Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, September 12, 1988

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, September 12, 1988
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News
Lupe De La Cruz, 37, a district administrative assistant for Rep. Esteban Torres of California, takes a leave of absence to become the California field director for the Dukakis/Bentsen campaign. . . Cuban American F6lix Rodriguez, a former CIA operative who came to the public forefront because of his involvement in the Iran-Contra scandal and his close ties to Vice President George Bush, admits to harboring fugitive Luis Posada Carriles. Posada Carriles was charged with the 1976 bombing of a Cuban passenger plane in which 73 people died... New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Green hires Dolores Fernandez, after much pressure from local Hispanic groups, as his deputy chancellor for instruction... Completing his
three-day fast, actor Edward James Olmos passes the wooden cross worn by United Farm Workers President Cesar Chdvez during his 36-day fast to actor Emilio Estevez. Estevez fasted for three days. He is the son of Martin Sheen, who had fasted as part of the same chain... The White House announces that Los Angeles teacher Jaime Escalante will receive its National Hispanic Heritage Week Education Award and that Orlando A.B., a Colombia-born artist working in Laguna Beach, Calif., and Hawaii^ will get its Heritage Week Award for Achievement in the Visual Arts... A federal jury in Los Angeles awards to Asmires Ramirez, 22, $450,000 in damages because of two gunshot wounds he received from two Los Angeles County sheriffs deputies when they stormed his garage because of reported gunfire. The jury felt the deputies used excessive force against the forklift operator...

Latinos Increase to 19.4 Million
Education of Workers Rises But Still Lagging
In 1988 more Hispanics in the work force completed four or more years of college, but they still lag behind blacks and Anglos in the area of educational attainment, according to Department of Labor figures released Aug. 29. Thirteen percent of Latino workers have completed at least four years of college, up from 9% in 1978, while 15% of black workers and 26% of Anglos have.
The data drawn from the Current Population Survey taken in March also found that the percentage of high school dropouts among the labor force dropped in the past 10 years for all ethnic groups Among Hispanic workers, it fell from 52% to 40%, for blacks from 40% to 23%, and for Anglos from 14% to 8%.
HISPANIC UNEMPLOYMENT
1978 1988
Dropouts 8.5% 10.3%
High School Grads 5.7 6.0
1-3 Yrs. College 4.9 3.5
College Grads 7.3 2.2
LA Fire Dept Picks Rojo
Chicano Reynaldo Rojo, 53, became the highest-ran king Hispanic in the Los Angeles Fire Department with his Aug. 31 appointment as deputy fire chief. It is the second highest position in one of the country's largest fire departments.
Rojo, a 30-year veteran of the department, is now responsible for most of a $200 million budget and for direct supervision of 250 employees His duties include recruitment and training of firefighters and paramedics, establishment of their communication networks and equipment supply to Los Angeles’ 110 fire stations.
The San Antonio native shares the title with three others who report directly to Fire Chief Donald Manning.
CORRECTION
The Sept. 5 issue of Weekly Report listed an incorrect date for the independence day of Costa Rica, Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua in its “Leaders See More Latino Unity" story. The date should have been Sept. 15.
There are 19.4 million Hispanics living on the mainland United States this year- a 34% increase from 1980 - reports a Census Bureau survey released Sept. 7. The growth rate is nearly five times greater than the 7% rate for the rest of the population.
Hispanics make up 8.1% of the United States’ 241 million residents, compared with 6.5% in 1980, the bureau says. With 3.28 million additional Latinos living in the U.S. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Hispanic percentage in the U.S. population increases to 9.4%.
The survey, “The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1988,” counts 640,000 more mainland Hispanics in March 1988 than a year earlier. Half of the growth is due to immigration, it says.
Mexican Americans now number 12.1 million and comprise 62% of all U.S. mainland Hispanics. Puerto Ricans, at 2.5 million, are next, accounting for nearly 13% of all mainland Lati nos. H ispanics of Central or South American origin, combined into one category for the survey, make up 11.5%. They are followed by 1 million Cuban Americans, making up 5%.
California has the largest group of Hispanics. One of every three Latinos lives there. Texas and California alone are home to 55% of the nation’s Hispanics.
In 1987, the survey says, 26% of the nation’s 7 million Hispanic families lived below the poverty line ($11,611 for a family of four). Ten percent of non-Hispanic families fell below the line.
Puerto Ricans by far had the most families,
253,000, or 38%, living below the poverty line. Cuban Americans had the smallest number of families, 43,000, or 13.8%, below the poverty line.
As they have in the past, Puerto Ricans in 1988 fared the worst in several categories. Among those are that they had the highest unemployment rate (10.5%) and the greatest proportion of families(44%) headed by single females.
Overall, the proportion of Hispanic families headed by married couples grew from 21.5% in 1982, or795,500 families, to 23.4%, or 1.07 million.
In the area of education, Hispanics made some gains but continue to trail non- H ispanics. Fifty-one percent of Hispanics 25 years old and over completed four years of high school or more and 10% had four or more years of college, reports the survey. The non-Hispanic rates were 78% and 21%, respectively.
The median income of the Hispanic family did rise to $20,310 in 1987, the latest data available, but it did not keep pace with the 3.7% increase in consumer prices. Puerto Rican families had the lowest median income at $15,190. The median income for non-Hispanic families was $31,610.
The median Hispanic age rose slightly in 1988, from 25.1 to 25.5. Indeed, 49% of ail Hispanics are 29 years old or younger. Conversely, the median age for non-Hispanics in 1988, says the survey, is 32.2. Cuban Americans are the oldest Hispanic subgroup at 38.7 years. At 23.9 years, Mexican Americans afe the youngest _ F6lix p6rez
HISPANIC POPULATION GROWTH: 1980-1988
(Numbers In Thousands)
1988 1987 1985 1982 1980
Mexican 12,110 11,762 10,269 y9,642 8,740
Puerto Rican 2,471 2,284 2,562 2,051 2,014
Cuban 1,035 1,017 1,036 950 803
Central, South American 2,242 2,139 1,722 1,523— >3,051
Other Hispanic 1,573 1,588 1,350 1,198—
Total Hispanic** 19,431 18,790 16,940 15,364 14,609
* The 1980 Census did not separate Central, South American from Other Hispanic.
** The total does not include the 3.28 million people living in Puerto Rico as of 1987. Source: U.S Census Bureau’s “The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1988"


Puerto Rico Politicians Split Over Minimum Wage Bill
A provision contained in Sen. Edward Kennedy’s (D-Mass.) minimum wage bill that would deny wage increases to some workers in Puerto Rico pits island politicians against one another and Kennedy against Sen. Paul Simon (D-lll.), say several Capitol Hill sources.
The legislation, which is ready for a Senate floor vote, would increase the minimum wage to $4.65 over three years, but Puerto Rico industries could appeal for an exemption to a Minimum Wage Board created by the amendment.
Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Herndndez-Col6n and non-voting Puerto Rico Congressman
Jaime Fuster support the exemption, while San Juan Mayor Baltazar Corrada del Rio opposes it Corrada is running against Hern6ndez-Col6n for the governor's seat this November.
Some Puerto Rican officials were concerned that the bill would allow U.S. companies with subsidiaries on the island to skirt higher pay scales But Congressman Foster's office said those companies already pay more than the new minimum wage.
Mayor Cprrada’s Washington, D.C., representative, Raul Torres concurred. He said, “This is a management vs labor issue just as it is here on the mainland. Sen-
ator Kennedy is on the labor side here but for management there.”
The chances for a floor vote are dim according to a Kennedy legislative analyst who said it may be filibustered. Congress will adjourn Oct. 5.
If the bill does reach the floor, however, Simon will seek an amendment to the Puerto Rico exemption, as he did when it was in committee, said his labor analyst Judy White.
Said another Corrada representative, Walter Davila, “We achieved wage parity in 1981 and we don’t want to turn back the clock.” - Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Bills Address Poverty Along Border
Along the U.S.- Mexico border, towns called colonias house more than a million Hispanics living mostly below the poverty level without hospitals or schools water or sewage facilities testified Rep. E.“Kika” de la Garza(D-Texas) at a Sept. 7 hearing before the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development.
Subcommittee Chairperson Rep. Henry Gonzdlez (D-Texas) also heard testimony from Rep. Ron Coleman (D-Texas), who was praised by Gonz&lez, De la Garza, and subcommittee member Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), for introducing the first federal bills addressing
Nobel Laureate, 77, Dies
Nobel Prize-winning physicist Luis Alvarez, 77, who was a member of the Manhattan Project which built the first atomic bomb, died of cancer Aug. 31 at his Berkeley, Calif., home.
The San Francisco native, born June 13, 1911, worked most of his professional life at the University of California at Berkeley, where he was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1968 for discovering subatomic particles.
While briefly at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology during World War II, Alvarez invented the widely used method of landing aircraft in poor visibility with the aid of radar beams.
Alvarez sat in a plane behind the bomber that dropped the A-bomb on Hiroshima in 1945.
In 1963, he assisted the Warren Commission in reporting on the assassination of President John Kennedy, concluding through the principles of physics that one person could have fired all the shots that killed Kennedy and wounded Texas Gov. John Connally.
Alvarez is survived by his wife and four children, including a geologist son, Walter, who helped him develop the theory that an asteroid collision with the earth caused it to cool, thereby bringing the extinction of dinosaurs.
Alvarez received his B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.
the issue.
One would establish a Border Regional Commission composed of the four governors in affected states - Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas- as well as congressional and federal representatives to review and authorize funds for colonias programs. A similar Senate bill was introduced in May by Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas), Democratic vice presidential nominee.
Coleman’s auxiliary legislation would supply $15.6 million for short-term relief to the border towns and is considered more likely to reach the floor before the 100th Congress ends Oct. 5.
According to Coleman, nearly2 million people live in these areas. He said they are the most economically depressed sections of the country. In El Paso alone, he cited, 28,000 people do not have water in their homes while 53,000 live without sewage facilities.
De la Garza, chairperson of the Committee on Agriculture, explained that colonias primarily do not fall underthe jurisdictions covered by existing federal.farm and housing programs and are consequently neglected.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Designers Help Students
Hispanic Designers Inc. expects to gross about $300,000 through its fashion show in Washington, D.C., Sept 15, most to go toward scholarship programs for Latino students.
