 that the INS violated the intent of Congress by denying legalization to applicants who had received or were likely to receive welfare. He ordered plaintiffs to draw up an order to implement his opinion by Aug. 29.
Also, in Sacramento, U.S. District Judge Lawrence Karlton upheld Aug 10 a deadline extension he granted in June to immigrants who traveled outside the United States during the application period without INS permission.
U.S. District Judge William Keller ruled in Los Angeles Aug. 11 that the INS acted illegally in disqualifying immigrants who left the country after January 1982 and reentered legally. He said he would order INS to extend the deadline through Nov. 30.
Eva Plaza, plaintiff s counsel on the Sporkin case, said the four rulings show“how much disagreement there is over the extent to which that (Supreme Court) decision binds courts.”
Plaza said the Washington Lawyers Committee, which filed the class-action suit before Judge Sporkin, would appeal the case. Additionally, a Sept. 6 hearing is set with Sporkin in order to request temporary working orders and other protections from deportation for the anticipated 2,000 people who will file by Aug. 31.
- Darryl L Figueroa
Latino AIDS Caucus Confronts CDC
Officials from the Centers for Disease Control agreed Aug. 16 to give Latinos a bigger voice in the planning and execution of AIDS programs. During a national minority AIDS conference in Washington, D.C, Latino AIDS caucus members told CDC officials they were unhappy with the lack of minority input in planning the conference and with their small numbers at decision-making levels within the CDC.
“Our needs are being pacified by a white CDC without sufficient input from the people they are trying to serve,” said Frank Santiago, one of 2,000 persons attending the 3-day CDC conference. About 20% were Hispanic.
In a meeting conducted in Spanish Aug. 15, Latinos reviewedi a list of resolutions to present the following day. Some threatened a walkout
continued from page 1
era was unabashedly political, written collectively by actors who sometimes lived communally and often performed for farm workers, jail inmates and school children.
Collective theater is still performed but more than ever in professional houses like the Los Angeles Theatre Center. Its Latino Theatre Lab is directed by Jos6 Luis Valenzuela
In 1987, Valenzuela directed Teatro de la Esperanzets signature piece, “La Vfctima,’’ in a fully staged production at LATC. He insists that contemporary Latino Theater can only survive with the support of corporations and mainstream producers.
“We* re movi ng, and we’ re at a critical point,” Valenzuela saya “The future of Latino theater depends on how well we do within the (mainstream) institutions. But we cannot do it without money. We’re not back in the days when we did it fpr love (of the art).”
The current state of Hispanic theater is a continuationj of,centuries-old dramatic; tra-2
But after a solidarity rally of all the minority groups the next afternoon, Rub6n Rivera, an AIDS project supervisor for the Door, a New York-based organization, said, “Now they see us as a force... because they know we’ re together.”
Thirty-nine percent of AIDS victims are black or Latino, according to figures cited by Arturo Olivas of Cara a Cara in Los Angeles during a press conference. He also said that 15% of AIDS victims are Latino. For Hispanic women and children, the figure is 20%.
A CDC staff member indicated the allocation of money was a caucus concern.
“There tends to be an expectation that resources will hit the community faster,” he said. “They don’t realize.... this takes some time, a couple months to a year.”
- Sophia Nieves
ditions of Spain and Latin America and of a tradition of Hispanic theater here that dates back to the late 16th century.
While English language productions of plays like SSnchez-Scott’s “Roosters” - already seen in San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Antonio - increasingly attract the nation’s mainstream theater audience, a wide network of Spanish-language theater houses is supported by predominantly Spanish-speaking theatergoers in major U.S. cities.
Los Angeles and Miami audiences, for instance, are always beckoned by offerings of a genre known as vddevil- short, topical comedies, often spiced by the appearances of bikini-clad vedettes. Classical Spanish works are consistently produced by university-sup-ported groups, such as Elenco, at the University of Texas at El Paso, and by professional companies, like New Yorks Repertorio EspahoL And the zarzuela, a Spanish cousin to the operetta, that is enjoying a renaissance worldwide, is quickly becoming a favorite of U.S. opera fans. _ Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Groups Charge Bush, Dukakis Slighted Them
Two Hispanic groups charged that they were slighted by presidential candidates this month.
The 75-member San Diego Republican Hispanic Assembly boycotted an Aug. 10 Latino issues meeting with Vice President George Bush’s son, Jeb, because Hispanics were not involved in its planning. The group’s leader, Nicholas Britto, agreed to attend only after he was promised a private meeting to discuss Hispanic grievances. The meeting in San Diego was coordinated by three Anglo businessmen.
In San Antonio Michael Dukakis did not show for a speaking engagement at the American Gl Forum’s Aug 1-7 convention. Forum officials said the Democratic presidential candidate had reneged on his pledge to the groups president, H6ctor Garcia Dukakis campaign officials denied he had promised to attend.
Republican candidate George Bush and Dukakis’ running mate, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, spoke to the 4,000 members attending. The Forum Represents about 150,000 Hispanic veterans in 33 states.
AIDS Hits Minority Military
In the military, as in the general public, a disproportionate number of blacks and Hispanics carry the AIDS virus, reported the Aug. 5 issue of a weekly publication issued by the Centers for Disease Control.
AIDS testing of about 1,750,000 active-duty military personnel from January 1987 through April 1988 found that about 2,300 tested positive for the AIDS virus. This represents a rate of 1.3 per 1,000.
Blacks tested positive at a rate of 2.9 per 1000 and Hispanics at 20 per1,000, compared with a OB rate for whites.
Though they represented only 23% of the active-duty personnel as of April 24, blacks and Hispanics comprised 51% of the AIDS cases.
U.S. Hispanic Theater Dates to 1500s
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Thomas Sharpe, guest columnist
Meet Lauro Cavazos
Lauro Cavazos, the man President Reagan has nominated to replace William Bennett as U.S. Secretary of Education, is not a man given to extremes.
As president of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, he presides over 23,500 students and a staff of 4,200. But his gentle professional demeanor remains that of a zoologist- a man whose career includes studies like “Cytochemistry and composition of the reproductive tract of the horned lizard (1959).”
Seldom prone to exaggeration, he eschews oversimplification. There is one exception. “I think that education will solve most of the problems of the world,” Cavazos says. “We solved the problem of malaria with education.
Smallpox, worldwide, we wiped it out practically, because of education. Education has put a man on the moon.
“Lack of education is the converse of that Hunger, poverty, illness, crime; lack of education. It all ties together.. . Look at the prison population, okay? The bulk of prisoners are illiterate.”
A sixth-generation Texan, Cavazos was born in 1927 and raised on the fabled King Ranch of South Texas. He spoke English to his ranch foreman father, Lauro Sr., and Spanish to his mother, Tomasa.
RETAIN YOUR HERITAGE
He is as proud as any Texan of his Hispanic heritage. He tells of one Boston bureaucrat who questioned him about minority faculty members when he was president of Tufts University School of Medicine. Cavazos listed them off, then matter-of-factly added himself. “He said, ‘Oh, come on. Not really. You’re kidding.’ I said, ‘What’s the matter? Don’t I fit your ethnic stereotype?' ”
Cavazos talks of the educational history of Spanish colonialism -how universities were founded in Lima and Mexico City before Harvard opened its doors. Then he notes that some Rio Grande Valley colleges, near his King Ranch birthplace, have 85% Hispanic enrollments “What has happened is that the Hispanic has stayed in certain areas and has not really moved.”
