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Hispanic link weekly report, September 19, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 19, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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The White House invites Joseph Ferndndez, super!ifie^ddnkof the Dade County, Fla., school district, and three other urban scKUbl leaders to a ceremony presided over by President Reagan for the unveiling of a student training program... Presidential candidate Michael Dukakis announces that Hispanic Congressman Bill Richardson (D-N.M.), will be one of 12 national co-chairs for his campaign... The National Republican Congressional Committee pledges $45,000 to the campaign of Ralph Ramirez in his effort to unseat Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.)... Arizona Gov. Rose Mofford urges voters there to reject a ballot measure seeking to make English the
sfate’s officialTaT^gaTTTsie^^^Tvfayor Ed Koch presents to Hiram Rodriguez the city’s first Hispanic Heritage Business Award at a ceremony at the mayor’s residence, Grade Mansion.. Rodriguez is president of Bronx-based La Rosa del Monte Express, a moving company that has revenues of $8.3 million annually... Suspended Ramsey County (Minn.) District Court Judge Alberto Miera, who went on a 57-day fast this summer to protest what he said was unethical criticism of him by fellow judges, appears in bankruptcy court to answer questions about his financial status Miera was convicted in March 1987 for forcing a kiss upon a male court reporter... '• A poll of People magazine readers finds that TV personality Geraldo Rivera is third behind boom boxes and ringing car alarms in what should be eliminated from the planet...
Vol. 6 No. 37

Sept 19,1988
Mayor Cisneros Says
U.Sb Slaps LA. County With Suit
Mayor Cisneros Says He Won’t Run Again
Citing the need fora more lucrative career, San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros announced at a Sept. 12 press conference that he would not seek a fifth term.
The 41-year-old politician told reporters his daughters require financial support for their college education while his son, who has a congenital heart defect and stomach ailments, steadily requires costly medical treatments.
Cisneros earns $50 a week for his mayoral post. He depends on speaking and writing fees for most of his income.
Once considered a vice presidential prospect, Cisneros surprised the Texas community with his announcement. Said assistant Shirl Thomas, who has worked with him all the years he has held office, “It was pretty teary around here when he decided.”
Though he has not accepted any particular post, Thomas said, he had received four high-paying offers just the previous week. She added that he would like to stay in the public policy arena. “Thaf s the engine that drives the man.”
The number of Latina elected office holders nationwide has reached an all-time high of 626, according to a report released Sept. 14 by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. The roster, compiled between August 1987 and August 1988, shows a growth rate of 5.6%.
Mostly gains are in municipal positions, where Latinas number 194, and in school board posts, where they number 277.
I n the population as a whole, female officeholders represent 12% of the total number of elected officials.
Michael Zamba, NALEO analyst, said women now represent 18.6% of Hispanic elected officials- |3,360. They are also represented in county positions with 84 nationwide, in judicial posts with 55, and at the state level with 16. No Hispanic women currently hold elective posts on the federal Tevel.
A lawsuit filed by the U.S. Justice Department Sept. 8 against Los Angeles County charges it discriminated against Hispanics when it drew up supervisorial districts in 1981. It calls for the county to redraw the district lines before 1990.
The voting-rights case is the largest ever undertaken by the Justice Department The county has 8.5 million residents, more than the population of 42 of the country’s 50 states. Its Board of Supervisors controls a $9 billion budget.
The case will be merged with a similar suit filed Aug. 24 by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California.
The suit charges that the five-member Board of Supervisors drew three district lines in 1981 that split Latinos in the San Gabriel Valley, where they comprised 73% of 1.2 million residents. The fragmentation denied them a majority or plurality in any of the five districts, it said
There has never been a Latino or other minority on the board in its 138-year history.
Based on the 1980 census, Hispanics comprise 28% of the county s7.5 million residents.
The fifth annual NALEO roster found a 1.3% increase among the total number of Hispanic officeholders. On a state-by-state basis, the increase was most marked in New Jersey. It was up 29% over last year.
According to NALEO Director Harry Pachbn, the roster of Latino elected officials now includes 11 voting seats in Congress, one governorship and mayoral offices in severa. large cities, such as Miami, San Antonio and Denver. - Sophia Nieves
HISPANIC ELECTED OFFICIALS
Texas 1,611 Florida 50
New Mexico 595 New Jersey 44
California 466 Illinois 28
Arizona 237 Connecticut 15
New York 68 Washington 12
They are projected to constitute 35% of 8.5 million now.
The Justice Department had been pressuring the board to redraw district lines voluntarily since May. MALDEF President Antonia Hernandez said of its action, “It’s about time.” The county board has 20 days to respond. County officials had hoped to postpone redistricting until after the 1990 Census.
Two supervisors are up for re-election in 1990. According to MALDEF Vice President for Legal Programs Richard Larson, the county wanted to put off redistricting because “they want to hold another illegal election.” MALDEF also seeks an increase in board seats, charging that this factor alone violates the Voting Rights Act. Each supervisor re-. presents almost three times the number of people represented by a member of Congress, the suit charges
Andy Hernandez, president of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, applauded the lawsuits which he said counter the past Hispanic inclination to forego voting because it won’t make a difference. “It’s vital to go after these dilution schemes so that we don’t frustrate our people.”
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
INS to Add 1,100 Agents
The first class of some 800 Border Patrol agents will begin training Oct. 3 at an Army base in Alabama The class will signal a move by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to increase its manpower along the U.S.-Mexico border by one-third in 1989.
An additional 300 agents will be trained at he regular INS facility in Georgia All will be in place'in June 1989. The 1,100 new agents comprise the Border Patrol’s largest buildup ever.
The 800 to be trained at Ft. McClellan were sent there because the INS’ regular training compound was not built to handle such a large influx.
The new agents are one of three steps called for in the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 to stem the flow of undocumented aliens. The other steps are the legalization program and employer sanctions.
Latina Officeholders Hit All-Time High


45% of Latino Undergrads Enroll in Two-Year Schools
Forty-five percent of Hispanic undergraduate college students attended two-year colleges In 1986, compared with 36% of Anglos and 31% of blacks, according to a U.S Census Bureau report released Sept 8. The report, “School Enrollment-Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 1986," counted 857,000 Hispanic undergraduate students.
It found that they were more likely to. be enrolled on a part-time basis than their counterparts
The data did not surprise Hispanic educators but Interpretations varied.
“Its not good to know Hispanics are going to two-year schools and thinking a two-year degree Is a terminal degree," said Gilbert SanchAz, president of New Mexico Highlands University, which at 70% has the second highest percentage enrollment of Hispanics in the country.
The president of an association of two-year colleges viewed the merits of a community college education differently. Pepe Barrdn said he sees two-year colleges as a
good ending point for some students as two reasons more Latinos are not enrolled wellasavaluabletransItionforotherLatlnos In four-year colleges, to the “foreign” territory represented by “There's a saying that If the university universities But, he admitted the transfer was to disappear tomorrow the barrio would rate is low. i Barrdn heads El Congreso never know the difference,” said Barrdn. National da Aaunloa Coleg tales. Both stressed the Importance of developing
Barrdn cited the complexity of financial better programs in both types of schools to aid forms and the unfamiliar atmosphere as encourage students to transfer.
- Sophia Nieves
STUDENT ENROLLMENT, 14 ANDOVER: 1986
All College Undergrads: Two-Year Four-Year
Students No. and % College** College**
Hispanic 783 857 45.2% 51.4%
Full Time 445 386(58.2%) 20.2 36.8
Part Time 318 271(41.2) 25.0 14.6
Blaok 1,324 1,179 30.5 65.2
Full Time 914 839(71.2) 18.0 51.9
Part Time 410 339(28.8) 14.5 13.3
White 10,497 8,399 35.8 61.1
Full Time 6,674 5,664(67.4) 16.6 48.9
Part Time * In thouMnd* 3,922 2,735(32.6): 19.2 12.3
** Total* let* than 100% a* some atudanta (ailed to indloate statu*
SOURCE: US Conaue Bureau's "School Enrollment - Soelei and Economic Characteristics ol Students: October (900"
Voter Groups Seek Mutual Solution
Representatives from Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project and the Center for Participation in Democracy will be meeting this week to try and reach a compromise on how Hispanics should be registered in California.
“In the last two months^there's been re* preachment going on on both sides. It does no' one any good... the community suffers and the leadership," said Richard Martinez, executive director of SVREP.
