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Hispanic link weekly report, October 10, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 10, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints David Velasquez of Mission Viejoas a municipal court judge for the South Orange County Judicial District.. New York Mayor Ed Koch names Phil Rivera, director of human resources at WNET-TV, and Xavier Rodriguez, president of the Bronx-based Coalition for Housing Improvement to the city’s Human Rights Commission... A federal jury in Los Angeles convicts Jesus F6lix-Guti6rrez, a 38-year-old former Los Angeles seafood company owner, of aiding and abetting in the 1985 torture death of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena. Two days earlier the jurors found convicted drug
trafficker Ren6 Verdugo-Urqufdez, kidnap-
ping and torture... Ramiro Sftnchez, the first Hispanic to become president of the Laredo (Texas) NationrtfBpnk andlfiflffiuthor, dies Sept 25 from heart failure. He was 80?V. Antbmin"toosqulto” Ordeftana, one of Cuba’s all-time premiere athletes who excelled at basketball and baseball, dies of a heart attack at the age of 69 in Miami... Dawn Tanorio, 35, wins the women’s division of the 1988 Eastern New Mexico State Fair Chili-Pepper Eating Contest by downing 10 heaters. She won a cool $300... Authorities solve the mystery of who placed a stick of dynamite into the lost suitcase £f Miami couple Gragorio and Esthar Martinez. The Metro-Dade Police Department forgot to remove the stick during an airport security-training exercise...
Court Says FBI Discriminated Against Hispanics
A federal judge in western Texas ruled Sept 30 that the FBI systematically discriminated against its Hispanic agents in promotions and assignments that lead to career advancement, as well as in disciplinary actions and other working conditions.
The case has far-reaching implications on several fronts.
The decision by U.S. District Court Judge Lucius Bunton of Midland represents a major victory in the seven-year battle of FBI agent Bernardo Matt P6rez to have the agency revamp its treatment of Hispanics. The 49-year-old P6rez was formerly the bureau’s highest ranking Hispanic. He has worked for the bureau for 25 years.
Said Hugo Rodriguez, one of Perez’s lawyers, from his Albuquerque, N.M., office, “There’s never been any case of this magnitude (at the federal level) on behalf of professional Hispanics.”
The victory sets a precedent for a growing number of similar cases. In Los Angeles, Hispanic officers filed a formal complaint of the same type of discrimination practices against the city police department Sept. 21. In the District of Columbia, Latino agents filed a nearly identical lawsuit against the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in October 1985.
In a95-page statement, Judge Bunton said the FBI’s Hispanic agents were put ona“taco circuit” where they were disproportionately assigned tedious work, such as wire tapping, requiring Spanish fluency but offering little in the way of experience looked for at promotion or reward time.
The bureau had countered that it needed Spanish-speaking agents for the work, particularly in drug-related cases. Bunton said this did not justify “the discrimination demonstrated at trial.”
1992 Quincentenary Plans Underway
Preparations for the celebration of the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ arrival on North American soil kicked off with the signing of a proclamation by President Reagan Oct 3 that recognizes the event.
John Goudie, chairman of the congressional-ly mandated Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission, said, “The four
Legal Group Picks Head
Rub6n Franco, a 41-year-old trial attorney, was named Sept 19 as president and general counsel of the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund in New York.
Franco leaves his partnership with a New York law firm and his seat on the 20-member board ofthePRLDEF to head the civil rights organization. He first worked for the 16-year-old group as a staff attorney immediately after graduating from Howard University’s law school in 1974.
He said the educational and drug problems of Latinos are the areas he first intends to tackle. “I want to spearhead the effort to do something about that,” said Franco.
years leading up to 1992 will afford many opportunities to increase national awareness of the Quincentenary and its significance.” Goudie is a Miami businessman bom in Cuba
Involvement of Hispanics in the activities leading up to the actual anniversary is important to the commission, according to Paco Martinez, deputy director. On Oct 5 a Columbus Day celebration was held in San Jose, Calif., featuring singer Juan Gabriel, folklorico dancing and mariachi music.
Martinez said Hispanic interests are represented on the commission and pointed to the membership of Luis Ferr6, former governor of Puerto Rico; and Jane Garcia, wife of U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.). Two other Hispanics are honorary members of the board composed of 24 individuals.
Susan Herrera, director of Washington, D.C. -based National Hispanic Quincentennial Commission, said the group will have its own activities. This includes a travelling exhibit in 1992 and a handbook to help communities plan their own events.
She said the purpose of her group is to let the United States know of the role Hispanics played in the nation’s history.
- Sophia Nieves
Bunton called the bureau’s internal procedures for dealing with discrimination complaints “bankrupt.” He found illegal retaliation taken against P6rez for his complaints. P6rez had been repeatedly demoted, even though his “ record demonstrates.. character and courage.,” the judge said.
The sixth-generation Mexican American was formerly head of the FBI office in San juan, Puerto Rico. He is now an assistant special agent in charge at the El Paso bureau, two rungs lower on the ladder.
