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Hispanic link weekly report, October 3, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 3, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Monsignor RaCil del Valle, the first Hispanic chancellor of the New York Archdiocese, dies Sept 20 of cancer. He was 62... Mother Margarita Maria, the founder of a 58-year-old Duarte, Calif., hospital built as a haven for girls with tuberculosis, dies Sept. 21 at the age of 85... San Francisco District Attorney Arlo Smith says a county grand jury will investigate whether criminal charges should be filed against the city’s police department for its crowd control tactics at a protest that resulted in a ruptured spleen to United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta . . Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley names Adolfo Nodal to head the city’s Cultural Affairs Department
Nodal currently heads the Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans.. Jos6 Canseco, the 24-year-old outfielder for the Oakland Athletics, becomes Sept. 23 the first player in major league history to hit 40 home runs and steal 40 bases in a season... A federal jury in Los Angeles convicts former Mexican police officer RaOl L6pez-Alvarez of six felony counts in connection with the February 1985 torture and death of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena. Lopez-Alvarez, 29, is a graduate of East Los Angeles’ Garfield High School... Chicago Police Officer Irma Ruiz, a 40-year-old mother of four, dies from a gunshot wound to the chest from Clemie Henderson, 41, who went on a rampage and killed four people for no apparent motive...
Vol. 6 No. 39
fO) HISPANI^^^^^EKLY^EPQRT^
Oct 3, 1988
Farm Workers Fault Pesticide Bill
Suit Seeks to Prevent
The Senate was expected to have passed a pesticide bill last week after squabbling elements in the body reached a compromise and amendments were scrapped that would have made chances for passage slim.
The U.S. House of Representatives passed the revision of the regulatory bill Sept 20, generating little enthusiasm from agricultural groups and drawing criticism from farm worker groups.
Chairman of the House Agricultural Committee Rep. E “Kika” de la Garza (D-Texas) called the bill uthe art of the possible,” admitting “it would hardly satisfy anyone.”
The legislation reauthorizes for three years the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Ro-denticide Act of 1972, stepping up the pace for review of hundreds of chemicals in pesticides used by farmers.
In addition to requiring testing within nine years, the bill will require manufacturers to pay $150 million to the Environmental Protection Agency to bear part of the cost It would also ease requirements that the federal government pay manufacturers’ storage and disposal costs if chemical products are determined to be unsafe.
The coordinator of the United Farm Workers’ grape boycott Jean Cainani, said union representatives do not believe protection from
The Latin American Law Enforcement Association, known as LA LEY, filed a complaint against the Los Angeles Police Department Sept 21, charging that it discriminates against Hispanics in promotion and employment.
LA LEY made its accusations to the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing and to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission following four years of monitoring LAPD promotion and assignment practices.
LA LEY spokesperson Alan Clayton in particular cited discrimination in promotion to civil service positions, pay grade advancements and desirable assignments, all key to aligning oneself for promotion to sergeant, detective, captain and commander.
“It’s on the way to sergeant level that the
pesticides will come through federal legislation but through contracts negotiated with growers Dr. Marion Moses, a farm worker activist and health consultant to the UFW, said the bill is needed but requires more work. “The real fear is that people are going to think something got done with FI FRA,” said Moses Jim Davis spokesman for the U.S. Agriculture Department, explained that while FI FRA originally contained provisions that directly concerned farm workers the legislation passed was a core bill containing essentials.
UFW President C6sar Chavez recently put the spotlight on workers’ health problems when he took on a 36-day fast. The union puts at 276 the cases of childhood cancer in California’s agricultural Kern County within the past 10 years - four to five times the national average. It charges they are the result of chemicals used in pesticides No national reporting system exists to keep track of the number of farm workers poisoned by pesticides each year.
Estimates range from 12,000 to 300,000 annually, according to Valerie Wilk, health specialist with the Farm Worker Justice Fund. “Who’s to say?” said Wilk. “Maybe it’s half a million, maybe more. Workers can’t go in for health care. They can’t afford it.”
- Sophia Nieves
bottleneck occurs for Hispanics,” said Clayton.
Latinos comprise about 19% of patrol officers and 8% of sergeants. Of the department’s 30 top-level captains, one is Hispanic. Of its 17 commanders, one is Hispanic. There are no Hispanics in six deputy chief slots.
The LAPD denied the allegations and questioned support among Latino officers for the complaint “The department is one family,” said Police Cmdr. William Booth, spokesman for Police Chief Daryl Gates. “We say we are all one color - blue.”
Sergeant Emilio P6rez, first vice president of LA LEY who has been with the department nearly 20 years, said that was partly true. “It’s not the department but a handful of managers that create the problem.”
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Suit Seeks to Prevent Fla English Initiative
Speak Up Now for Florida, a group set up to battle the initiative that seeks to make English the state’s official language, was expected to file a lawsuit late last week or early this week that would prevent the state from putting the initiative on its Nov. 8 ballot.
SUN for Florida will pattern its suit after one that successfully drew a preliminary injunction Sept 16 against the official-English effort in Colorado.
The federal judge hearing that suit filed by the National Lawyer’s Guild, ruled that more than half of the signatures gathered for the measure violated the Voting Rights Act because initiative materials were not published in English and Spanish in 12 counties subject to the act.
Florida and Colorado are two of three states with official-language initiatives on their Nov. 8 ballots. The other is Arizona
The leader of an Arizona group opposing that state’s English-only measure, codified on the ballot as initiative 106, said the group will not file a lawsuit Tom Espinoza, director of No On 106! and a real estate developer in Phoenix, said, “We feel confident that we’ll pull it off in the polls We see the Colorado ruling as an ace in the hole.” - Felix Perez
Serra Nearerto Sainthood
Franciscan Father Junfpero Serra, who established nine California missions in the 1700s, moved one step closer to sainthood when he was beatified Sept. 25 by Pope John Paul II in St Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican.
At a Mass offered to some 300,000 people, including 500 from California, the Pope hailed the Spanish missionary as a “shining example of Christian virtue.”
Despite approaching the height of blessedness in the Roman Catholic Church, Serra has been sharply criticized by some Native American groups for what they charge was the enslavement and virtual genocide of their ancestors by Serra to run the missions.
Serra died in Carmel, Calif., in 1784.
L.A. Police Group Charges Job Bias


Court’s Legalization Order May Benefit 250,000
A San Francisco federal appeals court ordered the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service Sept 21 to issue work permits to undocumented immigrants who were denied legal status or discouraged from filing applications for it because they had taken brief visits outside of the United States during the one-year legalization period in its interim ruling, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals also temporarily banned the INS from deporting members of this category of immigrants. J
It said INS must question persons arrested under the immigration law to determine whether they might be eligible for legalization if not for a “brief, casual and innocent” visit outside of the country after the legalization
period started in May 1987. If so, they cannot be deported, it stated adding they must be released without bond and issued temporary work authorization. Additionally, it instructed all information gathered by the INS in making . determination is to be kept confidentiai.
Under INS interpretation, such travel taken without the advance approval of INS could not be innocent and should exempt applicants from legalization eligibility.
Ralph Abascal of the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, lead counsel in the case, said the ruling applies to an estimated 125,000 to 150,000 persons
He noted that it was the first of five national immigration cases against INS re-
strictions on legalization applicants to reach an appellate court and that its significance extends to the other cases.
“It boils down tolnumbers and it’s one quarter of a million people,” said Abascal, explaining that that many people stand to win the chance to apply or reapply for legalization if the five cases are decided in favor of the plaintiffs.
According to Abascal, most undocumented persons were not aware of the travel dis-qualifier and might have lost a chance for legal status because of a few hours absence.
In November, the court will begin to hear arguments on the issue as well as the acceptance of post-deadline legalization applications. _ Darryl Lynette Figueroa
City to Vote on At-Large Elections
Citing the specter of related lawsuits in California, the Pomqna City Council decjded Sept 22 to add a referendum to its March ballot that will allow voters to determine whether the city should use at-large or district wide elections.
Nell Soto, the first Latina on the five-membei council, said the city won a lawsuit to impose tMrietwideaiections in 1986. Voters rejected such a proposal 16 years ago.
Council members represent four individual districts, but are elected by city wide vote. The mayor also sits on the council
The at-large system, opponents charge,
Caucus Goes Statewide ! . ................
The Hispanic Legislative Caucus of California will hold Sept 29 its orientation meeting with selected community activists in Sacramento as part of an effort to establish the first statewide network to facilitate development and passage of a legislative agenda for Latinos in that state.
Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, Sacramento and Fresno are the six cities from which the network will operate Six other cities will participate later.
Assemblyman Peter Chac6n(D-San Diego), chairman of the seven-membercaucus, will be present at initial meetings in each city to gather legislative ideas on the first set of issue areas - health, education, elections and housing.