Since its inception in 1984, gross receipts have climbed from $55,000 the first year.
The fashion show exhibits the work of established Latino designers, such as Adolfo, but also draws students into the spotlight. Winners of the Rising Star Award are students preparing to graduate. First, second and third place winners will receive scholarships. In part because of the national exposure he has received, Estevan Ramos, the 1987 winner, is launching his own clothing line, while Ofelia Montejano, this year's Rising Star, has been featured in publications such as “Women’s Wear Daily."
Montejano and Ramos were both students at the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles, which has a 17% Hispanic enrollment
Chicanos Less Likely to Smoke Than Others
Mexican Americans are less likely to smoke than blacks and Anglos and when they do, smoke fewercigarettes, according toa report published in the July/August issue of Public Health Reports.
Among males, researchers found that Mexican smokers smoked2 1/2 fewercigarettes than blacks and one-half pack fewer than Anglos.
Female Mexican Americans who smoke start later than women of other ethnic groups - generally after age 19 or 20. According to authors Richard Rogers and John Crank, Mexican American women smoke an average of nine cigarettes per day, compared with 13 per day for black women and 20 for whites.
In the report, based on the annual National Health Interview Survey, Rogers and Crank conclude the low rate of smoking among Mexican American women can be attributed to “a combination of factors, including peer influence, a lack of commercial advertising aimed at this group, and non-smoking family and community role models.”
Family Tenants Win Big
Seventy families, more than 90% of them Hispanic, will receive $2.5 million, the largest settlement ever awarded in a California landlord-tenant suit The tenants of a Los Angeles skid row building will receive average payments of $30,000 to$35,000 asa result of a 1985 lawsuit charging the landlord with refusing to correct health and safety hazards ranging from rats to poor security.
Following the Aug. 29 settlement announcement, the attorney for primary defendant Beverly Hills physician Martin Avol, pointed out that the settlement was not an admission of guilt. Meanwhile, tenants of the rat-and-roach infested building were making plans to buy homes or businesses.
Avol is a convicted slumlord, the first in Los Angeles to be sentenced to spend time in one of his own apartment buildings. In the past he has also served 55 days of a nine-month sentence after failing to correct slum conditions at three other buildings.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Jose Antonio Burciaga, guest columnist
Invisible Contributions
This is the last year we’ll celebrate Hispanic Heritage Week.
In 1989, by proclamation of the Congress and President Reagan, the nation will celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. With some two dozen countries feeding Latino food, music, philosophy, language, beautiful bodies and other cultural assets into los Estados Unidos, I guess our leaders figured it was too much to cram into a week.
That this is an election year had absolutely nothing to do with it
Personally, I appreciate the gesture. As our population and influence increase, maybe there’s a Hispanic Heritage Quarter in our future. Or even a Hispanic Heritage Fiscal Year.
It’s progress. A few years ago, a presidential candidate would never claim Dubliclv that he had a few little “brown ones” in his family.
They would have been kept out of sight, like beer-guzzling brothers and crazy cousins.
Now Mexican and Central American immigrants are said to be too competitive -taking jobs away from deserving “Americans.”
(You’ve seen all those long, long lines of “Americans” seeking employment as dishwashers and maids and weed-pullers.
WE TAKE CREDIT FOR ENGLISH ONLY
But there are some people who still don’t believe that Hispanics have contributed anything of significance to the United States. Not so. It’s just that many of our contributions are almost invisible.
First of all, we mejicanos contributed a lot of land - Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, California, and part of Wyoming and Colorado.
Lest we forget, most Latinos are Indo-Hispanics, a term I prefer over the federal government’s catch-all “Hispanic.” Our North American Indian brothers and sisters contributed even more land, involuntary though it was.
Our contribution to the Queen’s English is also worthy of note. What word did English-speakers use before macho was introduced?
We can also take credit for the English-Only movement. Without the popularity of Spanish, English monolinguals wouldn’t feel so threatened.
Then there are the indigenous foods contributed by Mexicans, such as nachos, not to be confused with machos. They are one of many corn food items. Also, there’s popcorn and corn chips, to say nothing of gasohol and corn liquor.
SPICING UP BASEBALL
Other indigenous foods include potatoes, tomatoes, avocados, chiles, vanilla, chocolate, coffee and peanuts. Baseball games without peanuts, popcorn and players like Fernando Valenzuela and Keith Hernandez are boring. Now Cuba and Puerto Rico have spiced things up with Jos6 Canseco and Benito Santiago.
And, after seven Septembers of telling Hispanics who visited the White House once a year to hear his Hispanic Heritage Week promise, “Mi casa es su casa,” President Reagan is actually going to let one stay more than a couple hours. He is bringing former Texas Tech President Lauro Cavazos into his capital-C Cabinet. (He already had some arranging the crystal in his small-C cabinet.)
We recognize that the appointment of Cavazos is just a Republican campaign tactic to get the Hispanic vote.
But having a Latino as U.S. Secretary of Education, if only for a couple of months, sends another signal that we do have something to contribute.
The first signal, in case you weren’t paying attention, was when all the fast-food hamburger joints added nachos and tacos to their menus.
(Jose Antonio Burciaga, of Stanford, Calif., is an artist and writer, whose second book, “Weedee Peepo,” was just published by Pan-American University Press, Edinburg, Texas.)
Sin Pelos en la lengua
LATINO COLUMNISTS: While other New York City dailies stand aloof from the 1.8 million Hispanics who inhabit that metropolis, The New York Daily News has two Latinos, Miguel P6rez and Juan Gonzdlez, who share their' views regularly with the tabloid’s 1.3 million readers.
Gonzalez produces two weekly opinion columns on Hispanic or general issues. Perez writes one and covers the city’s Latino cultural action.
Perez, 38, is a native of Cuba. He came to the United States at age 11, grew up and attended college in Miami, and earned his professional reporting credentials at The Miami Herald. In July 1978, he joined The New York Daily News as a reporter.He began his Hispanic-focus opinion column in 1981.
Gonzalez, a 40-year-old native New Yorker of Puerto Rican heritage, joined the Daily News last January. As a youth, he joined the Young Lords and tried a few trades - printing pressman and clothing presser among them - before gaining a press credential as a reporter with the Philadelphia Daily News in 1978. For several years, he wrote a weekly opinion column.
Together they give their readers Hispanic perspectives badly lacking in other New York English-language media - as well as dailies across the country.
Columns written by each on Sept. 1 illustrate their importance to the New York community. j
On that day Miguel wrote about an old Miami buddy, Charles G6mez, who went on to cover Central America for CBS-TV and now works at New York’s Channel 9. Reviewing Gomez’s new autobiographical play, “Bang Bang Blues,” he observed:
“Through Rick (the protagonist) and his co-workers in a network newsroom in Managua, Chuck has written an insightful indictment of how the networks cover Latin America.. Like Chuck, Rick was more daring than others to get the‘Bang Bang’ if necessary, but he was immediately replaced by white, superstar reporters when the bang bang got loud and the story got hot.
“The real-life Chuck was the first CBS correspondent to report from the Malvinas/Falklands War. ‘And then they sent Bob Schieffer down and I was relegated to being a translator,’ he says.
‘It kept happening over and over again. When the stories got really big, they would bring in someone from New York who would not know Spanish and would not know the region...”
In his column, Gonz&lez, long a proponent of black-Hispanic coalitions, took on Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow Coalition.
Jackson’s meeting with Mayor Ed Koch and Gov. Mario Cuomo, he pointed out, “included four black leaders..., but no leaders from the Latino, Asian or white communities that had worked so hard for him in April.”
Then, Gonzalez added, Jackson endorsed Robert Johnson, “who is black and who is a last-minute candidate of the corrupt Bronx machine for the Bronx district attorney’s race, despite there being an equally qualified and reform-minded Puerto Rican, Sal Collazo...
“Third, he attended a hastily called black-Latino unity rally (where) a half dozen Puerto Rican officials were summoned like errand boys to... have their pictures taken with Jackson, but not to meet and discuss the future of the Rainbow.”
Latinos, Gonzalez warned, will never “exchange a white oppressive structure for one controlled by bourgeois black leaders who are as distant from the black and Latino masses as a BMW is from a three-speed bike.”
LEAKY LOGIC?: Reacting to a complairit of editors that they can’t cover minority communities until they have minorities on their staffs, Ernie Sotomayor, Dallas Times Herald associate editor, tells us: “With that logic, you shouldn’t be able to cover the Democratic party if you’re not a Democrat.”
- Kay Barbaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sept 12,1988
3


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
SMOKING AMONG MEXICAN AMERICANS: The July/August issue of Public Health Reports contains an article which concludes that Mexican Americans smoke less than blacks or whites. For a copy, send $4.75 to Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
IMMIGRATION CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS: “In Defense of the Alien, Volume X” is a 250-page book on the proceedings of the 1987 National Legal Conference on Immigration and Refugee Policy focusing on the immigration act and its aftermath. To obtain a copy, send $14.95 to Center for Migration Studies, 209 Flagg Place, Staten Island, N.Y. 10304(718)351-8800.
STUDENT BORROWING IN CALIF.: A report on student participation in educational loan programs examines the characteristics of California’s student borrowers’ ethnicity and race and their level of indebtedness, along with issues relating to loan repayment and default. The 80-page report was prepared by the California Student Aid Commission. For a free copy write to CSAC, 1515 S St, North Building, Suite 500, P.O. Box 942845, Sacramento, Calif. 94245-0845.
LATINO MUSEUM RECEIVES HELP The California Museum of Latino History received Sept. 6 a $10,000 donation from Eastman Kodak Co. to help the museum establish the nation’s first permanent collection showcasing U.S. Latino achievements.
The gift was made a day before the museum opened a photograph exhibit “The Latino Olympians: A History of Latin American Involvement in the Olympic Games 1896-1988,” as part of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s annual convention in Washington, D.C.
An institution without walls, the California Museum of Latino History is attempting to locate additional funding.
For further information contact Antonio Rios- Bustamante, museum director, at P.O. Box 241795, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024 (213) 479-8793.
OTHER FACE, OTHER PLACE Arnold Torres, the national executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens from 1979-85, rejoins the organization in Washington, D.C., on a part-time basis as its director of public policy...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HERITAGE KICKOFF Washington, D.C. Sept 12 The Washington, D.C., Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers will hold ceremonies to commemorate National Hispanic Heritage Week. Rita Rodriguez, adirectorof the Export/lmport Bank will speak. This is one of 40 activities sponsored by council members working for federal departments and agencies. For specifics on other activities, call the number below.
