Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, September 26, 1988

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, September 26, 1988
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
U.S. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez of Texas receives the M. Justin Herman Memorial Award from the National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials. Gonz&lez is the first member of Congress to be honored with the 13-year-old award, which recognizes a person who has made outstanding contributions to decent housing nationally... FBI Director William Sessions invites all persons and groups whose names were recorded in a much-maligned agency investigation of the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador to expunge their names from FBI files... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Lourdes Baird as a Los Angeles
County Superior Court judge. She iscurr^rtt® aios Angeles County Municipal Court judge... The Miami Herald salutes Miami Archdiocese Auxiliary Bishop Agustin Roman and five other South Floridians as winners of its Spirit of Excellence awards. Roman was honored for his role in ending last year's riots of Marielitos in two prisons... Mark Gallegos, an attorney in private practice in Miami, takes office as president of the Hispanic National Bar Association at the group’s convention in Albuquerque, N.M. . . Richard Ramirez, former director of the Navy's Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization, agrees to plead guilty to charges that he and an associate conspired to receive $60,000 in bribes from the much-in-the-news Wedtech Corp. and $120,000 from another firm...
^^mHISPANICUI^^^^^TREPORT®^^
Spanish- LanguageTV Maturing
New competition in the nation’s Spanish- first-ever U.S.-produced novela. The charac-
language television market is yielding more viewing choices for the nation’s 17 million Spanish speakers and placing an increased emphasis on productions originating in the United States.
As much as 44% of Telemundo*s network programming and 15% of Univision’s is now produced in the United States. Eleven U.S.-produced programs have premiered on Spanish-language TV this year - eight on Telemundo and three on Univision.
The highest rated Spanish-language show in the United States is Uni vision’s “Shbado gigante,” a 3 1/2-hour live variety slot produced by the network’s Miami affiliate. It is seen by an estimated 4 million viewers in the United States every week.
While most of Univision’s native programming is produced or co-produced by the network, rival Telemundo has boosted its lineup with shows bought from well-known English-language production entities. Two daily game shows are currently produced by InterTelEspan for Telemundo. A music video program from MTV Networks and a nightly newscast co-produced by the Cable News Network were also added in 1988.
“Our first and foremost goal is having (our programming) produced by Hispanics,” says Lynne Rish, a Telemundo spokesperson who adds that non-Hispanic companies must employ Latino producers to deliver programming in Spanish. “It’s opening up possibilities as far as talent- a pool that hasn’t had a forum before.”
Telemundds most innovative program yet could be “Angelica mi vida,” touted as the
ters in the daily soap opera are second- and third-generation members of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban families living in New York City.
Innovations in Spanish-language programming can be attributed to major developments in that market over the last few years Univision was acquired in 1987 by Hallmark Cards The same year, the number of Telemundo stations rose to five, giving 25-year-old Uni vision, formerly known as SIN, its first taste of competition.
Telemundo now claims to reach as much as 67% of Hispanic households in the continental United States, with affiliates in 19 of the top 30 Hispanic markets. Univision reaches84% of that market, with 432 affiliates.
Imported programming still constitutes the bulk of the Spanish-language product - and that is not likely to change any time soon because of the availability and low cost of Latin American shows. But both networks promise native productions are on the increase.
“We’re convinced that U.S. Hispanics have needs and interests that are different from those of our brothers in Latin America,” says Univision President Joaquin Blaya, “and we must create television that responds to those needs. We’re interested in that not just from a philosophical point of view, but from a commercial standpoint.”
By all accounts* the Spanish-language market in the United States is a potential gold mine.
“Research shows that75% of U.S. Hispanics watch television either only in Spanish or mostly in Spanish,” says Henry Silverman,
continued on page 3
Huerta Beating Stirs Actions by City
A San Francisco policeman has been reassigned as a result of an ongoing investigation by the city into an incident Sept 14 which resulted in life-threatening injuries to Dolores Huerta, 58, vice president of the United Farm Workers.
According to UFW spokesman Daniel Martin, legal action will be taken although he does “not know against whom or what”
Huerta was to have been released from the hospital late last week after surgery for a
ruptured spleen and two fractured ribs. The injuries were allegedly incurred when police officers hit her as she was protesting George Bush’s stand against UFWs grape boycott The 5-foot-2 UFW co-founder was among about 1,000 protesters outside the St Francis Hotel, where Bush was speaking.
Mayor Art Agnos said during a press conference Sept. 15 that in a police film of the incident he could see Huerta was attempting to comply with police instructions to move.
Cavazos Becomes 1st Hispanic on Cabinet
Lauro Cavazos was sworn in as the U.S. Secretary of Education by Vice President George Bush at a Sept. 20 White House ceremony attended by President Reagan, making the 61-year-old sixth-generation Mexican American the first Hispanic Cabinet member.
The Senate had approved Reagan’s Aug. 9 nomination the same day, 94-0.
Cavazos will replace William Bennett for three months before a new administration moves into the White House. Since 1980 t he has served as president of Lubbock’s Texas Tech University, the largest U S. university run by a Hispanic.
English Only Suffers Blow
A federal judge in Denver dealt a serious setback to the Colorado official-English movement Sept. 16 when he issued a preliminary injunction that bars the state from having its voters decide this November the fate of an initiative seeking to make English the state’s official language.
U.S.District Court Judge Jirri Carrigan ruled that some 61,000 of the more than 100,000 signatures gathered in the petition drive to put the issue on the ballot violated the Voting Rights Act. Carrigan based his ruling on the fact that the 61,000 signatures were collected in 12 counties where the Voting Rights Act stipulates that initiative materials must be published in English and Spanish.
“We are of the opinion that if the decision is upheld - and we see it going to the (U.S.) Supreme Court - it’s going to kill them (the official-language movement),” said RudolpfT Schware, co-chair of the Colorado chapter of the National Lawyer’s Guild, the group that filed the suit.
Colorado Secretary of State Natalie Myer,a plaintiff, filed for a stay of the preliminary injunction the same day of the decision. At a press conference later that day, Myer said she would have the ballots printed as planned. The state was expected to appeal the ruling late last week.
- Felix Perez