He filed the lawsuit in January 1987 following dismissal of his internal complaint, officially lodged in October 1983. It had taken more than three years for the FBI’s equal employment opportunity office to reach a decision.
“The truth is I was subjected to discrimination since I first entered, in Washington, D.C., in 1963. I just didn’t want to admit it to myself,” said P6rez, who added that he feels “grand” right now.
P6rez explained that despite his rise to a rank higher than that previously attained by Hispanics, he began to see that he would go
continued on page 2
10 Latino Olympians Win Medals for U.S.
Among the 619 U.S. athletes participating in the 24th Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea- held Sept. 16 through Oct 2 -were 22 Hispanics Ten won medals, six in demonstration events Gold medal winners were:
Ty Griffin, Tampa, Fla Baseball
Arlene Limas, Chicago Taekwondo Tino Martinez, Tampa, Fla. Baseball Robin Ventura, Santa Maria, Ca Baseball Silver medal winners were:
Michael Carbajal, Phoenix Boxing Juan Moreno, Zion, III. Taekwondo Raoul Rodriguez, New Orleans Rowi ng Trade Rulz-Conforto, Synchronized Bothell, Wash. Swimming
Bronze medal winners were:
Margaret Castro-G6mez, Judo
Groton, Conn.
Dara Torres, Beverly Hills, Ca. Swimming


Calif. City Compromises on Street-Comer Hiring Dispute
Glendale; Calif, became Sept 28 the first Southern California city to reach a compromise between angry residents and the primarily Hispanic laborers who gather on city streets to solicit work. It is also the first to include undocumented immigrants in the services it now provides to immigrants who seek such temporary work.
At least half a dozen cities are considering legislation to eliminate the street-corner hiring, which opponents say leads to bothersome or intimidating crowds of men who then hang out all day. Such proposals have multiplied since the employer sanctions provisions of the Immigration Reform and
Control Act took effect this summer.
In Glendale, the Catholic Youth Organization provided its yard on the edge of town as a hiring site for the day workers. SisterVictoria Trujillo said the CYO had not considered the repercussions of including undocumented^ but would not now exclude them.
Trujillo, who runs CYO’s seven branches from its Los Angeles headquarters, said the crowd recently reached as high as 100 in the small yard. “ It is inconvenient and there always are one or two bad apples, but for the most part these are just family men looking for the opportunity to work.” Underthe agreement with Glendale officials;
laborers can meet in the yard between 6 and 9 a.m. daily.
The search for an alternative in the city of Costa Mesa led to the Oct. 4 opening of a hiring hall forthose who prove legal residency. Othercities, such as Long Beach,Placientia and Orange, are debating similar solutions.
Earlier this year, Redondo Beach passed a law banning street-corner hiring. Glendale tabled a similar ordinance until December.
Trujillo was concerned that the Immigration and Naturalization Service might investigate the CYO property, but CYO workers said they would challenge the INS if it did.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
310 Agents Join Suit Against Bureau
continued from page 1
no further. “I got sick of being treated like a Mexican,” he said.
When the suit received class-action status this summer, 310 agents joined the claim. Hispanics are now 439, or4.6%,of the 9,597 agents. Only one of the FBI's 58 field offictes is headed by a Hispanic, No Latinos are found in the top two FBI grade levels.
FBI Director William Sessions said in a four-page statement that he was“disappointecf by the decision and might appeal, but by press time Justice Department officials said they might not
Rodriguez pointed out that Sessions was formerly chief justice in the western Texas federal district and a former colleague of Bunton. “Coming from Bunton, this decision means so much more. It shows we didn’t just prove our case, we overwhelmed the court with evidence,” he said.
Within the overseeing Justice Department, the ruling was seen as an embarrassment to the agency that enforces the nation’s civil rights laws. It is also under fire from a black agent who sued its Omaha, Neb., and Chicago offices for racial harassment last November.
In the DEA case, a federal judge ruled Aug. 23 that the Justice Department had been “stalling” for three years through its failure to provide employment records required by the
plaintiffs.
The department “appears” to have complied with his orderto produce the required records, said Amy Wind, attorney for lead agent Jesus Muhiz in the class-action suit. DEA agents described his case as a “classic.” After eight years as a special agent, Muniz was rejected on more than 55 requests for promotion.
The suit charges that this isa consequence of a disproportionately large share of unfavorable work assignments which do not provide promotional opportunities.
Hispanics constitute 277, or 9.6%, of the DEA’s 2,882 agents. Three of the 20 domestic field offices are headed by Hispanics. No Latinos are found in the top two DEA grade levels.
DEA is a Justice Department agency which since 1982 has been overseen by the FBI. Its two top officials were formerly with the FBI. They report to Sessions.
Rodriguez, who served with the FBI for 18 years himself, praised the Latino agents who participated in the P6rez case. “I am just so proud that they had the guts to stand up against the company, because the company does not forget.”