There are four Hispanic legislators in the 80-member Assembly and three in the 40-member Senate California is 23% Hispanic.
Bill proposals will then be designed by the caucus for introduction in the 1989-90 legislative session, beginning this December. The network will make telephone calls, provide testimony and lobby to push the legislation through.
Caucus spokesperson Rebecca Nieto said, “This will allow Latino elected officials to take comprehensive action rather than hear about bills introduced by others that they can only| react |to.”
makes it next to impossible for non-majority groups to elect a candidate of their choice.
Soto, who led the arguments for the referendum, said, “We decided it was best to let voters choose, rather than to have courts , impose a change.”
Pomona’s population of about 120,000 is estimated to be 38% Latino and 25% black. Only three Hispanics have sat on the council in its more than 100-year history. No blacks have ever been on the counciL
The city is 31 miles east of Los Angeles.
This summer a federal appellate court ruled that Watsonville, a city in Santa Cruz County, i had discriminated against Hispanics by electing council members through at-large elections | Another lawsuit alleging city dilution of His-! panic voting power was filed last month against Los Angeles County by the U.S. J ustice Department
| - Darryl Lynette Figueroa
N.Y.G Schools 33% Latino
Latinos made up 33% of the students in New York City’s public, private and religious schools last year, compared with 26% 10 years before, according to new statistics for kindergarten through 12th grade released by the New York State Department of Education. Enrollment fell for both Anglos and blacks
Figures for the period show:
1987-88 1977-78 Change Blacks 411,075 435,396 - 24,321
Latinos 381,389 349,553 + 31,836
Anglos 354,617 527,628 -173,011
Total enrollment dropped from 1.35 million to 1.2 million, with 77% attending public schools
The city's Catholic schools lost students at a greater rate than did public or private schools with Hispanics and blacks constituting a growing proportion. Latinos accounted for 27% last year, compared with 20% 10 years ago. Black enrollment was up 8% over the past 10 years with black students now making up 20%.
Puerto Rico Population Grows to 3.3 Million
Puerto Ricofs population increased 95,000 since 1980 to 3.29 million in 1987, while an additional 227,000 island residents have migrated, according to a report issued Sept. 26 by the U.S. Census Bureau.
“Population Estimates for Puerto Rico and the Outlying Areas: 1980 to 1987” indicates Puerto Rico’s overall growth figure is 3%.
POPULATION OF PUERTO RICO
1987 3,292,000 1983 3,265,000
1986 3,273,000 1982 3,262,000
1985 3,282,000 1981 3,245,000
1984 2,265,000 1980 3,196,520
INS Investigates Priests
Three Los Angeles priests who urged readers to civil disobedience in a Los Angeles Times editorial are under criminal investigation by the Immigration and Naturalization Service for providing food and shelter to undocumented workers.
INS Los Angeles District Director Ernest Gustafson said Sept 23 that criminal charges would be filed if warranted against the Rev. Gregory Boyle, pastor at Mission Dolores, and the Revs. Luis Olivares and Michael Kennedy of Our Lady Queen of the Angels.
Gustafson disclosed the investigation at a press conference to announce the arrest of Salvadoran national Wilson Mendndez, 27, who admitted breaking $10,000 worth of windows at I NS headquarters in downtown Los Angeles. Men6ndez had regularly sought shelter at Our Lady.
Gustafson accused the priests of encouraging lawlessness in their Sept 21 newspaper editorial which read in part, “We have sought to align ourselves with the undocumented, denouncing laws and attitudes that seek to deny their basic rights and calling all citizens ... to care for these culturally disparaged.”
It further read, “To the extent that we openly aid, abet and harbor the undocumented, we indeed are breaking the law. The Gospel would have us do no other."
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Aurora Camacho de Schmidt,
guest columnist
Farm Workers Dealt New Blow
The workers who harvest our fruits and vegetables have a hard life. The recent 36-day fast of farm-worker leader C6sar Chavez has highlighted some facts that we wish to forget Agricultural workers suffer alarmingly
high rates of malnutrition, low life expectancy, exposure to pesticides, and lack of medical care. Their children, who often work in the fields, seldom receive an adequate education.
Few farm workers find year-round employment. Fewer than 2% belong to a union. Many must migrate for part of the year, following the crops.
The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 contains a provision known as H*2A that has received little public attention, but it is dealing a new blow to this embattled sector of the U.S. labor force. H-2A is an open-ended device to bring in temporary foreign labor, mainly for agriculture. It is based on H-2, a 45-year-old program that has allowed growers to bring Caribbean workers to the Atlantic states Constant vigilance on the part of farm worker advocates had kept H-2 relatively small, with fewer than 30,000 workers participating annually.
The new regulations, coupled with the present economic and political climate, make experts fear that300,000 H-2 A workers will be employed in the fields in the near future, involving new countries, new crops, and new states of destination.
POWERFUL GROWERS FAVORED
Immigration reform had the ostensible goal of saving jobs for U.S. residents, but this provision favors the powerful growers’ associations at the expense of workers who will be displaced.
Agricultural employers mounted an intensive successful lobbying campaign on Capitol Hill in 1982, fearing that immigration reform could make them lose the undocumented workers who year after year appeared miraculously at their gate. In this way, they won an amazing package of concessions, turning immigration legislation into an agricultural labor bill.
Between 1942 and 1964, the Southwestern growers enjoyed a government-to-government series of contracts with Mexico, the bracero program, importing temporary workers for specific jobs. The war-related shortage of workers gave Eastern growers the opportunity to bring in seasonal sugar cane cutters from the West Indies. The latter procedure was codified as section H-2 of U.S. immigration law.
Unlike the bracero program, terminated as a result of public outcry, H-2 was never taken off the books. Yet the same reasons that brought an end to the bracero program apply: the exploitation of foreign “disposable” workers and their displacement, depression of wages and worsening working conditions for domestic workers.
EMPLOYERS HAVE ABSOLUTE CONTROL
Growers do not pay social security or unemployment compensation, but their real savings come from the fabulous productivity of H-2 workers, achieved through a combination of high production quotas. and absolute control over employees, who cannot change job locations once they are in the United States.
H-2 workers live in labor camps, cannot bring in their families and have no bargaining power. They can be sent back home at any point during the contract period. An undesirable worker is formally stigmatized, never to be hired again.
The H-2A program could capture 30% of all jobs in labor-intensive agriculture. The-displaced workers will flood the labor market for other perishable crops. Women farm workers may be especially affected because men are still favored for many of the jobs.
The artificial surplus of farm labor created by H-2 A and other provisions of the immigration act are a net subsidy to an industry that has been impervious to efforts to improve its labor practices. It is a subsidy with an enormous human cost.
(Aurora Camacho de Schmidt is a senior staff writer in the national office of the American Friends Service Committee, in Philadelphia.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report qcj 3
Sin pelos en la lengua
TUCKERED OUT: Dade County School Board incumbent Rosa Castro Feinberg has been forced into a November runoff with challenger Jeff Tucker. In the Sept 6 primary in District 2, she drew 34,228 votes, while Tucker had 32,235.
Nothing special about that. Nothing, except that Tucker, a general contractor, didn’t try to raise any money for his primary effort, made only a few campaign appearances, hasn’t attended a school board meeting in his life, nor has he bothered to return reporters’ phone calls.
Miami Herald columnist Dorothy Gaiter notes in a recent column that Tucker answered the question, “ Please indicate why you think you would make a good school-board member,” posed to candidates by the Miami Herald’s editorial board, with a curt “N/A.” Not applicable.
That’s what he said. (After listening to Bush and Dukakis debate, you at least must admire Tucker’s ability to get to the point.)
One Castro Feinberg campaign official blamed the close vote on backlash and rednecks.
Observed Gaiter, who is black, “Very likely many whites voted for Tucker because he’s white. Tucker also got half of the black votes cast. Either those blacks voted for him because they preferred anyone but a Hispanic, as some whites did, or, as speculation would have it, many blacks may have thought he was black.”
Pointing out that Jeff Tucker sounds a little like Bill Turner, the school board’s only black member, she adds:
“In 1986, political consultant Jorge de Cardenas said that the only reason that LeRoy Nelson, a white, swept dozens of black precincts in his failed bid for a judgeship was that* LeRoy is a black name. That’s like Hispanics voting for a Pancho.’ ”
ROMANCING’ HISPANICS: In a Sept 19 piece on black voters’ attitudes, The Washington Post informed its readers that blacks “see the two political parties‘romancing’ Hispanic voters and ‘Reagan Democrats’ and they resent it.”
Nowhere in the endless article did the Post support the Hispanic resentment statement with a quote or other evidence, which makes it a little suspect to me. But lest we forget that it’s blacks and Hispanics who together follow the elephants and donkeys with shovels in our political parades, think back to debate night
How many times did either candidate mention blacks or Hispanics?