Martinez, expressed disappointment over a meeting held Aug. 26 that he had hoped would resolve four key points agreed upon earlier by Sen, Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and Andy Hern&ndez, SVREP president. Cranston is not a CPD board member, but he was involved in the formation of the center.
These points are: Hispanics In CPD should
decide how to register Hispanics, local Hispanic leadership should decide which group to work with, one-third of CPD's resources should be used for local elections and Cranston and1 CPD should support single-member district voting.
An additional point concerned Cranston's non-partisan fund raising i for the center. Martinez characterized these actions as “debilitating" because Cranston drew money 'rom SVREP1* possible fund sources
Cruz Reynoso, CPD chairman, attended the August meeting, He said It was never Intended by his group's contingent to be a means of resolution.
"It was simply not doable. We were not authorized (to make decisions), nor had the center’s board ever discussed... these types of issues," he said. - Sophia Nlavaa
Cavazos Discusses Views at Hearing
U.S. Secretary of Education designate Lauro Cavazos breezed through his Senate confirmation hearing Sept. 9, departing often from the views promoted by the current secretary, William Bennett.
Cavazos, who until recently had been president of Texas Tech University, In Lubbock disagreed with a 1985 statement by Bennett on the effectiveness of bilingual education: “After 17 years of federal Involvement, and after 61.7 billion of federal funding we have no evidence that the children we sought to help... have benefited."
Asked by Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Masa.) whether he agreed with Bennett’s assessment Cavazos said, “I believe In it(blllngual education), it’s effective. And it works." Kennedy heads the panel, the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, that heard Cavazos' test!-
White Calif. Students Become New Minority
White students will not be the majority in California public schools this year for the first time, said state education officials 8ept 6. Minority students, with Latinos making up the largest portion, will outnumber whites in athe nation's most populous state.
California Superintendent of Public Instruction Bill Honlg said the increasing minority enrollment signals a watershed.
There are 4.6 million students enrolled in kindergarten through high school this year in California.
Following are changes In enrollments for
mony.
Another point of departure from Bennett was the 61-year-old Cavazos' view on the necessity of there being an Education Department. *l frankly consider the Department of Education the most Important and serious effort that we can da"
Cavazos Is expected to be confirmed easily by the committee this week
CHC Elects Rop. Fuster
Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Jaime Fuster became the first Island congressman to head the 11-year-old Congressional Hispanic Caucus when he was unanimously elected as the group's chairman Sept 8 In Washington, D.C.
Fuster, 47,succeeds Rep Albert Bustamante (D-Texaa).
different groups (the figures for 2000 are
projections): 1966 1988 2000
Hispanic 13.6% 30.7% 36.1%
Black 8.2 9.0 9.3
Asian 2.2 7.6 8.8
White 75.2 49.2 42.7
Other 0.8 3.5 4,1
Brothers to Share(House*
Cuban Americans Mario, 26, and Lincoln Dlaz-Balart, 34, became Sept. 6 the first set of brothers to serve as state representatives in Florida since 1889.
Both represent Miami districts and both are Republicans with similar political views
This is Mario's first elected office while Lincoln won a second term unopposed, Mario served previously as an administrative aide to Miami Mayor Xavier SuArez.
Said Lincoln, “We never even shared a bedroom and now we'll be sharing the state House."
2
Hispanic Link WMkly Report


Margarita Mondrus Engle, guest columnist
An Extension of Love
It was 1960. I was eight years old. We were visiting my mother’s family in Cuba, my grandmother, greatgrandmother, aunts, uncles, cousins. Relatives were something I took for granted, as plentiful and readily available as tropical fruit.
I returned home to Los Angeles proudly carrying a collection of photographs taken with my first camera: horses, cattle, pigs, chickens.
Not a single snapshot of a relative.
Things are different now. I am 36. Twenty-eight years have passed since the days when I regarded using wads of chewing gum to catch tarantulas as the most enticing of tropical pastimes. Relatives are scarce now.
They live far away-^nCuba, New Jersey and Miami Everyone is growing older. Nothing can be taken for granted.
There is nothing quite so sweet as the image of an eight-year-old girl standing on a front porch, intently watching the black clouds of a tropical storm, relishing the warm air, sucking on a juicy guanabana fruit, content in the knowledge that when night falls, there will be a cluster of relatives, close and distant revolutionary, counterrevolutionary and neutral, gathering to play bingo and tell stories It is an image ol warmth, safety and permanence. It is a memory to treasure.
LACED WITH ASPHALT, LINOLEUM
Now my children will have similar memories
Early this year we held a Cuban family reunion in New Jersey. My children’s memories will be laced with cold winds instead of hot beaches, leafless trees instead of royal palms, asphalt and linoleum instead of cobblestones and red tile.
In New Jersey we drank tiny cups of Cuban expresso until we were jittery. We clustered around tables to consume mountains of black beans and chicken with yellow rice, fried bananas and manioc fritters, boliche as ado (stuffed roast), mamey milkshakes, and sweet caramelized flan
In Elizabeth and Union City, North Plainfield and West New York, dozens'of people gathered around to kiss me and hug me and make me feel like someone who belongs, just as they once did in Havana, Los Pinos and Trinidad, Cuba.
iAY, QUE LINDO!
In New Jersey we all spoke at the same time, in our loudest voices, letting the children run wild because that is how they are happy.
For a few days I knew the feelings of a shipwrecked sailor, rescued after many years on a deserted island. I, who have always treasured solitude, peace and quiet above all, found myself wondering why isolation from the extended family seems to be the trademark of the American Dream.
I am glad that my children have warm memories of people whose names they can’t remember, but whose love they are anxious to receive. I am glad they learned to say "/Ay, qua Undo!” (“Oh, how pretty!”) and “Te quiero mucho.”(u\ love you very much.”)
Above all, I am glad they know they are part of something larger than a family of four.
(Margarita Mondrus Engle, of Fall brook, Calif., is an agronomist and a free-lance writer.)
Quoting...
RISTO MARTTINEN, Falls Church, Va, jabbing at the English-Only movement, asks in a letter to the editor of the Montgomery County Journal:
“(If English becomes the official U.S. language), would you want your child to peek into dictionaries of mixed official and pre-official language unsupervised?”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin polos en la lengua
HISPANIC BIDDING WAR: The press chimes in as the presidential candidates’ battle for Hispanic votes lumbers on:
“There’s something a bit crass about this bidding war... but mostly it’s a benign competition. While politicians in other circumstances appeal to voters who fear the newcomers in their midst, (Bush and Dukakis) compete to welcome them.” - Washington Post editorial of July 30.
“Mr. Dukakis needs both Texas and California. Their large Hispanic populations could be decisive - if his campaign ban motivate and mobilize them with something more than his and Mr. Bentsen’s fluent Spanish ” - The New York Times’ Tom Wicker in his Sept 9 analysis of “The Hispanic Factor.”
“Not only do the politicians’ displays of Spanish offend an already aroused nativist element in the U.S., they foster the incorrect notion that Hispanics are not learning English and, by implication, not assimilating into American society. A further ironic result, of which Anglo politicians seem remarkably unaware, is that many Hispanics are offended by all this campaign Spanish...” - Peter Skerry, in a Sept. 13*Wall Street Journal column.
“Anyone who can manage to get the Hispanics and the Irish together could be president.” - The San Francisco Examiner's “Image” magazine, June 19, quoting a constituent of Ray Flynn, Boston’s mayor, who while working for Dukakis has national ambitions of his own.
“Dukakis has said there won’t be any negotiations with Castro until he respects human rights and initiates a democratic process in the country...
“(The Republicans) come to Calle Ocho(in Miami) and yell'Cuba iibre’ but the negotiations taking place are on a higher level than those of other administrations. If that isn’t a betrayal, then I don’t know what is. The Republican Party has betrayed the exiled Cuban community.” - Luis Lauredo, president of the Cuban Democrats Association, quoted July 17 in The Miami Herald.
LITTLE BROWN BUSHES: Comedian Paul Rodriguez, emceeing the Sept. 13 Congressional Hispanic Caucus annual banquet, ponders: “What a dilemma we’re in! On the one hand, we have George and his little brown Bushes. On the other hand, we have Dukakis, probably the only presidential candidate who knows all the words to La Bamba. Whaf s a Hispanic to do?”