SAT Math Scores Increase for All Hispanics in 1988
Scholastic Achievement Test averages in mathemathics increased between one and four points for all Latino categories between 1987 and 1988, shows a report released Sept 20. In the SAT verbal test, they improved three points for Mexican Americans, fell five points for Puerto Ricans and remained the same for other Hispanics.
The highest Latino scores in 1988 were those of other Hispanics. They scored 387 in verbal and 433 in math, still well behind white’s 445 verbal and 490 math averages.
Five percent of the more than 1.1 million students who took the SAT this year were Hispanic
Women in all minority groups showed gains in math averages, with Mexican American women gaining the most, eight points, followed by black women with seven points.
Since 1978 the average scores of Mexican Americans rose 12 points on the verbal portion and 26 on the math portion. Puerto Rican scores increased six points on the verbal and 14 points on the math.
Donald Stewart, president of The College
Board, which administers the test to college-bound high school students, said he was pleased with improvement of minorities’ scores, but he indicated the differences in test scores between minority groups and whites remains too great.
“If the gap. . . is ever to be closed, improvement in the elementary and secondary education of minority students must be accelerated,” said Stewart.
- Sophia Nieves
SAT AVERAGES BY ETHNIC, RACIAL GROUP- ’78-’88
1978 SAT Verbal 1980 1982 1984 1986* 1987 1988
Black 332 330 341 342 NA 351 353
Mexican American 370 372 377 376 NA 379 382
Puerto Ric&n 349 350 360 358 NA 360 355
‘Other Hispanic NA NA NA NA NA 387 387
White 446 442 444 445 NA 447 445
Black 354 SAT Mathematical 360 366 373 NA 377 384
Mexican American 402 413 416 420 NA 424 428
Puerto Rican 388 394 403 405 NA 400 402
‘Other Hispanic NA NA NA NA NA 432 433
White 485 482 483 487 NA 489 490
* The Student Descriptive Questionnaire that students complete when registering tor tests was changed to include “Other Hispanic” in 1987.
Source: "1988 Profile of SAT and Achievement Test Takers"
U.S. to Reimburse Legalization Groups
Federal officials reversed themselves Sept. 14 and agreed to reimburse community organizations for millions of dollars they spent on health and education services for undocumented or newly legalized immigrants.
The reversal followed protests by the affected groups and some congressmen who said many community agencies would be forced to close.
The U.S. Health and Human Services Depart-
Escalante Won’t Stump
Jaime Escalante denied in a Sept 15 interview with the Los Angeles Times that he has taken an official role in George Bush’s campaign. This conflicts with a list released two days earlier by the Bush-Quayle Coalition which indicates he is one of 94 National Honorary Chairmen of Hispanics for Bush.
One of Escalante’s co-workers, Blanca Soto, told Weekly Report Sept. 19 that the Garfield H ig h math teacher" has to be in the classroom” and the question put to him by Bush campaign workers was whether he was “voting as a citizen for him,” not whether he would be an honorary co-chair.
Jos6 Martinez, national campaign director of Hispanics for Bush,denied Sept. 19 that there was any confusion.
“He agreed to be national co-chair for Hispanics for Bush,” said Martinez. “The position of the campaign... is he was asked to serve and he accepted. I do not understand.”
Escalante, who teaches calculus at the East Los Angeles high school, became a symbol of educational excellence when his methods were spotlighted in the movie “Stand and Deliver.”
- Sophia Nieves
ment notified the groups Sept. 8 that State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants would not be honored for services provided between Oct. 1,1987, and June 30,1988. California alone was expecting $13 million for that period.
HHS said contracts between state governments and private groups were not signed until after that period. Community groups countered that they could not sign contracts earlier because reimbursement regulations were still unpublished.
The SLIAG program provides $4 billion over a four-year period to state and local groups working to facilitate the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. California will receive half of the funds.
Outreach to Youth Lacking
Two-thirds of the more than 3.3 million young Hispanics in the United States face a future of low-wage, dead-end employment, said Siobhan Nicolau, author of a report on Hispanic youth released at a Sept. 14 Washington, D.C., press conference.
Nicolau, president of the Hispanic Policy Development Project, compiled the study after she learned that individuals responsible for developing at-risk youth programs lacked knowledge in the area of Hispanic teen-agers.The project found that Hispanic males work more hours while in school than Anglos or blacks Forty-one percent drop out of high school to work, she added.
Nicolau’s report, titled, “Too Late To Patch,” was one of five released at the briefing.
She blamed the educational establishment for its lack of outreach to Latino youngsters, as well as the authoritarian Latino family structure, which often offers little communication between parent and child.
60% Say Immigrants Are Drain on Economy
More than six out of ten U.S. residents feel that immigrants take more from the U.S. economy than they contribute, while just 19% feel immigrants give more, found a Los Angeles Times Poll released Sept. 19.
Although at times giving answers that seemed contradictory, people interviewed for the poll - taken Sept 9 and 11 - in general displayed attitudes that were unwelcoming.
There was a high degree of ignorance of the 1986 immigration law and its provisions among the 1,418 people interviewed. While 31 % of the participants said they approved of the legalization program and 22% said they disapproved, 42% were unaware of it.
Reagan Picks Fernandez
President Reagan nominated Sept. 15 U.S. District Judge Ferdinand Fernandez of Los Angeles to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco.
Fernandez, 51, was appointed to the federal bench in 1985 and was a Superior Court judge in San Bernardino from 1980.
Reagan made the announcement at a White House press conference with Latino reporters. He added that the 9th Circuit, which has jurisdiction over California, Arizona, Hawaii and five other states, is in “a state of emergency because of vacancies.”
Observers noted that Fernandez may never receive a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, which reviews nominations, before Congress adjourns Oct. 5.
Committee Republicans have complained that 28 judicial nominations are being held up so that Michael Dukakis may make his own nominations if he wins in November.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Antonio Stevens-Arroyo, guest columnist
Loyalist Politics and
My political guru is don Millo, a Puerto Rican transit worker in New York City. When I want to get down from my university ivory tower and touch the pulse of the people, I seek out Emilio. His diagnosis of the 1988 presidential campaign is short and sweet: “Any Puerto Rican who votes for George Bush is un poco loco en el coco.”
This verdict has little to do with George Bush’s introduction of his Mexican heritage grandchildren as “the little brown ones” on the tarmac of the New Orleans airport on Aug. 16. After all, the poet Pedro Pietri tells us that among Puerto Ricans, “To be called negrito and negrita/means to be called love.”
When reminded of Bush’s words, don Millo simply shrugged his shoulders and with a rascal glint in his eye pointed to his own skin and said that he too is “brown,” a trigueho Puerto Rican.
What bothered him was Bush’s speech to the Chicano students at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles May 5, where the vice president suggested that Latinos were the people to do “the hard physical work in our society.” Millo’s lips tightened. “Qu6 bruto!" he muttered. How dumb.
This vignette is not university-level political science, but it reflects the kind of problems George Bush has in seeking votes among the million or more Puerto Ricans who live in the Northeastern United States and who are of all the Latino groups in New York the most likely to vote.
QUAYLE FOR VEEP WON’T HELP
I believe George Bush when he says that his remark about brown grandchildren should not be construed except as an expression of love. I am also sure that he intended to provide an uplifting message for the students at Garfield High. But George Bush works from a set of presumptions that differ vastly from the average Puerto Rican’s experiences. For Millo and the nearly half million Puerto Ricans who will vote in November, these impressions of Bush will probably supplant any detailed analysis of the candidates and their platforms. Dan Quayle for Veep will not help.
Factors such as party loyalty, union policy and a general lack of sophistication about issues frame most political decisions by Puerto Ricans. Nor are we alone: Cuban Americans are just as knee-jerk in their reactions on behalf of the Republicans as Puerto Ricans are for the Democrats.
Don Millo does not attribute his relative job security to Reaganomics; he credits his own hard work for his succesa He doesn’t blame drugs or crime on liberal Democrats; he sees it as personal failure or as sin.
the Latino Vote
In the issues that affect him, politics count for little. He votes out of a sense of tribal loyalty in which our guys are the good guys and the others are the desesperados.
LATINO REACTIONS KNEE-JERK
Such bulldog constancy can weaken rather than strengthen political awareness. It is more important, for instance, to ask why bilingual education is not mentioned in the lengthy Republican platform than it is to carp about George Bush’s verbal gaffes. Is his party against the amendment proposed by U.S. English to officially eliminate Spanish from this country, even though virtually all the organization’s leaders are Republicans? Moreover, since Indiana was one of the first states to outlaw Spanish or any language other than English, does the conservative Senator Quayle stand with or against his constituency on this issue?
The Democrats should not go unquestioned either. If appointed officials are what we need, the Republican Bush seems to be a better bet than the Democrat Dukakis. Just because Dukakis and Bentsen speak Spanish doesn’t make them liberators of the Latino peoplea In fact, it may be argued that the hacienda relationship to Mexicans of Anglo South Texas Bentsen in the model of patr6n-pe6n may be the wrong kind of acquaintance with Latinoa
POLITICAL LEADERS UNLIKELY SAVIORS Who is going to pose questions and demand answers! rather than rhetoric from 1988’s candidates? As long as we have not defined a substantial agenda, political parties will attempt to satisfy us with lots of Viva! Viva!, wear sombreroa munch on enchiladas, dance to a merengue, and think they have satisfied their obligations to Latinos.
How can we emerge with any kind of Latino agenda when our people’s voting patterns tend to be based on virtually anything except the issues? How can we bridge the regional and nationality differences that tribalize our presence if we constantly use symbols instead of substance to project leadership? How can we achieve unity behind a Latino candidate for national office if we always think and vote as Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans, etc.?
Our political leaders are unlikely saviors, since they work for the parties in question, i think it falls to Latinos in education and the media to define our agenda. I see some good things happening on this front on our extended news shows and feature columns. Educators can also educate and enlighten our people about the political issues. Without ideological posturing or partisan cheap shots, we in academia should articulate the issues that will force political parties to deal with substance rather than with symbols.
(Antonio Steve ns-Arroyo is director of political analysis at the Center for Latino Studies at Brooklyn College, City University of New York.)
Domestic Programming on the Increase
continued from page 1
chief executive officer of Telemundo Group Inc. Silverman claims that on a given night, as much as 6% of the total U.S. population could be watching Spanish-language TV.
“Less than 1% of the $30 billion spent (yearly) in television advertising in the United States goes to Spanish television. There is 6% (missing) - a potential of $1.6 billion.
“The job of Telemundo and Uni vision is to close the gap between the 6% that are watching and the 1% in advertising revenues.”
U.S.-produced programs, sold and aired abroad could provide both networks with additional revenue.
Last year, Univision petitioned the Federal Communications Commission to be excluded
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
from network syndication and prime time access rules. Networks are only allowed to produce a minimum of their prime-time programming and may not syndicate their programming.
In the United States, the Spanish-language market’s potential is already attracting new participants.
KTLA, a Los Angeles independent, English-language station, which broadcasts some 20 hours weekly with a Spanish soundtrack using Second Audio Program technology, has begun to broadcast commercials bilingually. Cable pay channels HBO and Cinemaxare expected to use SAP technology this year to air such movies as “La Bamba” and “Platoon” in dual (Spanish and English tracks. Pay-per-view Sept. 26,1988
cable channels did just that this month with “The Milagro Beanfield War”.
“Bravo!,” a syndicated interview/talkshow, is hosted in separate English and Spanish versions by its Cuban American producer, Nelly Gal4n. It is syndicated in dual versions in some 73 markets.
A Spanish-language cable network is operated in the United States by Univisa, a subsidiary of Mexico’s Televisa. Galavision became advertiser-supported this month and now beams news and information programming 24 hours a day from Mexico City.
Even further competition is expected in the market. A new 24-hour cable channel, to be known as Hispanica Television Network, will debut on some 136 cable affiliates around the country Dec. 1.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas 3


Jose Antonio Burciaga, guest columnist
My Question for George
If you couid sit eyeball to eyeball, like Ted Koppel does, with a presidential candidate and ask a single question, what would it be?
As one of eight Latino journalists chosen through our news agencies- mine was Hispanic Link News Service- to meet with Vice President George Bush in San Francisco Sept. 15 for half an hour, I had a couple of days to ponder my choice and submit it, in advance.
I thought about all of the promises heard by the Hispanic community in past election-year Septembers, weighed them against the reality of our status, and decided to ask:
“Mr. Vice President what makes you any different than past candidates?”
Would that be too cynical, disrespectful?
Even if it wasn’t, it was too general, a setup for him. And he’d have plenty of time to rehearse his answer. So I changed it.
To participate in the interview, I had to wake up at 5 in the morning, bike in the cold darkness to the railroad station in Palo Alto, and catch the 6 o’clock train.
I did all this to reach the Nikko Hotel at 7:30 a.m., where I was told our session jiad been moved from 8 to 9:45.