There will be a separate trial next month to determine damages in that case. Agents are asking for$5 million in damages and procedural changes. - Darryl Lynette Figueroa
L.A. County Promises to Battle Redistricting
Los Angeles County Counsel DeWitt Clinton said Sept. 27 the county has vowed to fight the U.S. Justice Department’s voting rights suit, claiming that the number of non-voting Latinos would make it impossible to form a new Latino majority supervisorial district Richard Fajardo, of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, disputed this, saying that in a similar suit in 1985 the city of Los Angeles initially used the same tack. The city is 28% Hispanic. Los Angeles now has two Latinos on its 15-member council.
Three of the supervisors in the 28% Hispanic county have indicated a willingness to realign district boundaries, but a fourth vote would be needed from one of two remaining members - Pete Schabarum and Mike Antonovich -who have come out against redistricting.
Latinos Hit N.Y.C Report
The second annual report on Hispanics released September 27 by the Mayor’s Office of New York City has been met with criticism by some community group leaders. They say Hispanics did not have enough input In his “Second Annual Report on Hispanic Concerns,” Mayor Ed Koch credits his own leadership for “initiatives underway,” including the compilation of the city's dropout rates according to ethnicity. The 103-page report breaks down progress according to data drawn from heads of departments, ranging from immigration to housing.
The president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, Angelo Falcon, said improvements such as those in the area of education are not necessarily the result of the mayor's initiative. The report lacks credibility, he said, because Koch broke his promise to have meetings with Hispanic leaders.
“We will never satisfy (critics),” said Luis Miranda, the mayor’s advisor on Hispanic ; affairs “Unless we met with every Hispanic, i those leaders will say those people (chosen)
I aren’t representative of the community.”
But he added, “Clearly there should be much more going on.”
INS Agents Arrest 7 During Mass
U.S. Border Patrol Agents burst into a Catholic church in Orange, Calif., during Mass and arrested seven undocumented workers sitting in the rear of the church Sept. 27. The men were among 160 taken in a sweep of the area where men gather to solicit work during the early morning.
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service officials said the agent was in “hot pursuit” of two men who had ducked into the church to elude capture.
“Our policy has not changed,” said Harold Ezell, western regional commissioner for the INS, the following day. “We’re not going to churches and kicking down doors looking
for illegal aliens... But I am not going to say to our agents that if someone runs to any particular building, with a cross on it or not, that it’s ollie, ollie, oxen-free.”
The Most Rev. Norman F. McFarland, bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange, said that while he has no immediate plans to take action, the behavior of the agents was unwarranted. “It gives an impression of police-state procedures.”
The bishop added, “We know that sanctuary doesn’t exist, de facto. However, the broad concept of sanctuary is an outreach to people who are in trouble... We’re not going to ask them to show their green card.”
2
- Sophia Nieves Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Juan Gonzdlez, guest columnist
Puerto Ricans Learned Dependency Too Well
Why are so many Puerto Ricans on welfare in New York?
Readers, usually angry white ones, ask me that a lot. You dirty the streets, they say; you have too many
babies, don’t want to work for what you get. Worse, you refuse to speak English, then have the nerve to complain about America!
Some Puerto Rican leaders refuse to talk about welfare in our community. They label as racist any look at the issue, preferring to stick their heads in sewers and spew muck from their mouths about oppression as if, by repeating the chant often enough, the problem will go away.
It won’t. So, let’s talk about it.
First, the facts. About 14% of New York families receive some sort of welfare. Among Puerto Ricans it skyrockets to 39%. Not only does that approach three times the city’s rate, it’s nearly double the rate(20%) of other Hispanic families. This according to a 1984 report of New York’s Department of City Planning.
In single-parent families headed by a female - the state most conducive to poverty -Puerto Ricans are also sharply different, not only from the rest of the city but also from other Hispanics. Single mothers head half of all Puerto Rican families, compared to a third from other Hispanic and non-Hispanic families.
ARE PUERTO RICANS LAZY?
Those who thought it had something to do with Spanish genes will be surprised to learn that Cubans, Colombians and other Latin American immigrants are not experiencing the same degree of poverty as Puerto Ricans, even though these groups arrived here 20 years after the large Puerto Rican migrations.
Only Dominicans, who also began arriving in the late 1960s, are close to Puerto Ricans in poverty and single-parent households.
This despite the fact that Puerto Ricans, because of their longer stay in this country, are more likely to understand and speak English. Even in the percentage of self-employed business people, Puerto Ricans have fallen behind other Hispanics. Walk into any bodega in New York. Increasingly, they are owned not by Puerto Ricans but by hard-working Dominicans.
Are Puerto Ricans lazy? Certainly the Puerto Rican men who gave up their lives for the U nited States on the battlefields from World War I to Vietnam showed they aren’t afraid to tackle problems or make sacrifices.
Or could it be something else? Could it have something to do with the unique conditions under which Puerto Ricans have evolved in
America?
THEY ARE CITIZENS, FOREIGNERS
Puerto Ricans are both citizens and foreigners at the same time: Citizens because, since 1917, they have been legally so; foreigners because they come from a different land, to which they can, and often do, return for periods of time.
That land has for decades had Depression-like conditions. As of last June, unemployment in Puerto Rico-the last major U.S. colony-was 15.3%, triple the U.S. level. More than half the island’s population lives in poverty. Sixty percent receive public assistance because there are not enough jobs. That’s why many come to the mainland. Jobs.