MISSING LINK: Did anyone not receive his/her Weekly Report of Aug. 1 (the one with the Burciaga cartoon on the English-speaking/non-English-speaking airline seating arrangements)?
The Post Office sent one back to us with the address label torn off, the envelope mangled and some shredded remains sanitarily wrapped in plastic, bearing the purple message: “Returned for Better Address.”
They didn’t even refund our 25 cents.
THE LATINO PSYCHE: Yet another non-Hispanic has found a publisher to print his gospel on U.S. Hispanics. Harper & Row just brought out “Hispanic U.SA,” by Thomas Wayr.
A sample of Weyr’s insight which just may discourage you from spending the $19.95 price listed on the jacket
“Despair is never far from the surface. They weep easily and wear their hurts for all to see, and do so in ways Anglos do not easily understand. A Hispanic cabdriver in San Antonio was to take me from the Hyatt to the Hispanic west side. He lost his way, pulled off the highway, and began to cry. He would quit college. He was no good. He had no hope. I felt guilt and irritation. Emotional barriers are formidable, yet they tell as much about a culture as thinking, talking, perceiving...”
We haven’t even overcome our “language barrier” yet and now we have an “emotional barrier” to surmount, too. jQue lastima!
TODAY’S PROVOCATIVE THOUGHT: (offered by comedian John Mendoza on a September HBO comedy special): “Do illiterate people get the full effect of alphabet soup?”
- Kay Barbaro
Sept 19,1988
3


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: “School Enrollment-Social and Economic Characteristics: October 1986,” a 103-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau, looks at enrollment from preprimary to graduate level according to race and ethnicity. For a copyfspecify Series P-20, No. 429) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (No price was available at press time.)
LEADERSHIP AGENDA: “Hispanic Issues Are America's Issues” is the 108-page document on the proceedings of the fourth quadrennial conference of the National Hispanic Leadership Conference, held in Aprils Fora copy send $7 to Pablo Sediflo, NHLC chairman, 1312 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 659-6876 or call Roger Rivera at (202) 628-9600.
OVERVIEW ON HISPANICS: The September issue of The World & I magazine offers a special 67-page section on U.S. Hispanics. It costs $10 plus shipping fee. Order from The World & I, 2850 New York Ave. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 635-4000.
LITERARY COMPETITION: The deadline for the third annual Letras de Oro competition is Oct. 12. All submissions, except for the translation of a Spanish-language book into English, must be in Spanish. For more information write Letras de Oro, University of Miami Graduate School of International Studies, P.O. Box 248123, Coral Gables, Fla. 33134.
HISPANIC ELECTED OFFICIALS: The National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials gives the number of officials nationally and on a state-by-state basis. It also contains a breakdown on Latina elected officials. To order a copy send a check for $32.40 to the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003(202)546-2536.
SENATE REPORT ON HISPANICS: “Hispanics: Talent for America’s Future” isa35-page report by the Senate Republican Task Force on Hispanic Affairs compiling data on Hispanics in the areas of literacy and education, economic development employment and health. For a free copy, contact Senate Republican Conference, 405 Hart Senate Building, Washington, D.C. 20510 (202) 224-2764.
FASTEST GROWING COMPANIES: Hispanic Business magazine's September issue devoted 25 of its 64 pages to the 100 fastest growing Hispanic-owned businesses. For a copy send $2 ($18 for a one-year subscription) to HB, 360 S. Hope St, Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 93105 (805) 682-5843.
VETERANS MEMORIAL CLOSER
A competition for designs for the nation’s first memorial to U.S. Hispanic veterans from all wars will kick off at the end of this month. The memorial will be built in Whittier, Calif.
The Association of Hispanic Vietnam Era Veterans wants to have the memorial erected by Memorial Day 1992. It is currently seeking funding from a variety of sources. Organizers hope to raise some $1.5 million through mass mailings and special events.
The effort saw its breakthrough in June when Whittier’s Rose Hills Memorial Park donated a half an acre.
For more information or to make contributions, contact Frank Gonzalez,Association of Hispanic Vietnam Era Veterans, 5452 1/2 E. Pomona Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90022 (213) 724-0812.
AIDS PROPOSALS SOUGHT
The U.S. Conference of Mayors has set Oct 12 as the deadline for accepting proposals for AIDS education projects geared primarily to racial and ethnic communities.
The conference will award approximately 15 grants ranging from $20,000 to $42,000. Funding has been provided by the federal Centers for Disease Control. Proposals from community-based organizations are particularly sought.
As of August Hispanics accounted for 14% of the 70,000 AIDS cases diagnosed.
For more specifics contact Matthew Murguia, U.S. Conference of Mayors, 1620 I St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 293-7330.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
US West, a diversified communications company that subsumes what was formerly Mountain Bell, Pacific Northwest Bell and Northwestern Bell, elects Remedios Diaz-Oliver to its 15-member board of directors. Diaz-Oliver is the CEO of the Miami-based American International Container Inc. . . First Interstate Bank of California appoints Mary Salinas Durdn as its vice president of urban and community affairs... Laura Balverde-Sanchez, president of the New El Rey Sausage Co., based in Vernon, Calif., is one of five female | business owners to receive the 1988 Women of Enterprise Awards from Avon Products in a ceremony in New York. El Rey generated $3.5 million in sales last year...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
LEADERSHIP Omaha, Neb. Sept. 19
US West Somos-Nebraska will co-sponsora seminar titled Hispanic/Chicano Leadership: Myth or Reality? The guest speaker will be Marty Martinez, an assistant professor at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. Tom Reyes (402) 422-8189
CHICANO PERSPECTIVES San Antonio Sept. 21-24
The Tercer Encuentro Chicane, co-sponsored by the Universidad Nacionai Auto noma de Mexico, will be dedicated to the late Willie Velasquez, founder of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project Topics to be covered are Chicanos and the media, “he demythification of the Chicano stereotype, and demogrrphic {development and economic perspectives of the Chicano population.
Martha Cortes (512) 227-0311
ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
Chicago Sept. 23
The Latino Institute, a research, advocacy and management training center serving Hispanics in the Chicago area, will hold a dinner to celebrate its fifth anniversary. Edwin Claudio (312) 663-3603
QUINCENTENARY PROGRAM
Washington, D.C. Sept. 23, 24
Raices del Pasado, or Seeds of the Past, is the name
of a program by the Smithsonian Institution covering
several topics on life in the Americas before the
landing of Christopher Columbus.
Office of Folklife Programs (202) 287-3541
STUDENT EMPOWERMENT Miami Sept. 25-27
The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities will have people such as Flora Mancuso-Edwards, president of New Jersey’s Middlesex Community College, and Arturo Madrid, president of the Tomas Rivera Center in California, address' its meeting titled Institutional Change andthe Empowerment of Hispanic Students.
Gene Gonzalez (512) 433-1501
COMING SOON
CELEBRATING CULTURE
US West Somos-Nebraska Omaha, Neb. Sept. 26 Tom Reyes (402) 422-8189
AN EVENING WITH CARLOS FUENTES University of California, Riverside Riverside, Calif. Sept. 26 Kathy Barton (714) 787-5185
SPOTLIGHT
USING PUBLIC RELATIONS: The Hispanic Public Relations Association will hold a one-day seminar aimed at Hispanic organizations on the uses of public relations, publicity and promotions to help them get their message out Registration for the seminar, to be held Oct. 1 in Los Angeles, costs $25. For more information call HPRA President Esther Renteria at (213) 726-7690.
Calendar will publish for free announcements on events of interest to the Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address itemsta Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
4
Sept 19, 1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
ELDERLY ASSOCIATION
Th# following positions are with ths National Association For Hlspanio Elder-ly/Asoolaoion Naolonal Pro Personas Mayoress
PROJECT MONITOR - For employment program for national organization. Excellent written and verbal communloa-tion skills. Requires BA In publlo administration or soolal sciences; bilingual preferred. Position based In Los Angeles; must be willing to travel.
COORDINATOR/LIAISON - National organization seeks self-starter to coordinate employment program at Its D.C. I office and aot as liaison with governmental agencies as requested. Requires B.A. in soolal sciences or publlo administration; exoellent Interpersonal and organization skills; bilingual.