Ana Villagra (202) 343-3098
STUDENT LEADERSHIP Washington, D.C. Sept. 12 Hispanic high school and college students will be introduced to skills necessary to start at-risk retention programs at their schools during the fourth annual National Hispanic Students Network Symposium. Students will also hear speakers such as Sen. Orrin Hatch, Rep. Esteban Torres and Katherine Ortega, secretary of the treasury.
Sandra Niebla (202) 293-0723
CHILDCARE Washington, D.C. Sept. 13 A conference on Hispanics and child care will be held by the Hispanic Heritage Committee of the Employment and Training Administration, Department of Labor. Among the topics to be addressed will be alternatives for parents seeking child care and help for people who want to start their own child care business.
Nida Cruz (202) 535-0517
HISPANIC CAUCUS
Washington, D.C. Sept. 13
The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute will
hold its 11 th annual dinner. The theme will be “The
Future - Education, Culture and Progress.”
Linda Chavez (202) 543-1771
HERITAGE BANQUET Alamos, N.M. Sept. 13
Club Amistad yCultura Image de Los Alamos and the Mexican American Engineering Society will hold a banquet honoring National Hispanic Heritage Week.
Keynote speaker will be TomCh&vez, directorof the Palace of the Governors museum.
Ramona Vigil (505) 662-3241
COLUMBUS AND HISPANICS Washington, D.C. Sept 13,14 The Library of Congress will hold a screening of the film “Stand and Deliver” followed by a lecture by Jaime Escalante the teacher whose accomplishments are chronicled in the movie. A program will also be offered titled “The Christopher Columbus Quincentenary 1492-1992: Perspective on Hispanic America” which will include a presentation by Joseph S&nchez, director of the Spanish Colonial Research Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. Carmen M6ndez (202) 287-5620
CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE Miami. Sept. 14-17
Delegations from chambers of commerce from Latin American countries and the United States will meet during the Hemispheric Congress of Latin Chambers of Commerce and Industry. During the congress an exhibition of non-traditional products from Latin America and the Caribbean will be held, as well as an exhibition spotlighting Florida export products. Waldo Castro-Molleda (305) 642-3870
HISPANIC DESIGNERS Washington, D.C. Sept. 15 Established designers such as Carolina Herrera, Adolfo, Oscar de la Renta and Fernando Pefta will join rising stars of the fashion industry in exhibiting their work at the Hispanic Designers Gala Fashion Show and Benefit.
Penny Harrison (202) 822-7895
BAR ASSOCIATION CONVENTION Albuquerque, N.M. Sept. 15-18 Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy will address members of the Hispanic National Bar Association’s convention during a reception honoring Hispanic judges. Seminar topics include computers in the law office, developing minority law firms and factors affecting immigration and the effectiveness of employer sanctions.
Mercedes Fern&ndez (505) 983-6686
SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET Los Angeles Sept. 16
The California Chicano News Media Association will hold a scholarship banquet. Proceeds will be used to award scholarships to Latino students pursuing Sept. 12,1988
careers in journalism.
Lourdes Martinez (213) 743-7158
EMPLOYMENT LAW CONFERENCE San Jose, Calif. Sept 16
The Bay Area Chapter of the Personnel Management Association of Aztlan and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission will hold a conference providing an opportunity for participants to explore major employment law issues, including the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and discrimination on the basis of sex, race and national origin.
Javier P6rez (408) 277-4204
LAW SCHOOL INFORMATION New York Sept. 16,17
The School Admission Services of the Law School Admission Council/Law School Admission Services will sponsor a forum to inform minorities and older adults about evaluating law schools and taking the Law School Admission Test. Representatives from more than 100 schools will be on hand.
Sharon Kemble (215) 968-1204
EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM San Antonio Sept. 16-18
The San Antonio Association of Hispanic Journalists and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Region 5, are sponsoring a symposium designed to look at solutions for high illiteracy and dropout rates. Lauro Cavazos, U.S. Education Secretary designate, has been invited to speak. A debate will be held between Linda Chdvez, president of U.S. English, and Rub6n Bonilla, counsel for the League of United Latin American Citizens.
Dino Chiecchi (512) 225-7411
LULAC10K RUN
Washington, D.C. Sept. 17
The League of United Latin American Citizens will
sponsors 10K run and a3K run to raise money for
The Family Place, a non-profit center in Washington,
D.C., providing services to predominantly Hispanic
pregnant women and their families
Maria Elena Orrego (202) 265-0149
CHILDREN’S FILMS
Washington, D.C. Sept. 17
To celebrate Hispanic Heritage Week, the Mount
Pleasant Branch of the District of Columbia Library
will screen children’s films in Spanish.
Kay Radar (202) 727-1361
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
------------ = /-------------------------------------------
ASSISTANT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR MARKETING
Duties: Teaching, research and service to enhance the Marketing Department at the University.
Qualifications: Ph.D. in Marketing required, prior college teaching experience or equivalent business experience required. Evidence of strong scholarly track record essential. A willingness to provide university/community service and ability to teach and conduct research studies.
Deadline Date: Materials must be received by October 31,1988 for consideration. Start Date: January 19,1989 start preferred, September 1989 if necessary.
Letter of interests, detailed resume and three letters of reference required. Please send application material to:
Chairman—Selection Committee Position #88014 310 King Hall
EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY Ypsilanti, Ml 48197
WE TAKE PRIDE IN THE PURSUIT OF OUR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OBJECTIVES AND ENCOURAGE QUALIFIED WOMEN AND MINORITIES TO CONSIDER THIS OPPORTUNITY. MULTICULTURAL EXPERIENCE DESIRED.
HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
A twenty-one member department offering B.S. and M.S. degrees is re-opening search for an individual with successful administrative experience, a broad biology background, and preferably computer experience. A Ph.D. in the Biological Sciences and 5 years of college teaching experience are required. Eastern Michigan University, a state university with an enrollment of 23,000 students, is located in Southeastern Michigan. A cover letter, a vitae, and 3 letters of recommendation must be received by December 28,1988. Send materials to: Position DH-B, P.O. Box 920 - Human Resources, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Ml 48197.
We take pride in the pursuit of our affirmative action objectives and encourage qualified women and minorities to consider this opportunity.
Eastern Michigan University
Z
ELDERLY ASSOCIATION
The following positions are with the National Association For Hispanic Elder-ly/Asociacion Nacional Pro Personas Mayores:
PROJECT MONITOR - For employment program for national organization. Excellent written and verbal communication skills. Requires B.A. in public administration or social sciences; bilingual preferred. Position based in Los Angeles; must be willing to travel.
COORDINATOR/LIAISON - National organization seeks self-starter to coordinate employment program at its D.C. office and act as liaison with governmental agencies as requested. Requires BA in social sciences or public administration; excellent interpersonal and organization skills; bilingual.
Send resum6 with salary history: President, ANPPM, 2727 W. Sixth St., Suite 270, Los Angeles, Calif. 90057 (213) 487-1922.
STATE POLICY ANALYST (1 year internship)
MALDEF, a national civil rights organization, seeks an individual who would research key state policy issues and monitor bills in the Texas Legislature affecting Hispanics. The State Policy Analyst will commute from the San Antonio area to the Texas Legislature in Austin.
Required: Legal training or graduate school equivalence in social science, political science, public administration or public policy; familiarity with the state legislative process and key Hispanic Issues; excellent oral and written communications skills; bilingual in Spanish/English preferred; and must have own automobile to commute between San Antonio and Austin.
Send resume and writing sample to: Barbara Aguirre, MALDEF, The Commerce Building, LTD, 314 E. Commerce St., Suite 200, San Antonio, Texas 78205 by 9/26/88.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Statewide community-based advocacy research and planning organization seeks Executive Director. Proven experience in fund raising, program and staff development, planning and administration required. Graduate degree in relevant field required, and Spanish/English bilingual ability preferred. Competitive salary.
Send resum6, cover letter and three letters of recommendation by 9/26 to: Search Committee, Hispanic Office of Planning and Evaluation, 55 Dimock St., Boston, Mass. 02119.
-----------------------7-------------
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MD., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sept. 12, 1988


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
GIRL SCOUTS OF THE USA
GIRL SCOUTS OF THE U.S.A. is expanding its NEW YORK headquarters staff creating the following job opportunities:
PERSONNEL CONSULTANTS
Provide technical assistance to outbased locations in the areas of AA/EOE planning, performance management, recruitment, legislation, etc... Candidate should have at least 3-5 years solid generalist background, ability to train & interface with all levels of management. Travel approx. 40-50%. Salary $30’s.
MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS
Provide technical assistance to outbased locations in the total management function, including needs identification and problem solving. Candidates should have at least 5 years broad management experience, knowledge of strategic & tactical planning, financial operations and fund development. Travel approx. 75%. Salary to low $40’s.
INNOVATIVE PROJECT DIRECTORS
(California/New York location — 2 yr. assigment.)
Design and implement field testing of pilot projects to extend Girl Scouting to racial/ethnic populations. Candidates must be creative, able to design & direct project, have supervisory skills as well as cultural awareness to needs of diverse groups. Mobility a must. Salary $30’s.
LAND USE PLANNING CONSULTANT Provide on-site consulting services and technical assistance in areas of long-range planning, property development & maintenance, and overall property management. Candidates should have degree in Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning or equivalent with min. 3-5 yrs. infield. Travel approx. 40-50%. Salary hi-$30’s.
For immediate consideration, send resume to: Janice Jacobs, Senior Employment Specialist Girl Scouts of the U.S.A.
830 Third Avenue New York, N.Y. 10016 AA/EOE M/F/H/V
TEXAS TECH
PRESIDENT
TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY AND TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER
The nomination of Dr. Lauro F. Cavazos to be the next Secretary of Education of the United States has created the need to recruit a new President for Texas Tech University and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. The Board of Regents and the President Search and Advisory Committees are at this time inviting applications and nominations for this position.