Consider Yolanda P6rez. Two years ago, she worked in a Star-Kist factory in Mayaguez, making $4.35 an hour, was divorced and had two children. She kept getting her ex-husband locked up for non-support but with no results. One day, she met Jos6 Luis Ruiz, who was married. She got pregnant and had his child. His wife found out He ran out on both women and headed for New York.
Yolanda, determined not to be deserted again, came here with the kids looking for him and found neither Jos6 Luis nor a job that pays well. An eighth-grade dropout, she’s on welfare now, gets $287 a month in food stamps, $163 every two weeks for clothes and spending money, and a maximum rent allowance of $319.
DEPENDENCE IS PART OF PSYCHE
That’s enough to pay for a hovel in the Bronx, one so bad she hasn’t had running water for three months; she gets her water from the fire pump down the street. The city has condemned the building. She’ll either find another hovel or head for a shelter to join the homeless army.
“Some people get used to being on welfare,’’ she says. “Not me. This is no kind of life.” She has a sister living in New Jersey who has a good job. Another one in Puerto Rico is on welfare.
But on the island, welfare, like unemployment, is worse. “My sister gets $150 a month from welfare for rent, $200 a month for food and expenses. Prices are just as bad over there,” Yolanda says.
Ninety years ago, the United States invaded Puerto Rico and made its people U.S. citizens. Puerto Rico is now the poorest place under the U.S. flag. First Spain told the Puerto Ricans, “You can’t live without us.” Then the United States told them the same thing. You tell people something long enough, they believe it
Puerto Rico the colony became Puerto Ricans the dependent people. It’s in the psyche now. Puerto Rican leaders are going to have to challenge the colonial mentally in too many Puerto Rican heads.
Free men and women make their own future with their sweat and labor. Only dependent peoples need welfare.
(Juan Gonzalez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
REBUTTAL: It must have been telepathy. No sooner had Weekly Report Editor F6lix P6rez selected Juan Gonzftle^s commentary on Puerto Rican dependency as one of this week’s guest columns than a call came from Gerson Borrero.
Borrero is a vital disk in the backbone of New York City's Institute for Puerto Rican Policy. When there’s a political dispute brewing in the City, he and his boss, Angelo Falc6h, are sure to be somewhere in its midst.
Earlier this year, Borrero and Falcbn expressed delight that columnist Gonzalez, a native of Puerto Rico who grew up in New York’s streets, was moving to the New York Daily News'from the Philadelphia Daily Newsi But this time Borrero was ready to buy Juan a one-way Amtrak ticket back to Philly.
In response to the above column, which appeared in the New York Daily News Sept. 29, Falcbn composed this response;
Dear Editor
Juan Gonzalez’s column on why so many Puerto Ricans are on welfare is the most confused piece of junk I’ve ever seen. He reinforces the stereotype of all Puerto Ricans as lazy and promiscuous by the examples he uses.
I had hoped he had come to the Daily News to correct stereotypes like this. At the same time he belittles those people who talk about oppression and racism as the causes of this dependency, his explanation of the cause as the colonial mentality of Puerto Ricans... amounts to the same thing.
Gonzftlez does a great disservice and damage to the many hard-working Puerto Ricans who have contributed so much to this city. He also shows he doesn’t understand the complexities of the issues involved...
Welcome back to the Big Apple, Juan. You’re not really a player there until you’ve been flogged publicly by the Institute. ____________________________________________- Kay BArbaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Oct. 10, 1988
3


Guillermo Torres, guest columnist
Latino Journalists, Be Wary
The phone call came just after 10 am.
The caller, representing an East Coast newspaper, politely asked whether she had awakened me.
“No, not really,” I lied, trying to sound wide awake after working a 12-hour shift the night before.
“I don’t know what you do at your newspaper,” her opening pitch began, “but we anticipate some openings in the near future...”
Another phone call, another recruiter asking- sight and experience unseen - if I would consider applying at her newspaper.
Face it If you are Hispanic and a newspaper editor or reporter, you are a hot commodity.
But be wary. Although newspapers are aggressively seeking brown and black faces, opportunities for advancement into managerial and top-flight reporting positions are slow in coming.
What kind of jobs are they offering?
A dead-end copy editor’s position? A reporting position that gives few opportunities to showcase writing talent, or worse, puts the reporter on the tamale-dinner beat?
Some analysts wonder why the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission hasn’t been making inquiries about the news industry’s dismal performance in integrating not only its newsrooms, but broadcast studios as well.
INDUSTRY AVOIDED SELF-EXAMINATION
Even the industry’s cheerleaders acknowledge that the news business was among the last of U.S. business sectors to integrate. Now, they say, there’s a good-faith effort being made to remedy the situation.
Through the years the industry has courageously taken the lead in denouncing discrimination and lack of opportunity for minorities. But for too long it pointed an accusing finger while avoiding self-examination.
Recent American Newspaper Publishers Association statistics indicate that minorities make up 16% of the work force at U.S. newspapers, yet only 8% work in newsrooms.
