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Hispanic link weekly report, September 5, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 5, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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SEP 6
Making The News This Week
The White House names Rudy Beserra, an associate director in the White House Office of Public Liaison, as a special assistant to President Reagan... Former President Richard Nixon sends a note to Orange County, Calif., Supervisor Gaddi V6squez congratulating him on his speech at the Republican National Convention. . . Following increased tension between Westminster, Calif., Hispanics and the police department because of the shooting death by police of 18-year-old Frank Martinez, a federal mediator suggests the department take steps to improve relations... The Orange Coast College Foundation, in Costa Mesa, Calif., sets up a fund to help pay the medical bills and other expenses of Juan Buenrostro. Buenrostro, a
ol-year-old Mexican citizen, remains in a coma after having his left arm mangled and sustaining head injuries while sneaking into the United States by strapping himself to the bottom of a bus. The bus was returning from a field trip to Tijuana with students from the college... The California Athletic Commission begins an investigation into the death of Baldwin Park professional boxer Rico Veldsquez, who collapsed during a match and later died of a cerebral hemorrhage. At question is the response time of an ambulance... Ram6n Masa, a New York resident who a month ago dangled in his wheel chair from the Brooklyn Bridge for several hours to prove handicapped people can be productive, performs another stunt. Getting out of his wheelchair, Masa, known as Megaman, jumps from the Staten Island ferry into New York Harbor. The 40-year-old is charged with disorderly conduct..

Leaders See More Latino Unity
MALDEF Files Suit Against LA. County
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Southern California filed a class action lawsuit Aug. 24 against the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors alleging it sought to dilute Latino voting power when it drew up supervisorial districts in 1981.
“We can elect Hispanics to the state Senate, to the state Assembly, and even to Congress, but we have been cut out of representation in county government” said one of the plaintiffs, Yolanda Garza.
The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, asks the court to bar elections in 1990 until a new plan has been implemented that would include at least one district with a majority of Latino residents. It also asks that the number of seats on the board be increased
Other Hispanic groups, including the League of United Latin American Citizens and the Los Angeles County Chicano Employees Association, held a press conference Aug. 24 to protest that the U.S. Department of Justice had been taking too much time to act.
The Justice Department sent its first letter charging the county with discrimination in May. On July 15 it instructed the county to submit a plan for redefining the five districts in the 31% Hispanic county.
Raul Nuftez, president of the Los Angeles County Chicano Employees Association, referred to a county plan to defer redistricting until after the 1990 census as “a ploy to keep the incumbency in control.”
- Sophia Nieves
Five Cuban men handcuffed themselves to a railing inside the crown of the Statue of Liberty for nearly two hours Aug. 27. They did so to call attention to the Aug. 30,1962, firing squad execution of more than 400 people in Cuba ordered by Fidel Castro.
As the exiles were standing in line with tourists to climb the statue’s stairs, friends and members of their fafnilies handed out English-and Spanish-language fliers protesting
Hispanic Heritage Week, celebrated this year from Sept. 11-17, will be expanded to a monthlong celebration next year starting in mid-September, which President Reagan will mark at a Sept. 13 Rose Garden ceremony.
As the nation increasingly recognizes the contributions of Hispanics to the United States, Latino leaders say there is also increased understanding and sensitivity by Hispanic subgroups toward one another. Nonetheless, Hispanics still largely see and seek primary identification as Mexican Americans or Puerto Ricans or Cubans or Salvadorans or whatever the group may be.
The majority of Hispanic leaders observe an increasing interaction among the subgroups at the personal level as well as growing cooperation among Hispanic organizations at the national level.
Assessed Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, “More and more, organizations are better coordinated in their efforts to focus on the issues that are important.”
National Puerto Rican Coalition President Louis Nuhez said of the connection among Latinos, “Clearly there is a relationship between all of us. But, I see it more as that of distant cousins than as brothers.”
Elected officials and community leaders attributed continuing separation primarily to geographical isolation rather than intragroup rivalry, noting that Mexican Americans predominate in the Southwest, Puerto Ricans in the Northeast and Cubans in Florida Some also observed that only recently have such groups as Central Americans and Dominicans been a consideration.
conditions in Cuba. The late morning to early afternoon incident ended when police arrived and the men freed themselves They were charged with impeding visitation and public assembly without a permit The five men, all from New Jersey, were Luis Abreu, 56, of North Bergen; Sergio Guarton, 51, of Guttenberg; Jorge Dulzaides, 53, of Union City, and Carlos Calvo, 48, and Marcelo Cuervo, 57, both of Yonkers.
Guarion6 Diaz, president of the Cuban American National Council, cited political sophistication and maturity as one reason for the softening of the fractiousness of the’60s. “We’re realizing that we don’t have to agree on all issues to work together. We don’t have to belong to the same political party or come from the same countries.”
One of the most often cited examples of this cooperation was the October 1987 His-panic Leadership Conference. It gathered a bipartisan group of more than 100 top Latino leaders in Washington, D.C., to develop a Hispanic agenda for presentation to the 1988 presidential candidates. The effort was repeated months later by other Latino groups for similar purposes.
Also pointed out was HACER, initially a coalition of six diverse Hispanic organizations that signed an agreement to promote the Adolph Coors Co. in 1984 in exchange for the company’s promise to return a proportionate share of resources to Hispanic communities.
At the local level, Julia Rivera, executive director of ASPIRA of New York, cited the recent partnership of Puerto Ricans and Dominicans in order to get a Hispanic on the city Board of Education. Their campaign resulted in the appointment of businesswoman Amalia Betanzos, who is Puerto Rican.
Congressman Jaime Fuster of Puerto Rico, CHC member, said, “Of late, we are all working very closely out of the awareness that there is so much more we have in common, not only by way of our heritage but also in our challenges and common struggles National Council of La Raza President Raul Yzaguirre was the only leader to know that Hispanic Heritage Week contains dates historically significant to Mexican Americans (Sept. 16 marks the independence of Mexico) and Central Americans (Sept. 16 is independence day for Costa Rica, Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua).
League of United Latin American Citizens national President Jos6 Garcia De Lara suggested that one week of the new celebration month be devoted to different Hispanic groups “Unless we understand and know each other, we look at each other from the side of our
continued on page 2
Five Cubans Cuff Selves To Liberty


Latino Immigrants Prefer N.Y.C., LA. As New Homes
Legal Latino immigrants to the United States are gravitating to the East and West Coasts, with New York and the Los Angeles-Long Beach area their most popular destinations, finds an analysis published in the September issue of American Demographics “Whereto Find the New Immigrants” tallies the arrivals of immigrants from five Latin countries in the years 1984 through 1986 and shows preferences as:
Colombians: 1)NewYork2) Miami3)Bergen- Passaic, N.J.
Cubans: 1)Miami 2)Jersey City 3)Los Angeles-Long Beach Dominicans: 1)NewYork2)Bergen-Passaic 3)Jersey City
Salvadorans: 1) Los Angeles-Long Beach 2)New York City 3)Washington, D.C.
Mexicans: 1)Los Angeles-Long Beach 2)Chicago 3)EI Paso.
The article’s authors use federal figures to determine how large immigrant communities were during those three years. James Allen and Eugene Turner found New York was number one, with the greatest share of its immigrants- one-sixth- coming from the Dominican Republic. During that same period, two and a half times more Mexicans could be found in the Los Angeles-Long Beach metropolitan area than in any other single, U.S. geographical location. Cubans make up more than half of recent
immigrants to the Miami-Hialeah area.
Nationwide immigration figures in the 1980s shot up 30% over the previous decade, averaging 570,000 new legal residents a year, according to calculations based on U.S. Census and U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service figures.
Mexico-born immigrants made up the largest share of all legal immigrants between 1983 and 1986.
“How to Count Illegals, State by State,” another article in the same American Demographics issue, puts the national undocumented population at 3.5 million for 1987, also drawing on federal data.
- Sophia Nieves
N.Y.C. Schools Lacking Counselors
Hispanic students with limited-Engiish-speaking skills in NewYorkCity have virtually no chance to speak with a counselor to help plan their high school curricula, according to a report issued by a civic watchdog group Aug. 25.
The Educational Priorities Panel sets the ratio of guidance counselors for Limited English Proficiency students at 2,000 to 1 in its report “Nowhere to Turn: The Crisis in Middle School Guidance and Support.”
The study looks at 10 city schools chosen at random. The situation is so bad that in cases where middle school students must have counseling, they may be referred to special education, where the law mandates bilingual counselors be provided forchildren who are physically or developmentally disabled according to a spokesperson for one of the EPP member groups, ASPIRA of New York.
“It’s criminal that you have to be labeled as
Kansans Take On Fasts
The five- person staff of the Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs and five of its seven officers began a series of fasts Aug. 23 to show their support for farm workers and to help keep in the public eye the recently ended fast of C6sar Chavez.
Jenny Tavares Bartlow, an education specialist with the committee who as of Aug. 30 had been on her juice-only fast seven days, said, “ I’m afraid that what Chavez did will be forgotten,” adding, “We did this to support Chavez and to sensitize people in Kansas.” The other committee staff and officers, including Executive Director Marc Marcano and Chairperson Jeannie Chavez-Martinez, will or have fasted for three days.
Dan Martin, a boycott organizerforC§sar Ch&vez’s United Farm Workers in Keene, Calif., said, “Hundreds and hundreds of people are calling with their support. The response is incredible.”
Ch&vez, who ended his 36-day fast Aug. 21, was able to take only a few steps on his own as of Aug. 30.
handicapped to get appropriate services,” said Luis Reyes, ASPIRA director for educational research.
To.offset some of the problems posed by the counselor shortage, the panel makes several recommendations, including establishment of a paraprofessional guidance category. The report also calls for an increase in the hours counseling services are provided and development of improved dropout prevention services. Additional funds of $6.5 million will be allocated for middle school guidance for the general student population in the 1988-89 school year.
ASPIRA puts the current dropout rate for Hispanics in the city at more than 50%.
- Sophia Nieves
Heritage Month Coming
continued from page 1
eyes with fear," he said.
All the leaders voiced satisfaction that the monthlong period will include Oct. 12, El Dia de la Raza, which marks Columbus’ arrival in the New World and is widely celebrated throughout all of Latin America.
Said Yzaguirre, “It’s imperative that we have symbols such as these. One that will help is a Hispanic movement song. Those are the kinds of symbols we are going to have to evolve to keep unity going.”
Cubana Jane Delgado, president of the National Coalition of Health and Human Services Organizations, echoed the sentiments of many when she suggested celebrating Hispanics every day of the year.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Hispanics and blacks in 1987 did not derive the same benefit from an improved economy as Anglos did, according to U.S. Census Bureau fig u res released Aug. 31. The poverty rate for Anglos dipped in 1987 from 11% to 10.5%. Yet, the number of impoverished Hispanics rose from 5.1 million to 5.5 million and the poverty rate for the group rose to 28.2% from 27.3%.
Latin Role Continues At Civil Rights March
> Contrary to some news reports of a newfound Hispanic presence during the 25th anniversary of the famed March on Washington Aug. 28, Latinos have a long history of working with blacks in the civil rights struggle, according to march organizers and participants
Hispanic groups represented in the march from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial included the League of United Latin American Citizens, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus the United Farm Workers and the Washington D.C.-based Hispanic Festival.
The link between Hispanics and blacks in the areas of civil rights human rights and immigration was forged long ago, according to the march’s liaison to the Hispanic community, Acie Byrd.
“This (march) was merely a continuation. There has always been unity between the groups” said Byrd.
He pointed out that Cesar Chavez’s fast in protest of pesticides and in support of farm workers had been taken on by the Rev. Jesse Jackson as well as the Rev. Joseph Lowery of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
Dolores Huerta, vice president of the UFW, spoke to the demonstrators and called for recommitment to a boycott on grapes
Betty Baca, director of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus participated in the 25th anniversary march, which drew 55,000. She also took part in the first march in 1963, where the crowd swelled to 250,000.
Much remains to be done before reaching the goals set forth in King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, she said. “We’re closer, but... the struggle continues.” - Sophia Nieves
“Income and Poverty Status in the United States 1987” indicates that the black poverty rate went from 31 % to 33%, with the number of blacks below the poverty line rising from 9 million to 9.7 million.
Overall, poverty in the nation in 1987 was 13.5%, differing little from the 1986 level of 13.6%. The poverty rate for a family of four was set at $11,611 in 1987.
Latino Poverty Up Despite Economy
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