Texas Tech is one of the state’s four major, comprehensive universities. With a student body of nearly25,000, the university's2,000 faculty members teach in over 157 undergraduate and 168 graduate programs. The university and the Texas Tech University Health Science Center share an 1,800 acre campus reflecting Spanish Renaissance architecture. Academic* i ally diverse, the university has seven colleges, a Graduate School, and a School of Law. The
Health Sciences Center has Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health.
Appropriate candidates should be leaders, educational diplomats with excellent organizational skills, good fund raisers who enjoy public relations, and be articulate and | persuasive in promoting the institution. The selected individual should be capable of decisiveness, yet able to build consensus; and possess the ability to interact sensitively and effectively with students, faculty, Board, staff, alumni, government officials, and with other members of the external community.
The President is the chief executive officer of the university and is directly responsible to the Board of Regents for the programs and administration of the institution.
Applications and nominations should be submitted to:
Mr. R. William Funk Heidrick and Struggles ATTN: Texas Tech-HLWR 1999 Bryan, Suite 1919 „ Dallas, Texas 75201
Review of nominations and applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected.
Texas Tech is an Affirmative Action,
Equal Opportunity Employer
MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST
Ann. #1506-9A-DHS Salary: $33,446-$39,210
Responsible administrative work in the Arlington County Department of Human Services, Division of Mental Health. Provides administrative assistance to Division Director; coordinate budget and personnel activities; manages special projects and supervises clerical staff.
Requires use and management of automated management systems. Flexibility, strong management and communications skills are critical. Requires BS and three years progressively responsible experience in administration, financial and personnel management including supervisory experience.
Preference may be given to applicants with experience in a) automatic management systems, b) state/.local government, c) human services, d) hands-on technical experience in budget/personnel administration and/or e) a MS in related field.
All applicants must submit an official Ar-lington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 PM on SEPTEMBER 22, 1988. To request application material, please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Deparment 2100 Clarendon Blvd. Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE/MEH
Sept 12,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
ASPIRA Association Inc.
PROJECT MANAGER AND DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST
Salary: $30,000 Site: Washington, D.C.
DUTIES: Manage national Hispanic dropout dissemination project in ten sites. Coordinate staff training, develop publications. Identify potential funders and coordinate development of national program.
QUALIFICATIONS: Demonstrated
experience in program management, fund raising and educational policy analysis. Excellent writing and organizational skills, public speaking ability, fluency In Spanish and English. Willingness to travel.
STAFF ASSISTANT
Must know Word Perfect and willing to learn Lotus 123 and dBase 3 plus. Excellent proofing and interpersonal skills. Knowledge of Spanish helpful.
Responsibilities include: Answering telephone, mail distribution, typing and scheduling of meetings. Occasional overtime required. Salary negotiable at $19,000 range based on experience.
Send resum6 to: ASPIRA Association Inc., 111216th St. NW, Suite 340, Washington, D.C. 20036
CORDOVA PRINTING SERVICE
1904 - 18th St. NW Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 265-7970
Serving the growing Hispanic community in the nation's capital. Fast. Friendly. Let us help you with your printing service needs.
REPORTERS
REPORTING INTERNSHIP for aspiring Hispanic journalist. Six months in Washington, D.C., working with Hispanic Link News Service. Funded by Ford Foundation. Application deadline: Sept. 24. For applications, contact F6lix P6rez or H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737.
SiCUlIY OFFICERS
SECURE YOUR FUTURE WITH THE U.S. GOVERNMENT
If you want a career in security, who better to protect than the National Security Agency? We have numerous vacancies on our staff of Uniformed Protective Officers in the Fort Meade, Maryland area.
Duties include: protecting federal property, maintaining a secure environment, and ensuring the safety of personnel under all circumstances.
• Salary is $16,663 or more based on experience
• Candidates must be 18 years old or over
• Must be a high school graduate or have a GED
• Applicants are subject to security clearance investigation which includes a polygraph examination
• Successful applicants will undergo 8 weeks of training at the Federal law Enforcement Training Center in Georgia
• Driver's license required
• Successful candidates will be required to carry firearms For more information please send us your resume, letter of
interest or SF-171.
National Security Agency
Attn: M322 (DBJ)
Ft. Meade, MD 20755-6000
U.S. citizenship required for applicant and immediate family members. An equal opportunity employer.
WHAT’S FUNNY BUT BITES?
New from Pan-American University Press:
WEEDEE PEEPO
A 207-page soft-cover collection of essays by humorist Jos6 Antonio Burciaga. In English and Spanish. An ideal Christmas gift. $10.95
Order your copy now: Pan American University Press, 1201 W. University Drive, Edinburg, Texas 78539-2999(512)381-2011.
JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Submissions are welcome for Weekly Reports “guest columnist” feature. Approx 500 words. For writers guidelines, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Guest Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Ordered by ________
Organization ______
Street_____________
City, State & Zip__
Area Code & Phone


Artsjt Entertainment
MUSIC MIX: Successful Latino recording acts continually alternate between Spanish- and English-language formats.
Various Hispanics are listed in Billboard Magazine’s Hot 100 Singles chart for the weekending Sept. 10- Gloria Estefan and Miami Sound Machine (1 -2-3, ranked 31), Brenda K Starr (What You See Is What You Get, 34, and / Still Believe, 80) and Denise L6pez (Sayin' Sorry Don’t Make It Right, 48).
Latinos known for English-language recording often cross over into the Spanish-language market. Billboard’s Latin 50 chart features Jose Feliciano’s Cuando el amorse acaba (33), Brenda K. Starr’s Yo creo en f/(26) and Gloria Estefan and MSM’s Todoporti(11) and their latest release Uno dos tres (46).
That chart is topped by Maria, the latest hit by Cuban American singer Franco. Recordings by Linda Ronstadt and Miami Sound Machine are also listed in the Top Latin Albums chart.
A new Spanish-language album by Rub6n Blades is due out Sept.
15 on the WEA Elektra label. The Panamanian returns to salsa after moderate success with his first English-language album, Nothing But the Truth, released earlier this year.
Other new and upcoming releases by Hispanics include:
• Bongoland, The Bermudez Triangle (WEA Latina): This tribute to Desi Arnaz, co-produced and co-written by Jorge Bermudez, is being released simultaneously in Spanish and English. The Nicaraguan percussionist sings lead vocals in the record.
• All of My Lifetime, Mary Maria (Discos MM): The first English-language version of Toda la vida, a tune that topped the charts last year in versions by Emmanuel and Franco, recorded by this 27-year-old performer from Houston.
• Serie Dorada (TH-Rodven): A new compact disc compilation of classic salsa recordings by artists such as Celia Cruz, La Sonora Matancera, Tito Rodriguez and Bobby Capo.
ONE LINER: Hispanic recording acts are a big attraction in Las Vegas this week- Miami Sound Machine is at the Las Vegas Hilton, Lupita D’Alessio at the Desert Inn, Vicente Fernandez at the Aladdin, and Julio Iglesias at Cesar's Palace... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
WHITE HOUSE BRIEFING: The White House Office of Media Relations has invited hundreds of U.S. Latino journalists to a Sept. 15 two-hour briefing on education, crime and drugs, business and foreign policy.
President Reagan will be on hand as will new U.S. Attorney General Richard Thornburgh and outgoing Secretary of Education William Bennett. A foreign policy expert had not been scheduled at press time.
Media relations officer John Peschong said such meetings are offered four or so times a year, and it was thought that “it would be nice to do it for Hispanics this time.”
Invitations primarily went to out-of-towners and others who do not generally have access to the White House, he said. For further information contact Elizabeth Board, director of Media and Broadcast Relations, at (202) 456-6623.
WEEKLY LATINO POLLING: Latino politics, attitudes and consumer habits in California are the subject of weekly polls paid for by a Mexican-owned FM broadcasting company, Califormula Radio Group.
The radio outfit commissioned a firm called Latin Ad to conduct random-sample surveys of Latinos in Southern California which, it said, can be projected to California H ispanics with a 95% accuracy rate.
One recent poll sought Latino reaction to Vice President Bush’s calling his grandchildren “the little brown ones.” According to the InfoRadio Opinion Poll, 91 % said they are not normally offended by such descriptions, but 83% felt in this case it was an inappropriate reference.
For further information, contact Victor Diaz, General Manager, Califormula Radio Group, 353 Third Ave., Suite 203, Chula Vista, Calif. (619) 422-2565.
SELLING HISPANICS: Advertising Age magazine and The Media Institute of Washington, D.C., are hosting an extensive, national
conference on Hispanic media and marketing Sept. 26-27 in New York City.
It is directed toward businesses and professionals interested in learning about advertising agencies and marketing companies that specialize in the Spanish-speaking consumer.
Speakers featured in the promotional material- all non-Hispanic-are Irvine Hockaday, CEO and president of Hallmark Cards, which owns Univision, Bob Wehling, ProctorS Gamble marketing manager, and Jim Adler, CEO and president of Saatchi & Saatchi, the world’s largest advertising firm.
NOTABLE: Chicano Stephen Montiel became Sept. 5 the first Latino president of the Institute for Journalism Education at the University of California at Berkeley, which operates the longest running summer journalism program for minorities.
Montiel has been on IJE’s board since 1977. He was most recently vice president of programs and communications at the Amateur Athletic Foundation in Los Angeles.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
Geographic Distribution of the Hispanic Population: March 1988
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘ N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Erickserv Mendoza Editor Felix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves.'