This is worrisome when considering that minorities make up21 % of the nation’s overall work force.
A few months earlier, in April, the American Society of Newspaper Editors came up with slightly lower newsroom numbers for minorities.
It found that blacks, Hispanics, Asian Americans and American Indians constitute 7.02% this year, an increase from 6.56% in 1987 and gp from 3.95% in 1978, the first year an ASNE survey was taken.
BEST AND WORST OF TIMES
ASNE counted 12,600 supervisory positions in the newsrooms of U.S. dailies. Of that total, 520, or 4.1%, are held by blacks, Hispanics, Asian Americans and American Indians.
That’s the stuff of scandals.
The industry wrings its collective hands and laments that there are few experienced minorities to recruit because the best and the brightest go into public relations, advertising, law and business. Those who leave say they do so because other fields offer advancement and greater rewards.
What a paradox It is the best of times for minority journalists, and the worst Such opportunity for jobs. Such dismal prospects for advancement
When well-meaning recruiters call, our egos are massaged and our spirits get a lift So I offer them a couple of suggestions:
When you make your solicitations, tell us about the openings for managerial positions or news beats with potential. Tell us about your excitement to discover that some of us have many years of experience.
And remember that some of us work odd and long shifts. Try calling a little later than 10 a.m.
(Guillermo Torres, a reporter for six years and editor for 10 with Texas and New Mexico newspapers, was copy desk chief at The New Mexican in Santa Fe, N.M., until his recent resignation.)
Oct 10,
Ramiro Burr, guest columnist
Linda’s Labor of Love
It seems you can’t please everyone no matter how hard you try. Ask Linda Ronstadt. She’s celebrating her Mexican heritage in a Spanish-language album but is being accused by some critics of rediscovering her roots just to cash in on the country’s new interest in Hispanics.
“Some people are getting rich from this, but if s certainly not me. I started working on this project several years ago... before Los Lobos and La Bamba hit,” says Ronstadt, who is of German and Mexican ancestry.
Recording “Canciones de Mi Padre,”an album of songs written with her father, Gilbert, was a labor of love, she explains.
“I would have done it for a loss. I love the music.”
The 41-year-old singer is not alone in her affection for the traditional Mexican ballads and rancheras - her latest effort has sold more than 500,000 copies.
Ronstadt remembers growing up in Tucson,
Ariz., listening to her father, who is a retired hardware store owner, playing the piano and singing the classics recorded on her album.
Hers was a family that valued music.
“ I sang Mexican music when I was three orfour. So if s been nice for me to be able to stand on the stage... and sing a song that I sang in my back yard when I was six years old. Like “El Adios del Soldado," she recounts. “Whenever I get to it, if s like, oh, there’s my Uncle Bill, my Aunt Luisa, and my brother and sister singing with me and my father.”
‘YOU OWE ME THIS ONE’
The album is not Ronstadf s first professional foray into Spanish music, although she does not speak Spanish.
“I started recording in Spanish in the 70s on my second album after” Heart Like a Wheel.” I had songs in Spanish that I wrote with my father that I wanted to do, but I couldn’t work with traditional music because I had to make records that sold.”
Now, after proving her value with albums of commercially acceptable music, Ronstadt felt she had earned this.
“When you give a record company a succession of platinum records, you can walk in and say,‘Look, I want to do this just for me. I don’t even know if if s going to sell, but you owe me this one.’ ”
Currently, her stage show “A Romantic Evening in Old Mexico” continues its North American tour with visits to several West Coast cities. Not just a concert, if s almost a theater production, with costly backdrops and choreography.
“There were times in the past when I was standing on the stage and looked at the list of songs and I thought, ‘Oh, I’m so tired of this song.’ Now I feel like I could sing these songs for 20 years and not get tired of them,” she says.
HAS GONE FULL SPECTRUM
Ronstadfs music has run nearly full spectrum. She started out performing folk music. In the 70s she was described by one critic as “pop perfectionist trying to make it as a rocker.” She astonished the music world in the early 1980s by putting out two albums of dreamy standards in collaboration with conductor Nelson Riddle. A country music album garnered Ronstadt and partners Emmy Lou Harris and Dolly Parton a Grammy nomination in 1986.
Throughout her career, each time she has broken with tradition, critics have pronounced with conviction that Ronstadt has found her niche in her new musical genre.
But Linda Ronstadt has demonstrated ifs not fair to categorize her. She is not just a folk singer, a pop performer or a torch singer; she is all of these, as well a singer of the Mexican music-
Still, she regards the Mexican songs - the music that “gives us a great desire to pay homage to our roots” - of special personal importance.
(Ramiro Burr is an entertainment writer with the San Antonio Light)
1988 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
4


COLLECTING
NEW YORK CITY PRIMARY VOTE: “The Puerto RicaiVLatino Vote in the New York City Democratic Primaries of September 15,
1988” is a 20-page booklet by the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy. For a copy send $4.25 tolPRP,286 Fifth Ave., Suite 804-5, New York, N.Y. 10001-4512(212)564-1075.