A student in medicine or law who remains in South Texas “is going to have a tough time competing against kids who have come out of U.T.-Austin, Texas Tech, A&M orRice,” hesays. His thesis: Hispanics must venture into the Anglo world for educational excellence.
Talking like a father (he and his wife, Peggy Ann, have 10 children), he urges young Latinos not only to become immersed as citizens of the United States, but also to retain “the very best of the Hispanic culture - religion, custom, tradition, the language. It strengthens the other side. I see that slipping away, unfortunately.”
TAKING THE COLD PLUNGE
As for bilingual education, he thinks it necessary for the Spanishspeaking child through the third grade for those who enter school at kindergarten; after that, he believes in taking the cold plunge.
“We concern ourselves more about a yellow school bus becoming the symbol of integration than we concern ourselves with what kind of education program will this youngster have. Ifs not unlike the dropout problem. People are looking at statistics. I say, ‘Look at the youngster agaia’ There is no more critical time than the adolescent period. Hormones., attitudes are changing. Physiology tends to be a big part of that.”
Out on the campus, strolling through the grassy square that has served as Tech’s center since the 1920s, Cavazos again becomes the high-profile university president.
Cavazos appears at his professional pinnacle. Are there other rungs in his career ladder? He pauses in thought and shakes his head. “As far as I’m concerned, I reached the pinnacle 30 years ago. I wanted to be a professor.”
(Thomas Sharpe is a media consultant with the National Council of La Raza in Washington, D.C. This article appeared in longer form in the prototype of the national magazine “Hispanic" in January.)
Aug. 22,
Sin pelos en la lengua
IQUE DICE? Here’s what President Reagan said when he nominated Texas Tech President Lauro Cavazos as U.S. Secretary of Education:
“Dr. Cavazos will be the first Hispanic-American member of the Cabinet. That says a lot about him and a lot about Americans of Hispanic heritage.”
That says a lot about Americans of Hispanic heritage?
How do you suppose he meant that?
SCOOP! Guess where I read this one:
“If he is confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Cavazos will be the first former EXPRESS-NEWS newspaper carrier to serve as Secretary of Education.”
The San Antonio Express-News offered that exclusive item.
SICK PEOPLE: Remember a year ago when 80 grape pickers in California’s San Joaquin Valley were poisoned by the French pesticide Zolone?
The Zolone people are back, according to an Aug. 13 Associated Press story. They invited Porterville (Calif.) College students to volunteer to pick grapes sprayed with the pesticide in a weeklong “monitoring” study.
The students were given a consent form to sign explaining that they should cease their work if they experienced low blood pressure, twitching, trembling, slow heart rate, staggering, or shortness of breath.
Student body president Bonnie Cobb signed up, but another student Judy Mae, said that after reading the consent form and attending an orientation session, “I ran. I ran for my life.”
Then a faculty member admonished her, she recalled: “Judy, you can’t kill college students. They're too healthy.”
CULTURALLY DEPRAVED BOSTONIANS: Linda Ronstadf s concert there Aug. 13 was billed as “Linda Ronstadt: Canciones de Mi Padre." But when the Latina star began belting out Mexican folk songs in Spanish, a number of folks in the audience took offense and shouted at her to sing in English.
The promoters graciously refunded their money.
How did Michael Dukakis ever get elected in Massachusetts?
CIVIL WRONGS: William Allen, a California professor who labelled the late chairman of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, reactionary Clarence Pendleton, “the first bona fide civil rights leader'’ to serve in that post, has been chosen by President Reagan to replace Pendleton.
The commissioners concurred in the selection by a 5-1 vote. Latina Esther Gonz6lez-Arroyo was one of the five. Blandlna C&rdenas didn’t vote.
MAJOR MISSPELLING: The invitation from Anglo Republicans to 500 San Diego County Latinos to meet Vice President George Bush’s son this month promised to have Jeb Bush speaking on “The roll of Hispanic-Americans in a Bush Administration.”
Thaf s right Roll. As in bolillo.
Bolillo, for any innocents among you, happens also to be the Latino counterpart term for the black community's “Oreo Cookies^’: Brown on the outside and white on the inside.
- Kay B&rbaro
Quoting...
GEORGE BUSH, pointing out his Mexican American grandchildren to President and Nancy Reagan at a naval air station Aug. 15 (his voice was picked up by the public-address system):
“ThaVs Jebbie's kids from Florida. The little brown ones...”
PANCHO SEGURA, former world class tennis pro, quoted in the August Hispanic magazine on his joining the Senior Tennis Tour: “Its great to be a rookie again. Tm going back to Forest Hills just when everybody thought I was going to Forest Lawn.”
1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


COLLECTING
AIDS IN THE MILITARY: For a copy of the Centers for Disease Control’s publication containing an article on the results of AIDS testing of active-duty military personnel, send $1 to the Superintendent of Documentsfspecify Aug. 5 issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report), Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
HISPANIC THEATER: “Hispanic Theater in the United States," edited by Nicholas Kanellos, is an 80-page collection of studies on Hispanic theater during the last 150 years. To order a copy, send $8 to the University of Houston, Arte Publico Press, 4800 Calhoun 429AH, Houston, Texas 77004-3784 (713)749-4768.
THEATER: The report “Hispanic Theater in the United States and Puerto Rico,” by Joanne Pottlitzer, is available free of charge from the Ford Foundation, Office of Reports, 320 E. 43rd St, New York, N.Y. 10017. For further information contact Oona Sullivan at (212) 573-5150.
PUERTO RICAN POVERTY IN CHICAGO: “West Town Story: Puerto Ricans Battle Persistent Poverty,” a 4-page article in the August issue of the Chicago Reporter, examines the East Humboldt Park neighborhood and its 46% poverty rate. For a copy send $2.50 (annual subscriptions are $38) to the Community Renewal Society, 332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60604 (312) 427-4830.
LATINO DOCTORATES: “Early Release of Summary Statistics on Science and Engineering Doctorates: 1987” is a 31-page report including tables showing the number of science and engineering doctorates awarded to Hispanics since 1978. It is available free of charge. Write: National Science Foundation, Room L611,1800 G St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20550, Attn: Susan Hill.
CONGRESSIONAL FELLOWSHIPS: The American Political Science Association seeks starting and midcareer political scientists with Ph.D.s for its nine-month Congressional Fellowship Program. Deadline for the $20,000 fellowship is Dec. 1. For more information, contact Congressional Fellowship Program, APSA, 1527 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 483-2512.
U.S. HISPANIC LITERATURE: Arte Publico Press is offering its 1988-89 book catalog for free. The catalog includes selections in all genres from Hispanic authors and poets, particularly works by Latinas. For acopy contact Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun429AH, Houston, Texas77004-3784(713) 749-4768.
CONNECTING
TAPES PROVIDE ENGLISH INSTRUCTION
Starting Sept. 15, a series of 60 half-hour videotapes designed to help legalization applicants learn the English skills necessary for permanent residency will be released to churches, libraries and schools throughout California.
Called “Opportunity U.S.A.,” the videos are being produced by the We the People of Los Angeles Foundation. The Los Angeles Unified School District is donating teacher time. Kaiser Permanente donated $40,000, PepsiCo Inc. $20,000 and Apple Computers $40,000 in in-kind services.
The videos were produced to provide an option to legalization applicants who must meet English proficiency requirements. California has 102,000 slots available in English instruction classes. The state has 815,000 legalization seekers.
The cost for the set of 60 videos is $270.