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues):
Institutions/agencies $118
Personal $108
Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
Source: U.S Census Bureau's "The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1988"
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The Ne w s This Week three-day fast, actor Edward James Olmos passes the woode n cross worn by United Farm Workers President Cesar Chavez during his 36-day fast to actor Emilio Estevez. Estevez fasted for thre e days. He is the son of Martin Sheen, who had fasted as part of the same chain ... The White House announces that Los Angeles teache r Jaime Escalante will receive its National Hispanic Heritage Week Education Award and that Orlando A.B., a Colombiaborn a rtist working in Laguna Beach , Calif., and Hawaii, will get its Heritage Week Award for Achievement in the Visual Arts . . . A federal jury in L o s Angeles awards to Asmires Ramirez, 22, $450,000 in damages because of two gunshot wounds he received from two Los Angeles County sheriffs deputies when they stormed his garage because o f reported gunfire. The jury felt the deputies used excessive forc e against the forklift operator ... Lupe De La Cruz, 37, a district administrative assistant for Rep . Esteban Torres of California, ta ke s a l e a v e of absence to become the California field director for the Dukakis/Bentsen campaign ... Cuban American Felix Rodriguez , a forme r CIA operative who came to the public forefront because of his involv ement in the Iran -Contra scandal and his close ties to Vice President George Bush, admits to harboring fugitive Luis Posada Carriles. Posada Carriles was charged with the 1976 bombing of a Cuban passenger plane in which 73 people died . . . New York City S chools Chancellor Richard Green hires Dolores Fernandez, after mu c h pressure from local Hispanic groups, as his deputy chancellor for instruction. . . Completing his v••"•••ll HISP A N I C LINK WEEKLY REPORT Education of Workers Rises But Still Lagging In 1988 more Hispanics in the work forc e completed four or more years of col lege, but they still lag behind blacks and Anglos in the area of educational attainment, according to Department of Labor figures released Aug. 29. Thirteen percent of Latino workers hav e completed at least four years of college, up from 9 % in 1978, while 15% of black wo r kers and 26% of Anglos have . The data drawn from the Current Population Survey taken in March also found that the percentage of high school dropouts among the labor force dropped in the pas t 1 0 years for all ethnic g r oups. Among Hispanic workers , it fell from 52% to 40%, for blacks from 40% to 23%, and for Anglos from 14% to 8%. HISPANIC UNEMPLOYMENT Dropouts High School Grads 1-3 Yrs . College College Grads 1978 8 . 5 % 5 . 7 4 . 9 7 . 3 1988 10. 3 % 6 . 0 3 . 5 2.2 L.A. Fire Dept Picks Ro j o Chicano Reynaldo Rojo, 53, became the highest-ranking Hispanic in the Los An geles Fire Department with his Aug . 31 appointment as deputy fire chief. It is the second highest position in one of the country's largest f ire departments. Rojo , a 30-year veteran of the department, is now responsible for most of a $200 million budget and for direct supervision of 250 employees. His duties include recruitment and training of firefighters and paramedics, establishment of their communication networks and equipment supply to Los Angeles' 11 0 fire stations. The San Antonio native shares the title with three others who report directly to Fire Chief Donald Manning. CORRECTION The Sept. 5 issue of Weekly Report lis t ed an incorrect date for the independence day of Costa Rica, Honduras, Guatemala, El Sal vador and Nicaragua in its "Leaders See More Latino Unity" story. The date should have been Sept. 15. Latinos Increase to 19.4 Milli on There are 19. 4 million Hispanics living on the mainland United States this year-a 34% increase from 1980reports a Census Bureau survey released Sept. 7 . The growth rate is nearly five times greater than the 7 % rate for the rest of the population. Hispanics make up 8 . 1 % of the United States' 241 million residents, compared with 6 . 5 % in 1980, the bureau says. With 3 .28 million addi tional Latinos living in the U . S . Commonwealth of Puerto Rico , the Hispanic percentage in the U . S . population increases to 9.4%. The survey , "The Hispanic Population in the United States : Marc h 1988," counts 640,000 more mainland Hispanics in March 1988 than a year earlier. Half of the growth is due to immigration, it says. Mexican Americans now number 12 . 1 million and comprise 62% of all U . S . mainland His panics. Puerto Ricans , at 2 . 5 million , are nex t , accounting for nearly 13% of all mainland Latinos. Hispanics of Central or South American origin, combined into one category for the survey , make up 11. 5% . They are followed by 1 million Cuban Americans, making up 5%. California has the largest group of Hispanics. One of every three Latinos lives there. Texas and California alone are home to 55% of the nation's Hispanics. In 1987, the survey says , 26% of the nation ' s 7 million Hispani c families lived below the poverty line($11 , 611 for a family of four) . Ten percent of non-Hispanic famil i es fell below the line . Puerto Ricans by far had the most famil i es, 253,000, or 38%, living below the poverty line . Cuban Americans had the smallest number of families, 43,000, or 13. 8%, below the poverty line. As they have in the past, Puerto R icans in 1988 fared the worst in several categories. Among those are that they had the hi g hest unemployment rate (1 0 . 5 % ) and the greates t proportion of families(44% ) headed by single females. Overall, t he proportion of Hispanic fam i lies headed by married couples grew from 21. 5 % in 1982, or795,500 families, to 23.4%, o r 1 . 0 7 million . In the area of education, Hispanics made some gains but continue to trail nonHis p a nics. F ifty-one percent of Hispanics 25 years o l d and over completed four years of h ig h schooi or more and 10% had four or more ye a r s of college, reports the survey . The non -Hisp ani c rates were 78% and 21 % , respectiv el y. The median income of the Hispanic family did r i se to $20,310 in 1987, the latest data available , but it did not keep pace with t h e 3 . 7% increase i n consumer prices. Puer to Rican families had the lowest median income at $15,190. The median income for n o n Hispanic families was $31 ,610. The median Hispanic age rose sli g h t l y i n 1988, from 25. 1 to 25. 5 . Indeed, 49% o f a il Hispanics are 29 years old or younger . Conversely, the median age for nonHispa n ics in 1988, says the survey, is 32. 2 . Cuban A m e ri cans are the oldest Hispanic subgroup at 38. 7 years. At 23.9 years, Mexican Ameri c a n s ate the youngest. _ Fel ix P ere z HISPANIC POPULATION GROWTH: 1980l (Numbers In Thousands) 1988 1987 1985 1982 1980 Mexican 12,110 11 ,762 10,269 /9,642 8 , 7 4 0 Puerto Rican 2 , 471 2 ,284 2 ,562 2 , 051 2 014 Cuban 1 ,035 1 ,017 1,036 950 '803 j Central, South American 2 ,242 2 ,139 1,722 1 ,523-I Other Hispanic 1 ,573 1 ,588 1 ,350 1 ,198-1 * Total Hispanic** 19,431 18,790 16,940 15,364 14,608 1 • The 1980 Ce n s u s d id n ot separa t e Centra l , So uth Ameri c an fr o m O t he r H is p a n i c . "The t o t al d oes n o t incl ud e t h e 3 .28 milli o n peopl e l ivin g in Pu e rt o Rico as o f 1987. Sou r ce : U.S Ce n s u s Bur ea u 's "The H is p anic P opula tion in th e Uni t ed S ta t es: M a r c h 1988 " _ _j

PAGE 2

Puerto Rico Politicians Split Over Min imu m Wage Bill A provision contained in Sen. Edward Kennedy's (DMass.) minimum wage bill that would deny wage increases to some workers in Puerto Rico pits island politicians against one another and Kennedy against Sen. Paul Simon (D-Ill.), say several Capitol Hill sources. The legislation, which is r eady for a Senate floor vote, would increase the minimum wage to $4.65 over three years, but Puerto Rico industries could appeal for an exemption to a Minimum Wage Board created by the amendment. Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael HernandezCol6n and non-voting Puerto Rico Congressman Jaime Fuster support the exemption, while San Juan Mayor Baltazar Corrada del Rio opposes it. Corrada is running against HernandezCol6n for the governor's seat this Some Puerto Rican officials were concerned that the bill would allow U.S. companies with subsidiaries on the island to skirt er pay scales. But Congressman Fuster's office said those companies already pay more than the new minimum wage. Mayor Corrada's Washington , D .C., re presentative, Raul Torres, concurred. He said , "This is a management vs. labor issue just as it is here on the mainland . Sen -Bills Address Poverty Along Border Along the U.S. Mexico border, towns called colonias house more than a million Hispanics living mostly below the po verty level without hospitals or schools, water or sewage facilities, testified Rep. E. "Kika" de Ia Garza(D-Texas) at a Sept. 7 hearing before the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development. Subcommittee Chairperso n Rep. Henry Gonzalez (DTexas) also heard testimony from Rep. Ron Coleman (D Texas), who was praised by Gonzalez, De Ia Garza, and subcommittee member Rep. Esteban Torres (DCalif.), for introdu c ing the first federal bills addressing 2 Nobel Laureate, 77, Dies Nobel Prize-winning physicist Luis Alvarez, 77, who was a member of the Manhattan Project which built the first atomic bomb, died of cancer Aug. 31 at his Berkeley , Calif . , home. The San Francisco native, born June 13, 1911, worked most of his professional life at the University of Ca lifornia at Berkeley, where he was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1968 for discoveri ng subatomic particles. While briefly at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology during World War II, Alvarez invented the wide ly used method of landing aircraft in poor visibility with the aid of radar beams. Alvarez sat in a plane behind the bomber that dropped the Abom b on Hiroshima in 1945. In 1963, he assisted the Warren Commi& sion in reporting on the assassination of President John Kennedy , concluding through the principles of physics that one person could have fired all the shots that killed Kennedy and wounded Texas Gov . John Connally. . Alvarez is survived by his wife and four children, including a geologist son, Walter , who helped him develop the theory that an asteroid collision with the earth caused it to cool, thereby bringing the extinction of dino saurs. Alvarez received his B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. from the U niversit y of Chicago. the issue. One would establish a Border Regional Commission composed of the four governors in affected states-Arizona, California, New W.exico and Texas-as well as congressional and federal representatives to review and authorize funds for colonias programs . A similar Senate bill was introduced in May by Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (DTexas) , Democratic vice presidential nominee . Coleman's auxiliary legislation would supply $15.6 million for short-term relief to the bor der towns and is considered more likely to reach the floor before the-1 OOth Congress ends Oct. 5. According to Coleman , nearly2 million people live in these areas. He said they are the most economically depressed sections of the country . In El Paso alone, he cited, 28,000 people do not have water in their homes while 53,000 live without sewage facilities. De Ia Garza, chairperson of the Committee on Agriculture , explained that colonias pri marily do not fall under the jurisdictions covered by existing federal.farm and housing programs and are consequently neglected. Darryl Lynette Figuer oa Designers Help Students Hispanic Designers Inc. expects to gross , about $300,000 through its fashion show in Washington, D . C., Sept 15, most to go toward scholarship programs for Latino students. Since its inception in 1984, gross receipts have climbed from $55,000 the first year . The fashion show exhibits the work of es tablished Latino designers, such as Adolfo , but also draws students into the spotlight. Winners of the Rising Star Award are students preparing to graduate. First, second and third place winners will receive scholarships. In part because of the national exposure he has received, Estevan Ramos, the 1987 winner, is