CONVENTION DELEGATE ATTITUDES: The August issue of Southwest Voter Research Notes contains a poll conducted by The Los Angeles Times in conjunction with Southwest Voter Research Institute that looks at Latino, black and white Democratic and Republican convention delegate attitudes on several issues. For a copy send $1 to SVRI, 403 E. Commerce, Suite 260, San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 222-8014.
U.S. POPULATION: “United States Population Estimates and Components of Change: 1970 to 1987,” a 22-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau, estimates that there were 245 million people in the United States as of Jan. 1,1988. For a copy (specify Series P-25, No. 1023) contact Superintendent of Documents* U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (No price was available at press time.)
HERITAGE POSTER: “Pioneros” is a one-color poster commissioned by Nabisco Brands Inc. celebrating the achievements of seven outstanding Hispanics. Study guides on the subjects, who include Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez, entertainer Rita Moreno, and Hartford (Conn.) Public Schools Superintendent Hern&n LaFontaine, are also available. For free copies, write B&C Assocs., P.O. Box 2636, High Point, N.C. 27261-2636.
HELPING AT-RISK STUDENTS: The National Education Association recently made available two publications, “At-Risk, Low-Achieving Students in the Classroom” ($9.95) and “At-Risk Students and Thinking: Perspectives From Research” ($12.95), to help educators. To obtain a copy, write NEA Professional Library, P.O. Box 509, West Haven, Conn. 06516.
STUDENTS’ SCIENCE SKILLS: “The Science Report Card: Elements of Risk and Discovery” is a 151-page report by the Educational Testing Service. In addition to measuring the science skills of 9-, 13- and 17-year-old students, it does so according to race and ethnicity. For a copy send $14 to Nation’s Report Card, P.O. Box 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541-6710.
CONNECTING
DROPOUT PROJECT STARTS
A group of 50, primarily Hispanic community and education leaders from San Antonio met late last month to begin to form the outline for combating the alarming dropout rate of Hispanics in that city.
Called the Hispanic Student Success Program, the project will initially reach out to 5,000 students in San Antonio, said Antonio Rigual, project director. Rigual also serves as executive director of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities.
Among the project’s goals is to decrease the Hispanic dropout rate from its current 45% to 30% by 1992. It will throw out a broad net to target dropouts by working with parents and educators as well as students.
The Ford Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trust have donated more than $2 million to the venture.
COLLEGES PROVIDE OUTREACH
The Sept 28 opening of the University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M’s University Outreach Center in predominantly Hispanic McAllen, Texas, will provide middle and high school students in that city a better chance to succeed in going on to college. The center will give university-staff support to the teachers and counselors in public schools.
The McAllen facility will provide services such as career counseling, tutoring, visits to university campuses, advice on financial applications and how to apply to Texas public universities.
The center is the third of its kind in Texas; the others are in Houston and San Antonio. McAllen is nearly 75% Hispanic. The centers hope to tackle academic deficiencies long before they occur by following a student’s educational progress beginning in his or her middle school years.
GROUP ELECTS OFFICERS
The Mexican American Women’s National Association elected a president and other national officers last month in Washington, D.C.
Irma Maldonado, who has been a MAN A member for seven years and who served as chairperson of the groups most recent convention, was elected president Among other officers elected to the 14-year-old organization was Elvira Valenzuela Crocker, executive vice president; and Cristina Caballero-Robtt vice president of programs.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
CAVAZOS RECEPTION Washington, D.C. Oct 12
The National Council of La Raza will host a reception for the new U.S. Secretary of Education, Dr. Lauro Cavazos. Cavazos recently became the first Hispanic to serve on a U.S. Cabinet. Co-hosts include the National Council of Hispanic Women, League of United Latin American Citizens and National IMAGE. Tom Sharpe (202) 628-9600
LATINO YOUTH Washington, D.C. Oct13
The Fourth Annual Celebration of Latino Youth will include music, a buffet dinner and dancing. Daniel Bueno, businessman and community activist will be given the Simon Bolivar Community Service Award. The Corporate Services Award, the Youth Services Award, the Special Volunteer Award and the Youth Leadership Award will be presented.
Mildred PArez (202) 483-1140
SPANISH-LANGUAGE CONFERENCE Miami Oct. 13-15
Florida International University and Florida Endow-Hispanic Link Weekly Report
ment for the Humanities will be sponsoring a linguistic conference on the Spanish language in the United States. Topics to be dealt with include the languages preservation, the cultural and historical significance of Spanish, and English as the official language of the United States.
Ana Roca (305) 554-2851
LAW ENFORCEMENT
Pasadena, Calif. Oct. 13-15
The Chicano Correctional Workers Association, the
Latin American Law Enforcement Association and
the Mexican American Correctional Association will
present a conference for law enforcement and
criminal justice professionals. Workshops will include
drug prevention, gang alternatives, AIDS and law
enforcement, affirmative action and officer street
safety.