Plans to make the tapes available to other states have not been finalized. For more information, call Emily Chappell, executive director of the We the People Foundation,.at (213) 485-6149.
SEEKING MED SCHOOL ENTRY
The Princeton, N.J.-based Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced early this month that it has committed $6 million for a five-year period to fund its Minority Medical Education Program.
The money will be disbursed to six institutions - Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, the University of Washington in Seattle, Baylor College in Houston, and Fisk University in Nashville, Tenn.- to set up six-week summer programs for undergraduate minority students interested in going to medical school.
The institutions will prepare students for the Medical College Admissions Test, counsel about applications and selections, give structured laboratory experiences and hone mathematics, science and logic skills
Recruitment for 1989 begins this fall. For more information, call the foundation at (609) 452-8701.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
Gilbert Carrasco resigns as director of the U.S. Catholic Conference’s Immigration Services to become a visiting professor at Seton Hall University’s School of Law in New Jersey... Fran Martinez-Bussie of Louisiana and Lou Moret of California are re-elected as at-large members of the Democratic National Committee...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
SPAIN’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE U.S. Washington, D.C. Aug. 24
A seminar will be conducted on Spain’s contribution to the revolution and independence of the United States by Alberto Aza Arias, Ambassador of Spain to the Organization of American States The Foundation forthe Advancement of Hispanic-Americans is sponsoring the event
Yves Gisse (202) 623-6869
LABOR MEETING San Antonio Aug 24-27
The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement will hold a national meeting with a theme which focuses on the importance of the Hispanic vote. The council will hold its own elections during the conference and will also hear an address by Luis Morales, president of the San Antonio AFL-CIO Central Labor Council.
Alfredo Montoya (202) 347-4223 4
POSTAL EMPLOYEES I Houston Aug. 26,27
The Hispanic Organization of Postal Employees will hold a conference featuring workshops on local political involvement gun safety and educational opportunities within the postal service,
Moses Villalpando (713) 228-4673
PUBLISHERS’ CONFERENCE Mexico City Aug. 28-31
The National Association of Hispanic Publications will hold its annual conference which will include meetings between Mexican and U.S. Hispanic print media. Topics to be addressed include management and publicity and freedom of the press in Mexico. Laurey Jaros (312) 656-6666
COMING SOON
AIDS WORKSHOP Latino Learning Center Houston Sept. 2 John Nufiez (713) 223-1391
HISPANIC FESTIVAL
People Acting in Community Endeavors New Bedford, Mass. Sept 3,4 Jovanna Morales (617) 999-9920
AWARDS LUNCHEON
National Association of Cuban Women of the U.S.
Washington, D.C. Sept. 8
Ana Maria Perera (202) 686-6506
HEALTH CONFERENCE
National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human
Service Organizations
San Antonio Sept. 11-15
Tom Blackburn-Rodriguez (202) 371-2100
STUDENT LEADERSHIP National Hispanic Student Network Washington, D.C. Sept. 12 Sandra Niebla (202) 293-0723
Calendar will announce for free events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Aug. 22,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
OPENING: CONSULTANCY-IMMEDIATE
Entertainment Industries Council, a national non-profit highly visible public service organization, seeks electronic media specialist with minority issues orientation. Position is consultancy to special project targeting Hispanic broadcasting. Project focus is drug abuse and AIDS awareness.
Send resume, references, writing sample and consultancy hourly rate to: Entertainment Industries Council, Inc, Attention: Phil Schrager, 1760 Reston Ave, #101, Reston, Va 22090.
PROJECT DIRECTORS 2 YEAR ASSIGNMENT CALIF/NY LOCATION Girl Scouts of the USA seeks skilled professionals to design and implement field testi ng of pilot projects, to extend girl scouting to racial/ethnic populations Candidates should be creative; able to design & direct projects; have excellent written/oral communication and supervisory skills; as well as cultural awareness to needs of diverse groups Mobility a must Salary: $30’s + benefits include 3 wks vacation. Send resume to: J. Jacobs, Employment Services GIRL SCOUTS of the USA PO BOX 1686, New York, N.Y. 10150-1686.
AA EOE M/F/H/V
FEDERAL WORKERS
A Note of Appreciation from the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund.
With the strong assistance from many generous individuals the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund was able to raise $35,000 in 1987 for much-needed scholarship support as a result of the 1987 Combined Federal Campaiga With your help, we hope to surpass this figure and assist a greater number of deserving Hispanic-American students across the nation.
In 1988, be a part of our effort aimed at recognizing and assisting some of the nation’s best and most talented minds. Please designate the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund on your Combined Federal Campaign.
IvHSF
NATIONAL
HISPANIC
SCHOLARSHIP
FUND
Direct contributions can be made to: National Hispanic Scholarship Fund Post Office Box 748 San Francisco, California 94101 Contributions to NHSF are tax deductible
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MD., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
Management Career Opportunities
OPEN HOUSE
WE DARE YOU TO COMPARE
Opportunity-for-opportunity. Benefiffor-benefit We dare you to compare what McDonalcfs offers with anyone in the restaurant industry.
At McDonald’s, the job is demanding and challenging. If you have strong supervisory and leadership experience and enjoy working with people, McDonald’s may be the right career move for you, but decide for yourself.
OPPORTUNITIES
• Ongoing management development
• Career advancement potential
• Store marketing/community relations
• Employee hiring/training
• Personnel supervision
• Purchasing/inventory control
BENEFITS
• Excellent salaries:
manager trainees earn $16,000 - $20,000; store managers earn $25,000 - $39,000
• Paid vacation/holidays
• Investment savings plan
• Profit sharing
• Stock purchase plan
• Tuition reimbursement
• Denial, medical and life insurance
McDonalds is always looking for energetic, ambitious men and women for our management training program. Tof ind out if you qualify, attend our open house on Wednesday, August24, 1988, from 5 p.m. to 9 pm. at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, 2799 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, Va (Presentations begin at 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.) If unable to attend our open house, please call or send your resume to: Crystal Newman, McDonalds Corporations, Dept HL0888,3015 Williams Drive, Fairfax, Va. 22031 (703) 698-4016.
Powered by
People /\ /\
With Pride. f M \ mmmemmmmaiecDonakr*
Always an Equal Opportunity ,â–  ^
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DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, blease complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (E7) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
Following is a selected anthology of U.S. Hispanic theater
• Fuenteovejuna, a 17th century classic by Spain’s Lope de Vega about a popular revolt is perennially performed throughout the world. An Irish company is expected to stage the piece in El Paso next year during the city’s Siglo de Oro festival.
• Los morns y cristianos, a Spanish auto sacramental with deep religious overtones, is believed by historians to be the first play staged in what is now the continental United States. It was performed in 1598 by Spanish colonizers on Juan de Ofiate’s expedition to New Mexico, near San Juan Pueblo.
• La carreta, perhaps the best known Puerto Rican play, is Rene Marques’ three-act drama about the struggles of a family that moves from a rural town to San Juan, and finally to New York. It was written in 1952.
REC’D. HR/CR
O Zoot Suit, Luis Valdez*s musical based on tbgjLos Angeles Sleepy Lagoon murder case of the ’40s&^j& gn^igteSvhit in 1976 when it was staged at Los Angeles’ Man; Taper Forum. It went to Broadway, where it earned Edward James Olmos a Tony nomination, and was made into a motion picture, also directed by Valdez.