launching his own clothing line, while Ofelia Montejano , this year's Rising Star, has been featured in publications such as "Women's Wear Daily." Montejano and Ramos were both students at the Fashion Institute of Design and Mer chandising in Los Angeles, which has a 17% Hispanic enrollment. ator Kennedy is on the labor side here but for manage ment there." The chances for a floor vote are dim according to a Kennedy legislative analyst who said it may be filibustered. Congress will adjourn Oct. 5. If the bill does reach the floor , however, S i mon will seek an amendment to the Puerto Rico exemption, as he did when it was in committee, said his labor analyst Judy White. Said another Corrada representative, Walter Davila, "We achieved wage parity in 1981 and we don ' t want t o turn back the clock." Darryl Lynette Figueroa Chicanos Less Likely to Smoke Than Others Mexican Americans are less likely to smoke than blacks and Anglos and when they do, smoke fewer cigarettes, according to a report published in t he July/August issue of Public Health Reports. Among males, researchers found that Mex ican smokers smoked 2 1/2 fewer cigarettes than blacks and one-half pack fewer than Anglos. Female Mexican Americans who smoke start later than women of other ethnic groups generally after age 19 or 20. According to authors Richard Rogers and John Crank, Mexican American women smoke an average of nine cigarettes per day , compared with 13 per day for black women and 20 for whites. In the report, based on the annual National Health Interview Survey, Rogers and Crank conclude the low rate of smoking among Mexican American women can be attributed to "a combination of factors, including peer f influence, a lack of commercial advertising aimed at this group, and non-smoking family and community role models." Family Tenants Win Big ! Seventy f amilies, more than 90% o . f them ! 1 Hispanic, will receive $2.5 million, the largest ; settlement ever awarded in a California landlord-tenant suit. The tenants o f a Los Angeles skid row building will receive average payments of$30,000 to $35,000 as a result of a 1985 lawsuit charging the landlord w ith refusing to correct health and safety hazards ranging from rats to poor security. Following the Aug. 29 settlement announce ment, the attorney for primary defendant, Beverly Hills physician Martin Avo I, pointed out that the settlement was not an admission of gui lt. Meanwhile, tenants of the rat-and roach infeste d building were making plans to buy homes or businesses. Avol is a convicted slumlord, the first in Los Angeles to be sentenced to spend time in one of his own apartment buildings . In the past he has also served 55 days of a nine-mo nth sentence after failing to correct slum conditions at three other buildings. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Jose Antonio Burciaga, guest columnist Invisible Contributions This is the last year we'll celebrate Hispanic Heritage Week. In 1989, by proclamation of the Congress and President Reagan, the nation will celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. With some two dozen countries feeding Latino food, music, philosophy, language, beautiful bodies and other cultural assets into los Estados Unidos, I guess our leaders figured it was too much to cram into a week. That this is an election year had absolutely nothing to do with it. Personally, I appreciate the gesture. As our population and influence increase, maybe there's a Hispanic Heritage Quarter in our future. Or even a Hispanic Heritage Fiscal Year. lfs progress. A few years ago, a presidential candidate would never claim oubliclv that he had a few little "brown ones" in his family . They would have been kept out of sight, like beer-guzzling brothers and crazy cousins. Now Mexican and Central American immigrants are said to be too competitivetaking jobs away from deserving " Americans." (You ' ve seen all those long , long lines of "Americans" seeking employment as dish washers and maids and weed-pullers. WE TAKE CREDIT FOR ENGLISH ONLY But there are some people who still don't believe that Hispanics have contributed anything of significance to the United States. Not so. lfs just that many of our contributions are almost invisible . First of all , we mejicanos contributed a lot of land-Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, California, and part of Wyoming and Colorado. Lest we forget, most Latinos are lndo-Hispanics, a term I prefer over the federal governmenfs catch-all "Hispanic." Our North Ameri c an Indian brothers and sisters contributed even more land, in voluntary though it was . Our contribution to the Queen's English is also worthy of note. What word did English-speakers use before macho was introduced? We can also take credit for the English-Only movement. Without the popularity of Spanish, English monolinguals wouldn' t feel so threatened. Then there are the indigenous foods contributed by Mexicans, such as nachos, not to be confused with machos. They are one of many corn food items. Also, there' s popcorn and corn chips, to say nothing of gasohol and corn liquor. SPICING UP BASEBALL Other indigenous foods include potatoes, tomatoes, avocados, chiles, vanilla, chocolate, coffee and peanuts. Baseball games without peanuts, popcorn and players like Fernando Valenzuela and Keith Hernandez are boring. Now Cuba and Puerto Rico have spiced things up with Jose Canseco and Benito Santiago. And , after seven Septembers of telling Hispanics who visited the White House once a year to hear his Hispanic Heritage Week promise, "Mi casa es su casa," President Reagan is actually going to let one stay more than a couple hours . He is bringing former Texas Tech President Lauro Cavazos into his capitai-C Cabinet. (He already had some arranging the crystal in his smaii-C cabinet.) We recognize that the appointment of Cavazos is just a Republican campaign tactic to get the Hispanic vote. But having a Latino as U .S. Secretary of Education, if only for a couple of months, sends another signal that we do have something to contribute. The first signal, in case you weren't paying attention, was when all the fast-food hamburger joints added nachos and tacos to their menus. (Jose Antonio Burciaga, of Stanford, Calif., is an artist and writer, whose second book, " Weedee Peepo , " was just published by Pan American University Press, Edinburg , Texas . ) Sin Pelos en Ia lengua LATINO COLUMNISTS: While other New York City dailies stand aloof from the 1 . 8 million Hispanics who inhabit that metropolis, The New York Daily News has two Latinos, Miguel Perez and Juan Gonzalez, who share their views regularly with the tabloid's 1 . 3 million readers . Gonzalez produces two weekly opinion columns on Hispanic or general issues. Perez writes one and covers the city's Latino cultural action. Perez , 38, is a native of Cuba. He came to the United States at age 11, grew up and attended college in Miami, and earned his professional reporting credentials at The Miami Herald. In July 1978, he joined The New York Daily News as a reporter. He began his Hispanic-focus opinion column in 1981 . Gonzalez, a 40-year-old native New Yorker of Puerto Rican heritage, joined the Daily News last January. As a youth, he joined the Young Lords and tried a few trades-printing pressman and clothing presser among them-before gaining a press credential as a reporter with the Philadelphia Daily News in 1978. For several years, he wrote a weekly opinion column. Together they give their readers Hispanic perspectives badly lacking in other New York English-language media-as well as dailies across the country. Columns written by each on Sept.1 illustrate their importance to the New York community. On that day Miguel wrote about an old Miami buddy, Charles Gomez, who went on to cover Central America for CBSTV and now works at New York's Channel 9. Reviewing Gomez's new auto biographical play, "Bang Bang Blues, " he observed: "Through Rick(the protagonist) and his co-workers in a network newsroom in Managua, Chuck has written an insightful indictment of how the networks cover Latin America ... Like Chuck, Rick was more daring than others to getthe'Bang Bang ' if necessary, but he was immediately replaced by white, superstar reporters when the bang bang got loud and the story got hot. "The real-life Chuck was the first CBS correspondent to report from the Malvinas/Fa.lklands War. 'And then they sent Bob Schieffer down and I was relegated to being a translator,' he says . 'It kept happening over and over again. When the stories got really big, they would bring in someone from New York who would not know Spanish and would not know the region ... " In his column, Gonzalez, long a proponent of black-Hispanic coalitions, took on Jesse Jackson's Rainbow Coalition. Jackson's meeting with Mayor Ed Koch and Gov. Mario Cuomo, he pointed out," included four black leaders . .. , but no leaders from the Latino, Asian or white communities that had worked so hard for him in April." Then, Gonzalez added, Jackson endorsed Robert Johnson, "who is black and who is a last-minute candidate of the corrupt Bronx machine for the Bronx district attorney's race, despite there being an equally qualified and reform-minded Puerto Rican, Sal Collazo ... "Third, he attended a hastily called black-Latino unity rally (where) a half dozen Puerto Rican officials were summoned like errand boys to ... have their pictures taken with Jackson, but not to meet and discuss the future of the Rainbow. " Latinos, Gonzalez warned, will never "exchange a white op pressive structure for one controlled by bourgeois black leaders who are as distant from the black and Latino masses as a BMW is from a three-speed bike. " LEAKY LOGIC?: Reacting to a complaint" of editors that they can't cover minority communities until they have minorities on their staffs, Ernie Sotomayor, Dallas Times Herald associate editor, tells us: "With that logic, you shouldn't be able to cover the Democratic party if you're not a Democrat." Kay Biubaro Hi s p a n ic Link Weekl y Report Sept. 12 , 1988 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING CONNECTING SMOKING AMONG MEXICAN AMERICANS: The July/August issue of Public Health Reports contains an article which concludes that Mexican Americans smoke less than blacks or whites. For a copy, send $4.75 to Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D .C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. LATINO MUSEUM RECEIVES HELP IMMIGRATION CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS: "In the Alien, Volume X" is a 250-page book on the proceedings of the 1987 National Legal Conference on Immigration and Refugee Policy focusing on the immigration act and its aftermath. To obtain a copy, send $14.95 to Center for Migration Studies, 209 Flagg Place, Staten Island, N.Y. 1 0304 (718) 351-8800. The California Museum of Latino History received Sept. 6 a $10,000 donation from Eastman Kodak Co . to help the museum establish the nation ' s first permanent collection showcasing U.S. Latino achievements. The gift was made a day before the museum opened a photograph exhibit, "The Latino Olympians: A History of Latin American Involvement in the Olympic Games 1896," as part of the U .S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce's annual convention in Washington, D.C. An institution without walls, the California Museum of Latino History is attempting to locate additional funding. STUDENT BORROWING IN CALIF.: A report on student participation in educational loan programs examines the characteristics of Cali fornia's student borrowers' ethnicity and race and their level of indebtedness, along with issues relating to loan repayment and default. The 80-page report was prepared by the California Student Aid Commission. For a free copy write to CSAC, 1515 S St., North Building, Suite 500, P.O. Box 942845, Sacramento, Calif. 942450845. For further information contact Antonio RiosBustamante, museum director, at P.O. Box 241795, Los Angeles, Calif . 