By my count, zero. Nor, on my TV screen, did I spot any black or Hispanic faces in the audience.
Where’s Jesse? Maybe its time to dredge Boston Harbor.
FOOD FIGHTS: Last month we reported on a California prison that refused to serve jalapehos to prisoners because it considered them potentially dangerous weapons.
Now there’s a story out of Florida where some inmates will no longer be served T-bone steaks every six weeks, per past custom. The reason: Prisoner Miguel Men6ndez stabbed Fidel Campos with a sharpened T-bone. _ Kay BArbaro
Quoting. . .
TONY COELHO (D-Calif.), U.S. House of Representatives whip, commenting on the “President Quayle” political button:
"Ifs the two most feared words in the English language
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR at The New York Times, when a Hispanic Link reporter asked, “May I please speak to (reporter) Jesus Rangel?”
“I don't know what you're talking about!"
HAROLD EZELL, Immigration & Naturalization Service Western Region commissioner, reacting to a Los Angeles Times Poll published Sept. 19 showing that 42% of the respondents were unaware of the INS legalization program:
"/ think the poll must have been taken on the moon."
1988 3


COLLECTING
CALIFORNIA NETWORK LINK: For information on the Hispanic Legislative Caucus Network, call consultant Rebecca Nieto, 1100 J St., Suite 150A, Sacramento, Calif. 95814 (916) 445-4533.
EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: “Educational Attainment in the United States: March 1987 and 1986” is an 88-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that details educational attainment by racial and ethnic group. Fora copy (specify P-20, No. 428) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
BROADCAST FELLOWSHIPS: The American Political Science Association seeks applicants who are broadcast journalists for its Joan Shorenstein Barone Congressional Fellowship. The fellows would work for nine months as congressional aides and be provided a $20,000 stipend. Application deadline is Dec.1. For more information contact APSA, Congressional Fellowship Program Director, 1527 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 483-2512.
CONSUMER INFORMATION CATALOG: The federal government has released its “Consumer Information Catalog” for this year. The free publication provides information on how to get free or low-cost federal booklets on nearly every subject. For a copy write Consumer Information Catalog, Pueblo, Colo. 81009.
PUERTO RICO POPULATION: “Population Estimates for Puerto Rico and the Outlying Areas: 1980-1987” is a six-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau. For a copy (specify Series P-25, No. 1030) contact the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (No price was available at press time.)
TEXAS MEXICAN EMPOWERMENT: “The Political Empowerment of Texas Mexicans 1974-1988,” a 21 -page booklet by the Southwest Voter Research Institute, points out that the political empowerment of Texas Mexican Americans has revolved around local issues. Fora copy send $4 to SVRI, 403 E. Commerce, Suite 260, San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 222-8014.
SPANISH-LANGUAGE STUDENT NEWSPAPER: Mi Globo is a four-page Spanish-language newspaper intended for limited-English-proficient students. Published 10 months a year, it includes a teacher’s guide. Subscriptions are $3.95 per student (10 or more) per year. To order contact Elizabeth Biane at 11320 Meadow Flower Place, San Diego, Calif. 92127 (619) 592-0128.
CONNECTING
GROUPS WIN AIDS GRANTS
The Washington, D.C., Mayor’s Office on Latino Affairs announced this month that it awarded $80,000 in grants to local groups to fund educational initiatives aimed at informing the city’s Latino community about AIDS.
The grants are to go to three groups to fund six-month projects.
Salud Inc., a health services organization, received $50,000 to make educational presentations to groups of high-risk Latinos. Salud will address groups at apartment buildings, work sites and homes. The group also received $10,000 to hire additional staff for its bilingual AIDS hotline.
Grants for $10,000 each were awarded to the LatiNegro theater group to produce a series of educational plays that will be presented at schools and to Alianza, a Latino advocacy group, to develop programs to reach at-risk Latino youth.
MALDEF AWARDS SCHOLARSHIPS
Mary Beltran, a 55-year-old second-year law student from Montana and mother of nine, won the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund’s $2,000 Valerie Kantor Memorial Scholarship this year. She was one of 20 Hispanic law students nationally to win a scholarship for 1988-89.
Two other scholarships of note went to Adrienne Valdespino and Irma Rodriguez. Valdespino won the $1,000 Judge Louis Garcia Award, which goes to the San Francisco Bay Area’s outstanding applicant. Ramirez won the $1,000 Matt Garcia Award, presented to the top applicant from Texas. She is from Brownsville.
California had the most scholarship winners with nine. Texas was second with four. New York, New Jersey, Arizona, Wyoming, Utah, Missouri and Montana each had one.
This was the 20th year MALDEF has awarded scholarships. It has given more than $800,000 to some 1,100 Hispanic law students to date.
For more information about next year’s scholarship competition, call Carlos Garcia or Dianne Palmiotti at (213) 629-2512.
STUDYING CHILDREN’S NEEDS
The Southwest Voter Research Institute joins University of Texas at Austin researcher Laura Lein injaj study evaluating services to children in one of the nation’s oldest public housing projects. The San Antonio project is predominantly Hispanic.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
LIMITED-ENGLISH SPEAKERS, LIBRARIES Immaculata Pa. Oct. 3
A colloquium on the role of librarians in the learning process of persons with limited-English proficiency will be sponsored by the Bicultural/Bilingual Studies Program of Immaculata College in cooperation with the Southeast Chapter of the Pennsylvania Library Association. Speakers will address the role of the school library and the neighborhood library as learning centers.
Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647-4400
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES New York Oct. 3
A conference will be held to explore current needs and potential volunteer opportunities forHispanics and other minorities. It is designed to examine ways in which hospitals, social service agencies and volunteer organizations can assist minority community members in obtaining training required for volunteer jobs. Workshops will focus on recruiting and retaining minority volunteers, raising funds and 4
developing minority volunteer leaders.
Kelly Harris (212) 683-1515
COLORADO ENGLISH ONLY Grand Junction, Colo. Oct. 4 Denver Oct. 7
The Colorado Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights will convene two public forums with the purpose of gathering information from proponents and opponents of the state’s English-only ballot initiative.
Maxine Kurtz (303) 575-5587
AWARDS BANQUET Washington, D.C. Oct. 5
Ten U.S. senators and representatives will be honored by the National Council of La Raza as part of its 20th anniversary celebration. A reception featuring mariachi music will be followed by an awards banquet.
Tom Sharpe (202) 628-9600
SUPPORT FOR FAMILIES Chicago Oct. 6-9
The National Council of La Raza is one of the groups co-sponsoring a conference focusing on the importance of the family as a national resource. Parents, professionals and public policy officials can attend Oct. 3,1988
workshops such as family support for low-income families and ethnicity and cultural diversity.
Carol Levine (312) 726-4750
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Chicago Oct 7-9
The Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project will hold its annual conference featuring a leadership program with 12 workshops including those offering instruction in coalition building, effective organizing, women’s empowerment, youth involvement and political action committees.
Juan Andrade (312) 427-8683
CARIBBEAN CULTURE New York Oct. 7-29
The Caribbean Cultural Center will present a festival and a conference centering on African heritage in the Americas. The center is bringing together performing artists, scholars, and educators from the Caribbean, the United States and Africa Theconcert series will include appearances by Batacumbele, an orchestra from Puerto Rico, Jerry Gonzalez and the Fort Apache Band, and Milton Cardona and the Eya Aranla Ensemble. Conference topics will include a took at the impact of teaching styles on children of color. Angelo Falcdn, director of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, will be one of the panelista Kenny Gumbes (212) 307-7420
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


PRESIDENT
COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATION
SER-Jobs for Progress Inc., a national Hispanic nonprofit employment and training organization, is currently seeking a president for its national office located in Dallas, Texas.
Responsibilities include: provide executive and managerial leadership at the national level; designing, implementing short- and long-term strategy; accounting for the management and financial obligation of the corporation; and marketing the corporation to the public and private sectors as well as the general public.
The qualified candidate will possess excellent communications and organizational skills; at least three years experience in publicly funded programs; proven administrative and leadership ability, and a background in fiscal management, contracts design and negotiations, planning and management of information systems.
A Master’s degree in business administration, social work, education, or related field is essential. Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred but not required.
Interested and qualified candidates should send resume to: Chairman of the Board, SER-Jobs for Progress Inc., National Office, 1355 River Bend Drive, Suite 240, Dallas, Texas 75247.
Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F/, V,H
GRADUATE MANAGEMENT INTERN
(FOUR POSITIONS)
Ann. #1514-9A-CMG Salary Range: $9.96 - $14.04/hr. These positions are designed to provide graduate students with learning experience while performing productive assignments and becoming oriented to the goals* organization and operations of local government. The vacancies exist in the following departments: DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES: This position will provide hands-on experience in local government in the areas of decision making, organizational process, purchasing, planning, and budgeting.