I EXPECTED TO BE FRISKED The hotel was crawling with Secret Service types. As we reporters gathered, I expected wewouldallbefrisked, butweweren’t Instead, we were asked to vacate the suite.
The vice president walked in, tall, fresh and rested. He wore a smile, and before sitting down, posed for photographs with five of the reporters and a couple of photographers Only the reporters from Univision and Telemundo and I chose not to pose with the vice president We did shake hands however. Then he sat down, three feet away from me.
The VP is a nice man. His answers were easy, although at times generic sounding, much like the press packet we were given.
The other reporters’ questions had to do with the English Only movement, which he opposes, and Central America where he’s afraid of the Communists No, he answered another, he is not for the rich guy.
My question? I asked one on the issue Hispanics identify as the most critical to our community - education. “Mr. Vice President,” I said, “considering the high dropout rate of Latinos what specific educational initiatives would you pursue if elected?”
“It is high,” he agreed.
BUSH DID PICK UP POINTER
“And frankly,” he went on, “you have to give much more support to bilingual education - I’ve already stated that out on the campaign trail.”
He talked about his proposal to give “substantial rewards” to those minority schools that“instill a sense of excellence and values into the kids.” He mentioned his proposal about college baby bonds and his pleasure with how the Head Start program has helped the Hispanic community. “I have proposed increases in Head Start and I’ve long been a supporter of bilingual education.”
With worry built into his expression, he told me, “Ifs heartbreaking when you see those dropout rates as high as they are.” It was good to hear him say those things, because his press packet0 made no specific mention of blacks or Hispanics.
I didn’t get toask any follow-up questions, as I had been told I might. Time ran out. But as he left the room, the vice president smiled, waved and told us, “Bye, guys.”
No question. While George Bush worked for President Reagan, he did pick up a pointer or two on how to play the press. Still, I’m saving his words to weigh' them against the Latino dropout rate four years from now, in case he wins and wants to talk about the issue once again. ,
(Jose Antonio Burciaga, of Stanford, CaiiU is a contributing columnist with Hispanic Link News Service and author of “Weedee Peepo.”)
4
Sin pelos en la lengua
BYE BYE, BILLIE: There are those who feel that next to asbestos, Bill Bennett is the worst thing that ever happened to Latino students sitting in public school classrooms. There are others who feel that such a comparison is unfair to asbestos.
Whatever the order, Billie the Boca has left the helm of the U.S. Department of Education after 3 1/2 years of bad-mouthing and slashing education programs essential to Latinos and to the poor.
At the same time, although it has received no attention in the press (except some mentions in Weekly Report), Bennett was busy ridding his department of Hispanic personnel, particularly at policy-influencing levels. Bennett, by the way, is the only head of a Cabinet department who has flat refused to prepare an affirmative action plan.
According to information collected by some Latino education advocates in Washington, there were 19 Hispanics in key positions within the Department of Education when Bennetf s predecessor, Terrel Bell, was secretary- four Senior Executive Service career professionals, one presidential appointee and 14 professionals at the highest regular civil service level, GS-15.
Today there are zero Hispanic SES career professionals, zero presidential appointees and only two GS-15 career executives. Both of the department’s Hispanic regional directors are gone.
When Bell was there, more than 4% of the department’s total work force was Hispanic. Now, ifs less than 3%.
During the Carter administration, the department held one national and five regional conferences on critical Hispanic education issues. During the Bennett years, it has held none.
Since its inception in 1968, the migrant education unit (which has an 85% Latino clientele) had been headed by a bilingual, bicultural professional experienced in migrant education issues. Bennett passed over fully qualified Hispanic professionals to choose an Anglo about ready to retire who was neither bilingual, bicultural nor experienced in migrant education to head the program.
When the White House invited Latino reporters to attend a Sept 15 “briefing” that included a report on education by Bennett Hispanic Link reporter Darryl Figueroa asked the secretary what role he played in President Reagan’s decision (made last June) to nameU.S. English President Linda Chdvezaschairof the newly mandated National Commission on Migrant Education.
Bennett offered the incredible response that he didn’t even know about it until Darryl asked the question, explaining that he’d been very busy the “past two weeks.”
Then Weekly Report editor Felix P6rez reminded the outgoing secretary of his September 1985 public denunciation of bilingual education as a 17-year, $1.7 billion bust pointing out that incoming Secretary Lauro Cavazos felt it was a very effective program. Bennett said his own opinion hadn’t changed.
The White House “briefing” turned out to be a bust itself. Less than 40 Latino journalists, mostly from Spanish-language radio and weekly papers, responded to the White House’s broad invitation. This, after the White House press office had been saying a week earlier fhat nearly all 150 seats in the briefing room had been filled.
Actually, another 40 or 50 seats were filled - by friends of the administration who punctuated the speakers! rhetoric with frequent applause and cheers. Hardly the kind of behavior one expects at press briefings.
One Bush campaign worker, Robert de Posada, who identified himself as a “Radio America” reporter, tossed Bennett a fat, distorted softbalt “The National Education Association and Michael Dukakis are against testing of teachers,” he said, asking, “What is your position on that?”
Lauro Cavazos has his work cut out for him the next three months. I hope he brought along a pooper-scooper.
- Kay Barbaro
Sept. 26,1988


COLLECTING
AT-RISK HISPANICS: The 115-page report titled “Too Late To Patch" on at-risk Hispanic youth details their characteristics and offers recommendations on bringing them into the mainstream. It is available for $5. Send a check to The Hispanic Policy Development Project, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-8414.
‘SAT CLASS OF 1988: “College-Bound Seniors: 1988 Profile of SAT and Achievement Test Takers” is a 12-page report by the College Board giving SAT scores by racial and ethnic group. For a free copy write College Board, Box AF, 45 Columbus Ave., New York, N.Y. 10023-6992.
COLORADO HISPANIC AGENDA: “Hispanic Agenda: Building a Stronger Colorado” is a 21-page document by the Latin American Research and Service Agency. For a copy send $5 to Hispanic Agenda, 899 Logan St, Suite 400, Denver, Colo. 80203 (303) 860-7171.
MEXICAN AMERICAN ORAL HEALTH: “Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease Among Mexican-American Children from Five Southwestern States, 1982-1983” is a 12-page article in the July summary issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report based on information from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. For a copy of the issue, send $1 to Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
‘SAT GUIDE: “Taking the SAT: The official Guide to the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Test of Standard Written English” is a 63-page booklet available free to any student who will take the SAT. For a copy write College Board ATP, Dept. E19, P.O. Box 6212, Princeton, N.J. 08541-6212.
KANSAS CITY-AREA HISPANICS: “Report on Kansas City: Hispanic Needs Assessment” is a 90-page report including 160 pages of charts and survey questions. For a copy send $2.50 to Greater Kansas Community Foundation, 127 W. 10th St., Suite 406, Kansas City. Mo. 64105 (816) 842-0944.
CHILD WELFARE AND IMMIGRATION: “Minors in Immigration Proceedings: Problem of Child Welfare and Immigration Enforcement” a 74-page booklet recommends the development of national guidelines to protect undocumented minors. For a copy send $7.50 to Refugee Policy Group, 1424 L St. NW, Suite 401, Washington, D.C. 20036.
CONNECTING
HELPING IMMIGRANT PUPILS
The Los Angeles Unified School District opened this month its first pre-enrollment center to assess the educational level, language proficiency and physical condition of newly arrived immigrant students
The Student Guidance, Assessment and Placement Center, located near downtown, has been budgeted at $1.8 million for its first two years. It is projected to screen up to 6,000 children for enrollment in city schools this year and determine whether they need special assistance. Serving 35 schools, the center is the first of what school officials hope will be as many as 10 such facilities districtwide.
Twenty-eight percent of the district’s 590,000 students, or 165,000, are not proficient in English. The bulk of these students are Hispanic.
KANSAS CITY LATINOS ASSESSED
The results of a comprehensive survey to assess the needs of Kansas City-area Hispanics in order to provide them with better services - first of its kind in the community- were released late last month by The Greater Kansas City Community Foundation.
Titled “Report on Kansas City: Hispanic Needs Assessment,” the survey found that although the 32,000 Hispanics in the seven-county area were somewhat better off economically than Hispanics nationally, they are less so than non-Hispanics in the Kansas City area.
Among the recommendations in the report:
• that a Metropolitan Hispanic Council- a think tank and advocacy institution - be established;
• that the bishop of the Catholic diocese of the area open an office to address Hispanic needs;
• that a leadership development program for young Hispanic professionals be created to introduce them to leaders in business, charitable, government and civic arenas; and
• that there be developed a Hispanic voter registration campaign.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
Andrew Montano, director of the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Albuquerque, N.M., and Fred Salas, director of the administration’s Medical Center in Denver, are among several federal government employees to be honored with a Meritorious Executive Rank Award at a ceremony in Washington, D.Cn presided overby President Reagan. Montano and Salas each received $10,000...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
LITERARY DISCUSSION Riverside, Calif. Sept. 26
Novelist Carlos Fuentes will speak on literature, politics and international relations. Fuentes teaches at Harvard University and is the author of MThe Old Gringo,” a book being produced as a movie. His appearance is being sponsored by the University of California Consortium on Mexico and the U.S. and the World Affairs Council of Inland California Kathy Barton (714) 787-5185
CULTURE CELEBRATION Omaha, Neb. Sept. 26
E! Mercado, a celebration of Hispanic^ulturethrough music, art, food and dance, will be held. The event, celebrating the state’s Hispanic Heritage Month, is sponsored by US West Somos- Nebraska and the Nebraska pluralism council.
Tom Reyes (402) 422-8189
MEDIA AND MARKETING New York Sept 26,27
At the 1988 Conference On Hispanic Media &
Marketing, professionals will lead sessions on topics which include the future of U.S. Hispanic media, the impact of Hispanic media, reaching the Hispanic community through radio, and creating advertising campaigns. Irvine Hockaday, president and CEO of Hallmark Cards, owner of Univision, and Evelyn Herndndez, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, are two of the featured speakers. The conference is sponsored by Advertising Age and The Media Institute.
Sue Geramian (212) 210-0209
ERASING RACISM Dallas Sept 298
A conference designed to help erase racism by examining ethnic biases in news reporting, entertainment and advertising will be sponsored by The Greater Dallas Community Relations Commission for members of the media and for civic volunteers. Workshops will also assess the level of minority hiring at media outlets in the Dallas-Fort Worth market area Discussion will result in the development of specific plans to address inequities.
Roger Kallenberg (214) 979-0406
LULAC PRESIDENT Chicago Sept 29
The League of United Latin American Citizens will hold a reception honoring its national president Jose Garcia De Lara
Sept. 26,1988
Rachel Cordero (312) 739-5603 DRUG ABUSE Lansing, Mich. Sept. 30
A regional Hispanic conference on substance abuse sponsored in part by the Midwest Hispanic Institute on Substance Abuse Prevention and Training will be held. Among the topics to be discussed will be family counseling, culturally appropriate substance abuse treatment and training, treatment for women, funding Sources and AIDS prevention. Keynote speakers include Alberto Mata from the Office for Substance Abuse Prevention, Department of Health and Human Services; and Rodolfo Balli Sanchez,
: chairman of the National Hispanic Family Against ! Drug Abuse.
! Guillermo Velasquez (517) 484-8380
’ MEDIA SEMINAR i Los Angeles Oct. 1
The Hispanic Public Relations Association will sponsor a one-day media seminar for Hispanic community organizations. The workshop is intended to provide I the groups with instruction on the uses of public j relations, publicity and promotions to help them I meet their goals. Guest panelists include Ray j Gonzales, KTLA-TV, and Teresa Samaniego, KABC-TV. Participants will be provided with media guides, legislative guides and sample press kits.
[ Esther Renteria (213) 726-7690
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY
University of California, Davis. The College of Lettersand Science invites applicationsfor an Assistant Professor 111, in the sociology of development, effective July 1989.
This is a tenure-track position. Areas of research specialization could include women and international development international organization, the sociology of agriculture, urbanization and development in the Third World, or economic development and social change. Teaching responsibilities include a graduate course in development planning in the International Agriculture Development program. Employment or research expertise in a developing country is desirable. Ph.D. Is required. The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology.
To apply, send curriculum vitae, letter of application and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to: Lyn Lofland, Chair, Development Search Committee, Sociology Department, University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616. Applications must be postmarked January 1,1989, or earlier to be considered.
The University of California is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.
TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY
The University of California, Davis. The College of Letters and Science invites applications for a sociologist with an emerging or established reputation forquantitative research and publication and a strong commitment to teaching. The level of appointment may be at the Assistant or Associate Professor levels.
A Ph.D. is required. It is desired that field or specialization be in one of the following areas: Gender and family, sociology of organization, economic sociology, historical, comparative sociology, international political economy, or poverty and social welfare. The position is reserved for someone actively engaged in quantitative research and able to participate regularly in teaching agraduate-level sequence In methodsand statistics. The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology.
To apply, send curriculum vitae, letter of application, and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to: James Cramer, Chair, Quantitative Search Committee, Sociology Department, University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616. Applications must be postmarked by January 10,1989, or earlier to be considered.
The University of California Is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.
PRESIDENT
COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATION
SER-Jobs for Progress Inc., a national Hispanic nonprofit employment and training organization, is currently seeking a president for its national office located in Dallas, Texas.
Responsibilities include: provide executive and managerial leadership at the national level; designing, implementing short- and long-term strategy; accounting for the management and financial obligation of the corporation; and marketing the corporation to the public and private sectors as well as the general public.
The qualified candidate will possess excellent communications and organizational skills; at least three years experience in publicly funded programs; proven administrative and leadership ability; and a background in fiscal management, contracts'design and negotiations, planning and management of information systems.
A Master's degree in business administration, social work, education, or related field is essential. Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred but not required.
Interested and qualified candidates should send resume to: Chairman of the Board, SER-Jobs for Progress Inc., National Office, 1355 River Bend Drive, Suite 240, Dallas, Texas 75247.
Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F/,V,H
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES Ordered by ___________________________
90 cents per word (city, state & zip
code count as 2 words; telephone Organization —-------te——_j----------
number, 1 word). Multiple use rates „
on request Street ' . -----—-----•***-------
D'SP^Y.CLeSS,F,ED.1ATES 2 City, State & Zip _________________________
(Ads with borders, varied type sizes)
$45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone_____________________
Services Assistant II (Bilingual) Permanent, Part-time,
30 hours-Reannouncement Ann. #1454-9A-DHS Salary: $8.04/hr
Highly responsible clerical position providing full clerical, administrative data entry, typing and transcription support in the Department of Human Services. Handles a variety of inquiries from a diverse population, especially the Spanish-speaking community.
Requires high school diploma or equivalent one year of responsible secretarial experience and typing of 40 wpm. Refer to announcement for desirable qualifications.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5 pm on OCTOBER 6, 1988. To request application material, please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT
2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE/MFH
EMPLEADOS GUBERNAMENTALES GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES
You can ensure that your contribution goes to the Hispanic organization that will maximize your $$s impact on your community. NATIONAL IMAGE INC. has pledged that all funds received will be used to “Promote the health and welfare of Hispanics,” particularly, decrease the high school dropout rates, unemployment, social, ethnic and sexual discrimination, and to provide training on how to successfully navigate the Federal employment system.
NATIONAL IMAGE INC. helped over3,000 Hispanics lastyearthrough training, scholarships, and amnesty assistance. Target your Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) code #0443 contribution to NATIONAL IMAGE, INC., 20 F Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20001. For membership information please call Ms. Aurora Mojica, Executive Director, at (202) 737-9220.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Executive Director sought for progressive Cuban American organization in Washington, D.C. Candidates to develop and maintain contacts with media and public officials, to administer off ice, and organize conferences.
Must have knowledge of Cuban American issues. BA/BS degree. Graduate education preferred.
Apply by Nov. 7 to Search Committee, P.O. Box 29612, Brookland Station, Washington, D.C. 20015.
Sept. 26,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP CITY OF PHOENIX
Three positions beginning July 1,1988, for a minimum 12-month period. Present starting salary $20,800 plus comprehensive employee benefits. Management Interns will work in the Management and Budget Department, serving rotational assignments in the City Manager’s Office and a line department.
This will be the 40th year of our intern program, which has proven to be an excellent training ground for higher level administrative managerial positions.
Applicants must have completed courses required for a Master’s degree in Public Administration or related field by July 1, 1989.
To obtain an application, write or call: Charles E Hill, Management and Budget Director, 251 West Washington, Phoenix, AZ 85003, (602) 262-4800. Deadline for all applications is February 3, 1989.
AA/EEO/H Employer
BOOKKEEPER
National Hispanic Organization is seeking experienced person for its G/L maintenance payroll, bank reconciliations, and other bookkeep-ing duties. Must be well organized. Lotus 1-2-3 a must.
Send resume to ASPIRA Association Inc., 1112 16th Street NW, Suite 340, Washington, D.C. 20036.
VICE CHANCELLOR for
HUMAN RESOURCES
Responsible to the Chancellor, provides for overall administration of a District-wide, comprehensive human resources program.
Qualifications include a Master’s degree and a minimum of three years administrative personnel experience, preferably in an educational setting must possess or be eligible for a California Community College Administrative Credential. Salary of $72,908, plus monthly mileage allowance and liberal fringe benefits.
To obtain an application form, contact: (714) 432-5008. Coast Community Colleges, Office of Human Resources, P.O. Box 1949, Costa Mesa, Calif. 92628. A District application must be filed prior to the deadline of October 15.
AA/EOE/M/F/H
ASPIRA Association Inc.
STAFF ASSISTANT
Must know Word Perfect and willing to learn Lotus 123 and dBase 3 plus. Excellent proofing and interpersonal skills. Knowledge of Spanish helpful.
Responsibilities include: Answering telephone, mail distribution, typing and scheduling of meetings. Occasional overtime required. Salary negotiable at $19,000 range based on experience.
Send resume to ASPIRA Association Inc., 111216th St. NW, Suite 340, Washington, D.C. 20036
MANAGEMENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Stand tall.
As part of our area team, you will, because you stand for the industry leaderl McDonalds. A Billion dollar corporation and One of the Ten Best Managed Companies in America As a Restaurant Manager, you’ll manage a million dollar business and staff of 60. You’ll make decisions and handle challenging day-to-day operations, seeing results everyday. You’ll enjoy on-going development and career challenges in a surprising variety of areas As well as these outstanding benefits:
• Excellent Starting Salary Management Trainees earn $16,000 - $20,000 Store Managers earn $25,000 - $39,000
• Performance/Merit Increases
• Medical, Dental & Life Insurance
• Company Funded Profit Sharing
• Paid Vacations/Holidays
• Employee Stock Ownership Plan
• Tuition Reimbursement
Stand tall. Attend our Open House, on Tuesday, September 27th, 1988. Presentations begin at 5:30 pm and 7:30 pm. If unable to attend our Open House, please call or send your resume to: Crystal Newman, McDonalds Corporation, Dept HL 925, 3015 Williams Drive, Fairfax, Virginia 22031; (703)698-4015.
---------------------------\
OPEN HOUSE
Tuesday,'September 27 th, 1988 5 pm - 9 pm
GAITHERSBURG HOLIDAY INN 2 MONTGOMERY VILLAGE AVE GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND
<__________________________j
Powered By People With Pride.SM
Always. An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employee
M
A
R
K
E
T
P
L
A
C
E
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
7