90024 (213) 479-8793. Calendar THIS WEEK HERITAGE KICKOFF Washington, D .C. Sept. 12 The Washington, D.C. , Council of Hispanic Employ ment Program Managers will hold ceremonies to commemorate National Hispanic Heritage Week. Rita Rodriguez, a director of the Export/Import Bank will speak. This is one of 40 activities sponsored by council members working for federal departments and agencies. For specifics on other activities, call the number below. Ana Villagra (202) 343 STUDENT LEADERSHIP Washington, D.C. Sept. 12 Hispanic high school and college students will be introduced to skills necessary to start at risk retention programs at their schools during the fourth annual National Hispanic Students Network Symposium. Students will also hear speakers such as Sen . Orrin Hatch, Rep . Esteban Torres and Katherine Ortega, secretary of the treasury. Sandra Niebla (202) 293 CHILD CARE Washington, D.C. Sept. 13 A conference on Hispanics and child care will be held by the Hispanic Heritage Committee of the Employment and Training Administration, Depart ment of Labor. Among the topics to be addressed will be alternatives for parents seeking child care and help for people who want to start their own child care business. Nida Cruz (202) 535 HISPANIC CAUCUS Washington , D .C. Sept. 13 The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute will hold its 11th annual dinner. The theme will be"The Future-Education, Culture and Progress ." Linda Chavez (202) 543 HERITAGE BANQUET Alamos, N.M. Sept. 13 Club Amistad yCultura Image de Los Alamos and the Mexican American Engineering Society will hold a banquet honoring National Hispanic Heritage Week. OTHER FACE, OTHER PLACE Arnold Torres, the national executive director of the League of United Latin American Citizens from 1979-85, rejoins the organization in Washington, D.C., on a part-time basis as its director of public policy ... Keynote speaker will be Tom Chavez, director of the Palace of the Governors museum. Ramona Vigil (505) 662 COLUMBUS AND HISPANICS Washington, D.C. Sept. 13, 14 The Library of Congress will hold a screening of the film "Stand and Deliver'' followed by a lecture by Jaime Escalante, the teacher whose accomplishments are chronicled in the movie. A program will also be offered titled "The Christopher Columbus Quin centenary 1492: Perspective on Hispanic America" which will include a presentation by Joseph Sanchez, director of the Spanish Colonial Research Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. Carmen Mendez (202) 287 CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE Miami .. Sept. 14 Delegations from chambers of commerce from Latin American countries and the United States will meet during the Hemispheric Congress of Latin Chambers of Commerce and Industry . During the congress an exhibition of non-traditional products from Latin America and the Caribbean will be held , as well as an exhibition spotlighting Florida export products. Waldo Castro-Molleda (305) 642 HISPANIC DESIGNERS Washington, D.C. Sept. 15 Established designers such as Carolina Herrera, Adolfo, Oscar de Ia Renta and Fernando Pena will join rising stars of the fashion industry in their work at the Hispanic Designers Gala Fashion Show and Benefit. Penny Harrison (202) 822 BAR ASSOCIATION CONVENTION Albuquerque, N .M. Sept. 15 Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy will address members of the Hispanic National Bar Association's convention during a reception honoring Hispanic judges . Seminar topics include computers in the law office , developing minority law firms and factors affecting immigration and the effectiveness of em ployer sanctions. Mercedes Fernandez (505) 983 SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET Los Angeles Sept. 16 The California Chicano News Media Association will hold a scholarship banquet. Proceeds will be used to award scholarships to Latino students pursuing Sept. 12 , 1988 careers in journalism . Lourdes Martinez (213) 743 EMPLOYMENT LAW CONFERENCE San Jose, Calif. Sept 16 The Bay Area Chapter of the Personnel Management Association of Aztlan and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission will hold a conference providing an opportunity for participants to explore major employment law issues, including the Im migration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and discrimination on the basis of sex, race and national origin . Javier Perez (408) 277 LAW SCHOOL INFORMATION New York Sept. 16 , 17 The School Admission Services of the Law School Admission CounciVLaw School Admission Services will sponsor a forum to inform minorities and older adults about evaluating law schools and taking the Law School Admission Test. Representatives from more than 1 00 schools will be on hand . Sharon Kemble (215) 968 EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM San Antonio Sept. 16 The San Antonio Association of Hispanic Journalists and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Region 5, are sponsoring a symposium designed to look at solutions for high illiteracy and dropout rates . Lauro Cavazos, U.S. Education Secretary designate , has been invited to speak . A debate will be held between Linda Chavez, president of U .S. English, and Ruben Bonilla, counsel for the League of United Latin American Citizens. Dine Chiecchi (512) 225 7411 LULAC 1 OK RUN Washington, D.C. Sept. 17 The League of United Latin American Citizens will sponsor a 10K run and a 3K run to raise money for The Family Place, a non-profit center in Washington, D . C., providing services to predominantly Hispanic pregnant women and their families. Maria Elena Orrego (202) 265 CHILDREN'S FILMS Washington, D . C . Sept. 17 To celebrate Hispanic Heritage Week, the Mount Pleasant Branch of the District of Columbia Library will screen children's films in Spanish. Kay Radar (202) 727 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS ASSISTANT ASSOCIATE P ROFESSOR MARKETING Duties: Teaching , research and service to enhance the Marketing Department at the University . Qu alifications: Ph.D. in Marketing required, prior college teaching e x pe r ien c e or equivalent business experience required. Evidence of strong scholarly track record essential. A willingness to provide university/community service and ability to teach and conduct research studies . D eadline Date : Materials must be received by October 31, 1988 for con s ideration . Start Date: January 19, 1989 start preferred, September 1989 if nece ssary. Letter of interests , detailed resume and three letters of referen c e required . Pleas e send application material to: Chairman-Selection Committee Position #88014 310 King Hall EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY Ypsilanti, Ml48197 W E TAKE PRIDE IN THE PURSUIT OF OUR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OBJE CTIV E S AND EN COURAGE QUALIFIED WOMEN AND MINORITIES TO CONSIDER THI S OPPORTUNIT Y MULTICULTURAL EXPERIENCE DESIRED . HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY A twenty-one member department offering B.S. and M . S . degrees is re opening search for an individual with successful administrative experience, a broad biology background, and preferably computer experience. A Ph.D . in the Biological Sciences and 5 years of college teaching experience are required . Eastern Michigan University , a state university with an enrollment of 23 , 000 students , is located in Southeastern Michigan. A cover letter , a vitae, and 31etters of recom mendation must be received by December 28, 1988 . Send materi als to : Position DH-8, P.O. Box 920 Human Resources, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Ml48197. We take pride in the pursu i t of our affirmative action objectives and encourage qualified women and minorities to consider this oppor tunity. Eastern Michigan Univ e rsity Hi spa ni c Link W e ekl y Report Sept. 12, 1988 ELDERLY ASSOCIATION The follow i ng positions are with the Na tional Association For Hispanic Elder ly/Asociacion Nacional Pro Personas Mayo res: PROJECT MONITOR For employ ment program for national organization . Excellent written and verbal communica tion skills. Requires B.A. in public ad ministrat i on or social sciences; bilingual preferred . Position based in Los Angeles; must be willing to travel. COORDINATOR/LIAISON National organization seeks self-starter to coor dinate employment program at its D .C. office and act as lia i son with governmen tal agencies as requested. Requires B.A. in social sciences or public administra t i on ; excellent interpersonal and or ganizat i on skills; bilingual. Send resumll with salary history : Presi dent , ANPPM, 2727 W . Sixth St., Suite 270, Los Angeles, Calif. 90057 (213) 487-1922. STATE POLICY ANALYST (1 year internship) MALDEF, a national civil rights organization, seeks an individual who would research key state policy issues and monitor bills in the Texas Legislature affecting Hispanics . The State Policy Analyst will commute from the San Antonio area to the Texas Legislature in Austin . Required : Legal training or graduate school equivalence in social science , political science, public administration or public policy; familiarity with the state legislative process and key Hispanic issues ; excellent oral and written communications skills; bilingual in Spanish/English preferred ; and must have own automobile to commute between San Antonio and Austin. Send resumll and writing sample to: Barba r a Aguirre, MALDEF , The Commerce Building, LTD, 314 E. Commerce St., Suite 200, San Antonio, Texas 78205 by 9/26/88. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Statewide community-based advocacy research and planning organization seeks Executive Director. Proven experience in fund raising, program and staff develop ment, planning and administration re quired . Graduate degree i n relevant field r e quired, and Spanish/English bilingual ability preferred. Competitive salary . Send resumll , cover letter and three let ters of recommendation by 9/26 to: Search Committee, Hispanic Office of Planning and Evaluation, 55 Dimock St., Boston, Mass. 02119. ./ ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md. , are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD. , govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. 5

PAGE 6

6 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS GIRL SCOUTS OF THE USA GIRL SCOUTS OF THE U.S.A. is expanding its NEW YORK headquarters staff creating the following job opportunities: PERSONNEL CONSULTANTS Provide technical assistance to outbased locations in the areas of AA/EOE planning, performance management, recruitment, legislation, etc. . . Candidate should have at least 3-5 years solid generalist background, ability to train & interface with all levels of management. Travel approx. 40-50%. Salary $30's . INNOVATIVE PROJECT DIRECTORS (California/New York location -2 yr. assigment.) MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS Design and implement field testing of pilot projects to extend Girl Scouting to racial/ethnic populations . Candidates must be creative , able to design & direct project , have supervisory skills as well as cultural awareness to needs of diverse groups . Mobility a must. Salary $30's. Provide technical assistance to outbased locations in the total management function, including needs identification and proble m solving. Candidates should have at least 5 years broad management experience, knowledge of strategic & tactical planning, financial operations and fund development. Travel approx . 75%. Salary to low $40's . LAND USE PLANNING CONSULTANT Provide on-site consulting services and technical assistance in areas of long-range planning, property development & maintenance, and overall property management. Candidates should have degree in Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning or equivalent with min. 3-5 yrs. in field. Travel approx. 40-50%. Salary hi-$30's. For immediate consideration, send resume to: Janice Jacobs, Senior Employment Specialist Girl Sc.outs of the U.S.A . 