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY PLANNING, HOUSING AND DEVELOPMENT: This position will assist in the development of a computerized housing data base forthecounty.
OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY AND INFORMATION SERVICES: This position will provide support to the County's Product Technology program. The assignment will be to identify, study, and help implement innovations to improve county operations.
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS: This position will assist the budget preparation and/or computer applications depending on the intern’s background. Other assignments are possible.
Qualification Requirements: Applicants must have graduated within the last year from a Master’s degree program and not previously been employed in the field, or must have completed one semester of graduate study beyond the Bachelor's degree and be currently enrolled in a program leading to a Master's degree in public or business administration, urban and regional planning or other field related to the needs of local government
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form and cover letter. Refer to official announcement for details. Applications and cover letter must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 p.m. on October13,1988. To request an application please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD(703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, VA 22201 EOE/MFH
EMPLEADOS GUBERNAMENTALES GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES
You can ensure that your contribution goes to the Hispanic organization that will maximize i your $$s impact on your community. NATIONAL IMAGE INC. has pledged that all funds received will be used to “Promote the health and welfare of Hispanics,” particularly, decrease the high school dropout rates, unemployment, social, ethnic and sexual discrimination, and to provide training on how to successfully navigate the Federal employment system.
NATIONAL IMAGE INC. helped over3,000 Hispanics last year through training, scholarships, and amnesty assistance. Target your Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) code #0443 contribution to NATIONAL IMAGE, INC., 20 F Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20001. For membership information please | call Ms. Aurora Mojica, Executive Director, at (202) 737-9220.
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OPERATION CIVIC
Deputy Director for LA office. OPERATION CIVIC seeks dynamo young leader to urge college students at Southern California four-year colleges to volunteer service to communities.
This new non-profit statewide catalyst headquartered in San Francisco, is opening new opportunities for students to volunteer in schools, non-profit organizations and public agencies. It represents a private response to recent Human Corps legislation which states that California students now are expected to serve communities at least 30 hours per year. The Deputy Director will work with CEO’s, university presidents, faculty chairs, student leaders, school administrators, ethnic forces, social service professionals, United Ways, PTAs, volunteer centers, foundations, political leaders and the press.
Position requires excellent public speaking, writing and organizational skills. The Deputy Director will set up and manage a small office, supervise a part-time secretarial assistant and interns, and monitor a sparse budget Travel throughout Southern California Command of Spanishj highly|desirable. Salary | $25 - $30,000.
Send resum6 and writing samples immediately ta OPERATION CIVIC SERVE, 3717 Buchanan St, Suite350, San Francisco,. Calif. 94123.
HEALTH EDUCATOR HEALTH EDUCATOR with at least 2 years experience in adolescent substance abuse prevention. Good writing and communication skilla Knowledge of adolescent educational programming and evaluatioa Master's degree preferred. Please send CV immediately to AMSA-CD, 1890 Preston White Dr., Reston, Virginia 22091.
EOE
MENTAL HEALTH THERAPIST II Hispanic Substance Abuse Family Therapist Announcement Number 6322-9C-DHS Salary Range: $13.25 - $15.04/hr or $27,563-$31,283/yr.
Provides out-patient family therapy services to families of Hispanic alcoholics and drug abusers. Requires bilinguaf(Spanish/English) ability.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form; Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 pm on OCTOBER 6,1988. To request application material, please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, VA 22201 EOE/MFH
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of H ispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in.Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
FESTIVAL FILE: Two Latino film festivals premiere this month, as world interest in Hispanic cinema continues to mount.
Already underway is the 1 st Festival Cine San Juan, a showing of films from countries in the Caribbean basin, staged through Oct. 8 by the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Tourism Company.
The 1988 National Latino Film and Video Festival will be pres at New York’s El Museo del Barrio Oct. 14-22. More than 90 entries several categories are vying for the various cash awards to be presented at opening ceremonies.
The festival will award honorable mentions to filmmakers Hector Sdnchez and Betty Kaplan.
A similar event, the Fourth Chicago Latino Film Festival, was held Sept 22 to Oct. 2 with 50 films from the United States, Spain and Latin America
Worldwide interest in Latin American films has been demonstrated
this year at festivals in Cannes, Venice, and San Sebastian, Spain. The latter event held last month, included screenings of such films as Cuba’s Cartas del parque, Peru’s La boca del lobo and Chile’s La imagen latente.
At San Sebastian, Argentine director Jeanine Meerapfel proposed the creation of a “Latin American common market for film” to aid filmmakers in distributing their works in the area.
Spanish and Latin American film are already a staple of major film festivals in this country - such as the prestigious New York Film Festival, which opened Sept. 23 with Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodovar’s Women on The Verge of A Nervous Breakdown (a prize winner in Venice). The festival closes Oct. 9.
The NYFF is directed this year by New York native Richard Pefia, who became program director for the Film Society of Lincoln Center this year.
Latin American works are also expected to have prominence at the eighth annual American Film Institute Video Festival, to be staged
Oct. 27-30 in Los Angeles. „
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
MEDIA MEET: The boards of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the National Association of Black Journalists will meet Oct. 15 in Baltimore forthe first time with counterparts from the Asian American Journalists Association and the Native American Press Association.
At the half-day meeting, NAHJ and NABJ will discuss, among other things, details for a joint conference they have agreed to hold in 1991. Based on their recent separate annual conferences, such an event should attract at least 3,000 participants.
The NABJ and NAHJ boards first met last October in Philadelphia, where they announced a joint resolution calling for newspapers to issue reports on their minority staffing broken down by race and ethnicity.
To attend the joint meeting, call NABJ at (703) 648-1270.
INTERNSHIPS: The Dow Jonss News-
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias*Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa,,
Sophia Nieves.I
Graphics/ Product ion: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
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paper Fund Inc. is accepting applications through Nov. 15 for its minority editing program. Ten college seniors work with their local newspapers for the summer. Pay for the internships vary, but Dow Jonesawards$1,000 at the end for school debts or $1,500 to interns going to graduate school. Contact Jan Maressa at (609) 452-2820...
The Los Angelos Times is accepting applications through Dec. 1 for paid summer internships offered to recent minority college graduates or those near graduation who are interested in becoming reporters or photographers. Contact Editorial Training Director Sandy Banks at 800-LA-TIMES, ext 74487.
The Times is also accepting applications through Jan. 1 for its two-year Minority Editorial Training Program for aspiring reporters, photographers and copy editors. Following successful completion of one year of training, participants are placed the second year with a Times Mirror newspaper for work in their chosen field.
To train as reporters or photographers at the Times, contact Sandy Banks at 800 LA-TIMES, ext. 74487. For copy editing work at
Long Island Newsday, also owned by Times Mirror, call METPRO Editing Director Ceaser Williams at (516) 454-3087...
Worcester (Mass.) County Newspapers is offering a one-year internship to a minority journalist with at least three years journalism experience who is committed to newspaper management The managerial intern will work as assistant to the company president
Send a resume, three letters of recommendation and a 500-word essay explaining interest in the program by Dec. 1 to Loren Ghiglione, president Worcester County Newspapers, 25 Elm St, Southbridge, Mass. 01550.
LOPEZ-MIRO JOINS HERALD EDITORIAL BOARD: Sergio L6pez-Mir6 replaces Carlos Verdecia as a member of The Miami Heralds editorial board. The 33-year-old L6pez-Mir6 covered the Latino community for The Miami News as a reporter before joining the Herald. Verdecia was recently named editor of El Nuevo Herald, a sister publication of The Miami Herald...