O Cuba and His Teddy Bear, a moving, provocative and often funny drama about a drug dealer and his son who live in a tenement apartment in New York. Reinaldo Povotfs play drew critical attention when it premiered at New York’s Public Theater in 1986, starring Robert de Niro and Ralph Macchio. It is currently playing in Los Angeles, at the Callboard Theater through Sept 11.
• Bang Bang Blues, by Charles G6mez, is one of six plays chosen for the workshops held as part of this year’s Hispanic Playwright Project in Costa Mesa, Calif. It is the story of a Hispanic journalist assigned to the Managua newsroom of a major U.S. television network; a workshop production plays as part of Festival Latino in New York through Aug. 28.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
SHIFTS: Former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca resigned Aug. 5 as publisher of Hispanic magazine. Editor-in-Chief Alfredo Estrada, 29, will assume Apodaca’s duties.
Estrada cited Apodaca’s varied national political commitments as reasons for the resignation, adding that he may work on the Dukakis campaign.
Apodaca also vacated his position as president of the Hispanic Publishing Corp., which puts out the 5-month-old, English-language magazine.
Associate Editor Jose Armas resigned one week prior to Apodaca He will contribute to the magazine’s La Merienda column.
Estrada said rumors of the Washington, D.C.-based magazine’s financial instability surprised him. “I guess we weren’t very sensitive to the thoughts people might have with Jerry leaving. But the magazine is here to stay.”
As evidence, the former New York litigator pointed out that the staff is moving into larger offices this month. Last month Hispanic picked up 3,000 subscribers, bringing the total to 12,000, he said.
JOURNALISTS FOR EDUCATION: The San Antonio Association of Hispanic Jour nalists and regional members of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists will sponsor a journalism symposium on education in Texas Sept. 16-18 in San Antonio.
Planning committee chairman Dino Chiecchi, a reporter with the San Antonio Express-News, said the idea sprang out of a meeting on immigration held last year by the El Paso Association of Hispanic Journalists in that Texas bordercity. “For us, education seemed like the natural topic,” he said.
One major plenary will have Texas Education Commissioner William Kirby debate James Vdsquez, superintendent of San Antonio’s Edgewood School District. V&squez brought suit against Kirby in 1984 for more equitable distribution of education funds in the state.
KUDOS& PROMOS: New York City Mayor Edward Koch declared Aug. 3 as Polito Vega
Day in honor of the birthday of on-air radio talent Polito Vega Born in Ponce, Puerto Rico, Vega was honored for 30 years of work in the Spanish-language broadcast industry. His daily morning show, LosAlegres Tres, airs on WKDM-AM...
Mary Ayala, formerly managing editor at KDSO-AM at San Diego, has been named assistant news director at the radio station...
COMPETITIONS: The American Political Science Association is accepting applications from print and broadcast reporters through Dec. 1 for congressional fellowships. The programs allow journalists with two to 10 years experience to work as congressional aides to gain an insider’s view of the government The fellowships run from November 1989 to Aug. 15, 1990. A $20,000 stipend plus travel allowance will be awarded to winners.
Eight fellowships are awarded annually.
Contact Director, Congressional Fellowship Program, American Political Science Association, 1527 New Hampshire NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 483-2512.
- Darryl L Figueroa
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CABINET ROOM - IN SESSION -
‘Welcome, sehor. Mi Cabinet es tu Cabinet, but don’t bother to unpack.”
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week and Israel Vasquez of Laguna Vista-to a33-member panel t hat wi ll recommend improvements in the state ' s juvenile justice and del in quency programs. . . New York Gov. Mario Cuomo appoints state Assemblyman Jose.Serrano to an 11-member commission that wi l l study the distribution of state funds to local school districts. .. The National Minority AIDS Council honors Eunice D i a:z; directo r of community affairs at White Medical Center in Cerritos, Ca l i f . D iaz and four other minorities were recognized at a Washing t on , D.C., c e remony for their services to combat AIDS . . . Indo-Hispanic quart erback Jim Plunkett, who led the Los Angeles Raiders to Super Bowl v ic t o ries in 19!31" a n d 1984, is cut after a 16-year professional c areer . Pl unkett, 40, amassed 25;882 career yards and was named Super Bowl XV's Most Valuable Player . . . First Lady Nancy Reagan presides over a White House ceremony to honor Mr. and Mrs. Mario Jimenez, from Whittier, Calif., and five other families for being selected by the Great American Families Awards Program ... Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, the Democratic vice . presidential candidate , and U.S. Treasurer Katherine Ortega keynote a San Antonio fund-raising banquet in honor of Willie Velasquez, the late founder of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project. . . Colorado Gov . Roy Romer names County Judge Alex Martinez of Pueblo to fill a vacant state district judgeship ... Texas Gov . Bill Clements names four LatinosMarla Delgado of San Antonio , Esther Alvarez of Fort Worth , Olivia Besteiro of Brownsville Hispanic Theater Booming, Entering Mainstrea m . A current boom in U.S . Hispanic theater is spawning the creation of a new, critically acclaimed Latino dramaturgy made up of English-language plays, often commissioned . and performed by the nation ' s leading main . stream producers. That new Hispanic dramaturgy consistently shows up at increasingly important theater events around the country, with titles such as " Cuba and His Teddy Bear," " Roosters' ' and " Bang Bang Blues." The latter-Charles Gomez' s true-to-life comedy about a U.S . news team in Nicaragua -premieres in New York this week. It epito mizes the new dramatic literature : It i s written in English but with liberal doses of Spanish . Its author, a participant in this year's third Hispanic Playwrights Project in Costa Mesa , Calif., is a 39-year-old, U.S . born Hispanic . Leading names among contemporary His panic playwrights include Luis Valdez, whose work with the nation's venerable Teatro Campesino in San Juan Bautista , Calif . , pre ceded his current fame , and Carlos Morton, whose play "The Many Deaths of Danny Rosales " won the 1986 Hispan i c Playwrights Festival Award at the New York Shakespeare Festival . Among the younger playwrights, Milcha Sanchez-Scott is considered a prominent figure, and her play " Roosters " is quickly becoming one of the most-often produced H i spanic plays i n the country. " Roosters " was developed at lntar, a 22 year-old New York-based Hispanic company that s i nce 1979 has produced plays in the English language exclusively . " We have to produce i n Engfish because that is the language our young playwrights can write in," says Max Ferra, the company's founder and artistic d irector. Puerto R ican Miguel Pinero is one of the better known playwrights of his generation. His play '!Short Eyes'' won the New York Drama C ritics Award for Best American Play in 197 4 . Pinero died earlier this year at the age of 41. The current boom can be attributed partly to the general healthy state of " regional " theater throughout the country that survives with a big boost from corporate grants. It is pulling the focus away from New York's Broad way district to respected professional com panies like San Diego ' s Old Globe Theater. In 1981 , the Globe founded Teatro Meta, a bilingual arm that produces theater workshops for junior high school students and bilingual productions of classics and contemporary Latin American theater. This year, the Globe premiered " The Boiler Room, " a new work in English by New York Puerto Rican Reuben Gonzalez . Jackson to Take On Chavez's Fast United Farm Workers President Cesar Chavez, suffering from dizziness , high blood pressure and cramps because of his fast, met w ith the Rev . Jesse Jackson Aug . 14. v i sited w i th the 61-year-old Chavez at his bedside in UFW headquarters in Delano, Calif. At a press conference after his visit Jackson said he was going to fast for three days to continue the pressure against table grapes once Chavez discontinued his fast. As of Aug . 