830 Third Avenue New York , N.Y. 10016 AA/EOE M/F/HN TEXAS TECH PRESIDENT TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY AND TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER The nomination of Dr. Lauro F. Cavazos to be the next Secretary of Education of the United States has created the need to recruit a new President for Texas Tech University and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center . The Board of Regents and the President Search and Advisory Committees are at this time inviting applications and nominations for this position . Texas Tech is one of the state's four major, comprehensive universities. With a student body of _ nearly 25,000, the university s 2,000 faculty members teach in over 157 undergraduate and 168 graduate programs. The university and the Texas Tech University Health Science Center share an 1,800 acre campus reflecting Spanish Renaissance architecture . Academic ally diverse, the university has seven colleges, a Graduate School, and a School of Law. The Health Sciences Center has Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health . Appropriate candidates should be leaderS, educational diplomats with excellent zational skil .ls, good fund raisers who enjoy public relations, and be articulate and persuasive in promoting the institution . The selected individual should be capable of decisiveness, yet able to build consensus; and possess the ability to interact sensitively and effectively with students, faculty , Board, staff, alumni, government officials, and with other members of the external community . The President is the chief executive officer of the university and is directly responsible to the Board of Regents for the programs and administration of the institution. Applications and nominations should be submitted to: Mr . R. William Funk Heidrick and Struggles ATTN: Texas Tech-HLWR 1999 Bryan, Suite 1919 , Dallas , Texas 75201 Review of nominations and applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected . Texas Tech is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer Sept 12 , 1988 MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST Ann. #1506-9A-DHS Salary : $33,446$39,210 Responsible administrative work in the Arlington County Department of Human Services, Division of Mental Health . Provides administrative assistance to Division Director; coordinate budget and personnel activities; manages special proJects and supervises clerical staff . Requires use and management of automated management systems. Flexibility, strong management and com munications skills are critical. Requires BS and three years progressively respon sible experience in administration, finan cial and personnel management including supervisory experience. Preference may be given to applicants with experience in a) automatic management systems, b) state/.local govern ment, c) human services, d) hands-on technical experience in budget/personnel administration and/or e) a MS in related field. All applicants must submit an official Ar lington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted . Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 PM on SEPTEMBER 22, 1988. To request application material, please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only). ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Deparment 2100 Clarendon Blvd. Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE/MEH 111spamc Link Weekly Report

PAGE 7

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS ASPIRA Association Inc. PROJECT MANAGER AND DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST Salary: $30,000 Site: Washington, D.C. DUTIES: Manage national Hispanic dropout dissemination project in ten sites. Coordinate staff training, develop publications. Identify potential funders and coordinate development of national program. QUALIFICATIONS: Demonstrated experience In program management, fund raising and educational policy analysis. Excellent writing and organizational skills, public speaking ability, fluency In Spanish and English. Willingness to travel. STAFF ASSISTANT Mus t know Word Perfect and willing to learn Lotus 123 and dBase 3 plus . Excellent proofing and interpersonal skills . Knowledge of Spanish helpful. Responsibilities include: Answering telephone, mail distribution, typing and scheduling of meetings. Occasional overtime required . Salary negotiable at $19,000 range based on experience. Send resume to: ASPIRA Association Inc., 111216th St. NW, Suite 340, Washington, D.C. 20036 C ORDOVA PRINTING SERVICE 1904 -18th St. NW Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 265-7970 Serving the growing Hispanic community In the nation's capital. Fast. Friendly. Let us help you with your printing service needs. REPORTERS REPORTING INTERNSHIP for aspiring Hispanic journalist. Six months In Washington, D.C., working with Hispanic Unk News Service. Funded by Ford Foundation. Application deadline: Sept. 24. For applications, contact Felix Perez or Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Unk, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. WHAT'S FUNNY BUT BITES? New from PanAmerican University Press: WEEDEE PEEPO A 207page soft-cover collection of essays by humorist Jose Antonio Burciaga. In English and Spanish. An ideal Christmas gift. $10.95 Order your copy now: Pan American University Press, 1201 W . University Drive, Edinburg, Texas 78539-2999 (512) 381. JOURNALISTS/CREATIVEWRITERS: Sub missions are welcome for Weekly Report's "guest c olumnist' ' feature. Approx. 500 words. For wri te( s guidelines, send self-addressed, stamped e nvelope to: Guest Coiumn, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Hi s pani c Link Weekly Report SECURITY OFFICERS SECURE YOUR FUTURE WITH THE U.S. GOVERNMENT If you want a career in security, who better to protect than the National Security Agency? We have numerous vacancies on our staff of Uniformea Protective Officers in the Fort Meade, Maryland area. Duties include: protecting federal property, maintaining a secure en v ironment, and ensuring the safety of personnel under all circumstances . • Salary Is $16,663 or more based on experience • Candidates must be 18 years old or over • Must be a high school graduate or have a GED • Applicants are subject to security clearance investigation which includes a polygraph examination • Successful applicants will undergo 8 weeks of training at the Federal law Enforcement Training Center in Georgia • Driver's lic ense r e quired • Successful candidates w ill be required to carry firearms For more information please send us your resume, letter of interest or SF-171. National Security Agency Attn: M322 (DBJ) Ft. Meade, MD 20755-6000 U.S. citizenship required for applicant and immediate family members. An equal opportunity employer. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report . To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to : Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or(202) 234 0280. Ad copy received(mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city , state & zip code count as 2 words ; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch . Ordered by Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & Zip _________ _ Area Code& Phone _______ _ _ 7

PAGE 8

Arts & Entertainment 15 on the WEA Elektra label. The Panamanian returns to sa/sa after moderate success with his first English-language album, Nothing But the Truth , released earlier this year. MUSIC MIX: Successful Latino recording acts continually alternate between Spanishand English-language formats. Other new and upcoming releases by Hispanics include: • Bongo/and, The Bermudez Triangle (WEA Latina): This tribute to Desi Arnaz, co-produced and co-written by Jorge Bermudez, is being released simultaneously in Spanish and English. The Nicaraguan percussionist sings lead vocals in the record . Various Hispanics are listed in Billboard Magazine's Hot 100 Singles chart fort he week ending Sept. 10-Gloria Estefan and Miami Sound Machine (1-2-3 , ranked 31), Brenda K Starr(What You See /s What You Get 34, and I Still Believe, 80) and Denise Lopez (Sayin' Sorry Don' t Make It Right, 48) . Latinos known for English-language recording often cross over into the Spanish-language market. Billboard's Latin 50 chart features Jose Feliciano' s Cuando el amor se acaba (33), Brenda K Starr's Yo creo en ti(26) and Gloria Estefan and MSM's To do por ti(11) and their latest release Uno dos tres (46). • All of My Lifetime, Mary Maria (Discos MM): The first Englishlanguage version of Toda Ia vida, a tune that topped the charts last year in versions by Emmanuel and Franco, recorded by this 27-year old performer from Houston. • Serie Dorada (TH-Rodven): A new compact disc compilation of classic sa/sa recordings by artists such as Celia Cruz, La Sonora Matancera, Tito Rodriguez and Bobby Cap6 . That chart is topped by Maria, the latest hit by Cuban American singer Franco. Recordings by Linda Ronstadt and Miami Sound Machine are also listed in the Top Latin Albums chart. ONE LINER: Hispanic recording acts are a big attraction in Las Vegas this week-Miami Sound Machine is at the Las Vegas Hilton, Lupita D' Alessio at the Desert Inn, Vicente Fernandez at the Aladdin, and Julio Iglesias at Cesar's Palace ... -Antonio Mejias-Rentas A new Spanish-language album by Ruben Blades is due out Sept. Media Report WHITE HOUSE BRIEFING: The White House Office of Media Relations has invited h u ndreds of U . S . Latino journalists to a Sept. 15 two-hour briefing on education, crime and drugs, business and foreign policy. President Reagan will be on hand as will new U.S. Attorney General Richard Thornburgh and outgoing Secretary of Education William Bennett. A foreign policy expert had not been scheduled at press time. Media relations officer John Peschong said such meetings are offered four or so times a year, and it was thought that"itwould be nice t o do i t for Hispanics this time. " Invita t ions primarily went to out-of-towners and others who do not generally have access to the White House, he said. For further information contact Elizabeth Board , director of Media and Broadcast Relations, at (202) 456-6623. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1 420 'N' Street NW Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-Q737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza l;ditor. F e li x Perez Reporting : Antonio Mejia& Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves . : Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien , Z oila Elias No portion o f Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be repr o duced o r broa d cas t in a ny form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): InstitutionS/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE C LASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word . Display ad s are $45 per column in c h . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of s ame w eek. Multiple use rates on request. 8 WEEKLY LATINO POLLING: Latino politics, attitudes and consumer habits in California are the subject of weekly polls paid for by a Mexican-owned FM broadcasting company, Califormula Radio Group. The radio outfit commissioned a firm called Latin Ad to conduct random-sample surveys of Latinos in Southern California which, it said , can be projected to California Hispanics with a 95% accuracy rate . One recent poll sought Latino reaction to Vice President Bush's calling his grandchildren "the little brown ones. " According to the lnfoRadio Opinion Poll, 91% said they are not normally offended by such descriptions, but 83% felt in this case it was an inappropriate reference . For further information, contact Victor Diaz, General Manager, Califormula Radio Group, 353 Third Ave., Suite 203, Chula Vista, Calif . (619) 422-2565. SELLING HISPANICS: Advertising Age magazine and The Media Institute of Wash ington, D.C., are hosting an extensive , national conference on Hispanic media and marketing Sept. 26-27 in New York City. It is directed toward businesses and profes sionals interested in learning about advertising agencies and marketing companies that special ize in the Spanish-speaking consumer. Speakers featured in the promotional materialall non-Hispanicare Irvine Hockaday, CEO and president of Hallmark Cards, which owns Unlvision, Bob Wehling, Proctor& Gamble marketing manager , and Jim Adler, CEO and president of Saatchi & Saatchi, the world's largest advertising firm. NOTABLE: Chicano Stephen Montiel be came Sept. 5 the first Latino president of the Institute for Journalism Education at the University of California at Berkeley, which operates the longest running summer journal ism program for minorities. Montiel has been on IJE's board since 1977. He was most recently vice president of programs and communications at the Amateur Athletic Foundation in Los Angeles. Darryl Lynette Figueroa Geographic Distribution of the Hispanic Population: March 1988 .-----New York 11"/o 3"/o Remainder of the U.S. Texas 21"/o Source : U.S Census Bureau's "The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1988 " Hispa .nic Link Weekly Report