Henry Corrales (213) 721-2310
MINORITIES AND THE LEGAL PROFESSION Washington D.C. Oct. 13-15 A national conference to review the recent history of minority access to the legal profession and to make plans for improvement is being sponsored by the Law School Admission Council, the American Bar Association’s Section on Legal Education, the Council on Legal Education Opportunity and others. Conference themes include minority student recruitment and performance.
Judith Hetrick (215) 968-1205 Oct. 10,1988
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE New York Oct 14
The Committee for Hispanic Children and Families will host the benefit premiere of “Dolores,” a Spanish-language film by Pablo Figueroa on the effects of domestic violence on a U.S. Hispanic family.
Digna SAnchez (212) 206-1090
BOOK FAIR
San Antonio Oct. 14-16
The San Antonio Inter-American Book Fair win include free admission to book exhibits by independent university and small presses from the U.S and Mexico. A public discussion on the adaptations of novels to film will be held featuring Larry McMurtry, author of “Lonesome Dove.” Carlos Fuentes, winner of Spain’s 1988 Cervantes Prize, will read from“The Old Gringo.”
Rosemary Catacalos (512) 271-3151
WOMEN NETWORKING San Antonio Oct. 14-16
Hispanas Unidas will bring together during its conference women from all walks of life to discuss issues that include employment education, family life, human resources, arts and political awareness. Funds raised in preparation for the event will provide scholarships, transportation and child care for economically disadvantaged participants.
Maria Antonietta BerriozAbal (512) 299-7040
5


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
SOCIOLOGIST UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA DAVIS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA DAVIS. The Department of Sociology invites applications for a sociologist of religion who has a demonstrated record of teachingand research in the sociology of religion and American culture. This is a tenure-track position with rank and salary open. A Ph.D. before July 1989 is required.
If hired at a senior level, the person must have a distinguished research record. The successful candidate will be expected to teach courses fulfilling program requirements in the American Studies and Religious Studies Programs, but these courses may be taught in the Sociology Department. The appointment is allocated as a full-time FTF position in sociology, but depending on the successful candidate’s desires, he or she may request a joint appointment in one of the other programs The appointment begins Julyl, 1989.
Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae and names of three references to: Gary Hamilton, Chair, Search Committee, Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis California 95616. Final Filing Date for applications is October 15, 1988.
The University of California is an equal opportunity/aff irmative action employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of diversity among its faculty and staff In that spirit we are particularly interested in receiving applications from persons of under represented groups including women, ethnic minorities disabled veterans Vietnam era veterans and handicapped persons
TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY
University of California Davis. The College of Letters and Science invites applications for an Assistant Professor 111, in the sociology of development effective July 1989.
This is a tenure-track position. Areas of research specialization could include women and international development international organization, the sociology of agriculture, urbanization and development in the Third World, or economic development and social change. Teaching responsibilities include a graduate course in development planning in the International Agriculture Development program. Employment or research expertise in a developing country is desirable Ph.D. is required. The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology.
To apply, send curriculum vitae, letter of application and the names of three references whom we may contact'for letters of recommendation to: Lyn Lofland, Chair, Development Search Committee, Sociology Department, University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616. Applications must be postmarked January 1,1989, or earlier to be considered.
The University of California is an affirmative action/equai opportunity employer.
TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY
The University of California, Davis. The College of Letters and Science invites applications for a sociologist with an emerging or established reputation forquantitative research and publication and a strong commitment to teaching. The level of appointment may be at the Assistant or Associate Professor levels
A Ph.D. is required. It is desired that field orspecialization be in one of the following areas Gender and family, sociology of organization, economic sociology, historical, comparative sociology, International political economy, or poverty and social welfare. The position is reserved for someone actively engaged in quantitative research and able to participate regularly in teaching a graduate-level sequence in methods and statistics The appointment will be In the Department of Sociology.
To apply, send curriculum vitae, letter of application, and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation ta James Cramer, Chair, Quantitative Search Committee, Sociology Department University of California Davis Calif. 95616. Applications must be postmarked by January 10,1989, or earlier to be considered.
The University of California Is an affirmative action/equai opportunity employer.
ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOON 1ST, Washington, D.C., based, will do free-lance work at reasonable rates Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873, or Hispanic Link (202) 234-0737.
WEEKLY REPORT WEEKLY REPORTS AVAILABLE: Hispanic Link has a limited number of unbound Weekly Report sets available: $18 for 18 issues in 1983, $53 for 53 issues in 1984, $52 for 52 issues in 1985, $50 each for 50 issues in 1986 and 1987. Order prepaid from Hispanic Link Back Copies, 1420 N' St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
PROFESSOR
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, BAKERSFIELD — Department of Political Science seeks candidates with teaching and public service experience for a temporary position as Visiting Professor. The appointment could be either full-time or part-time for the Winter and/or Spring quarters commencing January 3, and ending June 15, 1989. Area most preferred: Communist systems and/or China and Japan. The teaching area could be American public law and policy for the right candidate. Minorities and women are strongly encouraged to apply.
Salary and support are negotiable. Send vitae and names of three references to Dr. S. E. Clark, Chair, Dept, of Political Science, 9001 Stockdale Hwy., Bakersfield, Calif. 93311-1099
|Mexico Lindo"
Mexico Today!, a new travel, entertainment and leisure bi-monthly, is on sale now at your favorite news locations.