Arts & Entertainment
ON SPANISH TV: The following are Spanish-language programs, produced and broadcast in the United States. All times are Eastern: TELEMUNDO
Uno nunca sabe& Adivinelo con senas(Mon.- Fri., 4:00 pm.) Game shows from InfeirTelEspan where celebrity contestants compete for money donated to charity groups. Frank Torres is producer.
D/a a dia (Mon. - Fri., 5:00 p.m.) Home magazine, hosted by Maria Olga Fernandez and F6!ix Guillermo, broadcast live from Telemundo Productions in Miami.
Noticiero Telemundo CNN (Mon. - Fri., 6:30) Broadcast live from Cable News Network’s facilities in Atlanta; anchored by Jorge L. Gostoso and Maria Elvira Salazar.
Angelica mi vida( Mon.- Fri., 8:00 p.m.) Laura Fabidn plays Angelica, “a beautiful and innocent woman struggling to overcome her family’s.
past indiscretions," and Carlos Montalvo is Alfredo Chavez, “the grandson of a powerful New York food products magnate. . . passionately involved with Angelica.”
UNIVISION
TV Mu/er(Mon. - Fri., 12:00 pm.) Lucy Pereda and Gabriel Traversari host this live women’s magazine show, produced by Univision in Miami.
Desde Hollywood(Tues., 10:30 p.m.) A weekly magazine, produced by ZGS Productions in Washington, D.C., now in its third season.
Noticiero Univisidn (Daily, 6:30 p.m. and Mon. - Fri, 10:00 pm.) Jorge Ramos and Maria Elena Salinas are weekday anchors on the broadcasts originating in Laguna Niguel, Calif.
S6bado gig ante(Sat 7:00 pm.) Chilean actor Mario Kreutzberger known as Don Francisco hosts.
Hablemos de cine (Sun, 5:00 pm.) Humberto Luna and Jorge Elias give a comedy twist to film reviews. It is produced by Elias (Premieres Oct. 16.) - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
«■—BBdB—saasn«a»3BatmMfcWMsgniimM«H—asan«———
JOB FAIRS: The American Society of Newspaper Editors and the Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business begin their job fair season next month with meetings geared to minority college juniors and seniors interested in summer journalism internships or full-time newspaper jobs. Opportunities in business departments will also be offered.
SAN FRANCISCO: Oct. 13-15; covers California, Hawaii, Nevada. Contact Dianne Levy, San Francisco Chronicle (415) 777-7120.
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.: Oct 20-22; covers Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah. Contact Ricardo Gandara, The Albuquerque Tribune (505) 823-3629.
DETROIT: Oct. 20-22; Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Contact Sandy White, Detroit Free Press (313) 222-6712.
MIAMI: Oct. 27-29; Florida and Puerto Rico. Contact Christine Morris, The Miami
Herald (305) 376-3592.
BLOOMINGTON, IND.: Nov.3,4: Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky. Contact Ray Mosco-witz, Nixon Newspapers (317) 473-3091.
SYRACUSE, N.Y.: Nov. 10-12; Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont Contact Tim Bunn, Syracuse Herald-American (315) 470 2240.
CINCINNATI: Nov. 16,17; Indiana, Kentucky, Ohip Tennessee, West Virginia Contact J. Frazier Smith, The Cincinnati Enquirer (513)369-1918.
SAN ANTONIO: Nov. 18,19; Oklahoma, Texas Contact Ed Rademaekers, San Antonio Light (512) 271-2721.
NEPTUNE, N.J.: Dec. 1-3; Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania. Contact Larry Benjamin, Asbury Park Press (201) 922-6000.
SPOKANE, WASH.: Jan. 20, 21; Alaska, Idahp Montana, Oregon, Washington, Wyoming. Contact Christopher Peck, The Spokesman-Review (509) 459-5060.
COLUMBIA, MO.: Feb. 2-4; Illinois, Iowa, Kansas Missouri, Nebraska. Contact Mary Bullard-Johnson, Columbia Missourian(314) 442-3161.
NEW ORLEANS: Feb. 16-18; Alabama, Arkansas Louisiana, Mississippi. Contact Beth Adams The Times-Picayune(504) 826-3270.
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.*: Feb. 16-18; Georgis North Carolina, South Carotins Virginia Contact Fred Flagler, Winston-Salem Journal (919) 727-7374.
* Opportunities in news/editorial only.
OTHER ASNE-SPONSORSHIP: The American Society of Newspaper Editors is accepting applications through Nov. 4 for 60 $750 scholarship awards for minority high school seniors who will be entering college next fall. Applicants must have a minimum grade point average of 2.5...
ASNE a Iso offers minority col lege freshmen summer jobs with their hometown newspapers They will workasclerks, researchers assistants to reporters, etc. The positions pay minimum wage, but upon completion, ASNE awards a $300 bonus Applications must be postmarked by Dec. 5.
Contact Mireille Grangenois Gates, ASNE, Minority Affairs Director, P.O. Box 17004, Washington, D.C. 20041 (703) 648-1146...
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘ N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves.:
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (90 issues):
Institutions/agencies $118
Persona! $108
Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