17, Chavez had been on his water-only fast for 32 days. He has lost more than 30 pounds, or 17% of his weight when he started. Despite Chaveis high spirits, three doctors attending him issued a statement saying , " We are extremely concerned about the possibili t y of i rreversible damage . " Jackson told a rally of 3 ,000 Chavez supporters that Chavez intended to end his fast " in a few days . " But UFWspokesperson Lorena Parlee said Chavez had " given us no indication of it." The UFWs4-year-old boycott is aimed at five pesticides used for grapes. Parlee said Chavez decided to fast as penance for what he thought was too little effort on his part to ban the pesticides. "The fast is basically aimed at people who care. He is saying , ' Hey, this iswhafs happening and we ought to take responsibility.' " The healthy state of Hispanic theater in the United States is nurtured b y the Ford Four. dation -with grants exceeding $3 mi ll ion, one of the nation' s largest supporters of Hispanic theater-wh ich has just published Joanne Pottlitzer's exten s i ve and thorough report titled "Hispanic Theater i n the Un ited States. " In 1985 Pottlitzer, a respecte d d i rector, translator and presenter of Latin American theater in this country, surveyed some 150 institutions connected with Hi s pan ic theater. . Her data, updated i n 1987, list s 101 theater groups, 28 presenting organizatio ns, and 16 service .. organizations that support Latino theater in the count ry . The new Hispanic theater differ s greatlystylistically and thematically-from the works of the teatro movimientos that appeare d in the ' 60s, from Albuquerque, N . M . , t o San Juan, Puerto Rico . Hispanic theater from that con tinued o n pag e 2 Fla English Gets on Ballot An eleventh hour effort by proponents of the initiative to make English Florida's o fficial language netted them the 904 v otes they lacked to qualify the measure for t h e Nov. 8 ballot The total number of signa t u res needed statewide-342,939 -was also met. A week before the Aug . 9 deadline, F lorida English was told by the secreta ry o f state's office that a miscount had left the group short of the minimum needed in one of 1 0 congres sional districts. If the proposal for a constitutional a mendment is passed by the voters, Flori d a w o uld become the 14th state t o ma ke Eng li sh i t s official language, requiring all official bu s i ness be conducted in English. Similar initiati ves have also qualified for ballots in Arizona a n d Colorado. According to a survey of 800 Flor i da voters commissioned by U.S . English i n June 1987, 86% of them favo r ed the constitu ti on al a m end ment. In Arizona a U.S . English poll taken in March 1988 found 61% of those s a m p led approved of making English the state ' s o fficial language. In a June: poll conducte d for the Denver Post , 64% of Coloradans gav e their approval.

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RecentRullngs-3 of4-Extend . Legalization Period All . but one of four recent court decisions of the power of the court to extend the U.S. District Judge William Keller ruled in in lawsuitsagainstthe US.Immigrationand. deadline. Los Angeles Aug. 11 that the INS acted Naturalization Service for alleged illegalities : issue turns on a June 17 U.S. Supreme illegally in disqualifying immigrants who left in implementing the Immigration Reform decision which Sporkin interpreted the country after January 1982 and and Control Actof1986 have strengthened an that courts do not have the power entered legally. He said hewouldorderiNS the right of thousands of undocumented snd deadlines imposed by Congress. to extend the deadline through Nov. 30. immigrants to a legalization extension. However, , in a similar case, U.S. District Eva Plaza, plaintiffs counsel on the Sporkin The lone limiting ruling was issued by U.S. Judge Edward Garcia ruled in Sacramento case, said the four rulings show" how much DistrictJudgeStanleySporkin in Washington, Aug. 9 that the INS violated the intent of disagreement there is over the extent to D.C., who July22 partly overturned his May Congress by denying legalization to apwhich that (Supreme Court) decision binds 4 decision extending the application deadline plicants who had received or were likely to courts." to Aug. 31. receive welfare. He ordered plaintiffs to Plaza said the Washington Lawyers Com-He had initially ruled in March that the draw up an order to implement his opinion mittee, which filed the class-action suit INS acted contrary to the intent of Congress by Aug. 29. before Judge Sporkin, would appeal the by barring applicants who legally entered Also, in Sacramento, U.S. District Judge case . Additionally, a Sept. 6 hearing is set the United States before January 1982 and ' Lawrence Karlton upheld Aug. 10 a deadline with Sporkin in order to request temporary overstayed their visas. extension he granted in June to immigrants working orders and other protections from Sporkin said in his July 22 ruling that the who traveled outside the United States deportation for the anticipated 2,000 people late applicants may not be \ enti , tled \ to\full during the application period without INS who will file by Aug. 31. legalization \ l;>ecause he is no longer sure permission. -Darryl L. Figueroa . Latino . AIDS Caucus Confronts CDC Groups Charge Bush, ... Officials from the Centers for Disease Con trol agreed Aug. 16 to give Latinos a bigger voice in the planning and execution of AIDS piograms. During a national minority AIDS conference in Washington, D . C. Latino AIDS caucus members told CDC officials they were unhappy with the lack of minority input in planning the conference and with their small numbers at decisionmaking levels within the CDC. "Our needs are being pacified by a white CDC without sufficient input from the people they are trying to serve," said Frank Santiago, one of 2;000 persons attending the 3-day CDC conference. About 20% were Hispanic . In a meeting conducted in Spanish Aug. 15, i a 1 list of resolutions to pr& sent ' the following day. Some threatened a walkc:>ut But after' a solidarity rally of all the minority Dukakls Slighted Them groups the next afternoon, Ruben Rivera, an Two Hispanic groups charged that they AIDS project supervisor for the Door, a New were slighted by presidential candidates this York-based organization, said, "Now they month. see us as a force ... because they know we're The 75-member San Diego Republican Hi& together." panic Assembly boycotted an Aug. 10 Latino Thirty-nine percent of AIDS victims are issues meeting with Vice President George black or Latino, according to figures cited by Bush's son, Jeb, because Hispanics were not Arturo Olivas of Cara a Cara in Los Angeles involved in its planning. The group's leader, during a press conference . He also said that Nicholas Britto, agreed to attend only after he 15% of AIDS victims are Latino. For Hispanic was promised a private meeting to discuss women and children, the figure is 20%. Hispanic grievances. The meeting in San A CDC staff member indicated the allocation Diego was coordinated by three Anglo busines& of money was a caucus concern. men. "There tends to be an expectation that In San . Antonio Michael Dukakis did not resources will hit the community faster," he show for a speaking engagement at the Am& said. "They don't realize .... this takes some rican Gl Forum's Aug. 1-7 convention. Forum time, a couple months to a year . " officials said the Democratic presidential can Sophia Nieves didate had reneged on his pledge to the : U.S. Hispanic Theater Dates to 1500s group's president, Hector Garcia Dukakis campaign officials denied he had promised to attend. continued from page 1 era was unabashedly political, written collec tively by actors who sometimes lived com munally and often performed for farm workers, jail inmates and school children. Collective theater is still performed but more than ever in professional houses like the Los Angeles Theatre Center. Its Latino Theatre Lab is directed by Jose Luis Valen zuela In 1987, Valenzuela directed Teatro de Ia Esperanztis signature piece, "La Vfctima," in a fully staged production at LATC. He insists that contemporary Latino Theater can only survive with the support of corporations and mainstream . producers. "We're moving, and we're at a critical point," Valenzuela says. "The future of Latino theater depends on how well we do within the (main stream) institutions. But we cannot do it without money. We're not back in the days when we did it f,or love (of the art)." The current state of Hispanic theater is a continuation! of, centuries-old, dramatic : tra-2 ditions of Spain and Latin America and of a ' tradition of Hispanic theater here