Send resum* with salary history: President, ANPPM, 2727 W. Sixth St., 8uite 270, Los Angelos, Calif. 80067(213)487-1822.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Exec utive Director sought for progressive Cuban American organization In Washington, D.C. Candidates to develop and maintain oontaots with media and publlo officials, to adm Inlster off ioe, and organize oonferenoea.
Must have knowledge of Cuban Amerloan Issues BA/BS degree. Graduate eduoatlon , preferred.
Apply by Nov. 7 to Search Committee, P.O, Box 28612, Brookland Station, Washington, D.C, 20018.
8TATE POLICY ANALY8T (1 year internship)
MALDEF, a national olvll rights organization, seeks an Individual who would researoh key state polloy issues and monitor bills In the Texas Legislatu re affecting Hlspanlos, The State Polloy Analyst will eommute from the 8an Antonio area to the Texas Legislature In Austin.
Required; Legal training or graduate school equivalence In soolal selenoe, political aelsnoe, public administration or publlo polloy; familiarity with the state legislative proeess and key Hlspanio Issues; exoellent oral and written oommunloatlons skills; bilingual In Spanlsh/Engllsh preferred; and must nave own automobile to oommute between 3an Antonio and Austin,
Send resum* and writing sample to; Barbara Aguirre, MALDEF, The Commerce Building, LTD, 314 E. Commerce 8t., Suite 200, San Antonio, Texas 78208 by 8/28/88.
JOURNAU8T8/CRBATIVB WRITERS; Submissions are welcome for Weekly Report's “guest columnist" feature. Approx. 800 worda For writer1 s guidelines send self addressed, stamped envelope to: Gueet Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20008.
A WHO’S WHO OF OFFICEHOLDERS
WHO’S WHO: CHICANO OFFICEHOLDERS: 1887-88 Is a comprehensive reference directory compiled by Western New Mexloo University Professor of Political Science Arthur D. Martinez. This latest updated Seventh Edition lists more than 6,000 names addresses and telephone numbers of Chlcano and other Hispanic officeholders from the national to the municipal level. Photographs are incorporated throughout the publications The national level now lists all Hlspanlos, regardless of ethnlo background. Political party functionaries an expanded listing of nationwide olvlo organizations and seleeted political and demographic tables and charts also are inoluded.
For a copy send $18.95 to; Dr. Arthur D. Martinez, P.O. Box2271, Silver City, New Mexloo 88062, (605) 535-8228. All seven editions are available to those who wish to complete a FULL SET. Please indicate whether you want to be placed on the 8TANDING ORDER listing to automatically receive each succeeding edition.
BALES POSITION
Retail broadcast sales sales research, sales administration and coordinating certain sales/ promotion-related projects. One year retail broadoast sales or similar experienoo, typing skills good oommunioatlon skills marketing and/or promotional skills Compensation -salary plus commission.
Send resumes to General Manager, Llnooln Broadoaetlng Company, 100 Valley Drive, Brim bane, Calif. 84005. Resumeamuctbereoelvod by 9/23/88,
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 8tatewlde community-based advooaoy research and planning organization seeks Exeeutlve Director. Proven experlenoe In fund raising, program and staff development, planning and administration required. Graduate degree In relevant field required, and Spanlsh/Engllsh bilingual ability preferred. Competitive salary.
Send resume, oover latter and three letters of reoommendatlon by 8/26 to: Searoh Committee, Hlspanio Offloe of Planning and Evaluation, 88 Dlmook 8t„ Boston, Mass. 02118.
A8PIRA Association ino.
PROJECT MANAGER AND
DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST
Salary: 830,000 Site: Washington, D.C.
DUTIES: Manage national Hlspanio dropout dissemination proieot in ten sitae. Coordinate staff training, develop publications Identify potential funders and ooordinate development of national program.
QUALIFICATIONS: Demonstrated experlenoe In programs management, fund ralelng and eduoatlonal polloy analysis Exoellent writing and organizational skills publlo speaking ability, flueney In Spanish and English. Willingness to travel.
STAFF ASSISTANT
Must know Word Perfect and willing to learn Lotua 123 and dBase 3 plua. Exoellent proofing and Interpersonal skills. Knowledge of Spanish helpful.
Responsibilities Include: Answering telephone, mall distribution, typing and scheduling of meetings. Occasional overtime required. Salary negotiable at 118,000 range based on experlenoe.
Send resum* to: ASPIRA Association lno„ 1111lath 81 NW, Suite 340, Washington, D.C. 20033
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CALENDAR POTPOURRI: Following are events scheduled in major U.S. cities over the next few weeks:
Next week in the nation’s capital, GALA Hispanic Theatre performs Marco Antonio de la Parra’s play Matatangos in Spanish at the Kennedy Center. The production, from GALA’S past season, is part of the new Washington Front and Center series.
Rita Moreno will host a benefit reception and dinner prior to the performance, scheduled for Sept 26.
Two days later, Miami will host Camino a la OTI (Organizacion de Televisidn Iberoamericana) song festival, staged by Univision, to choose a U.S. envoy for the International OTI Song Festival, held in Buenos Aires in November.
Univision airs Camino a la OTI live Sept. 28 at 8 p.m. EDT.
Miami will 2-
11. Twenty Latin American musicians and composers will participate.
The Latin American Spirit: Art and Artists in the United States 1920-1970 is an exhibition of works by some 130 artists that opens Oct 1 at the Bronx Museum of Art in NewYorkCity. The show latertravelsto El Paso, Texas; San Diego; San Juan, Puerto Rico; and Vero Beach, Fla.
New York is the site for the 1988 National Latino Film and Video Festival, a juried event presented by the city’s El Museo del Barrio Oct. 14-22.
Puerto Rico holds the first Festival Cine San Juan Oct 1 -8, and San Antonio’s 13th CineFestival is being held Nov. 4-14.
This week the Guadalupe Theatre opens the exhibition La comunidad chicana hacia el aho 2000: Imagen y realidad. Presented at the San Antonio campus of Mexico City’s Universidad Autonoma Nacional, it runs from Sept 21 to'Oct. 18.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
" MEDIA AGENDA: The federal government should ensure media compliance with affirmative action in the nation’s newsrooms, according to the National Hispanic Leadership Conference’s 1988 agenda, published Aug. 31. •«
NHLC, a coalition of 20 national Hispanic organizations which meets every four years, made several recommendations, including:
• that the federal government enforce the Federal Communications Commission policy of granting tax certificates to broadcast station sellers who transfer ownership to minorities;
• that academic institutions provide English-and Spanish-language training in journalism and communications departments; and
• that Hispanic organizations petition news associations for positions as officers and managers.
Some 200 persons met in April in Washington, D.C., to shape the resolutions. In addition to the media, the 108-page agenda made re-
commendations in areas such as corporate and philanthropic responsibility, education and civil rights. (See Collecting to obtain a copy.)
HISPANICS COVERED: The phenomenon of Hispanics as the nation’s fastest-growing minority is the subject of a 67-page section in the September issue of The World & I magazine, a 700-page monthly published by The Washington Times Corp., part of the Rev. Sun Myung Moon’s News World Communications.
Featured are articles by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, New York Rep. Robert Garcia and Miami Mayor Xavier Sudrez. Subjects include the Hispanic vote in November, Spanish-language media and a look at bilingual education.
(See Collecting to obtain a copy.)
NOTICIAS DISPUTE: The management of Noticias del Mundo, a N ew York Spanish-language daily, is appealing the National Labor Relations Board decision to uphold the staffs vote to organize under The Newspaper Guild.
It is the first News World Communications publication to be organized.
MEDIA MEETS: The San Antonio As-
sociation of Hispanic Journalists raised, at last count $3,300 at its first scholarship fund softball game Sept. 10. Newspersons from the San Antonio Light defeated those from the Express-News by a score of 17-8, but the Express-News sold $2,400 worth of tickets. More than 1,000 spectators paid $2 each to cheer the players...
The Greater Dallas Community Relations Commission will hold a conference Sept. 29 geared toward combating racism in the media Keynote speaker will be F6lix Gutierrez, journalism professor at the University of Southern California. Contact Elizabeth Ann Flores at (214) 979-0406...
HONORS, NEWS AND MOVES: Houston book publisher Nicolds Kanellos was among three Latinos honored Sept 14 at a White House gala. He was presented the Hispanic Heritage Award for Literature. Kanellos is founder and director of Arte Publico Press, the oldest and largest publishing house for U.S. Hispanic literature...