John Trasvina and Susan Lee
Who is Dan Quayle?
While the debate lingers on about Sen. Dan Quayle’s Vietnam-era service in the Indiana National Guard, it is even more important to examine his record as a soldier in another war - the battles waged by the Reagan administration against civil rights.
On matters of critical importance to Hispanics and Asian Americans, J. Danforth Quayle finds himself among the ranks of those who would turn back the clock and retreat from the progress made.
Quayle is best known among Hispanic and Asian educators for pursuing Education Secretary William Bennett’s agenda against bilingual education. In 1986, Quayle introduced S.2256, a bill which would have restricted the educational rights of Hispanic,
Asian and other language-minority children to enroll in effective bilingual educational programs The Quayle bill would have permitted more federal money to go to English-only or immersion programs at the expense of more successful transitional bilingual programs.
When Bennett first announced his anti-bilingual “reform,” he stated, “After 17 years of federal involvement and after$1.7 billion of federal funding, we have no evidence that the children whom we sought to help - that the children who deserve our help - have benefited.” Yet at the Senate hearing on S.2256, Quayle welcomed Bennett by stating, “I know you are committed to bilingual education.”
The Quayle bill would have given local school districts more “flexibility’ to move from bilingual programs to English-only immersion. At the same time, studies sponsored by the Education Department and others were lauding bilingual education as producing students who scored higher in English than students in immersion programs.
VOTED FOR OFFBCIAL LANGUAGE MEASURE
In 1982, Quayle voted for two English-only measures by Sen. S.I. Hayakawa. First, he voted to eliminate bilingual election provisions from the Voting Rights Act This amendment failed, gaining just 32 votes. Later that year, he voted for Hayakawa’s Sense of Congress resolution declaring English the nation’s official language.
fn the area of immigration, Quayle was a consistent supporter of the Immigration Reform and Control Act in the 97th, 98th and 99th Congresses. In 1982, he voted to eliminate the fifth family immigration preference used by U.S. citizens who want to be reunited with their brothers and sisters from abroad. The fifth preference is most often used by siblings from Mexico, Hong Kong, the Philippines and other Asian nations. In 1985, Quayle voted against protecting workers from discriminatory application of employer sanctions.
The authoritative Congressional Education Associates’ Congressional Ledger, which scores Congress on its responsiveness to black and Hispanic interests, gave Indiana’s junior senator a 20% positive rating. Only 13 senators scored lower. But even Quayle’s rare pro-civil rights vote must be viewed closely. While he was one 75 Senate cosponsors of the Civil Liberties Act of 1987 for redress and reparations for Japanese Americans interned during World War 11 and voted for it on final passage, he first supported an amendment to remove provisions to pay each internee $20,000 and another to hold up payments until the federal government balanced the budget.
Coupled with his votes against the Civil Rights Restoration Act, extension of time for ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment and his support of Judges Bork and Manion, the vice presidential nominee’s record shows insensitivity to the interests of Hispanics and Asian Americans.
(Washington, D.C., attorneys John Trasvina and Susan Lee are respectively, counsel to Sen. Paul Simon and past executive director of the National Democratic Council of Asian and Pacific Americans.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin Pelos en
HAPPY ENDING? This tilts and spins, so hold on tight
Hallmark cards, which promised to be relevant to 20 million U.S. Hispanics when it was bidding to control this countrys Spanish-language television, needed a good man to run its newly acquired Univision TV network.
Presumably, it searched hard among the countless Latinos and Latinas who helped to put Spanish-language television on the U.S. map.
A few weeks ago, the happy-card company ended the suspense by announcing that it had found its man: somebody named Grimes who ran a cable sports network. Grimes even promised to take Spanish lessons after he took a vacation.
How does someone who understands neither the Spanish language nor the U.S. Hispanic experience know what’s relevant to Univision listeners? Or looking at it another way, could a non-English speaker fresh off the boat run CBS or NBC?
Fair questions. And Hallmark has an answer. A new press release tells us that Grimes (with the new title of president and chief executive officer of Univision Holdings Inc.) has chosen an assistant Joaquin Blaya, a 25-year veteran of Spanish-language TV and most recently general manager of WLTV in Miami, will be Univision “president’ reporting directly to Numero Uno Grimes.
Tell me, Tonto, how come we never get to be The Lone Ranger?
MORAL TANTRUM? I think Richard (Hunger of Memory Rodriguez writes outrageous things for the same reason little boys show their buns. He wants attention.
Now an editor for Pacific News Service, Richard wrote a weird, weird column on C6sar Chavez’s fast. I found it in the Aug. 28 Los Angeles Times
A sample of the man’s mind:
“This summer Ch&vez has asked consumers not to buy, not to eat table grapes. As he has done before, Ch&vez went on a hunger strike - a moral tantrum...”
Enuf.
BEN NETT A DISEASE? Let’s switch to syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak. They offered this item on I Billy Bennett and LauroCavazos(ln the column I saw, published ] in the New York Post, Cavazos’ name was spelled “Cavazo” all the | way through. Weighing the reliability both of the Post and i Evans/Novak team, if s hard to say who deserves credit for that creative spelling.):
“Fridays meeting between Secretary of Education William Bennett and his successor, Texas Tech president Lauro Cavazo, was their first since the appointment was announced over two weeks earlier because the White House wants them kept apart
“It was clear President Reagan’s aides did not want Bennett indoctrinating Cavazo with anti-establishment ideas. ‘Thats the first time I’ve been treated as a communicable disease,’ cracked Bennett, whose resignation is effective Sept 20.
“Cavazo is considered a policy question mark for what is left of the Reagan administration and, possibly, fora Bush administration. Bennett never had heard of him, and neither had traditionalist education leaders.”
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting.. .
â– '
EDWARD JAMES OLMOS, the actor, quoted by Associated Press last month as.he addressed a Laredo, Texas, youth rally.
"The reason I never dropped out of school was as I was finishing junior high, my father started junior high. And when I graduated from high school, my mother started back to school. And when I was finishing college, my mom graduated from high school. They were incredible examples and that kept me going.”
3
Sept. 5,1988