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Monsignor Raul del Valle, the first Hispanic chancellor of the New York Archdiocese, dies Sept 20 of cancer. He was 62. . . Mother Margarita Marla, the founder of a 58-year-old Duarte, Calif . , hospital built as a haven for girls with tuberculosis, dies Sept. 21 at the age of 85 .. . San Francisco District Attorney Arlo Smith says a county grand jury will investigate whether criminal charges should be filed against the city's police department for its crowd control tactics at a protest that resulted in a ruptured spleen to United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta. . . Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley names Adolfo Nodal to head the city's Cultural Affairs Department Nodal currently heads the Contemporary Art Center of New Orleans .. Jose Canseco, the 24-yearold outfielder for the Oakland Athletics, becomes Sept. 23 the first player in major league history to hit 40 home runs and steal40 bases in a season ... A federal jury in Los Angeles convicts former Mexican police officer Raul L6pezAivarez of six felony counts in connection with the February 1985 torture and death of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena. Lopez-Alvarez, 29, is a graduate of East Los Angeles' Garfield High School ... Chicago Police Officer Irma Rulz, a 40-year old mother of four, dies from a gunshot wound to the chest from Clemie Henderson, 41, who went on a rampage and killed four people for no apparent motive ... Vol. 6 No. 39 HISPANIC LINK WEEKL Farm Workers Fault Pesticide Bill The Senate was expected to have passed a pesticide bill last week after squabbling ele ments in the body reaclled a compromise and amendments were scrapped that would have made chances for passage slim . The U.S . House of Representatives passed the revision of the regulatory bill Sept 20, generating little enthusiasm from agricultural groups and drawing criticism from farm worker groups. Chairman of the House Agricultural Com mittee Rep. E. "Kika" de Ia Garza (D-Texas) called the bill"the art of the possible," admitting "it would hardly satisfy anyone." The legislation reauthorizes for three years the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Ro denticide Act of 1972, stepping up the pace for review of hundreds of chemicals in pesticides used by farmers In addition to requiring testing within nine years, the bill will require manufacturers to pay $150 million to the Environmental Pro tection Agency to bear part of the cost It would also ease requirements that the federal government pay manufacturers' storage and disposal costs if chemical products are deter mined to be unsafe. The coordinator of the United Farm Workers• . grape boycott, Jean Cainani, said union re presentatives do not believe protection from pesticides will come through federal legislation but through contracts negotiated with growers Dr. Marion Moses, a farm worker activist and health consultant to the UFW, said the bill is needed but requires more work. "The real fear is that people are going to think something got done with FIFRA," said Moses. Jim Davis, spokesman for the U.S. Agriculture Department, explained that while FIFRA origi nally contained provisions that directly con cerned farm workers, the legislation passed was a core bill containing essentials . UFW President Cesar Chavez recently put the spotlight on workers' health problems when he took on a 36-day fast. The union puts at 276 the cases of childhood cancer in California's agricultural Kern County within the past 1 0 years -four to five times the national average . It charges they are the result of chemicals used in pesticides No national reporting system exists to keep track of the number of farm workers poisoned by pesticides each year . Estimates range from 12,000 to 300,000 annually, according to Valerie Will<, health specialist with the Farm Worker Justice Fund. "Who's to say'?" said Wilk. "Maybe ifs half a million, maybe more. Workers can't go in for health care. They can't afford it." Sophia Nieves L.A. Police Group Charges Job Bias The Latin American Law Enforcement As sociation, known as LA LEY, filed a complaint against the Los Angeles Police Department Sept 21, charging that it discriminates against Hispanics in promotion and employment. LA LEY made its accusations to the Cali fornia Department of Fair Employment and Housing and to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission following four years of monitoring LAPD promotion and assignment practices. LA LEY spokesperson Alan Clayton in par ticular cited discrimination in promotion to civil service positions, pay grade advancements and desirable assignments, all key to aligning oneself for promotion to sergeant, detective, captain and commander. "lfs on the way to sergeant level that the bottleneck occurs for Hispanics," said Clayton. Latinos comprise about 19% of patrol officers and 8% of sergeants. Of the departmenfs 30 . toplevel captains, one is Hispanic. Of its 17 commanders, one is Hispanic . There are no Hispanics in six deputy chief slots The LAPD denied the allegations and question ed support among Latino officers for the complaint "The department is one family," said Police Cmdr. William Booth, spokesman for Police Chief Daryl Gates. "We say we are all one color-blue." Sergeant Emilio Perez, first vice president of LA LEY who has been with the department nearly 20 years, said that was partly true. "lfs not the department, but a handful of managers that create the problem." Darryl Lynette Figueroa ORT Suit Seeks to Prevent Fla. English Initiative Speak Up Now for Florida, a group set up to battle the initiative that seeks to make English the state's official language, was expected to file a lawsuit late last week or early this week that would prevent the state from putting the initiative on its Nov . 8 . ballot. SUN for Florida will pattern its suit after one that successfully drew a preliminary injunction Sept 16 against the official-English effort in Colorado. The federal judge hearing that suit, filed by the National Lawyer's Guild, ruled that more than half of the signatures gathered l .forttie measure violated the Voting Rights Act because initiative materials were not . fished in English and Spanish in 12 counties subject to the act. Florida and Colorado are two of three states with official-language initiatives on their Nov. 8 ballots. The other is Arizona The leader of an Arizona group opposing that state's English-only measure, codified on the ballot as initiative 106, said the group will not file a lawsuit Tom Espinoza, director of No On 1 06! and a real estate developer in Phoenix, said, "We feel con fident that we'll pull it off in the polls We see the Colorado ruling as an ace in the hole . " Felix Perez Sena Nearer to Sainthood Franciscan Father Junipero Serra, who established nine California missions in the 1700s, moved one step closer to sainthood when he was beatified Sept. 25 by Pope John Paul II in St Peter's Basilica at the Vatican . At a Mass offered to some 300,000 people, including 500 from California, the Pope hailed the Spanish missionary as a "shining example of Christian virtue." Despite approaching the height of blessed ness in the Roman Catholic Church, Serra has been sharply criticized by some Native American groups for what they charge was the enslavement and virtual genocide of their ancestors by Serra to run the missions . Serra died in Carmel, Calif., in 1784.

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Court's Legalization Order May Benefit 250,000 A San Francisco federal appeals court ordered the U.S : Immigration and Natural ( ization Service Sept 21 to iaaue wort< permits to undocumented immigrants who were denied legal status or discouraged from filing applications for it because they had taken brief visits outside of the United States during the one-year legalization period. In its interim ruling, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of A_p_peals allt9 banned the INS from deporting members of this I category _ _ ... I It said INS must question persons arrested under the immigration law to determine whether they might be eligible for legalization if not fora "brief, casual and innocenf' visit -outside of the country after the legalization period started in May 1987. If so, they cannot be deported, it stated, adding they must be released without bond and issued temporary work authorization. Additionally, it instructed all info rmation gathered by the INS in makin g . determination is to be kept confidential. Under INS interpretation, such travel taken without the advance . approval of INS could not be innoeent and should exempt applicants from legalization eligibility. Ralph Abascal of the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, lead counsel in the case, said the ruling applies to an estimated 1 25,000 to 150,000 persons. He noted that it was the first of five national immigration cases against INS re"City to on At-Large Elections Citing the specter of related lawsuits in California, the Pomona City Council decided Sept 22 to add a to its March ballot that will allow voters to determine . whether the city should use at-large or district wide elections. Nell Soto, the first Latina on the fi>J&membet said the city won a lawsuit to impose -tiiiidetWide.ttJeCtiona in i988-:-voiers rejected sucha propoaaf16-years &Qo. Council membe!fSf,epresent four individua l districts, but are elected by citywide vote. The mayor also sits on the council. The at-large system, opponents Goes, Statewide The Hispanic Legislative Caucus of Cali fornia will hold Sept 29 its orientation meeting ,.lth aelectecfconimuniiy activistS fn Sacra; 'menio'88P8rfofi:rri-effort -to establish the first statewide network to facilitate develop ment and passage of a legislative agenda for Latinos in that state. Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco , San Jose, Sacramento and Fresno are the six cities from which the networ1< will operate. Six other cities will participate later. Assemblyman Peter Chac6n (D-San _Diego), chairman of the seven-membercaucus, will be present at initial meetings in each city to gather legislative ideas on first set of issue areashealth, education, elections and housing. There are four Hispanic legislators in the 80-member Assembly and three in the 40member Senate. California is 2311& Hispanic . Bill proposals will then be designed by the caucus for introduction in the 1989-90 legislative sessiOn, beginning this December. Th8 networ1< will make telephone calls, provide testimony and lobby to push the legislation through. Caucus spokesperson Rebecca Nieto said, "Thiscwill allow Latino e _lected officials to take comprehensive action rather than hear about bills intrOduced by others that they can react \ to." 2 makes it next to impossible for non-majority groups to elect a candidate of their choice. Soto, who led the arguments for the refer endum, said, "We decided it was best to let voters choose, rather than to have courts 1 impose a change." Pomona's population of about 120,000 is estimated to be 38% Latino and 25% black. Only three Hispanics have sat on the council in its more than 100-year history. No blacks have ever been on the council. The city is 31 miles east of Los Angeles. This summer a federal appellate court ruled that Watsonville, a city in Santa Cruz County, : had discriminated against Hispanics by electr ing council members through aHarge elections. I Another lawsuit alleging city dilution of His . panic voting power was filed last month against ' Los Angeles County by the U . S . Justice Depart ment Darryl Lynette Figueroa N. Y.C. Schools33% Latino Latinos made up 33% of the students in New Yor1< City's public, private and religious schools last year, compared with 26% 1 0 years before, according to new statistics for kindergarten through 12th grade released by the New Yor1< State Department of Education. Enrollment fell for both Anglos and blacks. Figures for the period show: Blacks Latinos Anglos 1987-88 1977-78 Change 411 ,07 5 . . 435,396 -24, 321 381 ,389 349,553 + 31 ,836 354,617 527,628 -173,011 I I Total enrollment dropped from 1.35 millior. to 1 .2 million, with 77% attending public schools. The city's Catholic schools lost students a1 a greater rate than did public or private schools, with Hispanics and blacks constituting a growing proportion. Latinos accounted for 2 _ 7% last year, compared with 20% 1 0 years ago. Black enrollment was up 8% over the past 1 0 years, with black students now making up20%. strictions on legalization applicants to reach an appellate court and that its significance extends to the other cases. "It boils down tolnumbers and it's one quarter of a million people," said Abascal, explaining that that many people stand to win the cha_nce . to apply or reapply for legalization if the five cases are decided in favor of the plaintiffs. According to Abascal, most undocumented person ' s were not aware of the travel disqualifier and might have lost a chance for legal status because of a few hours absence . In November, the court will begin to hear arguments on the issue as well as the acceptance of post-deadline legalization applications. -Darryl Lynette Figueroa Puerto Rico Population Grows to 3.3 Million Puerto Ricds population increased 95,000 since 1980 to 3 .29 million in 1987, while an additional 227,000 island residents have migrated , according to a report issued Sept. 26 by the U.S. Census Bureau. "Population Estimates for Puerto Rico and the Outlying Areas : 1980 to 1987" indicates Puerto Ricds overall growth figure is 3%. POPULATION OF PUERTO RICO 1987 1986 1985 1984 3,292,000 3 ,273,000 3,282,000 2,265,000 1983 1982 1981 1980 3,265,000 3,262,000 3,245,000 3,196,520 INS . Investigates Priests Three Los Angeles priests who urged readers to civil disobedience in a Los Angeles Times editorial are under criminal investigation by the Immigration and Naturalization Service for providing food and shelter to undo cumented workers. INS Los Angeles District Director Ernest Gustafson said Sept 23 thatcriminal charges would be filed if warranted against the Rev. Gregory Boyle, pastor at Mission Dolores, and the Revs. Luis Olivares and Michael Kennedy of Our Lady Queen of the Angels . Gustafson disclosed the investigation at a J)ress conference to announce the arrest of Salvadoran national Wilson Menendez, 27, who admitted breaking $10,000 worth of windows at INS headquarters in downtown Los Angeles . Menendez had regularly sought shelter at Our Lady . Gustafson accused the priests of encourag ing lawlessness in their Sept. 21 newspaper editorial, which read in part, "We have sought to align ourselves with the undocumented, denouncing laws and attitudes that seek to deny their basic rights and calling all citizens ... to care for these culturally disparaged." It further read, "To the extent that we openly aid, abet and harbor the undocu mented, we indeed are breaking the law. The Gospel would have us do no other." Hispanic Link Weekly RePort '

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Aurora Camacho de Schmidt, guest columnist Sin pelos en Ia lengua Farm Workers Dealt New Blow TUCKEREDO U T: DadecountyschooiBoardincumbentRosa The workers who harvest our fruits and vegetables Castro Feinber g h as been forced into a N o vember runoff with have a hard life. The recent 36-day fast of farm-worker challenger Jeff Tucker. In the Sept. 6 primary i n D istrict 2 , she drew 34,228 vo t es, while T ucker h ad 32,235. leader Cesar Chavez has highlighted some facts that Nothing special about that. Nothing , ex cept t h a t Tucker, a wish to forget Agricultural workers suffer alarmingly general contractor, didn' t try to ra i s e an y mo n e y for his primary h1gh rates of malnutrition, low life expectancy, exposure to pesticides, effort, made on l y a few cam pa ign appe arances, has n ' t attended a and lack of medical care. Their children, who often work in the fields, school board meeting in his l ife, n o r has he b o thered to return seldom receive an adequate education. reporters ' phone calls. Few farm workers find year-round employment. Fewer than 2% Miami Herald col um nist Dorothy Gaiter notes in a recent belong to a union. Many must migrate for part of the year, following column that Tucker ans w e red the quest ion , " Pl ease indicate why the crops. you think you would make a good schoolb oa r d member," posed The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 contains a to candidates by t he M i ami Herald's edi t o r ial board, with a curt provision known as H-2A that has received little public attention, but " N/A." Not applicable. it is dealing a new blow to this embattled sector of the U.S. labor force. That's what he sa i d . (After listening to Bush and Dukakls H-2A is an open-ended device to bring in temporary foreign labor, debate, you at least must admire Tucker's abili t y to get to the mainly for agriculture. It is based on H-2 , a 45-year-old program that point.) has allowed growers to bring Caribbean workers to the Atlantic One Castro Fe i n be r g cam pa i g n o fficial blamed t he close vote states. Constant vigilance on the part of farm worker advocates had on backlash a n d red n ecks. kept 1+2 relatively small, with fewer than 30,000 workers participating Observed Gai ter, who is black, "Very likely many whites voted for annually. Tucker because h e's white. T ucker al s o got half of the black votes The new regulations, coupled with the present economic and cast. Either those bl acks vote d fo r him because they preferred political climate, make experts fear that300,000 H-2A workers will be anyone but a Hi s p a nic, a s s o me whites did, or, as speculation employedinthefieldsinthenearfuture,involvingnewcountries,new would have it , many blacks may have thought he was b l ack. " crops, and new states of destination. Pointi ng ou t t ha t Jeff Tucker sounds a little like Bill Turner, the POWERFUL GROWERS FAVORED school board ' s o nl y b lack member, she adds: Immigration reform had the ostensible goal of saving jobs for U.S . "In 1986, political consultant Jorge de C6rdenas said that the residents, but this provision favors the powerful growers' associations only reaso n that LeRoy Nelson, a w hi te, swept d o zens of black at the expense of workers who will be displaced. precincts i n hi s f a il e d bi d fora judgeshipwas that'LeRoyisa black name. That's like H ispani c s voting for a Pancho.'" Agricultural employers mounted an intensive successful lobbying campaign on Capitol Hill in 1982, fearing that immigration reform 'ROMANCING' HISPANICS: In a Sept. 19 piece on black could make them lose the undocumented workers who year after voters ' attitudes, T he Wash ington Post informed its readers that year appeared miraculously at their gate. In this way, they won an blacks " see th e two political pa rtie s 'romancing' Hispanic voters amazing package of concessions, turning immigration legislation and ' Reagan D e moc r a t s ' a nd they resent it." into an agricultural labor bill . Nowhere i n th e en dl e ss article did the Post support the H ispanic Between 1942 and 1964, the southwestern growers enjoyed a resentment statement with a quote or other evidence, which government-to-government series of contracts with Mexico, the makes it a littl e s uspect to me . But lest we forget tha t i t' s blacks bracero program, importing temporary workers for specific jobs. The and Hispanics who t ogeth e r follow the elephants an d donkeys war-rela t ed shortage of workers gave Eastern growers the opportunity with shov els in our political parades, think back to deb ate night to bring in seasonal sugar cane cutters from the West Indies. The How m any times d id either candidate mention black s or H ispanics? latter procedure was codified as section H-2 of U.S. immigration law. By my c ount, zero. Nor, on m y TV screen, did I spo t an y black or Unlike the bracero program, terminated as a result of public outcry, Hispanic face s in t h e audienc e . H-2 was never taken off the books. Yet the same reasons that Where's Jesse? Maybe it's time to dredge Boston Harbor. brought an end to the bracero program apply: the exploitation of FOOD FIGHTS: Last month we reported on a California prison foreign "disposable" workers and their displacement, depression of that refuse d to se rve jalapenos to prisoners because it considered wages and worsening working conditions for domestic workers. them potentially dang erous weapons. EMPLOYERS HAVE ABSOLUTE CONTROL Now there' s a story o ut of Florida wher e some in ma tes will no longer be serv ed T -bone steaks e v . e r y si x weeks, per past custom. Growers do not pay social security or unemployment compensation , Th e reason : Pr isoner Miguel Menendez stabbed F i d e l Campos but thei r real savings come from the fabulous productivity of H-2 w i th a sharpened T-bone. K 8 . b workers, achieved through a combination of high production quotas . and absolute control over employees, who cannot change job -locations once they are in the United States. H-2 workers live in labor camps, cannot bring in their f amilies and have no bargaining power. They can be sent back home at any point during the contract period. An undesirable worker is formally stigmatized, never to be hired again. The H-2A program could capture 30% of all jobs in labor-intensive agriculture. The-displaced workers will flood the labor market for other perishable crops. Women farm workers may be especially affected because men are still favored for many of the jobs. The artificial surplus of farm labor created by H-2A and other provisions of the immigration act are a net subsidy to an industry that : has been impervious to efforts to improve its labor practices. It is a . subsidy with an enormous human cost. (Aurora Camacho de Schmidt is a senior staff writer in the national office of the American Friends Service Committee, in Philadelphia) Quoting. • • TONY COELHO ( D-Calif . ) , U.S . House of Representatives whip, commenting on the" Pres ident Quayle" political b utton: "Irs the two most fea red words in the Englis h l a n g u a ge." SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR at T h e New York Ti mes, when a Hispanic Link r eporter asked, " May I please speak to (re p o rt er) Jesus Rangel? " " I don't know what you're talking about!" HAROLD EZELL, Immigration & Naturalization Serv ice Western Region commissioner, r eac tin g to a L os A nge l es T i m es Poll published Sept. 19 showing t h a t 42% of the respo ndents were unawar e of the INS legalization p rogram: " I think the poll must h ave been taken on the moon. " Hi s pan ic Lin k W ee kly R e port Oct. 3 , 1988 3