Gustavo Pupo-Mayo has been promoted to general manager of El Nuevo Herald and The Miami Herald editorial board member Carlos Verdecia was named editor...
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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President Reagan holds, the Hispanic Heritage Week proclamation after signing it Sept 13 at the White House. Behind him, from the left, are retired Air Force Col. Gilbert Coronado, Florida Gov. Bob Martinez, artist Orlando A. B., White House Office of Public Liaison Director Rebecca Range, high school teacher Jaime Escalante and publisher Nicolds Kanellos.
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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. state's official language. l . ew ayo r Ed Koch presents to The White House invites Joseph Fernandez, superi eld!JDhQf the Dade County, Fla., school district, and three other urban leaders to a ceremony presided over by President Reagan for the unveiling of a student training program . . . Presidential candidate Michael Dukakis announces that Hispanic Congressman Bill Rich ardson(D-N.M.), will be one of 12 national co-chairs for his campaign . . . The National Republican Congressional Committee pledges $45,000 to the campaign of Ralph Ramirez in his effort to unseat Rep. Matthew Martinez (DCalif . ) ... Arizona Gov . Rose Mofford urges voters there to reject a ballot measure seeking to make English the Hiram Rodriguez the , city:\s first Hispanic Heritage Business Award at a ceremony at the residence, Gracie Mansion . . Rodriguez is president of Bronx-based La Rosa del Monte Express, a moving company that has revenues of $8.3 million annually ... Suspended Ramsey County (Minn.) District Court Judge Alberto Miera, who went on a 57-day fast this summer to protest what he said was unethical criticism of him by fellow judges, appears in bankruptcy court to answer questions about his financial status. Miera was convicted in March 1987 for forcing a kiss upon a male court reporter ... A poll of People magazine readers finds that TV personality Geraldo ; Rivera is third behind boom boxes and ringing car alarms in what should be eliminated from the planet. .. Vol&No.371 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Mayor Cisneros Says He Won't Run Again U.S. Slaps L.A. County With Suit Citing the need for a more lucrative career , San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros announced at a Sept. 12 press conference that he would not seek a fifth term. The 41-yearold politician told reporters his daughters require financial support for their college education while his son , who has a congenital heart defect and stomach ailments, steadily requires costly medical treatments. Cisneros earns $50 a week for his mayoral post. He depends on speaking and writing fees for most of his income. Once considered a vice presidential pros pect, Cisneros surprised the Texas com munity with his announcement. Said ass is tant Shirl Thomas, who has worked with him all the years he has held office , "It was pretty teary around here when he decided." Though he has not accepted any particular post, Thomas said , he had received four high-paying offers just the previous week. She added that he would like to stay in the public policy arena. "Thafs the engine that drives the man." A lawsuit filed by the U.S. Justice Depart ment Sept. 8 against Los Angeles County charges it discriminated against Hispanics when it drew up supervisorial districts in 1981 . It calls for the county to redraw the district lines before 1990. The voting-rights case is the largest ever undertaken by the Justice Department. The county has 8.5 million residents, more than the population of 42 of the country's 50 states . Its Board of Supervisors controls a $9 billion budget. The case will be merged with a similar suit filed Aug. 24 by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the Ame rican Civil Liberties Union of Southern Cali fornia . The suit charges that the five-member Board of Supervisors drew three district lines in 1981 that split Latinos in the San Gabriel Valley, where they comprised 73% of 1.2 million residents . The fragmentation denied them a majority or plurality in any of the five districts, it said . There has never been a Latino or other minority on the board in its 138-year history . Based on the 1980 census, Hispanics com prise 28% of the county's7.5 million residents. Latina Officeholders Hit All Time High The number of Latina elected office holders nationwide has reached an all-time high of 626, according to a report released Sept. 14 by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials . The roster, compiled between August 1987 and August 1988 , shows a growth rate of 5.6%. Mostly gains are in municipal positions, where Latinas number 194, and in school board posts, where they number 277. In the population as a whole, female officeholders represent 12% of the total number of elected officials. Michael Zamba, NALEQianalyst, said worn en now represent 18.6% of Hispanic elected officials3,3.60 . They are also represented in county positionswiTh 84nationwide, in )udiCI81 posTs wiTh 55 , and aftFie5tate level with f6. No Hispanic-womenc -urrently hold elective posts on the federal Te11el. The fifth annual NALEO roster found a 1 .3% increase among the total number of Hispanic officeholders. On a state-by-state basis, the increase was most marked in New Jersey. It was up 29% over last year. According to NALEO Director Harry Pach6n, the roster of Latino elected officials now includes 11 voting seats in Congress, one governorship and mayoral offices in severa . large cities, such as Miami, San Antonio and Denver. Sophia Nieves HISPANIC ELECTED OFFICIALS Texas 1,611 Florida New Mexico 595 New Jersey California 466 Illinois Arizona 237 Connecticut New York 68 Washington 50 44 28 15 12 They are projected to constitute 35% of 8 . 5 million now . The Justice Department had been pressuring the board to redraw district lines voluntarily : since May. MALDEF President Antonia nandez said of its action, "lfs about time." The county board has 20 days to respond. County officials had hoped to postpone re districting until after the 1990 Census . Two supervisors are up for re-election in 1990. According to MALDEF Vice Presiden t for Legal Programs Richard Larson, the county wanted to put off redistricting because "they want to hold another illegal election." MALDEF also seeks an increase in board seats, charging that this factor alone violates the Voting Rights Act. Each supervisor re. presents almost three times the number of represented by a member of Congress, the suit charges. Andy Hernandez, president of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, applauded the lawsuits which he said counter the past Hispanic inclination to forego voting because i t wori't make a difference. "lfs vital to go after these dilution schemes so that we don' t frustrate our people." Darryl Lynette Figueroa .INS to Add 1,100 Agents The first class of some 800 Border Patrol agents will begin training Oct. 3 at an Army base in Alabama. The class will signal a move by the U .S. Immigration and Naturalizat ion Service to increase its manpower along the U.S. Mexico border by one-third in 1989. An additional300 agents will be trained at ; he regular INS facility in Georgia All will be in place . in June 19S9.The 1,100 new agents comprise the Border Patrol's largest buildup ever . The 800 to be trained at Ft. McClellan were sent there because the INS' regular training compound was not built to handle such a large influx. The new agents are one of three steps called for in the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 to stem the flow of undocumented aliens. The other steps are the legalization program and employer sanc : tions.