that dates back to the late 16th century. Republican candidate George Bush and Dukakis' running mate, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, spoke to the 4,000 members attending. The Forum I represents about 150,000 Hispanic veterans in 33 states. While English language productions of plays like Sanchez-Scott's "Roosters" already seen in San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Antonio-increasingly attract the nation's AIDS Hits Minority Military mainstream theater audience, a wide network . In the military, as in the general public, a of Spanish-language theater houses is supdisproportionate number of blacks and His ported by predominantly Spanish-speaking theatergoers in major U.S. cities. panics carry the AI OS virus, reported the Aug . Los Angeles and Miami audiences, for in5 issue of a weekly publication issued by the Centers for Disease Control. stance, are always beckoned by offerings of a AIDS testing of about 1 750 000 act1 v .... genre known as v6devil-short, topical co' • "' medias, often spiced by the appearances of duty military personnel from January 1987 bikini-clad vedettes. Classical Spanish works through April 1988 found that about 2,300 are consistently produced by university-suptested positive for the AIDS virus. This r& ported groups, such as Elenco, at the Univerpresents a rate of 1.3 per 1,000 . sity of Texas at El Paso, and by professional Blacks tested positive at a rate of 2 . 9 per companies, like New York's Repertorio Espai'loL 1 ,000 and Hispanics at 2.0 per 1 ,000, compared And the zarzuela, a Spanish cousin to the with a 0.8 rate for whites. operetta, that is enjoying a renaissance worldThough they represented only 23% of the wide, is quickly becoming a favorite of U.S. activ&duty personnel as of April 24, blacks and Hispanics comprised 51% of the AIDS opera fans, Antonio Mejias-Rentas cases. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Thomas Sharpe, guest columnist Meet Lauro Cavazos Lauro Cavazos, the . man President Reagan has nominated to replace William Bennett as U.S. Secretary of Education, is not a man given to extremes. As president of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, he presides over 23,500 students and a staff of 4 ,200. But his gentle professional demeanor remains that of a zoologista man whose career includes studies like "Cytochemistry and composition of the reproductive tract of the horned lizard (1959) . " Seldom prone to exaggeration, he eschews oversimplification . There is one exception." I think that education will solve most of the problems of the world, " Cavazos says . " We solved the problem of malaria with education. Smallpox, worldwide, we wiped it out practically, because of education. Education has put a man on the moon . "Lack of education is the converse of that. Hunger, poverty , illness, crime ; lack of edu cation. It all ties together. . . Look at the prison population, okay? The bulk of prisoners are illiterate." A sixth-generation Texan , Cavazos was born in 1927 and raised on the fabled King Ranch of South Texas. He spoke English to his ranch foreman father, Lauro Sr. , and Spanish to his mother, Tomasa. RETAIN YOUR HERITAGE He is as proud as any Texan of his Hispanic heritage . He tells of one Boston bureaucrat who questioned him about minority faculty members when he was president of Tufts University School of Medicine. Cavazos listed them off, then matter-of-factly added himself . " He said, 'Oh, come on. Not really . You ' re kidding.' I said, ' What's the matter? Don't I fit your ethnic stereotype?' " Cavazos talks of the educational history of Spanish colonialism how universities were founded in Lima and Mexico City before Harvard opened its doors. Then he notes that some Rio Grande Valley colleges, near his King Ranch birthplace, have 85% Hispanic enrollments. "What has happened is that the Hispanic has stayed in certain areas and has not really moved . " A student in medicine or law who remains in South Texas "is going to have a tough time competing against kids who have come out of U . T . -Austin, Texas Tech, A&M or Rice," he says . His thesis: Hispanics must venture into the Anglo world for educational excellence. Talking like a father(he and his wife, Peggy Ann , have 10 children), he urges young Latinos not only to become immersed as citizens of the United States, but also to retain "the very best of the Hispanic culture-religion , custom, tradition, the language . It strengthens the other side. I see that slipping away, unfortunately." TAKING THE COLD PLUNGE As for bilingual education, he thinks it necessary for the Spanish speaking child through the third grade for those who enter school at kindergarten; after that, he believes in taking the cold plunge . " We concern ourselves more about a yellow school bus becoming the symbol of integration than we concern ourselves with what kind of education program will this youngster have . lfs not unlike the dropout problem. People are looking at statistics. I say, ' Look at the youngster again.' There is no more critical time than the adolescent period. Hormones. .. attitudes are changing. Physiology tends to be a big part of that." Out on the campus, strolling through the grassy square that has served as Tech's center since the 1920s, Cavazos again becomes the high-profile university president. Cavazos appears at his professional pinnacle . Are there other rungs in his career ladder? He pauses in thought and shakes his head . "As far as I'm concerned, I reached the pinnacle30 years ago. I wanted to be a professor. " Sin pelos en Ia lengua c,QUE DICE? Here's what President Reagan said when he nominated Texas Tech President Lauro Cavazos as U.S . Secretary of Educat'i on : "Dr. Cavazos will be the first Hispanic-American member of the Cabinet. That says a lot about him and a lot about Americans of Hispanic heritage.'' That says a lot about Americans of His panic heritage? How do you suppose he meant that? SCOOP! Guess where I read this one: " If he is confirmed by the U.S . Senate, Cavazos will be the first former EX PRES& NEWS newspaper carrier to serve as Secretary of Education. " The San Antonio Express-News offered that exclusive item. SICK PEOPLE: Remember a year ago when 80 grape pickers in California's San Joaquin Valley were poisoned by the French pesticide Zolone? The Zolone people are back, according to an Aug . 13 Associated Press story. They invited Porterville (Calif.) College students to volunteer to pick grapes sprayed with the pesticide in a weeklong "monitoring" study. The students were given a consent form to sign explaining that they should cease their work if they experienced low blood pressure, twitching, trembling, slow heart rate , staggering, or shortness of breath. Student body president Bonnie Cobb signed up, but another student, Judy Mae, said that after reading the consent form and attending an orientation session , "I ran . I ran for my life .'' Then a faculty member admonished her, she recalled: "Judy, you can't kill college students. They're too healthy." CULTURALLY DEPRAVED BOSTONIANS: Linda Ronstadt's concert there Aug . 13 was billed as " Linda Ronstadt: Canciones de Mi Padre. " But when the Latina star began belting out Mexican folk songs in Spanish, a number of folks in the audience took offense and shouted at her to sing in English . The promoters graciously refunded their money. How did Michael Dukakls ever get elected in Massachusetts? CIVIL WRONGS: William Allen, a California professor who labelled the late chairman of the U . S . Civil Rights Commission, reactionary Clarence Pendleton, "the first bona fide civil rights leader" to serve in that post , has been chosen by President Reagan to replace Pendleton . The commissioners concurred in the selection by a 5-1 vote. Latina Esther Gonzalez-Arroyo was one of the five . Blandlna Cardenas didn't vote. MAJOR MISSPELLING: The invitation from Anglo Republicans to 500 San Diego County Latinos to meet Vice President George Bush's son this month promised to have Jeb Bush speaking on "The roll of Hispanic-Americans in a Bush Administration." Thafs right Roll. As in bolillo. Bolillo, for any innocents among you, happens also to be the Latino counterpart term for the black community's " Oreo Cookies'': Brown on the outside and white on the inside. Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • GEORGE BUSH, pointing out his Mexican American grandchildren to President and Nancy Reagan at a naval air station Aug . 15 (his voice was picked up by the public-address system): "That's Jebbie ' s kids from Florida The little brown ones .. " PANCHO SEGURA, former world class tennis pro, quoted in the (Thomas Sharpe is a media consultant with the National Council of August Hispanic magazine on his joining the Senior Tennis Tour: La Raza in Washington, D.C. This article appeared in longer form in "It's great to be a rookie again. I'm going back to Forest Hills just the prototype of the national magazine " Hispanic " in January.) when everybody thought I was going to Forest Lawn." Hispanic L ink Weekly Report Aug . 22, 1988 3