C ... t•C/ '(\ ,-\-t\' Making The News This Week -v v . \) \';t}tl County Superior Court judge. She is a os Angeles County Municipal Court judge . . . The Miami Herald salute s Mi ami Archdi ocese Auxiliary Bishop Agustin Roman and five other Sou t h Floridian s as winners of its. Spirit of Excel lence awards. Roma n was honored for his role in ending last year's riots of Marielitos in two p r i s o ns . .. Mark Gallegos, an attorney in private p ractice i n Miami , takes off i c e as president of the Hispanic National Bar Association at the g rou p's convention in Albuquerque, N.M . . . R ichard Ramirez, former director of the Navy's Office of Small and Disadvan ta ged Busi ness Utilization, agrees to plead gu ilty to charges that h e an d a n associate conspired to receive $60,000 in bribes from the mu c h i n-the-news Wedtech Corp . and $120,000 from another firm. . . U.S. Rep . Henry B. Gonzalez of Texas receives the M . Justin Herman Memorial Award from the National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials. Gonzalez is the first member of Congress to be honored with the 13-year old award , which recognizes a person who has made outstanding contributions to decent housing nationally . . . FBI Director William Sessions invites all persons and groups whose names were recorded in a much-maligned agency investigation of the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador to expunge their names from FBI files. . . California Gov . George Deukmejian appoints Lourdes Baird as a Los Angeles HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPOR T Sept 26, 1988 Spanish Language New competition in the nation's Spanishfirst-ever U.S . produced nove/a . The charac language television market is yielding more ters in the daily soap opera are secondand viewing choices for the nation's 17 million third-generat i on members of Mexican , Puerto Spanish speakers and placing an increased Rican, and Cuban families living in New York emphasis on productions originating in the City. United States. Innovations in Spanish-language programAs much as 44% of Telemundo's network ming can be attributed to major developments programming and 15% of Univision's is now inthatmarketoverthelast fewyears. Univision produced in the United States. Eleven U.S. was acquired in 1987 by . Hallmark Cards . The produced programs have premiered on Spanishsame year, the number of Telemundo stations language TV this year-eight on Telemundo rose to five, giving 25-year-old Univision, torand three on Univision. merly known as SIN, its firsttaste of compet ition The highest rated Spanish-language show Telemundo now claims to reach as much as in the United States is Univision's "Sabado 67% of Hispanic households in the continental gigante, " ' a 3 1/2-hour live variety slot produced United States, with affiliates in 19 of the top by the network's Miami affiliate. It is seen by 30 Hispanic markets . Univision reaches84% an estimated 4 million viewers in the United of that market, with 432 affiliates . States every week. While most of Univision's native program ming is produced or co-produced by the network, rival Telemundo has boosted its lineup with shows bought from well-known English-language production entities. Two daily game shows are currently produced by lnterTeiEspan for Telemundo . A music video program from MTV Networks and a nightly newscast co-produced by the Cable News Network were also added in 1988. "Our first and foremost goal is having (our programming) produced by Hispanics," says Lynne Rish, a Telemundo spokesperson who adds that non-Hispanic companies must employ Latino producers to deliver program ming in Spanish. "lfs opening up possibilities as far as talent-a pool that hasn't had a forum before. " Telemundo ' s most innovative program yet could be "Angelica mi vida, " touted as the Imported programming still constitutes the bulk of the Spanish-language product-and that is not likely to change any t i me soon because of the availability and low cost of Latin American shows. But both networks promise native productions are on the increase . "We' re convinced that U.S . Hispanics have needs and interests that are different from those of our brothers in Latin America," says Univision President Joaquin Blaya, " and we must create television that responds to those needs . We ' re interested in that not just from a philosophical point of view, but from a com mercial standpoint. " By all accounts, the Spanish-language market in the United States is a potential gold mine. "Research shows that 75% of U.S. Hispanics watch television either only in Spanish or mostly in Spanish," says Henry Silverman, continued on page 3 Huerta Beating Stirs Actions by City A San Francisco policeman has been re assigned as a result of an ongoing investigation by the city into an incident Sept 14 which resulted in life-threatening injuries to Dolores Huerta, 58, vice president of the United Farm Workers . According to UFW spokesman Daniel Martin, legal action will be taken although he does "not know against whom or what; ' Huerta was to have been released from the hospital late last week after surgery for a ruptured spleen and two fractur ed ribs. The injuries were allegedly incurred when police officers h i t her as she was protesting George Bush ' s stand against UFWs grape boycott. The 5-foot-2 UFW co-founder was among about 1 ,000 protesters outside the St. Francis Hotel, where Bush . was speaking. Mayor Art Agnos said during a press con ference Sept. 15 that in a police film of the incident he could see Huerta was attempting to comply with police instructions to move . Cavazos B ecomes .1st Hispanic on Cabinet Lauro Cavazos was s w orn in as the U.S. Secretary of Education by Vic e P r e siden t George Bush a t a Sept. 20 W hite H o use ceremony attended by Presi den t R e agan, making the 61year-old sixth-generation Mexican American the first H i spa ni c Cab inet member. The Senate had approve d Reagan's Aug . 9 nomination the same day , 94-0. Cavazos will replace W i ll i a m Bennett for three months before a new administr a t i on moves into the Whi t e House . Si nce 1 980 , he has served as president o f Lubbock' s Texas Tech Unive r sity, t h e la rgest U .S. u ni versity r un by a Hispani c . . Englis h On l y Suffers Blow A federal ju dge in Denver deal t a serio u s setback to the Colorado off i c i al-E ng lis h mo ve . ment Sept. 16 when he i s sued a prel i mina ry injunction that bars the s t ate from hav ing its voters decide this N o ve mbe r t he fate of an ini t iative seeking to ma k e E n gl i s h the state's off i cial language. U.S. District Court JudgeJini Carrig an ruled that some 61 ,000 of the mo r e t h a n 1 0 0 ,000 . signatures gathered in the pe t i t ion d r i ve to put the issue on the ballot v iolated the Voting Rights Act. Car r igan base d h is ruling on the fact that the 61 ,000 signatu res we r e collected in 12 count ie s wher e the Voting R ights Act stipulates that in i t i ative materi a l s must be published in English and Spanish. "We are of the opinion t h at i f the dec ision is . upheld-and we see it going t o the (U.S.) Supreme Court-ifs going t o ki ll them. (the official-language movement) ," s a id Schware, co-chai r of the C olorado chapter of the Na t ional Lawyer's Guild , the group that filed the suit. Colorado Secretary of State Natalie Myer,a plaintiff , filed f o r a s t ay of the preliminary injunction the same day o f the decisi on . At a press conferenc e lat e r t hat day, Myer sa i d she would have the ballots p r inted as p l ann e d . The state was expected t o ap peal th e ru li ng late last w eek. Felix Perez