Miguel P6rez, guest columnist
From One Vet to Another
When Angel Almedina was drafted into the Army in 1966, he had no choice but to go. He knew that U.S. soldiers were being killed in a war he didn’t even support but this 18-year-old Puerto Rican recognized that duty called He came from a poverty-stricken family in New York City. The thought of pulling strings to stay out of the war was too remote to imagine.
In East Harlem's El Barrio, he had never experimented with drugs. But two year later, when Almedina came back from Vietnam emotionally and physically torn by the experience of war,
“There is a misconception that because you grew up in El Barrio you were supposed to be on drugs," Almedina told me when I first met him three years ago. “No, man, I grew up in El Barrio and everything was all right, as far as it could be. We were poor, but we were not poor in spirit. We had no money, but we ate every day. Things got rough, but the family was there. The first time I got into narcotics was in Vietnam.”
It took him more than six years to beat the habit Around the same time this was happening to a poor Puerto Rican draftee, a rich National Guardsman from Indiana was first avoiding the war, then making a political career as a hawk.
This is why the controversy surrounding the military record of Dan Quayle has made Almedina literally ill.
QUAYLE ‘PUNKED OUT
“My stomach hasn’t stopped turning,” he says. “I’m sick from outrage.” He says that there was a price you had to pay during that era if you want to lead the nation now.
As the Quayle story evolves, Almedina becomes more outraged. “The National Guard during the ’60s, that’s where you went to hide out We knew it and anybody who says no - that’s hypocrisy. What happened to Kennedy’s ‘Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country1?
“I feel for the man,” he says. “I think Dan Quayle is a fine human being. But when the going got tough and tough had to get going, he punked out. There is a lack of leadership there. He can be anything he wants to be. He can be the senator from Indiana all his life, but he can’t lead this nation. He can’t lead my 18-year-old son. Thafscrazy.
I can’t believe that they even nominated him.”
They are both 41 years old, but the differences between Quayle and Almedina are enormous. One is a rich hawk who avoided the war, the other isa poor man who did his duty and paid dearly through years of war and drug addiction for a cause he didn’t believe in.
58,000 ON THE WALL - DEAD Having fought in Vietnam and coming from El Barrio makes Almedina, who is not running for office, more qualified than Quayle to understand the enemy. “When I got to Vietnam and I saw these poor folks fighting for their own land,” he once told me, noting that it reminded him of his relatives in the Puerto Rican countryside,“I knew they were the enemy. But from the poverty perspective, I kept saying, 'I’ve been there, I know these people.’ ”
An active member of the Vietnam Veterans of America, Almedina says he and many like him intend to keep the Quayle issue alive. “We are going to run into him from now until November. We have 58,000 people on the wall, dead, you know. It was bad enough that we had to go, but now you are saying it didn’t mean much, that if you didn’t go, you were lucky. Now you are changing the rules of the game. What happened to patriotism, loyalty, the stuff I learned in the books?” With irony in his voice, Almedina tells you blacks and Latinos should follow Quayle’s example. “The Army now is black and Hispanic. If we don’t join there is no Army. But let’s all join the National Guard. If it’s Quayle that sets such a good example, lef s all join. They should have told me that 20 years ago.”
(Miguel Perez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.)
Jim Sagel, guest columnist
‘Guarding’ The Land
The Republican vice presidential nomination of Indiana Sen. Dan Quayle has focused the nation’s attention on the National Guard of the late ’60s. But when Hispanics in the Southwest recall that era, a different picture comes to mind.
It is the picture of National Guardsmen combing the mountains of , Northern New Mexico in search of Reies Lopez Tixerina and members of his Aiianza Federal de los Pueblos Libres(Federal Alliance of Free City States) who had, on a June morning in 1967, attempted to make a citizen’s arrest of the district attorney at the Rio Arriba County Courthouse in Tierra Amarilla.
Though the picture has grown a little fuzzy,
Hispanics in New Mexico will never forget the day General Jacob Jolly’s tanks rolled into town. It was the day that catapulted Tixerina into the national spotlight, enlightening countless U.S. residents who until then had believed that only blacks were engaged in a struggle for their civil rights. In the Hispanic Southwest the struggle was inevitably a "lucha” for the land as well.
Ironically, the land the Guard “occupied” in its search for Tixerina had once been part of that same system of “mercedes," or land grants, which the Aiianza claimed had been stolen over the years by unscrupulous lawyers, ranchers and land developers.
T/O SAM, THE LAND BARON
The 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo which ended the war with Mexico had guaranteed the protection of the Spanish and Mexican land grants. But as waves of Anglo merchants and settlers came chugging into the Southwest on the tracks of their” manifest destiny,” nearly all of the grants passed from the hands of the H ispanic farmers and ranchers who had lived on them for generations into the control of such land barons as Thomas Catron and Tio Sam’s National Forest system.
The loss of the land meant the loss of a way of life, which was what Tixerina had been protesting in Tierra Amarilla when the National Guard was dispatched to bring him in.
Yet, that was not the biggest irony of that summer day in 1967. Even more so was the fact that a disproportionately larger number of young Hispanics were in Vietnam at that very moment, fighting for that same government of checks and balances that had determined, on balance, it was best to hold Tixerina and his group of land grant activists firmly in check. Tixerina eventually did time in federal prison.
OCCUPATION UNTIL VINDICATION
A friend from Northern New Mexico who served in the regular army at the time clearly recalls the conflicting emotions he felt the day he opened his copy of “Stars and Stripes,” the official newspaper of the armed forces, and saw an article detailing Tixerina’s courthouse raid. Those emotions are with him still, even as a man of his generation runs for vice president and the land struggle goes on in New Mexico.
Tierra Amarilla resident Amador Flores was recently released on bond after spending several months in jail for refusing to vacate the property he’s lived on since the 1960s. The story is all too familiar Title for the land was quieted in the name of an Arizona corporation which holds a legalistic pedigree to the acreage. But it is Flores who holds the traditional right to the land,
Though Flores has had to agree to stay off the disputed property while his case is pending, activist and Vietnam vet Pedro Arechuleta and others vow to occupy the land until Flores has been vindicated by the courts.
Though the turbulent era of the ‘60s has come back to haunt Dan Quayle, the legacy of the Tierra Amarilla courthouse raid has never faded from the consciousness of Hispanics in the Southwest. And whether Quayle stays or goes, the issue of the loss of the land grants will never go away.
(Jim Sagel, of Espahoia, N.M., is a journalist and author.)
he was a heroin addict.
4
Sept 5,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
MEDICAL SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: An article on Hispanicsand other minorities in medical schools around the country and in Puerto Rico is included in The Journal of the American Medical Association. It is available for $5. Specify the Aug. 26 issue when you contact The Journal of the American Medical Association, Circulation Dept, 535 Dearborn St, Chicago, III. 60610 (312) 280-7168.
COU N SELING CRISIS: T o obtain a copy of “Nowhere to Turn: The Crisis in Middle School Guidance and Support,”an 80-page study focusing on the lack of guidance counselors in New York City’s middle schools, send a check for $5 to the Educational Priorities Panel, 666 Broadway, 8th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10012.
POVERTY IN THE UNITED STATES: “Money Income and Poverty Status in the United States” is a 51-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau which details poverty by racial and ethnic group. To order (specify Series-P-60, Advance Report), contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (The cost was not available at time of publication.)
IMMIGRATION DESTINATIONS: To obtain a copy of American Demographics September issue containing articles on legal and undocumented immigrants, send $4 to Circulation Department, American Demographics, P.O. Box 58184, Boulder, Colo. 80322-SI 84.
CALL FOR PAPERS: The National Association for Ethnic Studies invites interested persons to present papers, media productions or panels on the theme “Ethnicity in America Interdisciplinary Approaches” For more information contact Professor Johnella E Butler, Department of American Ethnic Studies, GN 80 University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 98195 (206) 543-5401.
MIAMI’S TRANSFORMATION: “How Miamfs Image Was Created” is a 16-page paper by Luis Botifoil on the role Cubans played in taking Miami from a resort in the 1950s to the international center it is today. For a copy send $3 to University of Miami, Graduate School of International Studies, Publications, P.O. Box 24-8123, Coral Gables, Fla 33124-8123(305)284-6866.
RESEARCH GRANTS: The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council will make grants from $20,000 to $35,000 available for public policy research on contemporary Hispanic issues. Application deadline is Jan. 16,1989. For more information call or write Raquel Ovryn Rivera, Staff Associate, SSRC, 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158 (212) 661-0280.
CONNECTING
ACTIVISTS RECEIVE AWARDS There were three Hispanics among five minority community organizers who were awarded the first national Charles Bannerman Memorial Fellowships Aug. 23. The $10,000 fellowships were created to allow activists to take a sabbatical of three months or more from their jobs.
The three are Diana Caballero, director of the Puerto Rican/Latino Education Roundtable in New York and a founder of the National Congress of Puerto Rican Rights, Gary Delgado, general director of the Center for Third World Organizing in Oakland, Calif., and Cecilia Rodriguez, director of La Mujer Obrera Program, an El Paso, Texas, organization of women who work in the textile industry.
Applications and brochures for the 1989 fellowships are available from the Charles Bannerman Memorial Fellowship Program, c/o The Youth Project, 2335 18th St NW, Washington, D.C., 20009.
TAKING ON THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY
Upset with their overrepresentation in the front-line defense of the nation as compared with their nearly invisible role in the defense industry and its profits, a California coalition of eight minority groups proposed a plan last month that would offer more benefits to minorities from the $150 billion-a-year industry.
The Minority/Women’s Coalition released its plan Aug. 18, voicing its displeasure with being excluded from a meeting earlier that day between congressmen, including California Reps. Augustus Hawkins and Matthew Martinez, and defense industry officials In its plan, the coalition asks that Congress require defense contractors to set a 20% goal for subcontracts to women- and minority-owned firms it also asks Congress to require the industry to disclose annually its philanthropic contributions particularly those to organizations that serve minorities and women.
Hawkins chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, proposes that $80 million a year be raised from contractors to help educate women and minorities for defense jobs.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Dora Salinas a public relations executive with the Southwestern Bell Telephone Co., receives an award from the San Antonio-based Centro del Barrio health and human service agency for her contributions to the agency and the community... Robert Pacheco, principal of Harlandale High School in San Antonio, receives the 1988 Luby Prize for Educational Leadership. The $2,000 award goes to the best principal in Bexar County’s 15 school districts...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
IMMIGRATION MEETING Washington, D.C. Sept. 7
The Task Force on Immigration Reform will hold its third quarterly meeting. Included will be legalization outreach reports and congressional updates, as well as a presentation of INS second stage regulations for legalization.
Eliza May (202) 293-7550
HISPANIC BUSINESS Washington, D.C. Sept. 7-11 The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will hold its annual convention and trade fair. “Hispanic Business and Its Political Voyage^' is the theme of the meeting Business development sessions will cover topics ranging from international business to equal opportunity.
Gloria Bessenbacher(816) 531-6363 EMPLOYMENT MANAGERS
Phoenix, Ariz. Sept 8, 9
The Arizona Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers will hold a seminar focusing on the role education plays in the future of H ispanics. Agolf tournament will be held in conjunction with the seminar.
Ray Tapia (602) 774-7161 ext 292
BUSINESS BANQUET Las Vegas, Nev. Sept 9
The Latin Chamber of Commerce will hold its sixth annual banquet to honor members from different fields. Elaine Wynn, director of the Golden Nugget Hotel, will talk about scholarships available for minority students through the Nevada Gaming and Hotel Foundation.
Elena Aguirre (702) 385-7367
CIVIL RIGHTS CONFERENCE San Francisco Sept 10
The American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California will examine in its annual meeting the ways in which economic inequality affects the struggle for civil rights and civil liberties. Demetria Martinez, reporter and recently acquitted sanctuary defendant from New Mexico, will be among the speakers. There will also be a panel on the immigration law.
Sept 5,1988
Marcia Gallo (415) 621-2493
HEALTH CONFERENCE San Antonio Sept 11-15
The National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations will hold a conference and training institute. Workshop topics will include AIDS research among Hispanics, Hispanic elderly and prevention and treatment of chronic diseases.
Tom Blackburn-Rodrlguez (202) 371-2100
COLOMBIAN FOLKLORE Hyattsville, Md. Sept 11
The Prince George's Countys Executive Office will hold a celebration of Hispanic culture featuring a performance by a Colombian folklore and musical group.
Nuria Alvarez Grant (202) 952-4666 HERITAGE CELEBRATION Lansing, Mich. Sept. 11,12 The Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs will hold a Hispanic Heritage Week celebration which will include Mexican folklorico dancing, a parade of attire from different Latin American countries and an awards banquet honoring Hispanic achievers. Essie Solano (517) 373-8339
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
DIRECTOR OF PARENT LEADERSHIP PROGRAM
MALDEF, a national civil rights organization, seeks an individual who would direct new Hispanic Parent Leadership Program. The one-year program will integrate MALDEF's expertise in leadership development and legal education advocacy skills. If successful, the program may be extended.
Requirements: advanced degree in education, law or related field; familiarity with public school education systems; knowledge of education issues and the Los Angeles Unified School District. Bilingual in Spanish/English.
Send resume and writing sample to Rose Calder6n, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif., 90014 by September 19,1988.
PROFESSOR
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, BAKERSFIELD — Department of Political Science seeks candidates with teaching and public service experience for a temporary position as Visiting Professor. The appointment could be either full-time or part-time for the Winter and/or Spring quarters commencing January 3, and ending June 15, 1989. Area most preferred: Communist systems and/or China and Japan. The teaching area could be American public law and policy for the right candidate. Minorities and women are strongly encouraged to apply.
Salary and support are negotiable. Send vitae and names of three references to Dr. S. E. Clark, Chair, Dept, of Political Science, 9001 Stockdale Hwy., Bakersfield, Calif. 93311-1099
TEXAS TECH
PRESIDENT
TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY AND TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER
The nomination of Dr. Lauro F. Cavazos to be the next Secretary of Education of the United States has created the need to recruit a new President for Texas Tech University and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. The Board of Regents and the President Search and Advisory Committees are at this time inviting applications and nominations for this position.
Texas Tech is one of the state’s four major, comprehensive universities. With a student body of nearly25,000, the university s2,000 faculty members teach in over 157 undergraduate and 168 graduate programs. The university and the Texas Tech University Health Science Center share an 1,800-acre campus reflecting Spanish Renaissance architecture. Academically diverse, the university has seven colleges, a Graduate School, and a School of Law. The Health Sciences Center has Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health.
Appropriate candidates should be leaders, educational diplomats with excellent organizational skills, good fund raisers who enjoy public relations, and be articulate and persuasive in promoting the institution. The selected individual should be capable of decisiveness, yet able to build consensus; and possess the ability to interact sensitively and effectively with students, faculty, Board, staff, alumni, government officials, and with other members of the external community.
The President is the chief executive officer of the university and is directly responsible to the Board of Regents for the programs and administration of the institution.
Applications and nominations should be submitted to:
Mr. R. William Funk Heidrick and Struggles ATTN: Texas Tech-HLWR 1999 Bryan, Suite 1919 Dallas, Texas 75201
Review of nominations and applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected.
Texas Tech is an Affirmative Action,
Equal Opportunity Employer
PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT CHAIRMAN
Southwest Texas State University of San Marcos, Texas, invites applications or nominations for the position of Chair of the Department of Psychology. Applicants should qualify for a tenurable appointment at the rank of associate or professor, should show evidence of leadership and provide evidence of substantial achievement in teaching and research, as well as skills at interpersonal communication, program development and resource procurement.
Area of specialization is not a major consideration. The appointment will be effective September 1,1989, and it is a 12-month appointment. Southwest Texas State University enrolls approximately 20,000 students. The Department of Psychology enrolls approximately 4,000 students per semester with over 600 majors. The faculty includes 18 full-time and 7 part-time members. A masters level program is under consideration.
Applicants should submit a complete resume with a cover letter, a one-page statement of leadership philosophy, and at least three references to Dr. Karen Brown, Chair, Search Committee, Institute of Social Work, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666. COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BEFORE JANUARY 15,1989.
Southwest Texas State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE Employment^referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media Opportunities for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers magazines television, radio and other media, English or Spanish language. Contact Jocelyn Cbrdova, National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228.
JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Submissions are welcome for Weekly Report’s “guest columnist” feature. Approx 500 words For writers guidelines send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Guest Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 pm. (EST) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display rates: $45 per column inch.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
•Sept 5,1988