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45% of L8tfno UiiCielilJnlds Enroll in Forty-five percentof Hispanic undergraduate college students attended two-year colleges In 1986, compared with 36% of Anglos and 31% of blacks, according to a U.S Census Bureau report released Sept 8. The report, "School EnrollmentSoclal and Eco nomic Characteristics of Students: October 1986," counted 61S7,000 Hispanic under graduate students. It found that they were more likely to. be enrolled on a parttlme basis than their counterparts. The data did not surprise Hispanic edu cators. but Interpretations varied. "lfs not good to know Hispanics are going to two-year schools and thinking a two-year degree Ia a termInal degree,'' said G ilbert Sanchez, presldeht of New Mexico Highlands University, which at 70% has the second highest percentage enrollment of Hispanics in the country. The president of an aeaoclatlon of two year colleges viewed the merits of a com• munlty college education differently. Pepe Barr6n said he sees two-year colleges aa a ; good ending point for some students as well as a valuable transition for other Latinos to the "foreign" territory represented by universities. But, he admitted the transfer rate Is low. , Barr6n heads El Congreso Naclonal de Asuntos Coleglale& Barr6n cited the complexity of financial aid forma and the unfamiliar atmosphere aa two reasons more Latinos are not enrolled In four•year colleges . "There's a saying that If the university was to disappear tomorrow the barrio would never know the difference," said Barr6n. Both stressed the Importance of developing better ptograms In both types of schools to encourage students to transfer. Sophia Nieves STUDENT ENROLLMENT,14 ANDOVER: 1986 Hlepanlc Full Time Part Time Black Full Time Part Time White Full Time Part Time • In ttlouaanda All College Students 763 446 318 1,324 914 410 10,497 6,574 3,922 Undergrada: No. and% 657 386(58.2%) 271(41.2) 1,179. 839(71.2) 339(28.8) 8,399 5,664(67.4) 2,736(32.6) : .. Totalaleaa ttlen •• tome atudentalalled to lndloate 1tetua Two-Year College** 45.2% 20.2 26.0 30.5 16.0 14.5 35.8 16.6 19.2 Four-Year College** 51.4% 36. 8 14.6 66.2 61.9 13.3 61.1 48.9 12.3 SOURCE: u.s ceneu• Burt1u'1 "Sohool Enrollment-Soolelend Eoonomlo Chereottrlat/oa of Sturlenta: OCtober lf88" Voter Groups Seek Mutual Solution , White Calif. Students Become New Minority Representatives from Southweat Voter Registration and Educatio n Project and the Center for Participation In Democracy will be meeting this week to try and reach a compromise on how Hispanics should be reglatered in California . ''In the last two montha11there'a been reproachment going on on both aides. It i:loei -no\ one I -any good. . . the community auffera and the leadership, " aald Fllcl'lard Martinez, executive director of SVFIEP. Martlne11:, expresaed disappointment over a meeting held Aug. 26 that he had hoped would resolve four key pointe agreed upon earlier by Sen. Alan Cranston (DCallf.) and Andy Hernande1:, SVFIEP president. Cranaton is not a CPO board member, but he wae involved in the format,on of the center. These points are: CPO ahould decide how to reglater Hlapanlca, local Hllleadership ahould decide which group to work with, one-third of CPO'a reaources ahould be used for local election• and Cran aton and I CPO should support 1ingl1-member district voting . An additional point concerned Cranston'• non-partisan fund ralalng 1 for the center. Martinez characterized theai actlona at "deb ilitating" becauae Cranaton drew money •rom SVREP'a poaalble fund aourcea. Cruz Reynoeo, CPO chairman, attended the :\uguat meeting. He said ltwaa never Intended by his group's contingent to be a means of reaolutlon. "It was simply not doable. We were not authorized (to make decielont), nor had the board everdlacueeed ... theae type• of laluei," he allCI. Sophia Nlevea Cavazos Discusses VIews at Hearing .. u.s. Secretary of Education designate Lauro Cavazos breezed through hla Senate conflr' mation hearing Sept. 9. departing often from the views promoted by the current secretary, William Bennett. Cavazos, who until recently had been president of Texas Teeh University, In Lubbock, disagreed with a 1985 statement by Bennett on the effectiveneas of bilingual education: M After 17 years of federal Involvement, and after $1.7 billion of federal funding we have no evidence that the c hildren we aought to help. , . have benefitted." Asked by Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Maaa.) whether he agreed with Bennett's aaa111ment Cavazos said. believe In lt(blllngual education). ,lfs effective . And It works. " Kennedy heads the panel; the Senate Labor and Human R .. sources that heard Cavazos' testl2 mony. Another point of departure from Bennett was the 61year-old Cavazos' view on the necessity of there being an Education Depart ment. "I frankly conalder the Ool)artment of Education tne moat Important and aerloua effort that we can do." Cavazos is expected to be confirmed easily by the committee thla week. Rap. Fuater . Puerto Rico Realdent Commlaaloner Jaime Fuater became the flret leland congressman. to head the 11•year-old Congreaalonal H lit' panic Caucus when. he waa unanimously elected aa the group's chairman Sept. 8 In Waahlngton, O.C. -Fuster, 47 ,.succeeds Rei). Albert Bustamante (D-Texaa). White atudenta will not be the miJorlty In California public: achoola thl1 year for the flrat . time, aald state education offlclala Sept. e . t,tlnorlty atudenta_ with Latino• making up the largeat portion, will outnumber whltea In the nation' a moat populoue atate. • California Superintendent of Public lnatNCtlcn Bill Honig aald thelncreaalng minority ment algnala a watel'lhed . There are 4.8 million atudenta enrolled In kindergarten through high achool thla year In California . Following are changea In tnrollmenta for different groupe (tht flguroa for 2000 are 1111 1188 2000 Hlal)anlc 13.8% 30.7% 38.1% Black 8.2 9.0 9.3 Aalan 2.2 7.8 8.8 White 78.2 49. 2 42.7 Other o.e 3.5 4.1 Brothera to Share' House' Cuban Americana Mario, 28, and Lincoln Olaz Balart, 34, became Sept. e the flrat set of brothere to serve as atate repreaentatlvea in Florida since 1889. Both represent Miami districts and both are Rel)ubllcana with similar political views. Thia Ia Marlo's flrat elected office while Lincoln won a second term unoppoaed. Mario served previously as an adml nlstratlve aide to Miami Mayor Xavier Su6rez. Said Lincoln, "We never even shared a bedroom and now we' II be sharing the state Houae." Hlapanlo Link Wnkly Report

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Margarita Mondrus Engle, guest columnist An Extension of Love It was 1960. I was eight years old. We were visiting my mother's family in Cuba, my grandmother, great grandmother, aunts, uncles, cousins. Relatives were something I took for granted, as plentiful and read ily available as tropical fruit. I returned home to Los Angeles proudly carrying a collection of photographs taken with my first camera: horses, cattle, pigs, chickens. Not a single snapshot of a relative.: Things are different now. I am 36. Twentyeight years have passed since the days when I regarded using wads of chewing gum to catch tarantulas as the most enticing of tropical pastimes. Relatives are scarce now. , They live far New Jersey i!nd Miami. Everyone Is growing older. Nothing can be taken for granted. . . There is nott.ir19 -c1uite so sweet as the image of an eight-yearold girl standing on a front porch, intently watching the black clouds of a tropical storm, relishing the warm air, sucking on a juicy guanabana fruit, content in the knowledge that when night falls, there will be a cluster of relatives, close and distant, revolutionary, counterrevolutionary and neutral, gathering to play bingo and tell stories. It is an image of warmth, safety and permanence .. It is a memory to treasure . LACED WITH ASPHALT, LINOLEUM Now my children will have similar memories. Early this year we held a Cuban family reunion in New Jersey. My children's memories will be laced with cold winds instead of hot beaches, leafless trees instead of royal palms, asphalt and linoleum Instead of COQblestones and red tile. . In New Jersey we drank tiny cups of Cuban expresso un t il we were jittery. We clustered around tables to consume mountains of black beans and chicken with yellow rice, fried bananas and manioc fritters, bolicheasado(stuffed roast), mamey milkshakes, and sweet caramelized f/an h1 Elizabeth and Union City, North Plainfield and West New York, dozens-of people gathered around to kiss me and hug me and make me feel like someone who belongs, just as they once did in Havana, Los Pinos and Trinidad, Cuba. lAY, QUE LINDO! 1.n New Jersey we all spoke at the same time, in our loudest voices, letting the children run wild because that is how they are happy. For a few days I knew the feelings of a shipwrecked sailor, rescued after many years on a deserted island. I, who have always treasured solitude, peace and quiet above all, found myself wondering why isolation from the extended family seems to be the trademark of the American Dream. 1 am glad that my children have warm memories of people whose names they can't remember, but whose love they are anxious to receive. 