PAGE 2

SAT Math Scores Increase for All in 1988 Scholastic Achievement Test averages in mathemathics increased between one and four points for all Latino categories betWeen 1987 and 1988, shows a report released Sept 20. In the SAT verbal test, they improved three points for Mexican Ameri cans, fell five points for Puerto Ricans and remained the same for other Hispanics. The highest Latino scores in 1988 were those of other Hispanics. They scored 387 in verbal and 433 in math, still well behind white's 445 verbal and 490 math averages. Five percent of the more than 1.1 million students who took the SAT this year were Hispanic. Women in a _ ll minority groups showed gains in math averages, with Mexican A merican women gaining the most, eight points, followed by black women with seven points. Since 1978 the average scores of Mexican Americans rose 12 points on the verbal portion and 26 on the math portion . Puerto Rican scores increased six points on the verbal and 14 points on the math. Donald Stewart, president of The College Board, which administers the test to college bound high school students, said he was pleased with . improvement of minorities' scores, but he indicated the differences in test scores between minority groups and whites . remains too great. "If the gap. . . is ever to be closed, improvement in the elementary and second ary education of minority students must be accelerated," said Stewart. Sophia Nieves SAT AVERAGES BY ETHNIC, RACIAL GROUP-'78-'88 SAT Verbal 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986* 1987 1988 Black 332 . . 330 341 342 NA 351 353 Mexican American 370 372 377 376 NA 379 382 ' Puerto Rican 349 350 360 358 NA 360 355 *Other Hispanic NA NA NA NA NA 387 387 White 446 442 444 445 NA 447 445 SAT Mathematical . Black 354 360 366 373 NA 377 384 Mexican American 402 413 . 416 420 NA 424 428 Puerto 388 394 403 405 NA 400 402 *Other Hispanic NA NANA NA NA 432 433 White 485 482 483 487 NA 489 490 * The Student Descriptive Questionnaire that students complete when registering for tests was changed to include "Other Hispanic" in 1987 . Source : "1988 Profile of SAT and Achievement Test Takers " U.S. to Reim _ burse Legalization Groups 600/o Say Immigrants Are Drain on Economy Federal officials reversed themselves Sept. 14 and agreed to reimburse community or' ganizations for millions of dollars they spent on health and education services for un. documented or newly legalized immigrants. The reversal followed protests by the affected groups and some congressmen who said many community agencies would be forced to close. j The U.S. Health and Human Services Depart-Escalante Won't Stump Jaime Escalante denied in a _ Sept. 15 interview with the Los Angeles Times that he has taken an official role in George Bush's campaign. This conflicts with a list released two days earlier by the Bush Quayle Coalition which indicates he is one of 94 National Honorary Chairmen of His-panics for Bush. _ One of Escalante's co-workers, Blanca Soto, told Weekly Report Sept. 19 that the Garfield High math teacher"has to be in the classroom" and the question put to him by Bush campaign workers was whether he was "voting as a citizen for him," not whether he would be an honorary co-chair. Jose Martinez, national campaign director of Hispanics for Bush,.denied Sept. 19 that i there was any confusion . \ "He agreed to be national co-chair for' Hispanics for Bush," said Martinez. "The position of the campaign . . . is he was asked to serve and he accepted I do not understand." Escalante, who teaches calculus at the East Los Angeles high school, became a symbol pf educational when h . is . methods were spotlighted m the mov1e \ "Stand and Deliver." i Sophia Nieves 2 ment notified the groups Sept. 8 that State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants would not be honored for services provided between Oct. 1, 1987, and June 30, 1988. California alone was expecting $13 million for that period. H HS said contracts between state govern ments and private groups were not signed u ntil after that period . Community groups countered that they could not sign contracts _ earlier because reimbursement regulations were still unpublished. The SLIAG program provides $4 billion over a four-year period to state and local groups working to facilitate the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. California will receive half of the funds. Outreach to Youth Lacking , Two-thirds of the more than 3.3 million young Hispanics in the United States face a future of low-wage, dead-end employment, said Siobhan Nicolau, author of a report on Hispanic youth released at a Sept. 14 Wash ington, D.C., press conference. Nicolau, president of the Hispanic Policy Development Project, compiled the study after she learned that individuals responsible for developing atrisk youth programs lacked knowledge in the area of Hispanic teen project found that Hispanic males work more hours while in school than Anglos or blacks. Forty-one percent drop out of high , school to work, she added. Nicolau's report, titled, "Too Late To Patch," was one of five released at the briefing. She blamed the educational establishment for its lack of outreach to Latino youngsters, as well as the authoritarian Latino family structure, which often offers little communica, tion between parent and child. More than six out of ten U.S. residents feel that immigrants take more from the U.S. eco nomy than they contribute, while just 19% feel immigrants give more, found a Los Angeles Times Poll released Sept. 19. Although at times giving answers that seemed contradictory, people interviewed for the poll -taken Sept. 9 and 11 in general displayed attitudes that were unwelcoming. There was a high degree of ignorance of the 1 986 immigration law and its provisions among the 1 ,418 people interviewed. While 31% of the participants said they approved of the legalization program and 22% said they disapproved, 42%.were unaware of it. Reagan Picks Fernandez President Reagan nominated Sept. 15 U.S. District Judge Ferdinand Fernandez of Los Angeles to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco . Fernandez, 51, was appointed to the federal bench in 1985 and was a Superior Court judge in San Bernardino from 1980. Reagan made the announcement at a White House press conference with Latino reporters . He added that the 9th Circuit, which has jurisdiction over California, Ari zona, Hawaii and five other states, is in "a state of emergency because of vacancies." Observers noted that Fernandez may never receive a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, which reviews nominations, before Congress adjourns Oct. 5. Committee Republicans have complained that 28 judicial nominations are being held up so that Michael Dukakis may make his own nominations if he wins in November. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Antonio Stev ens-Arroyo, guest columnist Loyalist Politics and the Latino Vote My political guru is don Millo, a Puerto Rican transit worker in New York City. When I want to get down from my university ivory tower and touch the pulse of the people, I seek out Emilio. His diagnosis of the 1988 presidential campaig n is short and sweet: "Any Puerto Rican who votes for George Bush is un poco loco en el coco . " This verdict has little to do with George Bush ' s introduction of his Mexican heritage grandchildren as "the little brown ones" on the tarm ac of the New Orleans airport on Aug . 16. After all, the poet Pedro Pietri te lls us that among Puerto Ricans, "To be called negrito and negrita/means to be called love. " When reminded of Bush's words, don Millo simply shrugged his shoulders and with a rascal glint in his eye pointed to his own skin and said that he too is "brown," a trigueflo Puerto Rican . What bothered him was Bush's speech to the Chicano students at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles May 5 , where the vice president sug gested that Latinos were the people to do "the hard physical work in our society." Millo's lips tightened. "Que bruto! " he muttered. How dumb. This vignette is not university-level political sc i ence, but it reflects the kind of problems George Bush has in seeking votes among the million or more Puerto Ricans who live in the Northeastern United States and who are of all the Latino groups in New York the most likely to vote . QUAYLE FOR VEEP WON'T HELP I believe George Bush when he says that his remark about brown grandchildren should not be construed except as an expression of love . I am also sure that he intended to provide an uplifting message for the students at Garfield High. But George Bush works from a set of presumptions that differ vastly from the average Puerto Rican's experiences . For Millo and the nearly half million Puerto Ricans who will vote in November, these impressions of Bush will probably supplant any detailed analysis of the candidates and their platforms . Dan Quayle for Veep will not help. Factors such as party loyalty , union policy and a general lack of sophistication about issues frame most political decisions by Puerto Ricans . Nor are we alone: Cuban Americans are just as knee-jerk in the ir reactions on behalf of the Republicans as Puerto Ricans are for the Democrats . Don Millo does not attribute his relative jobsecurityto Reaganomics ; he cred i ts his own hard work for his success. He doesn't blame drugs or c rime on liberal Democrats; he sees it as personal failure or as sin . In the issues that affect him, politics count for little . He votes out of a sense of tribal loyalty in which our guys are the good guys and the others are the desesperados. LATINO REACTIONS KNEEJERK Such bulldog constancy can weaken rather than strengthen political awareness . It is more important, for instance, to ask why bilingual education is not mentioned in the lengthy Republican platform than it is to carp about George Bush ' s verbal gaffes. Is his party against the amendment proposed by U.S. English to officially eliminate Spanish from this country, even though virtually all the organization's leaders are Republicans? Moreover, since Indiana was one of the first states to outlaw Spanish or any language other than English, does the conservative Senator Quayle stand with or against his constituency on this issue? The Democrats should not go unquestioned either. If appointed officials are what we need, the Republican Bush seems to be a better bet than the Democrat Dukakis. Just because Dukakis and Bentsen speak Spanish doesn't make them liberators of the Latino peoples. In fact, it may be argued thatthe hacienda relationship to Mexicans of Anglo South Texas Bentsen in the model of patr6npe6n may be the wrong kind of acquaintance with Latinos. POLITICAL LEADERS UNLIKELY SAVIORS Who is going to pose questions and demand answers rather than rhetoric from 1988's candidates? As long as we have not defined a substantial agenda, political parties will attempt to satisfy us with lots of Viva! Viva/, wear sombreros, munch on enchiladas, dance to a merengue, and think they have satisfied their obligations to Latinos. How can we emerge with any kind of Latino agenda when our people's voting patterns tend to be based on virtually anything except the issues? How can we bridge the regional and nationality differences that trlbalize our presence if we constantly use symbols . instead of substance to project leadership? How can we achieve unity behind a Latino candidate for national office if we always think and vote as Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans , etc . ? Our political leaders are unlikely saviors, since they work for the parties in question. I think it falls to Latinos In education and the media to define our agenda . I see some good things happening on this front on our extended news shows and feature columns. Educators can also educate and enlighten our people about the political issues. Without ideological posturing or partisan cheap shots, we in academia should articulate the issues that will force political parties to deal with substance rather than with symbols. (Antonio Stevens-Arroyo is director of political analysis at the Center for Latino Studies at Brooklyn College, City University of New York) Domestic Programming on the Increase cable channels did just that this month with " The Milagro Beanfield War". continued from page 1 chief executive officer of Telemundo Group Inc. Silverman claims that on a given night, as much as 6% of the total U .S. population could be watching Spanish-language TV. "Less than 1% of the $30 billion spent (yearly) in television advertising in the United States goes to Spanish television . There is 5% (missing)-a potential of $1.5 bill i on. " The job of Telemundo and Univision is to close the gap between the 6% that are watching and the 1% in advertising revenues . " U . S. -pro duced programs sold and aired abroad cou ld provide both networks with additional reven ue . Last year, Univision petitioned the Federal Communications Commission to be excluded Hispani c Link Weekly R e port from network syndication and prime time access rules . Networks are only allowed to produce a minimum of their prime-time pro gramming and may not syndicate their pro gramming. In the United States, the Spanish-language markefs potential is already attracting new participants . KTLA, a Los Angeles independent, English language station , which broadcasts some 20 hours weekly with a Spanish soundtrack using Second Au. dio Program technology, has . begun to broadcast commercials bilingually. Cable pay channels HBO and Cine max are expected to use SAP technology this year to air such movies as "La Bamba " and " Platoon " in dual , Spanish and English tracks. Pay-per-view Sept. 26, 1988 "Bravo!," a syndicated interview/talk show, is hosted in separate English and Spanish versions by its Cuban American producer, Nelly Galan. It is syndicated in dual versions in some 73 markets. A Spanish-language cable network is oper ated in the United States by Univisa, a sub sidiary of Mexicds Televisa Gala vision became advertiser-supported this month and now beams news and information programming 24 hours a day from Mexico City . Even further competition is expected in the market. A new 24hour cable channel, to be known as Hispanica Television Network, will debut on some 136 cable affiliates around the country Dec. 1 . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas 3