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
LATINO PUBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHIPS FOR 1989
The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council announce their 1989 Grants Competition for Public Policy Research on Contemporary Hispanic Issues. Grants will vary from small individual awards to support for collaborative research projects. Awards will range from $20,000 to $30,000. Priority will be given to the following themes: children and youth at risk; culture and economic behavior; political organization and empowerment; national policy initiatives and their impact on Latino communities; and other city-specific themes
For more information contact Raquel Ovryn Rivera, Social Science Research Council, 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158 (212) 661-0280.
ATTORNEY
Connecticut based Fortune 200 corporation seeks lawyer with two years experience for new position in highly visible legal department. Will assist in preparation, review and negotiation of all legal and financial instruments & provide counsel to ensure protection and compliance. Relocation assistance provided. Reply to:
l-h*-
Six Landmark Square. Suite 400 Siam lord. Connecticut 06901 Telephone (203) 359-5678 Telex 4750130 HQ STAM Fax (203) 324-7051
Malntenance/Ft. Meade, MD Location
Trades 8 Crafts
The National Security Agency, a U.S. government agency, has vacancies for the following positions in the Ft. Meade, Maryland area: . ,
HVAC Mechanics
Elevator Mechanics
Distribution Facilities Electricians (High Voltage) All applicants must be high school graduates or have a GED. Salary in mid S20’s (based on experience). All candidates are subject to security clearance Investigation. (Allow 6 to 8 months for processing.)
NSA offers you job security and Job satisfaction:
• Stable, full-time work
• Good working environment
• Excellent benefits including a retirement plan, health/life insurance, paid vacation and free parking
• Relocation reimbursement
• Upward mobility
To apply, please send resume, letter of interest or SF-171.
# National Security Agency
Attn: M322 (DCZ)
Fort Meade, MD 20785-6000
U.S. citizenship required for applicant and immediate family members. An equal opportunity employer.
I N- s r | R-'S
L A T IN
F I . i
FREE-LANCE
RADIO
JOURNALIST
NPR’s Latin File seeks experienced free-lance journalist from Los Angeles, Miami, and other communities with a significant Hispanic population. Reporters will produce weekly features and news spots.
Submit resume and audio tape to Judy Moore-Smith, NPR’s Latin File, National Public Ftadio, 2025 M St., Washington, D.C. 20036.
ASSISTANT EDITOR/WRITER
HISPANIC magazine is looking for an assistant editor/writer. 3-4 years experience necessary. Send resum6 and clips to: Marfa Sharp, HISPANIC magazine,111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 410, Washington, D.C. 20001.
GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Typesetting • Layout • Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010(202)483-7755.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MD., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301)952-3408.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report



Arts& Entertainment
LATINOS LAUGH: A study by a New York advertising agency suggests that Hispanic television viewers prefer family-oriented comedies to other genres.
Out of the 20 shows most watched by Hispanics, 15 are sitcoms. Only one features a Latino in a lead role- NBC’s Family Ties, which co-stars Tina Yothers. Another NBC sitcom on the list, 227, introduced a Hispanic family to its storyline during an episode that aired last season. The Gonzalez family- played by Alfonso Arau, Yvonne Wilder and Alex Ruiz - is expected to return with the show in the fall.
Among the five shows ranked that were not comedies, only NBC’s Miami Vice features Hispanic actors - Edward James Olmos and Saundra Santiago - in lead, Hispanic roles.
The study, by BBDO, analyzed ratings in TV markets with heavy
Latino concentration.
THEATER BOOK DUE: Scholar Yolanda J. Broyles-Gonzalez is writing the first book-length study on California’s El Teatro Campesino company.
The associate professor of Chicano studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship to work in the project. As a Ford Postdoctoral Fellow, she spent a year and a half at the Teatro archival collection in San Juan Bautista, Calif.
For the book she will use archival material, as well as oral histories, personal accounts by the artists and production notes.
MOVING ON: Lupe Serrano, a veteran ballerina of the American Ballet Theatre, joins the Washington Ballet in the fall as artistic associate and principal coach... Argentine tennis superstar Guillermo Vilas- who is a published poet- is planning to record an album which should be out by next summer... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
NEWSPAPER HIRING SURVEY: A survey released Aug. 24 by the American Newspaper Publishers Association that showed minority staffing on daily newspapers is now nearing population parity in most departments was roundly criticized by Hispanic and other journalists as distorted.
A press release distributed by AN PA at a St. Louis meeting of the National Association of Black Journalists showedthat Hispanics, blacks and Asians comprise 16% of the nation1 s newspaper employees and 10% of their newsroom staffs The percentages included clerical and administrative positions.
In the newsroom, it said blacks account for 6%, Hispanics 3%, Asian Americans 1% and Native Americans less than one-half of 1 % of employees This differs dramatically from the 1988 report of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, which said blacks are 3.9% and Hispanics 1.9% of newspersons employed by daily newspapers ASNEs figures for Asians and American Indians were on par
with AN PA’s.
The ANPA report said minorities are most likely to be found in general management (22%), production (19%) and circulation (19%) departments. Similar proportions also apply to Hispanics. ANPA noted that minorities constitute 21 % of the nation’s work force.
NEWSPAPER INDUSTRY STAFFING
Latinos Blacks
General Mngmnt. 10% 15%
Circulation 5 12
Production 5 13
Acctng/Finance/Infa Srves. 5 10
Editorial 3 6
Advertising 3 9
Mrktng./Promo./Research 3 6
Source: American Newspaper Publishers Association. (Asians accounted for between 1% and 2% in all categories and Native Americans for between less than one-half of 1% and 1%.)
Although the ANPA survey of 546 newspapers was commended as the first attempt to study minority hiring in all newspaper departments, it was called misleading by officials of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists as well as by ANPA’s Task Force on Minorities.
The groups noted that the inclusion of
minorities working in service positions skewed the findings in all categories, most particularly in the general management division where publishers were counted along with janitors and clerks Within most divisions the greatest number of Hispanics were found in service/ clerical positions.
NAHJ President and Newsday reporter Evelyn Hernandez called the study“dangerousf’ in its distortion. “For an industry that places so much emphasis on accuracy and fairness this is really alarming.”
ANPA called management’s view of its efforts to increase minority hiring positive. Four out of 10 newspapers were found to have active affirmative action programs their most often identified activity was placing ads for minorities in their own classified sections In its conclusion, ANPA interpreted the efforts as “excellent” and emphasized that they were voluntary. Hernandez was perplexed by such an assessment. She said, “If you interpreted that in terms of a school grade, that would be 40%-sounds like an F to me.” Instead, she described increasing complacency in the news industry and urged that more creative programs be developed.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves.'
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila .Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues):
Institutions/agencies $118
Personal $108
Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
ARCW ON VASMIN6T0
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