1 am glad they learned to say "iAY, que Iindo!" ("Oh, how pretty!") and "Te quiero mucho." ("I love you very much . ") Above all , 1 am glad they know they are part of something larger than a family of four. (Margarita Mondrus Engle, of Fallbrook, Calit, is an agronomist and a free-lance writer.) Quoting. • • RISTO MARTTIMEN, Falls Church, Va, jabbing at the EnglishOnly movement, asks in a letter to the editor of the Montgomery County Journal: "(If English becomes the official U.S would you your child to peek into dictionaries of mixed off1c1al andpre-off1c1al Sin pelos en Ia lengua HISPANIC BI-DDING WAR: The press chimes in as the presidential candidates' battle for Hispanic votes lumbers on: "There's something a bit crass about this bidding war. . . but mostly ifs a benign competition. While politicians in other circumstances appeal to voters who fear the newcomers in their midst, (Bush and Dukakls) compete to welcome them."-Washington Post editorial of July 30. "Mr. Dukakis needs both Texas and California . Their Hispanic populations could be decisive if his campaign can motivate and mobilize them with something more than his and Mr. Bentsen's fluent Spanish."The New York Times ' Tom Wicker in his Sept. 9 analysis of "The Hispanic Factor." "Not only do the politicians' displays of Spanish offend an already aroused nativist element in the U . S., they foster the incorrect notion that Hispanics are not learning English and, by not assimila -ting into American society. A further ironic result, of which Anglo politicians seem remarkably unaware, is that many Hispanics a re offend e d by all this campaign Spanish .. . " -Peter Skerry, in a Sept 13-Wall Street Journal column. "Anyone who can manage to get the Hispanics and the Irish together could be president." The San Francisco Examiner's "Image" magazine, June 19, quoting a constituent of Ray Flynn, Boston ' s mayor , who while working for Dukakis has national ambitions of his own. "Dukakis has said there won't be any negotiations with Castro until he respects human rights and initiates a democratic process in the country ... "(T he Republicans) come to Calle Ocho(in Miami) and yeii'Cuba libre ' but the negotiations taking place are on a higher level than those of other administrations. If that isn't a betrayal, then I don't know what is. The Republican Party has betrayed the exiled Cuban community." -Luis Lauredo, president of the Cuban Democrats Association, quoted July 17 in The Miami Herald. LITTLE BROWN BUSHES: Comedian Paul Rodriguez, emceeing the Sept 1 3 Congressional Hispanic Caucus annual banquet, ponders: "What a dilemma we're in! On the one hand, we have George and his little brown Bushes. On the other hand, we have Dukakis, probably the only presidential candidate who knows all the words to La Bamba Whafs a Hispanic to do?" MISSING Ll NK: Did anyone not receive his/herWeekly Report of Aug. 1 (the one with the Burciaga cartoon on the English speaking/non-English-speaking airline seating arrangements)? The Post Office sent one back to us with the address label torn off, the envelope mangled and some shredded remains sanitarily wrapped in plastic, bearing the purple me ss age: "Returned for Better Address." . They didn't even refund our 25 cents. THE LATINO PSYCHE: Yet another nonHispanic has found a publisher to print his gospel on U .S. Hispanics. Harper& Row just brought out "Hispanic U.S.A.," by Thomas Weyr. A sample of Weyr' s insight which just may discourage you from spending the $19.95 price listed on the jacket "Despair is never far from the surface. They weep easily and wear their hurts for all to see, and do so in ways Anglos do not easily understand. A Hispanic cabdriver in San Antonio was to take me from the Hyatt to the Hispanic westside. He lost his way, pulled off the highway, and began to cry. He would quit college. He was no good. He had no hope. I felt guilt and irritation. Emotional barriers are formidable, yet they tell as much about a culture as thinking, talking, perceiving ... " We haven't even overcome our" language barrier'' yet and now we have an "emotional barrier" to surmount, too. iOue lastima! TODAY'S PROVOCATIVE THOUGHT: (offered by comedian John Mendoza on a September HBO comedy special): "Do illite rate people get the full effect of alphabet soup?" Kay Barbaro language unsupervised?" v HisPanic Link Weekiy Report Sept 19, 1988 3

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COLLECTING SCHOOL ENROLLMENT: "School EnrollmentSocial and Economic Characteristics: October 1986," a 1 03page report by the U . S . Census Bureau, looks at enrollment from preprimary to grad uate level according to race and ethnicity. For a copy(speCify Series P -20, No. 429) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government .Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (No price was available at press time.) LEADERSHIP AGENDA: "Hispanic Issues Are America's Issues" is the 1 08-page document on the proceedings of the fourth quadren nial conference of the National Hispanic Leadership Conference, held in April. For a copy send $7 to Pablo Sedillo , NHLC chairman, 1312 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 659-6876 or call Roger Rivera at (202) 628-9600. OVERVIEW ON HISPANICS: The September issue of The World & I magazine offers a special 67-page section on U.S. Hispanics. It costs $10 plus shipping fee. Order from The World & I, 2850 New York Ave. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 635-4000. . ' LITERARY COMPETITION: The deadline for the third annual Letras de Oro competition is Oct. 12. All submissions, except for the translation of a Spanish-language book into English, must be in Spanish. For more information write Letras de Oro, University of Miami Graduate School of International Studies, P.O. Bo x 248123, Coral Gables, Fla. 33134. HISPANIC ELECTED OFFICIALS: The National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials gives the number of officials nationally and on a state-by-state basis. It also contains a breakdown on Latina elected officials. To order a copy send a check for $32.40 to the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536. SENATE REPORT ON .HISPANICS: "Hispanics: Talent for America's Future" is a35-page report by the Senate Republican Task Force on Hispanic Affairs compili'ng data on Hispanics in the areas of literacy and education, economic development, employment and health. For a free copy, contact Senate Republican Conference, 405 Hart Senate Building, Washington, D .C. 20510 (202) 224-2764. FASTEST GROWING COMPANIES: Hispanic Business magazine's September issue devoted 25 of its 64 pages to the 1 00 fastest growing Hispanic-owned businesses . For a copy send $2 ($18 for a one-year subscription) to HB, 360 S . Hope St., Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 931 05 (805) 682-5843. CONNECTING VETERANS MEMORIAL CLOSER A competition for designs for the nation's first memorial to U.S. Hispanic veterans from all wars will kick off at the end of this month . The memoria l will be built in Whittier, Calif. The Association of Hispanic Vietnam Era Veterans wants to have the memorial erected by Memorial Day 1992. It is currently seeking funding from a variety of sources. Organizers hope to raise some $1.5 million through mass mailings and special events. The effort saw its breakthrough in June when Whittier's Rose Hills Memorial Park donated a half an acre. For more information or to make contributions, contact Frank Gonzalez,Associ1ation rof Hispanic Vietnam Era Veterans, 5452 1/2 E. Pomona Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90022 (213) 724-0812. AIDS PROPOSALS SOUGHT The U.S. Conference of Mayors has set Oct. 12 as the deadline for accel)ting proposals for AIDS education projects geared primarily to racial and ethnic communities. .. The conference will award approximately 15 grants ranging from $20,000 to $42,000. Funding has been provided by the federal Centers for Disease Control. Proposals from community-based o rgan ization s are particularly sought. As of August Hispanics accounted for 14% of the 70,000 AIDS cases diagnosed. For more specifics contact Matthew Murguia, U.S. Conference of Mayors, 1620 I St. NW, Washington , D.C. 20006 (202) 293-7330. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES US West, a di versified communications company that subsumes what was form erl y Mountain Bell, Pacific Northwest Bell and North western Bell, elects Remedios Diaz-Oiiver to its 15-member board of directors. Diaz-Oiiver is the CEO of the Miami-based American International Container Inc. . . First Interstate of California appoints Mary Salinas Duron as its vice president o . f urban and community affairs . . . Laura Balverde-Sanchez , president of the New El Rey Sausage Co., based in Vernon, Calif., is one of five female ! business owners to receive the 1988 Women of E!!terprise Awar(js from Avon Products in a ceremony in New York. El Rey generated $3.5 million in sales last year. . . --------------Calendar THIS WEEK LEADERSHIP Omaha , Neb. Sept. 19 US West Somas-Nebraska will co-sponsor a seminar titled Hispanic/Chicano Leadership: Myth or RealitY? The guest speaker will be Marty Martinez, an assistant professor at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. Tom Reyes (402) 422-8189 CHICANO PERSPECTIVES San Antonio Sept. 21-24 The TercerEncuentro Chicano, co-sponsored by the Universidad Nacional Aut6noma de Mexico, will be dedicated to the late Willie Velasquez, founder of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project Topics to be covered are Chicanos and the media, ' he demythification of the Chicano stereotype, and demogr.phic \ development and economic , perspec tives , of the Chicano population. Martha Cortes (512) 2270311 ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION 4 Chicago Sept. 23 US West Somas-Nebraska The Latino Institute, a research, advocacy and mana geOmaha, Neb. Sept. 26 menttraining center serving Hispanics in t he Chicago _ Tom Reyes (402) 422-8189 area, will hold a dinner to