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COLLECTING CALIFORNIA NETWORK LINK: For information on the Hispanic Legislative Caucus Network, call consultant Rebecca Nieto, 1100 J St., Suite 150A, Sacramento, Calif . 95814 (916) 445-4533. EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: "Educational Attainment in the United States: March 1987 and 1986" is an 88-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that details educational attainment by racial and ethnic group. For a copy (specify P.20, No. 428) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) BROADCAST FELLOWSHIPS: The American Political Science Association seeks applicants who are broadcast journalists for its Joan Shorenstein Barone Congressional Fellowship. The fellows would work for nine months as congressional aides and be provided a $20,000 stiPend. Application deadline is Dec.1 . For more information contact APSA, Congressional Fellowship Program Director, 1527 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 483-2512. CONSUMER INFORMATION CATALOG: The federal government has released its "Consumer Information Catalog" for this year. The free publication provides information on how to get free or low-cost federal booklets on nearly every subject. For a copy write Consumer Information Catalog, Pueblo, Colo. 81009. PUERTO RICO POPULATION: "Popu1ation Estimates for Puerto Rico and the Outlying Areas: 1980-1987" is a six-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau. For a copy (specify Series P-25, No. 1 030) contact the Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (No price was available at press time.) TEXAS MEXICAN EMPOWERMENT: "The Political Empowerment of Texas Mexicans 1974-1988," a21-page booklet by the Southwest Voter Research Institute, points out that the political empowerment of Texas Mexican Americans has revolved around local issues. For a copy send $4 to SVRI, 403 E. Commerce, Suite 260, San Antonio , Texas 78205 (512) 222-8014. SPANISH-LANGUAGE STUDENT NEWSPAPER: Mi Globo is a four-page Spanish-language newspaper intended for limited-English proficient students. Published 10 months a year, it includes a teacher's guide. Subscriptions are $3.95 per student (1 0 or more) per year. To order contact Elizabeth Blane at 11320 Meadow Flower Place, San Diego, Calif. 921 27 (619) 592-01 28. CONNECTING GROUPS WIN AIDS GRANTS The Washington, D.C., Mayor's Office on Latino Affairs announced this month that it awarded $80,000 in grants to local groups to fund educational initiatives aimed at informing the city's Latino community about AIDS. The grants are to go to three groups to fund six-month projects. Salud Inc., a health services organization, received $50,000 to make educational presentations to groups of high-risk Latinos. Salud will address groups at apartment buildings, work sites and homes. The group also received $1 0,000 to hire additional staff for its bilingual AIDS hotline. Grants for $10,000 each were awarded to the LatiNegro theater group to produce a series of educational plays that will be presented at schools and to Alianza, a Latino advocacy group, to develop programs to reach at-risk Latino youth. MALDEF AWARDS SCHOLARSHIPS Mary Beltran, a 55-year-old second-year law student from Montana and mother of nine, won the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund's $2,000 Valerie Kantor Memorial Scholarship this year. She was one of 20 Hispanic law students nationally to win a scholarship for 1988-89. Two other scholarships of note went to Adrienne Valdespino and Irma Rodriguez. Valdespino won the $1,000 Judge Louis Garcia Award, which goes to the San Francisco Bay Area's outstanding applicant. Ramirez won the $1 ,000 Matt Garcia Award, presented to the top applicant from Texas. She is from Brownsville . California had the most scholarship winners with nine. Texas was second with four. New York, New Jersey, Arizona, Wyoming, Utah, Missouri and Montana each had one. This was the 20th year MALDEF has awarded scholarships. It has given more than $800,000 to some 1,100 Hispanic law students to date. For more information about next year's scholarship competition, call Carlos Garcia or Dianne Palmiotti at (213) 629-2512. STUDYING CHILDREN'S NEEDS The Southwest Voter Research Institute joins University of Texas at Austin researcher Laura Lein in1aj study evaluating services to children in one of the nation's public housing projects. The San Antonio project is predominantly Hispanic. Calendar-developing minority volunteer leaders. Kelly Harris (212) 683-1515 workshops such as family support for low-income families and ethnicity and cultural diversity. THIS WEEK LIMITED-ENGLISH SPEAKERS, LIBRARIES Immaculata, Pa. Oct. 3 A colloquium on the role of librarians in the learning process of persons with limited-English proficiency will be sponsored by the BiculturaVBilingual Studies Program of Immaculata College in cooperation with the Southeast Chapter of the Pennsylvania Library Association. Speakers will address the role of the school library and the neighborhood library as learning centers. Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647-4400 VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES New York Oct. 3 A conference will be held to explore current needs and potential volunteer opportunities for Hispanics and other minorities. It is designed to examine ways in which hospitals, social service agencies and volunteer organizations can assist minority com munity members in obtaining training required for volunteer jobs. Workshops will focus on recruiting and retaining minority volunteers, raising funds and 4 COLORADO ENGLISH ONLY Grand Junction, Colo. Oct. 4 Denver Oct. 7 The Colorado Advisory Committee to the U.S. Com mission on Civil Rights will convene two public forums with the purpose of gathering information from proponents and opponents of the state's Englishonly ballot initiative. Maxine Kurtz (303) 575-5587 AWARDS BANQUET Washington , D.C. Oct. 5 Ten U . S . senators and representatives will be honored by the National Council of La Raza as part of its 20th anniversary celebration. A reception featuring mariachi music will be followed by an awards banquet. Tom Sharpe (202) 628-9600 SUPPORT FOR FAMILIES Chicago Oct. 6-9 The National Council of La Raza is one of the groups co-sponsoring a conference focusing on the importance of the family as a national resource . Parents, professionals and public policy officials can attend Oct. 3, 1988 Carol Levine (312) 726-4750 LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Chicago Oct. 7-9 TheM idwest/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project will hold its annual conference featuring a leadership program with 12 workshops including those offering instruction ir1 coalition building, effec tive organizing, women ' s empowerment, youth il'l volvement and political action committees. Juan Andrade (312) 427-8683 . CARIBBEAN CULTURE New York Oct. 7-29 The Caribbean Cultural Center will present a festival and a conference centering on African heritage in the Americas. The center is bringing together performing artists, scholars, and educators from the Caribbean, the United States and Africa The concert series will include appearances by Batacumbele , an orchestra from Puerto Rico, Jerry_ Gonzalez and the Fort Apache Band, and Milton Cardona and the Eya Aranla Ensemble. Conference topics will include a look at the impact of teaching styles on children of color. Angelo Falc6n, director of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, will be one of the panelists. Kenny Gumbes (212) 307-7420 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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PRESIDENT COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATION SEF!Jobs for Progress Inc., a national Hispanic nonprofit employment and training organization, is currently seeking a president for its national office located in Dallas , Texas . Responsibilities include: provide executive and managerial leadership at the national leve t designing, implementing shortand long-term strategy; accounting for the management and financial obligation o f the corporation ; and marketing the corporation to the public and private sectors as well as the general public . The qualified candidate will possess excellent commun i cations and organizational skills; at least three years experience in publicly funded programs; proven administrative and leadership ability; and a background in fiscal management , contracts design and negotiations, planning and management of information systems. A Master's degree in business administration, social work, education , or related field is essential . Bilingual (English / Spanish) preferred but not required. Interested and qualified candidates should send resume to: Chairman of the Board, SEA Jobs for Progress Inc., National Office, 1355 River Bend Drive, Suite 240, Dallas, Texas 75247. Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F/,V,H G RADUATE MANAGEMENT INTERN (FOUR POSITIONS) Ann. #1514A-CMG 1 . EMPLEADOS GUBERNAMENTALES GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES Salary Range ; $9.96-$14.04/hr. These positions are designed to provide graduate students with learning experience while performing productive assignments and becoming oriented to the goals, organization and operations of local government. The I ' vacancies exist in the following departments: DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES : 1 This position will provide hands-on experience , in local government in the areas of decision making, organizational process, purchasing, pla n ning, and budgeting. DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY PLAN NING, HOUSING AND DEVELOPMENT: This i position will assist in the development of a computerized housing data baseforthecounty . OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY AND INFOR MATION SERVICES: This position will provide support to the County's Product Technology program . The assignment will be to identify , study, and help implement innovations to improve county operations . DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS : This position will assist the budget preparation and/ o r computer applications depending on t he intern's background. Other assignments are possible . You can ensure that your contr i bu t ion goes to the Hispanic organization that will maximize 1 your SSs i mpact on your community . NA' TIONAL IMAGE INC. has pledged that all funds received will be used to " Promote the health and welfare of His panics, " particularly , decrease the high school dropout rates, unem ployment, social, ethnic and sexual nation, and to provide training on how to successfully navigate the Federal employment system. NATIONAL IMAGE INC. helpedover3 ,000 Hispanics last year through t r aining , scholar ships , and amnesty assistance . Target your Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) code #0443 contributi on to NATIONAL IMAGE , IN . C . , 20 F Street , N.W . Washington , D . C . 20001. For membership information please [ .call Ms . Aurora Mojica , Executive Director, at (202) 737-9220. HEALTH EDUCATOR HEALTH EDUCATOR with at least 2 years experience in adolescent substance abuse pr& vention. Good writing and communication skills. Knowledge of adolescent educational program ming and evaluation. Master's degree preferred Please send CV immediately to AM SA-CD, 1890 Preston White Dr., Reston, Virginia 22091 . EOE DEPUTY DIRECTOR OPERATION CIVIC Deputy Director for LA. office . OPERATION CIVIC seeks dynamo young leader to urge college students at Southern California four year colleges to volunteer service to com munities. This new non-profit statewide catalyst, head quartered in San Francisco, is opening new opportunit i es for students to volunteer in schools, non-profit organizations and public agencies. It represents a private response to recent Human Corps legislation which states that California students now are expected to serve communities at least 30 hours per year. The Deputy Director will work with CEO's , university presidents, faculty chairs, student leaders, school administrators, ethnic forces, social service professionals, United Ways, PTAs, volunteer centers, foundations, political leaders and the press. Position requires exceMent public speaking, writing and organizational skills. The Deputy Director will set up and manage a small office, supervise a parHime. secretarial as sistant and interns, and monitor a sparse budget Travel throughout Southern California Command of Spanish [ highlY [ desirable . Salary [$25$30,000. ' Send resume and writing samples im mediately to: OPERATION CIVIC SERVE, 3717 Buchanan St, Suite350, San Francisco , , Calif . 941 23. MENTAL HEALTH THERAPIST II Hispanic Sltlstar.:e Abuse Family Therapist Announcement Number. 6322-90-DHS Salary Range : $13.25-$15.04/hr or $27,563 $31,283/yr. Provides out-patient family therapy services to families of Hispanic alcoholics and drug abusers. Requires bilinguai ( Spaniah/English) ability. All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form , Resumes submitted without a completed off i cial Arlington County application form will not be accepted: Ap' plications must be received into the Person nel Department no later than 5 :00 pm on • .ocTOBEf'l6, _1988. material , please call (703) 358-3500 or TOO . • (i03i 284 (hearing I mpaired only). ' ARL IJIIGTON COUNTY PERSON ' NEL DEPARTMENT 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington , VA. 22201 EOE/MFH Qualification Requirements: Applicants must have graduated within the last year from a Master's d egree p r ogram and not previously been employed in the field, or must have completed one semeste r of graduate study beyond the Bachelor's degree and be currently , enrolled in a program leading to a Master's degree in public or business administration, urban and regional planning or other field related to the needs of local government. All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form and cover letter. Refer to official announcement for details . Applications and cover letter must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 p.m.on0ctober13,1988. To request an application please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD(703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only) . DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace , please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Washington , D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in .Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2100 Clarendon Blvd . , Suite 511 Arlington, VA. 22201 EOE/MFH Hispan i c Link Week l y Repo r t CLASSIFIED Ab RATES Ordered by 90 cents per word (city , state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone Organization number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. Street -------------DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES . . City, State & Zip ________ _ (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch . . Area Code & Phone _______ _ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment this year at festivals in Cannes, Venice, and San Sebastian, Spain. The latter event, held last month, included screenings of such films as Cuba's Cartas del parque, Peru's La boca de/lobo and Chile's La imagen latente. FESTIVAL FILE: Two Latino film festivals premiere this month, as world interest in Hispanic cinema continues to mount. At San Sebastian, Argentine director Jeanine Meerapfel proposed the creation of a "Latin American common market for film" to aid filmmakers in distributing their works in the area. Already underway is the 1st Festival Cine San Juan, a showing of films from countries in the Caribbean basin, staged through Oct. 8 by the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Tourism Company. Spanish and Latin American film are already a staple of major film festivals in this country-such as the prestigious New York Film which opened Sept. 23 with Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodovar's Women on The Verge of A Nervous Breakdown (a prize winner in Venice). The festival closes Oct. 9. The 1988 National Latino Film and Video Festival will be pree at NewYorl. several categories are vying for the various cash awards to be presented at opening ceremonies. The festival will award honorable mentions to filmmakers Hector Sanchez and Betty Kaplan. A similar event, the Fourth Chicago Latino Film was held Sept 22 to Oct. 2 with 50 films from the United States, Spain and Latin America The NYFF is directed this year by New York native Richard Pefla, who became program director for the Film Society of Lincoln Center this year. Latin American works are also expected to have prominence at the eighth annual American Film Institute Video Festiva( to be staged Worldwide interest in Latin American films has been demonstrated Oct. 27-30 in Los Angeles. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report MEDIA MEET: The boards of the National A .. oclatlon of Hispanic Journalists and the National Association of Black Joumallsts will meet0ct.15 in Baltimoreforthefirsttime with counterparts from the Asian American , Journalists Association and the Native American Press Association. At the: hallfday meeting, NAHJ and NABJ will discuss, among , other things, details for a joint conference they have agreed to hold in 1991. Based on their recent separate annual conferences, such an event should attract at least 3,000 participants. The NABJ and NAHJ boards first met last October in Philadelphia, where they announced a joint resolution calling for newspapers to issue reports on their minority staffing broken down by race and ethnicity. To attend the joint meeting, call NABJ at (703) 648-1 270. INTERNSHIPS: The Dow Jones News-. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234.0280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, . Sophia Nieves.! GraphicS/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Unk Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): InstitutionS/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request 6 paper Fund Inc. is accepting applications through Nov. 15 for its minority editing program. Ten college seniors. work with their local newspapers for ttie summer. Pay for the in terns hips vary, but Dow Jonesawards$1 ,000 at the end for school debts or $1,500 to interns going to graduate school. Contact Jan Maressa at (609) 452-2820 ... The Los Angeles Times is accepting ap plications through Dec . 1 for paid summer internships offered to recent minority college graduates or those near graduation who are interested in becoming reporters or graphers. Contact Editorial Training Director Sandy Banks at 800-LA-TIMES, ext. 74487. The Times is also accepting applications through Jan . 1 for its Minority Editorial Training Program for aspiring reporters, graphers and copy editors. Following succes& ful completion of one year of training, partici pants are placed the seqond year with a Times Mirror newspaper for work in their chosen field. To train as reporters or photographers at the Times, contact Sandy Banks at 800 LATIMES, ext. 74487. Forcooyeditingworkat Long Island Newsday, also owned by Times Mirror, call MET PRO Editing Director Ceaser Williams at (516) 454-3087 ... Worcester (Mass.) County Newspapers is offering a one-year internship to a minority journalist with at least three years journalism experience who is committed to newspaper management. The managerial intern will work as assistant to the company president. Send a resume, three letters of recom mendation and a 500-word essay explaining interest in the program by Dec. 1 to Loren Ghiglione, president, Worcester County Newspapers, 25 Elm St., Southbridge, Mass. 01550. LOPEZMIRO JOINS HERALD EDITORIAL BOARD: Sergio L6pez-Mir6 replaces Carlos Verdecia as a member of The Miami Heralds editorial board. The 33-year-old L6pez -Mir6 covered the Latino community for The Miami News as a reporter before joining the Herald. Verdecia was recently named editor of El Nuevo Herald, a sister publication of The Miami Herald .. Darryl Lynette Figueroa NEWS ITEM i Warden relents-chiles no longer labeled "dangerous • weapons" in Orange County, Calif., prison. Hispanic Link Weekly Report