. S EP 6 1 Mexican citizen, remains in a coma after having his left Ma king The News This Week arm mangled and sustaining head injuries while sneaking into the ' . United States by strapping himself to the bottom of a bus. The bus was returning from a field trip to Tijuana with students from the college ... The California Athletic Commission begins an investigation into the death of Baldwin Park professional boxer Rico Velasquez, who collapsed during a match and later died of a cerebral hemorrhage . At question is the response time of an Ram6n Masa, a New York resident who a month ago dangled m h1s wheel cha1r from the Brooklyn Bridge for several hours to prove handicapped peopl.e can be productive, performs another stunt. Gett1ng out of h1s wheelchair, Masa, known as Megaman, jumps from the Staten Island ferry into New York Harbor. The 40-year-old is charged with disorderly conduct. . . Vol. 6 No. 35 HISPANIC LINK WEEKL REPORT Sept 5, 1988 MALDEF Files Suit Against LA. County Leaders See More Latino Unity The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Southern Cali fornia filed a class action lawsuit Aug. 24 against the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors alleging it sought to dilute Latino voting power when it drew up supervisorial districts in 1981. "We can elect Hispanics to the state Senate, to the state Assembly, and even to Congress, but we have been cut out of representation in county government," said one of the plaintiffs, Yolanda Garza. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, asks the court to bar elections in 1990 until a new plan has been implemented that would include at least one district with a majority of Latino residents. It also asks that the number of seats on the board be increased. Other Hispanic groups, including the League of United Latin American Citizens and the Los Angeles County Chicano Employees Association, held a press conference Aug. 24 to protest that the U.S. Department of Justice had been taking too much time to act. The Justice Department sent its first letter charging the county with discrimination in May. On July 15 it instructed the county to submit a plan for redefining the five districts in the 31% Hispanic county. Raul Nunez, president of the Los Angeles County Chicano Employees Association, re ferred to a county plan to defer redistricting until after the 1990 census as "a ploy to keep the incumbency in control." Sophia Nieves Hispanic Heritage Week, celebrated this year from Sept.11-17, will be expanded to a monthlong celebration next year starting in mid-September, which President Reagan will mark at a Sept. 13 Rose Garden ceremony. As the nation increasingly recognizes the contributions of Hispanics to the United States, Latino leaders say there is also increased understanding and sensitivity by Hispanic subgroups toward one another. Nonetheless, Hispanics still largely see and seek primary identification as Mexican Americans or Puerto Ricans or Cubans or Salvadorans or whatever the group may be. The majority of Hispanic leaders observe an increasing interaction among the subgroups at the personal level as well as growing cooperation among Hispanic organizations at the national level. Assessed Rep. Albert Bustamante(DTexas), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, "More and more, organizations are better coordinated in their efforts to focus on the issues that are important . " National Puerto Rican Coalition President Louis Nunez said of the connection among Latinos, "Clearly there is a relationship be tween all of us. But, I see it more as that of distant cousins than as brothers." Elected officials and community leaders attributed continuing separation primarily to geographical isolation rather than intragroup rivalry, noting that Mexican Americans pre dominate in the Southwest, Puerto Ricans in the Northeast and Cubans in Florida. Some also observed that only recently have such groups as Central Americans and Dominicans been a consideration . Five Cubans Cuff Selves To Liberty Five Cuban men handcuffed themselves to a railing inside the crown of the Statue of Liberty for nearly two hours Aug . 27. They ?id so to call attention to the Aug. 30, 1962, flnng squad execution of more than 400 people in Cuba ordered by Fidel Castro. As the exiles were standing in line with tourists to climb the statue's stairs, friends and members of their families out English-and Spanish-language fliers protesting conditions in Cuba. The late morning to early afternoon incident ended when police arrived and the men freed themselves. They were charged with impeding visitation and public assembly without a permit. The five men, all from New Jersey, were Luis Abreu, 56, of North Bergen; Sergio Guart6n, 51, of Guttenberg; Jorge Dulzaides, 53, of Union City; and Carlos Calvo, 48, and Marcelo Cuervo, 57, both of Yonkers. Guario ne Diaz, president of the Cuban American National Council, cited political sophistication and maturity as one reason for the softening of the fractiousness of the ' 60s. "We're realizing that we don't have to agree on all issues to work together. We don't have to belong to the same political party or come from the same countries." One of the most often cited examples of this cooperation was the October 1987 His panic Leadership l!_gathefEl_d_ a bipartisan group of more than 1 00 top Latino leaders in Washington, D.C., to develop a Hispanic agenda for presentation to the 1988 presidential candidates. The effort was repeated months later by other Latino groups for similar purposes. Also pointed out was HAGER, initially a coalition of six diverse Hispanic organizations that signed an agreement to promote the Adolph Coors Co. in 1984 in exchange for the company's promise to return a proportionate share of resources to Hispanic communities. At the local level, Julia Rivera, executive director of ASPIRA of New York, cited the recent partnership of Puerto Ricans and Dominicans in order to get a Hispanic on th e city Board of Education . Their campaign resulted in the appointment of businesswoman Amalia Betanzos, who is Puerto Rican. Congressman Jaime Fuster of Puerto Rico, CHC member, said, "Of late, we are all working very closely out of the awareness that there is so much more we have in common, not only byway of our heritage but also in our challen ges and common struggles. National Council of La Raza President Raul Yzaguirre was the only leader to know that Hispanic Heritage Week contains dates his torically significant to Mexican Americans (Sept. 16 marks the independence of Mexico) and Central Americans (Sept. 16 is independence day for Costa Rica, Honduras, Guate mala, El Salvador and Nicaragua) . League of United Latin American Citizens national President Jose Garcia De Lara suggested that one week of the new celebration month be devoted to different Hispanic groups. "Unless we understand and know each other, we look at each other from the side of our continued on page 2

PAGE 2

Latino Immigrants Prefer N. Y.C., L.A. As New Homes Legal Latino immigrants to ttie United States are gravitating to the East and West Coasts, with New York and the Los Angel e . & Beach area their most popular desti nations, finds an analysis published in the September issue of American Demographics. "Where to Find the New Immigrants" tallies the arrivals of immigrants from five Latin countries in the years 1984 through 1986 and shows preferences as: Colombians: 1)NewYork2) Miami3)Ber gen-Passaic , N . J . Cubans: 1 )Miami 2)Jersey City 3) Los AngelesLong Beach Dominicans: 1)New York 2)Bergen-Passaic 3)Jersey City Salvadorans: 1)LosAngeles-Long Beach 2)New York City 3)Washington, D.C. Mexicans: 1)Los Angeles-Long Beach 2)Chicago 3)EI Paso. The article's authors use federal figures to determine how large immigrant com munities were during those three years. James Allen and Eugene Turner found New York was number one, with the greatest share of its immigrants-one-sixth-coming from the Dominican Republic . During that same period, two and a half times more Mexicans could be found in the Los Angeles Long Beach metropolitan area than in any other single, U .S. geographical location. Cubans make up more than half of recent N. Y .C. Schools Lacking Counselors Hispan i c students with limited-English speaking skills in New York City have virtually no chance to speak with a counselor to help plan their high school curricula, according to a report issued by a civic watchdog group Aug. 25. The Educational Priorities Panel sets the ratio of guidance counselors for Limited English Proficiency students at 2,000 to 1 in its report "Nowhere to Turn: The Crisis in Middle School Guidance and Support." The study looks at 1 0 city schools chosen at random. The situation is so bad that in cases where middle school students must have counseling, they may be referred to special education, where the law mandates bilingual counselors be provided for children who are physically or developmentally disabled, according to a spokesperson for one of the EPP member groups, ASPIRA of New York. "lfs criminal that you have to be labeled as Kansans Take On Fasts : The fiveperson staff of the Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs and five of its seven officers began a series of fasts Aug. 23 to show their support for farm workers and to help keep in the public eye the recently ended fast of Cesar Chavez. Jenny Tavares Bartlow, an education spe cialist with the committee who as of Aug. 30 had been on her juice-only fast seven days, said," I'm afraid that what Chavez did will be forgotten," adding, "We did this to support Chavez and to sensitize people in Kansas." handicapped to get appropriate services, " said Luis Reyes, ASPIRA director for educa tional research. To . offset some of the problems posed by the counselor shortage, the panel makes several recommendations, including establish ment of a paraprofessional guidance category. The report also calls for an increase in the hours counseling services are provided and development of improved dropout prevention services. Additional funds of $6.5 million will be allocated for middle school guidance for the general student population in the 198889 school year. ASPIRA puts the current dropout rate for Hispanics in the city at more than 50%. Sophia Nieves Heritage Month Coming continued from page 1 eyes with fear," he said. All the leaders voiced satisfaction that the monthlong period will include Oct. 12, El Dia de Ia Raza, which marks Columbus' arrival in the New World and is widely celebrated through out all of Latin America . Said Yzaguirre , "It's imperative that we have symbols such as these. One that will help is a Hispanic movement song. Those are the kinds of symbols we are going to have to evolve to keep unity going." Cubana Jane Delgado, president of the National Coalition of Health and Human Ser vices Organizations, echoed the sentiments of many when she suggested celebrating Hispanics every day of the year . -Darryl Lynette Figueroa immigrants to the Miami-Hialeah area . Nationwide immigration figures in the 1980s shot up 30% over the previous decade , averaging 570,000 new legal residents a year , according to calculations based on U.S. Census and U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service figures. Mexiccrborn immigrants made up the lar gest share of all legal immigrants between 1983 and 1986. "How to Count lllegals, State by State," another article in the same American Demcr graphics issue , puts the national undocu mented population at 3.5 million for 1987, also drawing on federal data. Sophia Nieves Latin Role Continues At Civil Rights March ' Contrary to some news reports of a new found Hispanic presence during the 25th anniversary of the famed March on Washing ton Aug. 28 , Latinos have a long history of working with blacks in the civil rights struggle, according to march organizers and participants. Hispanic groups represented in the march from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial included the League of United Latin American Citizens, the Congressional His panic Caucus, the United Farm Workers and the Washington D.C.-based Hispanic Festival. The link between Hispanics and blacks in the areas of c i vil rights, human rights, and immigration was forged long ago , according to the march's liaison to the Hispanic com munity, Acie Byrd. "This (march) was merely a continuation. There has always been unity between the groups," said Byrd. He pointed out that Cesar Chavez ' s fast in protest of pesticides and in support of farm workers had been taken on by the Rev. Jesse Jackson as well as the Rev. Joseph Lowery of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference . Dolores Huerta, vice president of the UFW, spoke to the demonstrators and called for to a boycott on grapes. Betty Baca, director of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, participated in the 25th anniversary march, which drew 55 ,000. She also took part in the first march in 1963, where the crowd swelled to 250,000. Much remains to be done before reaching the goals set forth in King's" I Have a Dream" speech, she said. "We're closer, but. .. the struggle continues." Sophia Nieves The other committee staff and officers, including Executive Director Marc Marcano and Chairperson Jeannie Chavez-Martinez, will or have fasted for three days. Latino Poverty Up Despite Economy Dan Martin, a boycott organizer for Cesar Chavez's United Farm Workers in Keene, Calif., said , "Hundreds and hundreds of people are calling with their support. The response is incredible." Chavez, who ended his 36-day fast Aug. 21, was able to take only a few steps on his own as of Aug. 30. 2 Hispanics and blacks in 1987 did not derive the same benefit from an improved economy as Anglos did, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures released Aug. 31. The poverty rate for Anglos dipped in 1987 from 11% to 1 0.5%. Yet, the number of impoverished Hispanics rose from 5.1 million to 5.5 million and the poverty rate for the group rose to 28.2% from 27.3%. "Income and Poverty Status in the United States: 1987" indicates that the black poverty rate went from 31% to 33%, with the number of blacks below the poverty line rising from 9 million to 9.7 million. Overall, poverty in the nation in 1987 was 13.5%, differing little from the 1986 level of 13.6%. The poverty rate for a family of four was set at $11,611 in 1987. Hispanic Link Weekl y Report