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COLLECTING AIDS IN THE MILITARY: For a copy of the Centers for Disease Control's publication containing an article on the results of AIDS testing of active-duty military personnel, send $1 to the Superintendent of Documents(specify Aug. 5 issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report), Government Printing Office, Washington, D .C. 20402. HISPANIC THEATER: "Hispanic Theater in the United States, " edited by Nicholas Kanellos , is an 80-page collection of studies on Hispanic theater during the last 150 years. To order a copy, send $8 to the University of Houston, Arte Publico Press , 4800 Calhoun 429AH, Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 749-4768. THEATER: The report " Hispanic Theater in the United States and Puerto Rico , " by Joanne Pottlitzer, is available free of charge from the Ford .Foundation , Office of Reports, 320 E. 43rd St, New York, N . Y . 10017. For further information contact Oona Sullivan at (212) 573-5150. PUERTO RICAN POVERTY IN CHICAGO: " West Town Story: Puerto Ricans Battle Pers istent Poverty, " a 4-page article in the August issue of the Chicago Reporter, examines the East Humboldt Park neighborhood and its 46% poverty rate . For a copy send $2.50 (annual subscriptions are $38) to the Community Renewal Society, 332 S . Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60604 (312) 4274830. LATINO DOCTORATES: "Early Release of Summary Statistics on Science and Engineering Doctorates: 1987" is a 31page report including tables showing the number of science and engineering doctorates awarded to Hispanics since 1978. It is available free of charge. Write: National Science Foundation, Room L611 , 1800 G St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20550, Attn: Susan Hill. CONGRESSIONAL FELLOWSHIPS: The American Political Science Association seeks starting and midcareer political scientists with Ph . D .s for its nine-month Congressional Fellowship Program . Deadline for the $20,000 fellowship is Dec . 1 . For more information, contact Congressional Fellowship Program, APSA, 1527 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 483-2512. U.S . HISPANIC LITERATURE: Arte Publico Press is offering its 1988 book catalog for free. The catalog includes selections in all genres from Hispanic authors and poets, particularly works by Latinas. For a copy contact Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun429AH, Houston, Texas77004(713) 749-4768. Calendar POSTAL EMPLOYEES i Houston Aug . 26, 27 CONNECTING TAPES PROVIDE ENGLISH INSTRUCTION Starting 15, a series of 60 half -hour videotapes designed to help legalization applicants learn the English skills necessary for permanent residency will be released to churches, libraries and schools throughout California . Called "Opportunity U.S.A , " the videos are being produced by the We the People of Los Angeles Foundation. The Los Angeles Unified School District is donating teacher time. Kaiser Permanente donated $40,000, Pepsico Inc . $20,000 and Apple Computers $40,000 in in kind services. The videos were produced to provide an option to legalization applicants who must meet English profic i ency requirements. California has 1 02,000 slots available in English instruction classes. The state has 815,000 legalization seekers. The cost for the set of 60 videos is $270. Plans to make the tapes available to other states have not been f inalized. For more information, call Emily Chappell, executive director of the We the People Foundation,.at (213) 485-6149. SEEKING MED SCHOOL ENTRY The Princeton , N . J.based Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced early this month that it has committed $6 million for a five year period to fund its Minority Medical Education Program. The money will be disbursed to six institutions-Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, the University of Washington in Seattle, Baylor College in Houston, and Fisk University in Nashville, Tenn .to set up six-week summer programs for undergraduate minority students interested in going to medical school. The institutions will prepare students for the Medical College Admissions Test, counsel about applications and selections, give structured laboratory experiences and hone mathematics, science and logic skills. Recruitment for 1989 begins this fall. For more information , call the foundation at (609) 452-8701 . OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Gilbert Carrasco resigns as director of the U.S. Catholic Conference ' s Immigration Services to become a visiting professor at Seton Hall University's School of Law in New Jersey ... Fran Martinez Bussie of Louisiana and Lou Moret of California are re-elected as at-large members of the Democrat i c National Committee ... People Acting in Community Endeavors New Bedford, Mass. Sept 3 , 4 THIS WEEK SPAIN ' S CONTRIBUTION TO THE U .S. Washington, D . C . Aug. 24 The His panic Organization of Postal Employees will hold a conference featuring workshops on local political involvement , gun safety and educational opportunities within the postal service , Jovanna Morales (617) 999 AWARDS LUNCHEON National Association of Cuban Women of the U . S . Washington , D . C . Sept. 8 A seminar will be conducted on Spain's contribution to the revolution and independence of the United States by Alberto Aza Arias , Ambassador of Spain to the Organization of American States The Foundation for the Advancement of Hispanic-Americans is sponsor ing the event Yves Gisse (202) 623 LABOR MEETING San Antonio Aug. 24-27 The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement will hold a national meeting with a theme which focuses on the importance of the Hispanic vote . The council will hold its own elections during the con ference and will also hear an address by Luis Morales, president of the San Antonio AFL CIO Central Labor Council. Alfredo Montoya (202) 347-4223 4 Moses Villalpando (713) 228-4673 PUBLISHERS' CONFERENCE Mexico City Aug . 2831 The Nati onal Association of Hispanic Publications will hold its annual conference which will include meetings between Mexican and U . S . Hispanic print media. Topics to be addressed include management . and publicity and freedom of the press in Mexico. Laurey Jaros (312) 656-6666 COMING SOON AIDS WORKSHOP Latino Learning Center Houston Sept. 2 John Nunez (713) 2231391 HISPANIC FESTIVAL Aug . 22, 1988 Ana Maria Perera (202) 686-6506 HEALTH CONFERENCE National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Service Organizations San Antonio Sept. 11-15 Tom Blackburn-Rodriguez (202) 371 00 STUDENT LEADERSHIP National Hispanic Student Network Washington , D.C. Sept. 12 Sandra Niebla (202) 293-0723 Calendar will announce for free events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW . Washington , D . C . 20005. Hispani c Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS OPENING: CONSULTANCY IMMEDIATE Entertainment Industries a national non-profit , highly visible public service or ganization, seeks electronic media specialist with minority issues orientation. Position is consultancy to special project targeting His panic broadcasting. Project focus is drug abuse and AIDS awareness . Send resume, references, writing sample and Consultancy hourly rate to: Entertain ment Industries Council , Inc. , Attention : Phil Schrager, 1760 Reston Ave , 01, Reston , Va 22090. PROJECT DIRECTORS 2 YEAR ASSIGNMENT CALIF/NY LOCATION Girl Scouts of the USA seeks skilled profes sionals to design and implementfield testing of pilot projects, to extend girl scouting to raciaVethnic populations. Candidates should be creative ; able to design & direct projects; have excellent written/oral communication and supervisory skills ; as well as cultural awareness to needs Qf diverse groups. Mobility a must. Salary: $30' s + benefits include 3 wks. vacation Send resume to: J . Jacobs, Employment Services. Gl RL SCOUTS of the USA, PO BOX 1686, New York, N . Y . 