PAGE 4

Jose Antonio Burciaga, guest cohtw.nist My Ques ti on for George If you could sit eyeball to eyeball, like Ted Koppel does, with a preside ntial candidate and ask a single question, what would it be? As one of eight Lati no journalists chosen through our news agencies-m ine was Hispanic Link News Serviceto meet with Vice President George Bu sh in San Francisco Sept. 15 for half an hour, I had a couple of days to p o nder my choice and submit it, in advance. I thought about all of the promises heard by the Hispanic community in past election-year Septembers, weighed them against the reality of our status, and decided t o ask: "Mr. Vice President, w hat makes you any different than past candi d a t es?" Would that, be too cynical, disrespectful? Even if it wasn't, it wa s too general, a set up for him . And he'd have pfenty of time to rehearse his answer. So I changed it. To participate in t he i nterview, I had to wake up at 5 in the morn ing , bike in the cold darkness to the railroad stat ion in Palo Alto , and catch the 6 o'clock trai n , I did al! this to reach the Nikko Hotel at 7:30a.m. , where I was told our se_ssion )1ad been m oved f rom 8 to 9:45. I EXPECTE D TO BE FRISKED The hotel was crawlin g w i t h Secret Service types. As we reporters gathered, I expected w e would all be frisked , but we weren't. Instead, we were asked to vacat e th e suite. The vice president walked iri , t all, fresh and rested . He wore a smile, and before sitting down, posed for photographs with five of the reporters and a coupl_ e of p hotographers. Only the reporters from Univision and Telem undo and I chose not to pose with the vice president. We did shake ha nds, however. Then he sat down, three feet away from me. The VP is a nice man. H is answers were easy, although at times generic sounding, much like t he press packet we were given. The other reporters' ques ti ons had to do with the English Only ,movement, whi c h he oppo ses, and Central America, where he's afraid of the Communists. No, he a nswered another, he is notfor the rich guy. My question? I asked one on the issue Hispanics identify as the most critical to our com mu nity-education. "Mr. Vice President," 1 said, "considering the hig h dropout rate of Latinos, what specific educational initiatives would you pursue if elected?" "It is high." he agreed. BUSH DID PICK UP POINTER "And frankly," he w en t on, " you have to give much more support to bilingual education I ' ve already stated that out on the campaign trail." He talked about his pro posal to give "substantial rewards" to those minority schools t ha t " insti ll a sense of excellence and values into the kids." He mentioned his proposal about college baby bonds and his pleasure with how the Head Start program has helped the Hispanic community. "I have proposed increases in Head Start and I ' ve long been a supporter of bilin gual education. " With worry built into h i s ex pression, he told me, "lfs heartbreaking when you see those dropou t rates as high as they are." It was good to hear him say those things , because his press packe P made no specific mention of blacks or Hispanics. I didn't get to ask any follow-up questions, as I had been told I might. Time ran out. But as he l eft the room , the vice president smiled, waved and told us, "Bye, guys." No question. While George Bush worked for President Reagan, he did pick up a pointer or two on how to play the press. Still, I'm saving his words to weigh. the m against the Latino dropout rate four years from now, in case h e wins and wants to talk about the issue once again . • (Jose Antonio Bur ciaga, of Stanford, Calif, is a contributing columnist with Hispanic Link N ews Service and author of "Weedee Peepo .") Sin pelos en Ia lengua BYE BYE, BILLIE: There are those who feel that next to asbestos, Bill Bennett is t he worst thing that ever happened to Latino students sitting in public school classrooms . There are others who feel that such a comparison is unfair to asbestos. Whatever the order, Billie the Boca has left the helm of the U .S. Department of Education after 3 1/2 years of bad-mouthing and slashing education programs essential t o Latinos and to the poor. At the same time, although it has r eceived no attention in the press (except some mentions i n Weekly Report), Bennett was busy ridding his department o f H i s p anic pe r sonnel , particularly at policy-influencing levels . Bennett, by the way , is the only head of a Cabinet department who has flat refused to prepare an affirmative action plan. According to information collected by some Latino education advocates in Washington, the r e w ere 19 Hispanics in key positions within the Department of Education when Bennetfs predecessor, Terrel Bell, was secretary-fou r Senior Executive Service career professionals, one president i al appointee a nd 14 professionals at the highest regular civil serv ice level , GS-15 . Today thereare zero Hispanic SES career p r ofessionals, zero presidential appointees and only two G&15 career executives . Both of the departmenfs Hispanic regional directors are gone. When Bell was there , more t han 4 % of the departmenfs total work force was Hispan i c . N o w , ifs less t han 3% . During the Carter administration , t he department held one national and five regional confer ences on critical Hispanic edu cation issues . During the B ennett years , it has held none. Since its inception in 1968, t h e migra nt education unit (which has an 85% Latino clientele) had been headed by a bilingual , bicultural professional ex p e r i e nc e d i n m i g rant education issues . Bennett passed o v e r f ull y q ualifi ed His pa n ic professionals to choose an Anglo abou t ready t o retire w h o was neither bi l ingual , bicultural nor experie nced in migrant education to head the program. When the White House invi t ed L a t ino r eporters to attend a Sept. 15 " briefing " tha t included a repo rt on education by Bennett, Hispanic reporte r Darryl F igueroa as k ed the secretary what role he played in P resident Reagan'sdecision(made last June) to nameU . S . English P resident Linda Chavez as chair of the newly mandated National Com m ission on Migra nt Education . Bennett offered the incre d ib l e r es po nse that he didn't even know about it unt i l Da r ryl as k ed the q ue s tion , explaining that he ' d been very busy the "pas t two w eeks . " Then Weekly Report edi tor Felix Perez reminded the outgoi ng secretary of his September 1985 publ i c de nunciation of bilingual education as a 17-year, $1. 7 b illion bust , pointing out that incoming Secretary Lauro C a vazos fel t i t was a very effec t ive program . Bennett said his own opini on hadn't changed. The White House " briefing " t urned ou t to be a bust itself. Less than 40 Latino journalists , mostly from Spanish-language radio and weekly papers, res p onded t o t he White House's broad invitation. This, after the Whi t e House pre ss off ice had been saying a week earlier fhat nearly all 150 seats i n the briefing r oom had been filled. Actually, another 40 o r 50 seats were filledby friends of the administration who p u nct u ated the speakers' rhetoric with frequent applause and cheers. Hardly the kind of behavior one expects at press briefings . One Bush campaign worker, Robert de Posada, who identified himself as a "Radio America " reporter, t ossed Bennett a fat , distorted softball : " The Natio nal Education Association and Michae l Dukakis are against testing o f teachers," he said, asking, " What is your position on that? " Lauro Cavazos has his work cut out for him the next three months . I hope he brough t along a pooper-scooper. -Kay Barbaro 4 Sept. 26, 1988

PAGE 5

COLLECTING ATRISK HISPANICS: The 115-page report titled "Too Late To Patch " on at-risk Hispanic youth details their characteristics and offe rs recommendations on bringing them into the mainstream. It is available for$5. Send a check to The Hispanic Policy Development Project , 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C . 20036 (202) 822. . 'SAT' CLASSOF1988: "College-Bound Seniors: 1988 Profile of SAT and Achievement TestTakers" is a 12-page report by the College Board giving SAT scores by racial and ethnic group. For a free copy write College Board , Box AF, 45 Columbus Ave., New York, N.Y. 1 0023. COLORADO HISPANIC AGENDA: " Hispanic Agenda: Building a Stronger Colorado" is a 21-page document by the Latin American Research and Service Agency. For a copy send $5 to Hispanic Agenda, 899 Logan St., Suite 400, Denver, Colo. 80203 (303) 860 7171 . MEXICAN AMERICAN ORAL HEALTH: "Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease Among Mexican-American Children from Five Southwestern States, 1982" is a 12-page article in the July summary issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report based on information from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey . For a copy of the issue , send $1 to Superintendent of Do cuments, U . S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 7833238. 'SAT' GUIDE: "Taking the SAT: The official Guide to the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Test of Standard Written English" is a 63-page booklet available free to any student who will take the SAT. For a copy write College Board ATP, Dept. E19, P . O . Box 6212, Princeton, N.J. 08541. KANSAS CITY-AREA HISPANICS: "Report on Kansas City: Hispanic Needs Assessment'' is a 90-page report, including 160 pages of charts and survey questions. For a copy send $2.50 to Greater Kansas Community Foundation, 127 W . 1Oth St., Suite 406, Kansas City. Mo. 64105 (816) 842. CHILD WELFARE AND IMMIGRATION: "Minors in Immigration Proceedings: Problem of Child Welfare and Immigration Enforcement," a 7 4 page booklet, recommends the development of national guidelines to protect undocumented minors. For a copy send $7.50 to Refugee Policy Group, 1424 L St. NW, Suite 401, Washington, D.C. 20036. CONNECTING HELPING IMMIGRANT PUPILS The Los Angeles Unified School District opened this month its first pre-enrollment center to assess the educational level , language proficiency and physical condition of newly arrived immigrant students The Student Guidance, Assessment and Placement Center, located near downtown, has been budgeted at $1.8 million for its first two years. It is projected to screen up to 6 ,000 children for enrollment in city schools this year and determine whether they need special assistance. Serving 35 schools, the center is the first of what school officials hope will be as many as 10 such facilities districtwide. Twenty-eight percent of the district's 590,000 students, or 165,000, are not proficient in English . The bulk of these students are Hispanic. KANSAS CITY LATINOS ASSESSED The results of a comprehensive survey to assess the needs o f Kansas City-area Hispanics in order to provide them with better services-first of its kind in the community-were released late las t month by The Greater Kansas City Community Foundation. Titled "Report on Kansas City: Hispanic Needs Assessment," the survey found that although the32,000 Hispanics in the seven-county area were somewhat better off economically than Hispanics nationally , they are less so than non Hispanics in the Kansas City area. Among the recommendations in the report: • that a Metropolitan Hispanic Councila think tank and advocacy institution-be established; • that the bishop of the Catholic diocese of the area open an office to address Hispanic needs; • that a leadership development program for young Hispanic professionals be created to introduce them to leaders in business, charitable, government and civic arenas; and • that there be developed a Hispanic voter registration campaign. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Andrew Montano, director of the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Albuquerque, N .M., and Fred Salas, director of the adminis tration's Medical Center in Denver, are among several federal govern ment employees to be honored with a Meritorious Executive Ran k Award at a ceremony in Washington, D.C , presided over by President Reagan . Montano and Salas each received $1 0 ,000 ... Calendar THIS WEEK LITERARY DISCUSSION Riv erside, Calif . Sept. 26 Novelist Carlos Fuentes. will speak on literature , politics and i nternational relations. Fuentes teaches at Harvard University and is the author of " The Old Gringo , " a book being produced as a movie. His appearance is being sponsored by the University of California Consortium on Mexico and the U . S . and the World Affairs Council of Inland California . Marketing , professionals willie ad sessions on topics which include the future of U . S . Hispanic media , the impact of Hispanic media, reaching the Hispanic community through radio, and creating advertising campaigns. Irvine Hockaday , president and CEO of Hallmark Cards, owner of Univision , and Evelyn Hernandez , president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, are two of the featured speakers. The conference is sponsored by Advertising Age and The Media Institute. Rachel Cordero (312) 7395603 DRUG ABUSE Lansing, Mich. Sept. 30 A regional Hispanic conference on substance abuse sponsored in part by the Midwest Hispanic Institute on Substance Abuse Prevention and Training will be held . Among the topics to be discussed will be . family counseling , culturally appropriate substance abuse treatment and training , treatment for women , : funding sources and AIDS prevention. Keynote • speakers include Alberto Mala from the Office for , Substance Abuse Prevention, Department of Health i and Human Services ; and Rodolfo Balli Sanchez, 1 chairman of the National Hispanic Family Against . Drug Abuse . Kathy Barton (714) 787 CULTURE CELEBRATION Omaha, Neb . Sept. 26 El Mercadq a celebration of Hispanic rUiturethrough music, art, food and dance, will be held . The event , celebrating the state's Hispanic Heritage Month , is sponsored by US West Somos-Nebraska and the Nebraska pluralism c ouncil . Tom Reyes (402) 422 MEDIA AND MARKETING New York Sept 26,27 At the 1988 Co nfer e nce On Hispanic Media & Hispani c Link Weekly Report Sue . Geramian (212) 21 0 ERASING RACISM Dallas Sept. 298 A conference designed to help erase racism by examining ethnic biases in news reporting, entertain ment and advertising will be sponsored by The Greater Dallas Community Relations Commission for members of the media and for civic volunteers. Workshops will also assess the level of minority hiring at media outlets in the Dallas-Fort Worth market area Discussion will result in the develop ment of specific plans to address inequities. Roger Kallenberg (214) 979 LULAC PRESIDENT Chicago Sept. 29 The League of United Latin American Citizens will hold a reception honoring its national president , Jose Garcia De Lara . Sept. 26, 1988 ! Guillermo Velasquez (517) 484 I MEDIA SEMINAR I 1 Los Angeles Oct. 1 I , The . Hispanic Public Relations Association will sponso r a one-day med1a semmar for H1spanic community I organizations. The workshop is intended to provid e , the groups with instruction on the uses of publi c I! relations,. publicity and promotions to help them meet their goals. Guest panelists include Ra y 11 Gonzales , KTLA TV, and Teresa Samaniego , KABC TV . . Participants will be provided with media guides, legislative gu1des and sample press kits. Esther Renteria (213) 726 5