celebra te its fifth anniversary. Edwin Claudio(312) 663-3603 AN EVENING WITH CARLOS FUENTES QUINCENTENARY PROGRAM Washin gton, D.C. Sept. 23, 24 Raices del Pasado, or Seeds of the Past , is the name of a program by the Smithsonian Institution covering several topics on life in the Americas before the landing of Christopher Columbus. Office of Fo lklife Programs (202) 287 -3541 STUDENT EMPOWERMENT Miami Sept. 25-27 The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities will have people such as Flora MancusoEdwards. president of New ,Jersey's Middlesex Community College , and Arturo Madrid, president of the Tomas Rivera Center in California, address its meeting titled Institutional Change and the Empowerment of Hispanic Students. Gene Gonzalez (512) 433-1501 COMING SOON CELEBRATING CULTURE Sept. 19, 1988 University of California, Riverside Riverside, Calif. Sept. 26 Ka 't hy Ba rt on (714) 787-5185 SPOTLIGHT USING PUBLIC RELATIONS: The Hispanic P u blic Relations Association will hold a one-day seminar aimed at Hispanic organizations on the uses of publ ic relations. publicity and promotions to help them get their message out. Registration for the seminar, to be held Oct. 1 in Los Angeles, costs $25. For more information call HPRA President Esther Renteria at (213) 726-7690. Calendar will publish for free announcements on events of interest to the His-panic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number . Address itemsta Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D .C. 20005. ' Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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______ ELDERLY ASSOCIATION The following poaltlona are with the National Aaaoclatlon For Hlapanlo Eldtr ly/Aaoolaolon Naclonal Pro Ptraonaa Mayortl: PROJECT MONITOR -For employ ment program for national organization. Excellent written and verbal communica tion akllla. Rtqulrtl B.A. In public ad ministration or aoclal aolencea: bilingual preferred. Poaltlon baltd In Loa Angtltl; must be willing to travel. COORDINATOR/LIAISON National organization Htka aelfatarter to coor dinate employment program at Ita D.C. office and act u llalaon with governmtn tal agencltl aa requtlttd. Rtqulrtl B.A. In aoolal aolencea or public admlnlatra tlon: excellent lnterperaonal and or ganlzatlon akllla; bilingual. Send with ulary hlatory: Prtll dent, ANPPM, 2727 W. Sixth St., Suitt 270, Loa Angeltl, Calif. 80057 (213) 487 1822. EXECUTIVE DIRICTOR Exec'utlve Director aought for progrtlalvt Cuban American organization In Waahlngton. D.C. Candldatea to develop and maintain contaeta with media and public offlclala, to admlnlateroffiee, and organize conftrtnctl. Muat have knowledge of Cuban American IIII!Utll. BA/BS degrtt . Graduate education Apply by Nov. 7 to Search Commltttt, P.O. Sox 28612, Brookland Station, Waehlngton, D.C. 20016, STATE POLICY ANALYST (1 year lnternahlp) MALDEF, a national olvll rlghta organization, ntkl an Individual who would reltarch key atate policy luutl and monitor bllll In the Texaa Lt;l1lature affecting Hl1panlc1. The State Polley Analyat will commute from the San . Antonio area to the Ttxaa Llglllatureln Aultln. Required: Legal training or graduate IChool equivalence In aoclalaolence, polltloalaolenoe, public admlnlltratlon or public policy; familiarity with the ltattleglllatlve prcceu and key Hlapanlc laautl; excellent oral and written oommunloatlonl 1klll1; bilingual In Spanlah/Englllh preferred; and mu1t have own automobile to commute between San Antonio and Aultln. Send reeum6 and writing aamplt to: Barbara Aguirre, MALDEF, The Commerce Bulldln;, LTD,314 E . Commerce St. , Suitt 100, San Antonio, Texaa 78205 by 8/H/88. JOURNALIITIIC"IA TIVI W"ITI"I: Subo mlealona are welcome torWHkly Repcrt'a "guett columnlat" feature. ApprolC. 500 worde. For wrlte(a guldellnea, tend 1tlfoaddreaatd, atamped envelope to: Gueat Column, Hlapanlc Link' Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Waehlngton, o . c . 20005. Hlepanlc Link W"kly RIP
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tam .wi:l ;als . . a=: mteesti11at = 11. Twenty Latin American musicians and composers will participate. CALENDAR POTPOURRI: Following are events scheduled in major U.S. cities over the next few weeks: The Latin American Spirit: Art and Artists in the United States 1920-1970 is an exhibition of works by some 130 artists that opens Oct. 1 at the Bronx Museum of Art in New York City. The show later travels to El Paso, Texas; San Diego; San Juan, Puerto Rico; and Vero Beach, Fla. Next week in the nation's capital, GALA Hispanic Theatre performs Marco Antonio de Ia Parra's play Matatangos in Spanish at the Kennedy Center. The production, from GALA's past season, is part of New York is the site for the 1988 National Latino Film and Video Festiva( a juried event presented by the city's El Museo del Barrio Oct. 14-22. the new Washington Front and Center. series. Rita Moreno will host a benefit reception and dinner prior to the performance, scheduled for Sept. 26. Two days later, Miami will host Camino a Ia OTI (Organizaci6n de Television lberoamericana) song festival, staged by Univision, to choose a U.S. envoy for the International OTI Song Festival, held in Buenos Aires in November. Puerto Rico holds the first Festival Cine Scm Juan Oct. 1-8, and San Antonio's 13th CineFestivalis being held Nov. 4-14 . This week the Guadalupe Theatre opens the exhibition La comunidad chicana hacia el a no 2000: Imagen y realidad Presented at the San Antonio campus of Mexico City's Universidad Autonoma Nacional, it runs from Sept. 21 to' Oct. 18. Univision airs Camino a Ia OT/Iive Sept. 28 at 8 p.m. EDT . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report MEDIA AGENDA: The federal government should ensure media compliance with affir mative action in the nation's newsrooms, according to the National Hispanic Leadership Conference's 1988 agenda, published Aug. 31. . .• NHLC, a coalition of 20 national Hispanic organizations which meets every four years, made several recommendations, including: , • that the federa19overnment enforce the Federal Communications Commission policy of granting tax certificates to broadcast station sellers who transfer ownership to minorities; • that academic institutions provide English and Spanish-language training in journalism and communications departments; and • that Hispanic organizations petition news associations for positions . as officers and managers. Some 200 persons met in April in Washington, D.C., to shape the resolutions. . In addition to the media, the 108-page agenda made reHISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national qt Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-Q280 or Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez .. Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Oanyl Lynette Figueroa. Sophia Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien , Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 Issues): Institutional agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word . Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week . Multiple use rates on request. 8 commendations in areas such as corporate and philanthropic responsibility, education and civil rights. (See Collecting to obtain a copy.) HISPANICS COVERED: The phenomenon of Hispanics as the nation's fastest-growing minority is the subject of a 67-page section in the September issue of The World & I maga zine, a 700-page monthly published by The Washington Times Corp., part of the Rev . Sun Myung Moon's News World Communi cations. Featured are articles by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, New York Rep. Robert Garcia and Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez. Subjects include the Hispanic vote in November, Spanish language media and a look at bilingual edu cation. (See Collecting to obtain a copy.) NOTICIAS DISPUTE: The management of Noticiasdel Mundo, a New York Spanish language daily, is appealing the National Labor Relations Board decision to uphold the staffs vote to organize under The News paper Guild. It is the first News World Communications publication to be organized . MEDIA MEETS: The San Antonio Association of Hispanic Journalists raised, at last count, $3,300 at its first scholarship fund softball game Sept. 1 0. Newspersons from the San Antonio Light defeated those from the Express-News by a score of 17-8, but the Express-News sold $2,400 worth of tickets. More than 1 ,000 spectators paid $2 each to cheer the players. .. The Greater Dallas Community Relations Commission will hold a conference Sept. 29 geared toward combating racism in the media Keynote speaker will be Felix Gutierrez, jour nalism professor at the University of Southern California. Contact Elizabeth Ann Flores at (214) 979-0406 . . . HONORS, NEWS AND MOVES: Houston book publisher Nicolas Kanellos was among three Latinos honored Sept. 14 at a White House gala. He was presented the Hispanic Heritage Award for Literature. Kanellos is founder and director of Arte Publico Press, the oldest and largest publishing house for U.S. Hispanic literature ... Gustavo Pupa-Mayo has been promoted to general manager of El Nuevo Herald and The Miami Herald editorial board member Carlos Verdecia was named editor ... Darryl Lynette Figueroa President Reagan holds1 Herltag_!l _ after signing It Sepl13 at the White House. Behind him, from the left, are retired Air Force Col. Gilbert Coronado, Florida Gov. Bob Martinez, artist Orlando A. B., White House Office of Public Liaison Director Rebecca Range, high school teacher Jaime Escalante and publisher Nicolas Kanellos. Hispanic Link Weekly Report