PAGE 3

John Trasvina and Susan Lee Who is Dan Quayle? While the debate lingers on about Sen. Dan Quayle's Vietnam-era service in the Indiana National Guard, it is even more important to examine his record as a soldier in another war -the battles waged by the Reagan administration against civil rights. On matters of critical importance to Hispanics and Asian Americans, J. Danforth Quayle finds himself among the ranks of those who would turn back the clock and retreat from the progress made . Quayle is best known among Hispanic and Asian educators for pursuing Education Se cretary William Bennetfs agenda against bilingual education. In 1986, Quayle intro duced S.2256, a bill which would have re stricted the educational rights of Hispanic, Asian and other language-minority children to enroll in effective bilingual educational programs. The Quayle bill would have permit ted more federal money to go to English only or immersion programs at the expense of more successful transitional bilingual programs. When Bennett first announced his anti-bilingual "reform," he stated, "After 17 years of federal involvement, and after$1.7 billion of federal funding, we have no evidence that the children whom we sought to help -that the children who deserve our help have benefited. " Yet, at the Senate hearing on S.2256, Quayle welcomed Bennett by stating," I know you are committed to bilingual education." The Quayle bill would have given local school districts more "flexibility" to move from bilingual programs to English-only immersion. At the same time, studies sponsored by the Education Department and others were lauding bilingual education as producing students who scored higher in English than students in immersion programs. VOTED FOR OFFICIAL LANGUAGE MEASURE In 1982, Quayle voted for two English-only measures by Sen. S.l. Hayakawa. First, he voted to eliminate bilingual election provisions from the Voting Rights Act This amendment failed, gaining just 32 votes. Later that year, he voted for Hayakawa's Sense of Congress resolution declaring English the nation's official language. tn the area of immigration, Quayle was a consistent supporter of the Immigration Reform and Control Act in the 97th, 98th and 99th Co _ ngresses. In 1982, he voted to eliminate the fifth immi_wation preference used by U .S. citizens who want to be reunited with their brothers and sisters from abroad. The fifth preference is most often used by siblings from Mexico, Hong Kong, the Philippines and other Asian nations. In 1985, Quayle voted against protecting workers from discriminatory application of employer sanctions. The authoritative Congressional Education Associates' Congressional Ledger, which scores Congress on its responsiveness to black and Hispanic interests, gave Indiana's junior senator a 20% positive rating . Only 13 senators scored lower. But even Quayle's rare pro-civil rights vote must be viewed closely. While he was one 75 Senate co sponsors of the Civil Liberties Act of 1987 for redress and reparations for Japanese Sin Pelos en Ia lengua HAPPY ENDING? This tilts and spins, so hold on t ight Hallmark cards, which promised to be relevant to 20 million U.S. Hispanics when it was bidding to control this country's Spanish language television, needed a good man to run its newly acquired Univision TV network. Presumably, it searched hard among the countless Lati nos and Latinas who helped to put Spanish-language television on the U.S. map. A few weeks ago, the happy-card company ended t he suspense by announcing that it had found its man : somebody named Grimes who ran a cable sports network. Grimes even promised to take Spanish lessons after he took a vacation. How does someone who understands neither the Spanish language nor the U.S . Hispanic experience know whafs relevant to Univision listeners? Or looking at it another way, cou ld a non English speaker fresh off the boat run CBS or NBC? Fair questions. And Hallmark has an answer. A new press release tells us that Grimes (with the new title of president and chief executive officer of Univision Holdings Inc.) has chosen an assistant Joaquin Biaya, a 25-year veteran of Spanish-l anguage TV and most recently general manager of WL TV in Miami, will be Univision "presidenf' reporting directly to Numero Uno Grimes. Tell me, Tonto, how come we never get to be The Lone Ranger? MORAL TANTRUM? I think Richard (Hunger of Memory) Ro driguez writes outrageous things for t he same reason little boys show their buns . He wants attention. Now an editor for Pacific News Service, Richard wrote a weird, weird column on Cesar Chavez's fast I found it in the Aug . 28 Los Angeles Times. A sample of the man's mind: "This summer Chavez has asked consumers not to buy, not to eat table grapes. As he has done before, Chavez went on a hunger strike-a moral tantrum ... " Enuf . BENNETT A DISEASE? Lefs switc h to syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak. They offered this item on Billy Bennett and Lauro Cavazos(ln the column I saw, published in the New York Post , Cavazos ' name was spelled"Cavazo" all the way through. Weighing the reliability both of the Post and EvanS/Novak team, ifs hard to say who deserves credit for that creative spelling . ) : "Friday's meeting between Secretary of Education William Bennett and his successor , Texas Tech president Lauro Cavazo, was their first since the appointment was announced over two weeks earlier because t he White House wants them kept apart. "It was clear President Reagan's aides did not want Bennett indoctr inating Cavazo with anti-establishment ide as. 'Thafs the first time I ' ve been treated as a communicable disease,' cracked Bennett, whose resignation is effective Sept 20. "Cavazo is considered a policy question mark for what is left of the Reagan administration and, possibly, for a Bush admin i stration . Bennett never had heard of him, and neither had traditionalist education leade rs." Kay Barbaro Americans interned during World War II and voted for it on final passage, he first supported an amendment to I " remove provisions to pay each internee $20,000 and another to hold up payments until the federal government balanced the budget. Coupled with his votes against the Civil Rights Restoration Act, extension of time for ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment and his support of Judges Borkand Manion, the vice presidential nominee's record shows insensitivity to the interests of Hispanics and Asian Americans . (Washington, D.C., attorneys John Trasvina and Susan Lee are respectively, counsel to Sen. Paul Simon and past executive director of the National Democratic Council of Asian and Pacific Americans.) Quoting. • • EDWARD JAMES OLMOS, the actor, quoted by Associated Press last month as.he addressed a Laredo, Texas , youth rally: "The reason I never dropped out of school as I was finishing junior high, my father started junior high. Andwhen I graduated from _ high school, my mother started back to school. And when 1 was finishing college, my mom graduated from high school. They were incredible examples and that kept me going." Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sept. 5, 1988 3

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Miguel Perez, guest columnist From One Vet to Another When Angel Almedina was drafted into the Army in 1966, he had no choice but to go. He knew that U.S. soldiers were being killed in a war he didn ' t even support, but this 18-year-old Puerto Rican recognized that duty called. He came from a poverty-stricken family in New York City. The thought of pulling strings to stay out of the war was too remote to imagine. In East Harlem's El Barrio, he had never experimented with drugs. But two year later, when AI medina came back from Vietnam emotionally and physica lly torn by the experience of war, he was a heroin addict. "There is a misconception that because you grew up in El Barrio you were supposed to be on drugs," AI medina told me when I first met him three years ago. "No, man, I grew up in El Barrio and everything was all right, as far as it could be . We were poor, but we were not poor in spirit. We had no money, but we a t e every day . Things got rough, but the family was there. The first time I got into narcotics was in V ietnam. " It took him more than six years to beat the habit Around the same time this was happenin g to a poor Puerto Rican draftee, a rich National Guardsman from Indiana was first avoiding the war , then making a political career as a hawk . This is why the controversy surrounding the military record of Dan Quayle has made Alme dina literally ill. QUAYLE 'PUNKED OUT' "My stomach hasn't stopped turning," he says. "I'm sick from outrage." He says that there was a price you had to pay during that era if you want to lead the nation now. As the Quayle story evolves, Almedina becomes more outraged. " The National Guard during the '60s, thars where you went to hide out We knew it, and anybody who says no-thars hypocrisy. What happened to Kennedy's 'Ask not what your country can do for you , ask what you can do for your country'? "I feel for the man," he says. "I think Dan Quayle is a fine human being. But when the going got tough and tough had to get going, he punked out. There is a lack of leadership there . He can be anything he wants to be. He can be the senator from Indiana all his life , but he can't lead this nation. He can't lead my 18-year-old son. Tharscrazy. I can't believe that they even nominated him." They are both 41 years old, but the differences between Quayle and Aimed ina are enormous. One is a rich hawk who avoided the war, the other is a poor man who did his duty and paid dearly through years of war and drug addiction for a cause he didn't believe in. 58,000 ON THE WALL-DEAD Having fought in Vietnam and coming from El Barrio makes Aimed ina, who is not runni ng for office, more qualified than Quayle to understand the enemy. "When I got to Vietnam and I saw these poor folks fighting for their own land," he once told me , noting that it reminded him of his relatives in the Puerto Rican countryside, "I knew they were the enemy. But from the poverty perspective, I kept saying, 'I ' ve been there, I know these people.'" An active member of the Vietnam Veterans of America, Almedina says he and many like him intend to keep the Quayle issue alive . "We are going to run into him from now until November . We have 58,000 people on the wall , dead, you know . It was bad enough that we had to go, but now you are saying it didn't mean much, that if you didn't go, you were lucky. Now you are changing the rules of the game . What happened to patriotism, loyalty , the stuff I learned in the books?" With irony in his voice, Almedina tells you blacks and Latinos should follow Quayle's example . "The Army now is black and Hispanic. If we don't join there is no Army . But lers all join the National Guard. If irs Quayle that sets such a good example,lers all join. They should have told me that 20 years ago." (Miguel Perez is a columnist with the New York Daily News . ) Jim Sage I, guest columnist 'Guarding' The Land The Republican vice presidential nomination of Indiana Sen. ban Quayle has focused the nation's attention on the National Guard of the late '60s. But when Hispani cs in the Southwe st recall that era, a different picture comes to mind. It is the picture of Nat ional Guardsmen combing the mountains of , Northern New Mexico in search of Reies Lopez Tixerina and members of his Alianza Federal de los Pueblos Ubres(Federal Alliance of Free City States) who had , on a June morning in 1967, attempted to make a citizen ' s arrest of the district attorney at the Rio Arriba County Courthouse in Tierra Amarilla . Though the picture has grown a little fuzzy, Hispanics in New Mexico will never forget the day General Jacob Jolly's tanks rolled into town . It was the day t hat c a tapulted Tixerina into the national spotlight, enlighten ing countless U.S. residents who until then had believed that only blacks were engaged in a struggle for their civil rights. In the Hispanic Southwest the strug gle was inevitably a "lucha" for the land as we ll . Ironically, the land the Guard " occupied" in its search for Tixerina had once been part of that same system of " mercedes, " or land grants, which the Alianza claimed had been stolen over the years by unscrupulous lawyers, ranchers and land developers. TIO SAM, THE LAND BARON The 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo which ended the war with Mexico had guaranteed the protection of the Spanish and Mexican land grants. But as waves of Anglo merchants and settlers came chugging into the Southwest on t he t racks of their" manifest destiny , " nearly all of the gra nts passed from the hands of the Hispanic farmers and ranchers who had l iv ed on them for generations into the c ontrol of such land barons as Thomas Catron and Tio Sam's National Forest system. The loss of the la nd meant the loss of a way of life , which was what Tixerina had been protesting in Tierra Amarilla when the National Guard was dispatched to bring him in. Yet, that was not the biggest ironyofthatsummerday in 1967 . Even more so was the fact that a disproportionately larger numbe r of young Hispanics were in Vietnam at that very moment, fighting for that same governme nt of checks and balances that had determined on balance , it was best to hold Tixerina and his group of land grant activists firmly in check. Tixerina eventually did time in federal prison . OCCUPATION UNTIL VINDICATION A friend from Northern New Mexico who served in the regular army at the time clearly recalls the conflicting emotions he felt the day he opened his copy of "Stars and Stripes," the official newspape r of the armed forces , and saw an article detailing Tixerina's cou rthouse raid . Those emotions are w i th him st ill , even as a man of his generation runs for vice preside nt and the land struggle goes on in New Mexico. Tierra Amarilla resident Amador Flores was recently rele ased on bond after spending several months in jail for refus in g to vacate the property he's lived on since the 1960s. The story is all too familiar. Title for the land was quieted in the name of an Arizona corporation which holds a legalis tic pedigre e to t he acreage . But it is Flores who holds the tradit i onal right to the land, Though Flores has had to agree to stay off the disputed property while his case is pending, activist and Vietnam vet Pedro Arechuleta and others vow to occupy the land until Flores has been vindicated by the courts. Though the turbulent era of the '60s has come back to haunt Dan Quayle, the legacy of the Tierra Amarilla courthouse raid has never . faded from the con scious ness of Hispanics in the Southwest. And whether Quayle stays or goes, the issue of the loss of the land grants will never go away . (Jim Sage/, of Espanola, N.M., is a journalist and author.) 4 Sept. 5, 1988 Hispanic link Wee kly Report