PAGE 6

s . TENURETRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY University of California, Davis. The College of Letters and Science invites applications for an Assistant Professor Ill, in the sociology of development, effective July 1989. This is a tenure-track position. Areas of research specialization could include women and international development, international organization, the sociology of agriculture, urbanization and development In the Third World, or economic development and social change. Teaching responsibilities include a graduate course in development planning in the International Agriculture Development program. Employment or research expertise in a developing country is desirable. Ph .D. is required . The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology . To apply, send curriculum vitae, letter of application and the names of three references wtiom we may contacftorletters of recommendation to: Lyn Lofland, Chair, Development Search Committee, Sociology Department, University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616. Applications must be postmarked January 1, 1989, or earlier to be considered. The University of California is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer. TENURE TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY The University of California, Davis . The College of Letters and Science invites applications for a sociologist with an emerging or established reputation for 'quantitative research and publication and a strong commitment to teaching . The level of appointment may be at the Assistant or Associate Professor levels. f!. Ph. D . is required It Is desired that field or specialization be in one of the following areas: Gender and family, sociology of organization, economic sociology , historical, comparative sociology, International political economy, or poverty and social welfare . The position is reserved for someone actively engaged In quantitative research and able to participate regularly In teaching a graduate-level sequence In methods and statistics. The appointment will be In the Department of Sociology. To apply, send curriculum vitae , letter of application, and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to: James Cramer, Chair, Quantitative Search Committee, Sociology Department, University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616. Applications must be postmarked by January 10, 1989, or earlier to be considered . The University of California Is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer. PRESIDENT COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATION SERJobs for Progress Inc . , a national Hispanic nonprofit employment and training organization, Is currently seeking a president for its national office located In Dallas, Texas. Responsibilities include: provide executive and managerial leadership at the national levet designing, lll)plementing shortand long-term strategy; accounting for the management and financial obligation of the corporation ; and marketing the corporation to the public and private sectors as well as the general public. The qualified candidate will possess excellent communications and organizational skills; . at least three years experience In publicly funded programs; proven administrative and leadership ability; and a background in fiscal management, contracts'design and negotiations, planning and management of information systems. A degree in business administration, social work, education, or related field is essential. Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred but not required . Interested and qualified candidates should send resume to : Chairman of the Board, SEA Jobs for Progress Inc. , National Office, 1355 River Bend Drive, Suite 240, Dallas , Texas 75247. ' Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F/, V,H DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectivene ss and speed of His panic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace , please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C . . 20005 or phone (202) 234 or (202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p .m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week . CLASSIFIED AD RATES Ordered by 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone Organization number, 1 word). Multiple use rates Street onrequest. ----------------------------DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES City, State & Zip (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) ' -----------$45 per column inch. , Area Code & Phone ________ _ Sept. 26, 1988 Services Assistant II {Bilingual) Permanent, Part-time, 30 hoursReannouncement Ann. #1454ADHS Salary: $8.04/hr Highly responsible clerical position providing full clerical, administrative data entry, typing and transcription support in the Department of Huma n Services . Handles a variety of inquiries from a diverse population, especially the Spanish-speaking community. Requires high school diploma or equivalent, one year of responsible secretarial experience and typi n g of40 wpm. Refer to announcement for desirable qualifications . All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted withou t a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Ap plications must be received into the Personnel D epa rtment no later than 5 pm on OCTOBER 6, 1988. To request application material , please call (703) 358 or TOO (703) 284 (hearing impaired only). ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2 100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE/MFH EMPLEADOS GUBERNAMENTAL ES GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES You can ensure that your contribution goes to the Hispanic organization that will maximiz e your $$s impact on your community. NA TIONAL IMAGE INC. has pledged that ail funds received will be used to "Promote the health and welfare of Hispanics, " particularly , decrease the high school dropout rates, unem ployment, social , ethnic and sexual nation , and to provide training on how to successfully navigate the Federal employment system. NATIONAL IMAGE INC. helpedover3 ,00 0 Hispanics last year through training, scholar ships, and amnesty assistance. Targe t your Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) code #0443 contribution to NATIONAL IMAGE , INC., 20 F Street, N . W . Washington, D . C . 20001 . For membership information please call Ms . Aurora Mojica, Executive Director, at (202) 737. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Exec'utive Director sought for progressiv e Cuban American organization in Washington , D.C. Candidates to develop and maintain contacts with media and public officials, to administer office , and organize conferences . Must have knowledge of Cuban American issues. BNBS degree . Graduate education preferred . Apply by Nov. 7 to Search Committee , P.O. Box 29612 , Brookland Station , Washington , D .C. 20015. Hispani c Link Weekly Report

PAGE 7

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP CITY OF PHOENIX Three positions beginning July 1, 1988, for a minimum 12-month period. Present starting salary $20,800 plus compre hensive employee benefits. Management Interns will work i n t h e Management and Budget Department , serving rotational assignments in the City Manager's Office and a line department. This wi ll be the 40th year of our intern program , wh ich has proven to be an excellent training grou nd for higher level administrative Applicants must have completed courses required for a Master's degree in Public Administration or r elated field by July 1, 1989. To obtain an application, write or call : Charles E. Hill, Management an d Budget Director , 251 West Washingto n , Phoenix , AZ 85003, (602) 262-4800. Deadline for all applications is February 3, 1989. AIVEEO!H Employer BOOKKEEPER National Hispanic Organization is seeking experienced person for its GIL maintenance payroll, bank reconciliations, and other bookkeep ing duties . Must be well organized. Lotus 1-2-3 a must. Send resume to ASPIRA Association Inc . , 1112 16th Street NW, Suite 340, Washington, D.C. 20036. VICE CHANCELLOR for HUMAN RESOURCES Responsible to the Chancellor, provides for overall administration of a District-wide , com prehensive human resources program . Qualifications include a Master's degree and a minimum of three years administrative personnel experience , prefer ably in an educational setting ; must possess or be eligible for a California Community College Administrative Credential . Salaryof$72,908, plus monthly mileage allowance and liberal fringe benefits . To obtain an application form , contact: (714) 432-5008. Coast Community Colleges , Office of Huma n Resources, P . O . Box 1949, Costa Mesa, Calif. 92628. A District application must be f il ed pri or to the deadline of October 15. AIVEOE/M/F!H ASPIRA Association Inc. STAFF ASSISTANT Must know Word Perfect and willing to learn Lotus 123 and dBase 3 plus. Excellent proofing and interpersonal skills. Knowledge of Spanish helpful. Responsibilities include: Answering telephone, mail distribution, typing and scheduling of meetings. Occasional overtime required. Salary negotiable at $19,000 range based on experience. Send resume to ASPIRA Association Inc . , 1112 16th St. NW, Suite 340, Washington, D . C. 20036 Hi s pani c Link Weekly Report MANAGEMENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Stand tall. As part of our area team , you will , because you stand for the industry McDonalds. A Billion dollar corporation and One of the Ten Best Managed Companies in America As a Restaurant Manager, you ' ll manage a million dollar business and staff of 60 . You ' ll make decisions and handle challenging day-to-day operations, seeing results every day . You ' ll enjoy on-go i ng development and career challenges in a surprising variety of areas. As well as these outstanding benefits: • Excellent Starting Salary Managem e nt Trainees earn $16,000 $20,000 Store Managers earn $25,000 $39,000 • Performance/Merit Increases • Medical , Dental & Life Insurance • Company Funded Profit Sharing • Paid Vacations/Holidays • Employee Stock Ownership Plan e Tbition Reimbursement Stand tall . Attend our Open House, on Tuesday, September 27th, 1988. Presen tations begin at &.30 pm and 7:30 pm . If unable to attend our Open House, please call or send your resume to: Crystal Newman ; McDonalds Corporation, Dept. HL 925, 3015 Williams Drive , Fairfax, Virginia 22031 ; (703) 698-401 5 . OPEN HOUSE Tuesday,' September 27th, 1988 5 pm -9 pm GAITHERSBURG HOLIDAY INN 2 MONTGOMERY VILLAGE AVE. GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND 1\1\fSS fMCJon; Powered By People With Prlde.5 M Always, An Equal Action EmploJef. 7

PAGE 8

Arts & Enter tainment past indiscretions, " and Carlos Montalvo is Alfredo Chavez, "the grandson of a powerful New York food products magnate . . . passionately involved with Angelica . " ON SPANIS•i TV: The following a re Spanish-language programs, produ ced and broadcast in the Un i t ed Sta t es. All times are Eastern: UNIVISION TV Mujer(Mon.-Fri . , 12:00 p.m. ) Lucy Pereda and Gabriel Traversari host this live women' s magazine show, produced by Univision in Miami. TELEMUNDO U no nunc a sa be& Adivine l o con sefla s (Mon.-Fri., 4:00 p.m.) Game shows fro m lnttwTeiEspan where celebrity contestant s compete for. money donated to charity g roups . Frank Torres is producer. Desde Hollywood(Tues., 10:30 p .m.) A weekly magazine, produced by ZGS Productions in Washington, D.C., now in its third season. Noticiero Univisi6n (Daily, 6 :30 p . m . and Mon. Fri. , 10:00 p .m.) Jorge Ramos and Maria Elena Salinas are weekday anchors on the broadcasts originating in laguna Niguel, Calif . Dia a dia (Mon.-Fri. , 5:0 0 p .m.) Home magazine , hosted by Maria Olga Ferna ndez and Fe!ix G uillermo, b r oadcast live from Telemundo Productions in Miami. Noticiero Teiemundo CNN (Mon. -F ri., 6 : 30) Broadcast live from Cable News f