101501686. AA EOE M/F/H/V FEDERAL WORKERS . A Note of Appreciation from the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund . With the strong assistance from many generous individuals, the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund was at>le to raise $35,000 in 1987 for much-needed scholarship support as a result of the 1987 Combined Federal Campa ign With your help, we hope to surpass this figure and assist a greater number of deserving Hispanic-American students across the nation. In 1988, be a part of our effort aimed at recognizinQ and assisting some of the nation ' s . bEist and most talented minds. Please de signate the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund on your Combined Federal Campaign . NISF NATIONAL HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP FUND Dire c t contributions can be made to: National Hispanic Scholarship Fund Post Office Box 7 48 San Francisco , California 94101 Contributions to NHSF are tax deductible PRINCE GEORGE ' S COUNTY, MD., govern ment office on personnel. has a JOB hotline . (301) 952-3408. H is panic link W eekly Report Management Career Opportunities OPEN HOUSE WE DARE YOU TO COMPARE Opportunity-for-opportunity . Benefit-for-benefit We dare you to compare what McDonalds offers with anyone in the restaurant industry. At McDonald 's, the job is demanding and challenging. If you have strong supervisory and leadership experience and enjoy working with people, McDonalds may be the right career move for you, but decide for yourself . OPPORTUNITIES e Ongoing management development • Career advancement potential • Store marketing/community relations • Employee hiring/training • Personnel supervision • Purchasing/inventory control BENEFITS • Excellent salaries: manager t rainees earn $16,000-$20,000; store managers earn $25,000-$39,000 • Paid vacation/holidays • Investment savings plan e Profit sharing • Stock purchase plan • Tui t ion reimbursement • Dental , medical and life insurance McDonalds is always looking for energe tic, ambitious men and women for our management training program . To find out if you qualify , attend our open house on Wednesday, August24, 1988, from5 p.m . to9 p.m . at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, 2799 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington , Va (Presentations begin at 5 :30 p . m . and 7 :30 p . m . ) If unable to attend our open house , please call o r send your resume to: Crystal Newman , McDonald a Corporations, Dept HL0888, 3015 Williams Drive, Fairfax, Va . 22031 (703) 698-4016. Powered by People With Pride. Alweyo Oil EQUol AIIIrmai!Ye Action Employer I DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received(mail or phone) by 5 p . m . (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES Ordered by 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone Organization number, 1 word) . Multiple use rates on request. Street -------------DISPLAY CLASSI.FIED RATES Cit State & Zi (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) . , y, p -----------$45 per column inc; h . Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

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REC'D. HR/CR Arts & Entertain merit • Zoot Suit Luis Valdez's musical based on ttm.J.ps Angeles Sleepy Lagoon murder case of the '40i;lijfi}; in 1976 when it was staged at Los Angeles' Ma?l< faper Forum. It went to Broadway, where it earned Edward James Olmos a Tony nomination, . and was made into a motion picture, also directed by Valdez. Following is a selected anthology of U . S . Hispanic theater: • Fuenteovejuna, a 17th century classic by Spain's Lope de Vega about a popular revolt, is perennially performed throughout the world. An Irish company is expected to stage the piece in El Paso next year during the city' s Siglo de Oro festival. e Cuba and His Teddy Bear, a moving, provocative and often funny drama about a drug dealer and his son who live in a tenement apartment in New York. Reinaldo Povod's play drew critical attention when it premiered at New York's Public Theater in 1986, starring Robert de Niro and Ralph Macchio. It is currently playing in Los Angeles, at the Callboard Theater through Sept. 11. • Los moros y cristianos, a Spanish auto sacramental with deep religious overtones, is believed by historians to be the first play staged in what is now the continental United States. It was performed in 1598 by Spanish colonizers on Juan de Onate's expedition to New Mexico, nea.r San Juan Pueblo. • La carreta, perhaps the best known Puerto Rican play, is Rene Marques' three-act drama about the struggles of a family that moves from a rural town to San Juan, and finally to New York. It was written in 1952. • Bang Bang Blues, by Charles Gomez, is one of six plays chosen for the workshops held as part of this year's Hispanic Playwright Project in Costa Mesa, Calif. It is the story of a Hispanic journalist assigned to the Managua newsroom of a major U.S. television network; a workshop production plays as part of Festival Latino in New York through Aug. 28. Media Report SHIFTS: Former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca resiyned Aug. 5 as publisher of magazine . Editor-in-Chief Alfredo Estrada, 29, will assume Apodaca's duties. Estrada cited Apodaca's varied national political commitments as reasons for the resignation, adding that he may work on the Dukakis campaign. Apodaca also vacated his position as pre sident of the Hispanic Publishing Corp., which puts out the 5-month-old, English-lan guage magazine. Associate Editor Jose Armas . resigned one week prior to Apodaca He will contribute to the magazine's La Merienda column ; Estrada said rumors of the Washington, D.C.-based magazine's financial instability surpri sed him . " I guess we weren't very sensitive to the thoughts people might have with Jerry leaving. But the magazine is here to stay." 6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of H ispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publisher He ctor Ericks en Mendoza Editor Felix Perez Reporting : Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia N i eves, Diana Padilla . Graphics / Production : Ca rlos Arrien , Zoila Elias No portion of Hispan ic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcas t in any form without advance permission. .Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) , $30 CO RPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads a re $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run i n Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use r ates on request. As evidence , the former New York litigator pointed out that the staff is moving into larger offices this month. Last month Hispanic picked up 3,000 subscribers, bringing the total to 12,000, he said. JOURNALISTS FOR EDUCATION: The San Antonio Association of Hispanic Journalists and regional members of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists will sponsor a journalism symposium on education in Texas Sept. 16 in San Antonio. Planning committee chairman Dino a reporter with the San Antonio Express News, said the idea sprang out of a meeting on immigration held last year by the El Paso Association of Hispanic Journalists in that Texas border city. "For us, education seemed like the natural topic," he said. One major plenary will have Texas Education Commissioner William Kirby debate James Vasquez, superintendent of San Antonio's Edgewood School District. Vasquez brought suit against Kirby in 1984 for more equitable distribution of education funds in the state. KUDOS& PROMOS: NewYorkCityMayor Edward Koch declared Aug . 3 as Polito Vega -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Day in honor of the birthday of on-air radio talent Polito Vega. Born in Ponce, Puerto Rico, Vega was honored for 30 years of work in the Spanish-language broadcast industry. His daily morning sl:low, Los Alegres Tres, airs on WKDMAM ... Mary Ayala, formerly managing editor at KDSQ-AM at San Diego, has been named assistant news director at the radio station ... COMPETITIONS: The American Political Science Association is accepting applications from print and broadcast reporters through Dec. 1 for congressional fellowships. The programs allow journalists with two to 1 0 years experience to work as congressional aides to gain an insider's view of the govern ment. The fellowships run from November 1989 to Aug . 15, 1990. A $20,000 stipend plus travel allowance will be awarded to win ners. Eight fellowships are awarde(.l annually. Contact Director, Congressional Fellowship Program, American Political Science Associa tion, 1527 New Hampshire NW, Washington, D . C . 20036 (202) 483. Darryl L Figueroa "Welcome, seiior. Mi Cabinet es tu but don't bother to unpack." Hispanic Link Weekly Report