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COLLECTING MEDICAL SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: An article on Hispanics and other minorities in medical schools around the country and in Puerto Rico is included in The Journal of the American Medical Association . It is availab le for $5 . Specify the Aug. 26 issue when you contact: The Journal o f t he American Medical Association, Circulation Dept. , 535 Dearb orn St., Chicago, Ill . 60610 (312) 280-7168. COUNSELING CRISIS: To obtain a copyof"Nowhereto Turn: The Crisis in Middle School Guidance and Support, " an 80-page study focusing o n t he lack of guidance counselors in New York City's middle scho ols, send a check for $5 to the Educational Priorities Panel , 666 Broadway , 8th Floor , New York, N.Y. 10012. POVERTY I N THE UNITED STATES: "Money Income and Poverty Stat us in the United States" is a 51page report by the U.S. Census Bure au which details poverty by racial and ethnic group. To order (speci fy Series-P-60, Advance Report) , contact Superintendent of Documents , U . S . Government Printing Office, Washington , D . C . 20402 (202) 783-3238. (The cost was not available at time of publication. ) IMMIGRATION DESTINATIONS: To obtain a copy of American Demograph ics September issue containing arti cles on legal and undocumented immigrants, send $4 to Circulation Department, American D emographics , P .O. Box 58184, Boulder, Colo . 803228184. CALL FOR PA PERS : The National Association for Ethnic Studies invites interest ed persons to present papers, media productions o r panels on the theme • Ethnicity in America: Interdisciplinary Approaches. " For more infor mation contact Professor Johnella E. Butler , Department of American Et hnic Studies, G N 80 University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 98195 (206) 543-5401 . MIAMI'S TRA NSFORMATION: " How Miam1s Image Was Created " is a 16-page paper by Luis Botifoll on the role Cubans played in taking Miami from a resort in the 1950s to the international center it is today . For a copy s end $3 to University of Miami , Graduate School of Internationa l St udies , Publications, P . O . Box 24-8123, Coral Gables , Fla 331248123 (305) 284-6866. R ES EARCH GRA NTS: The Inter-University Program for Latino Research an d the Social Science Research Council will make grants from $20,000 to $35,000 available for public policy research on contemporary Hispanic issues. Application deadline is Jan. 16,1989. For more inf ormation call or write Raquel Ovryn Rivera, Staff Associate , SSRC, 605 T hird Ave., New York , N . Y . 10158 (212) 661-0280. Phoenix, Ariz. Sept. 8 , 9 CONNECTING ACTIVISTS RECEIVE AWARDS There were three Hispanics among five minority community organizers who we re awarded the first national Charles Bannerman Memorial Fellowships Aug . 23. The $10,000 fellowships were created to allow activists to take a sabbatical of three months or more from their jobs. The three are Diana Caballero , director of the Puerto Rican/Latino Education Roundtable in New York and a founder of the National Congress of Puerto Rican Rights, Gary Delgado, general director of the Cente r for Third World Organizing in Oakland, Calif., and Cecilia Rodriguez , director of La Mujer Obrera Program, an El Paso, Texas, organization of women who work in the textile industry. Applications and brochures for the 1989 fellowships are available from the Charles Bannerman Memorial Fellowship Program, c/o The Youth Project , 2335 18th St NW, Washington, D.C., 20009. TAKING ON THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY Upset with their overrepresentation in the front-line defense of the nation as compared with their nearly invisible role in the defense industry and its profits, a California coalition of eight minority groups proposed a plan last month that would offer more benefits to minorities from the $150 billion-a-year industry. T he Minority/Women ' s Coalition released its plan Aug. 18, voicing its displeasure with being excluded from a meeting earlier that day between congressmen , including California Reps. Augustus Hawkins and Matthew Martinez, and defense industry officials. In its plan , the coalition asks that Congress require defense contractors to set a 20% goal for subcontracts to women-and minority-owned firms. it also asks Congress to require the industry to disclose annually its philanthropic contributions, particularly those to organizations that serve minorities and women. Hawkins, chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, proposes that $80 million a year be raised from contractors to help educate women and minorities for defense jobs. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Dora Salinas, a public relations executive with the Southwestern Bell Telephone Co., receives an award from the San Antonio-based Centro del Barrio health and human service agency for hercontributio;,s to the agency and the community. . . Robert Pacheco, principal of Harlandale High School in San Antonio, receives the 1988 Luby Pr i ze for Educational Leadership . The $2,000 award goes to the best principal in Bexar County's 15 school districts ... Calendar THIS WEEK The Arizona Council of Hispanic Employment Pro gram Managers will hold a seminar focusing on the role educat i on plays in the f utur e of Hispanics . A golf tournament will be held in c onjun c tion with the seminar . Marcia Gallo (41 5) 621 2493 HEALTH CONFERENCE San Antonio Sept. 11-15 The Nat i onal Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations will hold a conference and training institute . Workshop topics will include AIDS research among Hispanics, Hispanic elderly and prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. Tom Blackburn-Rodriguez (202) 371 IMMIGRATION MEETING Washington, D .C. Sept. 7 The Task For ce on Immigration Reform will hold its third quarterl y meeting . Included will be legalization outreach reports and congressional updates , as well as a prese ntation of INS second stage regulations for lega l izat ion . Eliza May (20 2 ) 293-7550 HISPANIC BUSINESS Washingt on, D.C. S e pt. 7-11 The U .S. Hisp ani c Chamber of Commerce will hold its annual c onv e n t ion and trade fair . " H i spanic Business an d Its Political Voyage ' is the theme of the meet ing. Business development sessions will cover topics ra nging from international business to equa l opportunity. Glor i a Bessenbacher (816) 531 -6363 E MPLOYMENT MANAGERS Hispanic Link Weekl y Report Ray Tapia (602) 77 4-7161 e xt. 292 BUSINESS BANQUET Las Vegas, Nev . Sept 9 The Latin Chamber of Commerce will hold its si x th annual banquet to honor members from differ e nt fields. Elaine Wynn , director of the Golden Nugget Hotel, will talk about scholarships available for minority students through the Nevada Gaming and Hotel Foundation . Elena Aguirre (702) 385-7367 CIVIL RIGHTS CONFERENCE San Francisco Sept. 1 0 The American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California will e x amine in its annual meeting the ways in which economic inequality affects the struggle for civil rights and civil liberties. Demetria Martinez, reporter and recently acquitted sanctuary defendant from New Mexico , w i ll be among the speakers . There will also be a panel on the immigration law . Sept. 5 ,1988 COLOMBIAN FOLKLORE Hyattsville , Md . Sept 11 The Prince George's Countys Executive Office will hold a celebration of Hispanic culture featuring a performance by a Colombian folklore and musical group. Nuria Alvarez Grant (202) 952-4666 HERITAGE CELEBRATION Lansing , Mich . Sept. 11, 12 The Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs w i ll hold a Hispan i c Heritage Week celebration which will include Mexican folklorico dancing, a parade of attire from dWferent Latin American countries and an awards banquet honoring Hispanic achievers. Essie Solano (517) 373 5

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS DIRECTOR OF PARENT LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MALDEF, a national civil rights or ganization, seeks an individual who would direct new Hispanic Parent Leader ship Program . The one-year program will integrate MALDEF's expertise in leader ship development and legal education advocacy skills. If successful, the program may be extended. Requirements: advanced degree in education, law or related field; familiarity with public school education systems; knowledge of education issues and the Los Angeles Unified School District. Bilin gual in Spanish/English. Send resume and writing sample to Rose Calder6n, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11th Aoor, Los Angeles , Calif., 90014 by September 19, 1988. PROFESSOR CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, BAKERSFIELD -Department of Political Science seeks candidates with teaching and public service experience for a temporary position as Visiting Professor. The appointment could be either full-time or part-time for the Winter and/or Spring quarters commencing January 3, and ending June 15, 1989. Area most preferred: Communist and/or China and Japan. The teaching area could be American public law and policy for the right candidate . Minorities and women are strongly encouraged to apply. Salary and support are negot i able . Send vitae and names of three references to Dr. S. E. Clark, Chair, Dept. of Political Science, 9001 Stockda.le Hwy., Bakersfield, Calif. 933.11"10199 TEXAS TECH PRESIDENT TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY AND TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER The nomination of Dr . Lauro F . Cavazos to be the next Secretary of Education of the United States has created the need to recruit a new President for Texas Tech University and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. The Board of Regents and the President Search and Advisory Committees are at this time inviting applications and nominations for this position. Texas Tech i s one of the state ' s four major, comprehensive universities. With a student body of nearly 25 , 000 , the university's 2,000 faculty members teach in over 157 undergraduate and 168 graduate programs . The university and the Texas Tech University Health Science Center share an 1 , 800-acre campus reflecting Spanish Renaissance architecture . Academic ally diverse , the university has seven colleges, a Graduate School , and a School of Law . The Health Sciences Center has Schools of Medicine , Nurs ing, and Allied Health. Appropriate candidates should be leaders, educational diplomats with excellent zational skills, good fund raisers who enjoy public relations, and be articulate and persuasive in promoting the institution. The selected individual should be capable of decisiveness , yet able to build consensus ; and possess the ability to interact sensitively and effectively with students , faculty, Board , staff, alumni , government officials, and with other members of the external community . The Pres i dent is the chief executive officer of the university and is directly responsible to the Board of Regents for the programs and administration of the institution. Applications and nominations should be submitted to: Mr. R. William Funk Heidr i ck and Struggles ATIN : Texas Tech-HLWR 1999 Bryan, Suite 1919 Dallas, Texas 75201 Review of nominations and applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected . Texas Tech is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT C I -IAIRMAN . service for Hispanic pro . fessionals and students In the medii OppOrtunities for internships, en t ry-level and advanced posi t ions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media , English or Spanish language . Contact Jocelyn CIJrdova, National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228. Southwest Texas State Univers ity of San Marcos, Texas, inv i tes applications or nominations for the position of Chair of the Departmen t of Psychology . Applicants should qualify for a tenurable appointment at the rank of associate or professor , should show evidence of leadership and provide evidence of substantial achievement in teaching and research, as well as skills at interpersonal communicati on, program development and resource procure ment. Area of specialization is not a major consideration. The appointment will be effective Sep tember 1, 1989, and it is a 12-month appointment. SouthwestTexas State University enrolls approximately 20,000 students . The Department of Psychology enrolls approximately 4 , 000 students per semester with over 600 maj ors. The faculty includes 18 full-t ime and 7 part time members. A masters level program is under cons i deration . Applicants should submit a complete resume with a cover letter , a one page statement of leadership philosophy, and at least three references to Dr . Karen Brown , Chair , Search Com mittee, Institute of Social Work, Southwest Texas State University , San Marcos, Texas 78666. COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BEFORE JANUARY 15 , 1989. Southwest Texas State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer . Sept. 5 , 1988 JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Sub missions are welcome for Weekly Report's "guest columnisf' feature. Approx. 500 words. For write(s guidelines, send self-addressed , stamped envelope to : Guest Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report , 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D . C . 20005. PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for execut i ves and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ESl) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 90 cen. ts per word. D i splay rates : $45 per column inch . 1-iispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS LATINO PUBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHIPS FOR 1989 The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council announce their 1989 Grants Com petition for Public Polley Research on Contemporary Hispanic Issues. Grants will vary from small individual awards to support for collaborative research projects. Awards will range from $20,000 to $30,000 . Priority will be given to the following themes: children and youth at risk; culture and eco nomic behavior, political organization and empowerment national policy initiatives and their impact on Latino communities; and other city-specific themes. For more Information contact: Raquel Ovryn Rivera, Social Science Research Council, 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158 (212) 661. ATTORNEY Connecticut based Fortune 200 cor poration seeks lawyer with two years ex perience for new position in highly visible legal department. Will assist in prepara tion, review and negotiation of all legal and financial instruments & provide coun sel to erisure protection and compliance. Relocation assistance provided. Reply to: Six Landmark Square. Suite 400 Stamford, Connecticut 06901 Telephone (203) 359 Telex 4750130 HQ STAM Fax (203) 324 N P R 'S l A T I N f I l , J Hispanic Link Weekly Report Maintenance/Ft. Meade, MD Location 7rades & Crafts The National Security Agency, a U.S. government agency, has vacancies for the following positions In the Ft. Meade, Maryland area: BVAC Mechanics Elevator Mechanics Disbibution FacUlties Electricians (High Voltage) All applicants must be high school graduates.or have aGED. Salary In mid S20's (based on experience). AU candidates are subject to security clearance Investigation. (AUow 6 to 8 months for processing.) NSA offers you job security and job satltdaciiDn: • Stable, full-time work • Good working environment • Excellent benefits Including a retirement plan, health/IUe Insurance, paid vacation and free parking • Relocation reimbursement • Upward mobUlty To apply, please send resume, letter of Interest or SF-171. National Security Agency Attn: M322 (DCZ) . Fort Meade, MD 20755-6000 U.S. citizenship required for applicant and Immediate famUy members. An equal opportunity employer. FREE-LANCE RADIO JOURNALIST NPR's Latin File seeks ex perienced free-lance journalist from Los Angeles, Miami, and other communities with a sig nificant Hispanic population. Reporters will produce weekly features and news spots. Submit resume and audio tape to Judy Moore-Smith, NPR's Latin File, National Public Radio, 2025 M St., Washington, D.C. 20036. ASSISTANT EDITOR/WRITER HISPANIC magazine is looking for an assistant editor/writer. 3-4 years experience necessary. Send resume and clips to: Marfa Sharp, HISPANIC magazine, 111 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Suite 410, Washington, D.C. 20001. ' GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C. , provides: • Design • Typesetting e Lay out • Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483 . ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952. 7

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Arts & Entertainment Latino concentration. THEATER BOOK DUE: Scholar Yolanda J. Broyles-Gonzalez is . writing the first book-length study on California's El Teatro Campesino company. LATINOS LAUGH: A study by a New York advertising agency suggests that Hispanic television viewers prefer family-oriented comedies to other genres. The associate professor of Chicano studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship to work in the project. As a Ford Postdoctoral Fellow, she spent a year and a half at the Teatroarchival collection in San Juan Bautista, Calif. Out of the 20 shows most watched by Hispanics, 15 are sitcoms . Only one features a Latino in a lead roleNBC's Family Ties, which co-stars Tina Yothers. Another NBC sitcom on the list, 227, introduced a Hispanic family to its storyline during an episode that aired last season. The Gonzalez family-played by AlfonsoArau, Yvonne Wilder and Alex Ruiz-is expected to return with the show in the fall . For the book she will use archival material, as well as oral histories, personal accounts by the artists and production notes. Among the five shows ranked that were not comedies, only NBC's Miami Vice features Hispanic actors-Edward James Olmos and Saundra Santiago-in lead, Hispanic roles . MOVING ON: Lupe Serrano, a veteran ballerina of the American Ballet Theatre, joins the Washington Ballet in the fall as artistic associate and principal coach ... Argentine tennis superstar Guillermo Vilaswho is a published poet-is planning to record an album which should be out by next summer. . . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas The study, by BBDO, analyzed ratings in TV markets with heavy Media Report NEWSPAPER HIRING SURVEY: A survey released Aug . 24 by the American New& paper Publishers Association that showed minority staffing on daily newspapers is now nearing population parity in most departments was roundly criticized by Hispanic and other journalists as distorted. A press release distributed by ANPA at a St. Louis meeting of the National Association of Black Journalists showed that Hispanics, b lack s and Asians comprise 16% of the nation's newspaper employees and 1 0% of their news ro om staffs. The percentages included clerical and administrative positions. In the newsroom, it said blacks account for 6%, Hispanics 3%, Asian Americans 1% and Na tive Americans less than one-half of 1% of This differs dramatically from the 1988 report of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, which said blacks are 3.9% and Hispanics 1.9% of newspersons employ ed by daily newspapers. ASNE's figures tor Asians and American Indians were on par HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publisher. Hector E r icksen Mendoza Editor. F e li x P erez Reporting : Antonio Mejia9-Rentas, Darryl Lynette F igueroa, Sophia Nieves. : Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila . Eiias No portion of Hi spa nic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rate s 90 cents per word. D isplay ads are $45 per column in c h . Ads placed b y Tuesday will run in We ekly Report mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 8 with ANPA's. The ANPA report said minorities are most likely to be found in general management (22%), production (19%) and circulation (19%) departments. Similar proportions also apply to Hispanics . ANPA noted that minorities constitute 21% of the nation's work force. NEWSPAPER INDlJSTRY STAFFING Latinos Blacks General Mngmnt. 10% 15% Circulation 5 12 Production 5 13 Acctng/Finance/lnfo. Srvcs. 5 10 Editorial 3 6 Advertising 3 9 Mrktng./Promo./Research 3 6 Source : American Newspaper Publishers Association . (Asians accounted for between 1% and 2% in all categories and Nati ve Americans for between less than one-half of 1% and 1%.) Although the ANPA survey of 546 news papers was commended as the first attempt to study minority hiring in all newspaper departments, it was called misleading by officials of the National Association of Hi& panic Journalists as well as by ANPA's Task Force on Minorities. The groups_ noted that the inclusion of minorities working in service positions skewed the findings in all categories, most particularly in the general management division where publishers were counted along with janitors and clerks. Within most divisions. the greatest number of Hispanics were found in service/ clerical positions. NAHJ President and Newsday reporter Evelyn Hernandez called the study"dangerous" in its distortion. "For an industry that places so much emphasis on accuracy and fairness. this is really alarming." ANPA called management's view of its efforts to increase minority hiring positive. Four out of 10 newspapers were found to have active affirmative action programs; their most often identified activity was placing ads for minorities in their own classified sections. In its conclusion, ANPA interpreted the efforts as "excellent'' and emphasized that they were voluntary . Hernandez was perplexed by such an assessment. She said, "If you interpreted that in terms of a school grade, that would be 40%-sounds like an F to me." Instead, she described increasing compla cency in the news industry and urged that more creative programs be developed. -Darry/Lynette Figueroa .. /1\AR<.Iil 25th Hispanic Link Weekly Report