This month's issue brings you train travel, pandas and fishing features; Look for this issue's columns on health and living better in Mexico
Mexico Today! is geared for the active person in Mexico.
Annual subscriptions are $17 (US) Sample issues $2.95 (US), Write to: Mexico Today!, 1420 N St., NW, #402, Washington, D.C. 20005
Writers!
Freelance writers sought for Mexico Today!, a new English-language bi-monthly for retirees in Mexico and frequent travelers to that beautiful country. Be a contributor to this new travel, entertainment and leisure magazine.
Writers' guidelines available with self-addressed, stamped envelope. Sample issues are $2. Send manuscripts and/or query letters to: Mexico Today!, 1420 N St., NW, #402, Washington, D.C. 20005 Telephone: (202) 387-5142.
EMPLEADOS QUBERNAMENTALES GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES
You can ensure that your contribution goes to the Hispanic organization that will maximize your $$s impact on your community. NATIONAL IMAGE INC. has pledged that all funds received will be used to “Promote the health and welfare of Hispanics,” particularly, decrease the high school dropout rates, unemployment, social, ethnic and sexual discrimination, and to provide training on how to successfully navigate the Federal employment system.
NATIONAL IMAGE INC. helped over3,000 Hispanics last year through training, scholarships, and amnesty assistance. Target your Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) code #0443 contribution to NATIONAL IMAGE, INC., 20 F Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20001. For membership information please call Ms. Aurora Mojica, Executive Director, at (202) 737-9220.
HEALTH EDUCATOR HEALTH EDUCATOR with at least 2 years experience in adolescent substance abuse prevention. Good writing and communication skills. Knowledge of adolescent educational programming and evaluation. Master’s degree preferred Please send CV immediately to AMSA-CD, 1890 Preston White Dr., Reston, Virginia 22091.
EOE
Oct 10, 1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


MIDWEST COORDINATOR OF of the 1990 CENSUS PROGRAM
MALDEF, a national Hispanic civil rights organization, seeks an individual to develop and coordinate a community education program to inform Hispanics about the importance of the 1990 Census.
The requirements for the Chicago-based position include: an undergraduate degree, 3*5 years community organizing or related activity; working knowledge of Midwest Hispanic organizations, experience working with local and state policymakers; research writing and oral communications skills and bilingual in English/Spanish preferred.
Send resume, writing sample and a list of 3 references to R. Calderbn, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St, 11th FI., Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by 10/21/88.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251 -2252.
JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Submissions are welcome for Weekly Report’s “guest columnist” feature. Approx. 500 words. For writer’s guidelines, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Guest Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
CORDOVA PRINTING SERVICE
1904 - 18th St. NW Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 265-7970
Serving the growing Hispanic community in the nation’s capital. Fast. Friendly. Let us help you with your printing service needs.
NAHJJOB EXCHANGE Employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media Opportunities for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media English or Spanish language. Contact Jocelyn Cordova, National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228. Hispanic Link Weekly Report
LATINO PUBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHIPS FOR 1989
The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council announce their 1989 Grants Competition for Public Policy Research on Contemporary Hispanic Issues. Grants will vary from small individual awards to support for collaborative research projects. Awards will range from $20,000 to $30,000. Priority will be given to the following themes: children and youth at risk; culture and economic behavior; political organization and empowerment; national policy initiatives and their impact on Latino communities; and other city-specific themes.
For more information contact Raquei Ovryn Rivera, Social Science Research Council, 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158(212) 661-0280 or Harriett Romo, Centerfor Mexican American Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Student Services Bldg. 4.120, Austin, Texas 78712(512)471-1817.
PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT CHAIRMAN
Southwest Texas State University of San Marcos, Texas, invites applications or nominations for the position of Chair of the Department of Psychology. Applicants should qualify for a tenurable appointment at the rank of associate or professor, should show evidence of leadership and provide evidence of substantial achievement in teaching and research, as well as skills at interpersonal communication, program development and resource procurement.
Area of specialization is not a major consideration. The appointment will be effective September 1,1989, and it is a 12-month appointment. Southwest Texas State University enrolls approximately 20,000 students. The Department of Psychology enrolls approximately 4,000 students per semester with over 600 majors. The faculty includes 18 full-time and 7 part-time members. A masters level program is under consideration.
Applicants should submit a complete resume with a cover letter, a one-page statement of leadership philosophy, and at least three references to Dr. Karen Brown, Chair, Search Committee, Institute of Social Work, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666. COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BEFORE JANUARY 15,1989.
Southwest Texas State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes)
$45 per column inch.
Ordered by ________
Organization ______
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TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS
Tarleton State University, part of the Texas A&M University System, is seeking candidates for Assistant Professor, criminal justice, 9-month, full-time, tenure-track position beginning fall, 1989. Duties include teaching four courses per semester, one summer term usually available, and perform other university and departmental duties. Specialty in criminal and civil rights law preferred. Requires Ph.D. in Criminal Justice, Justice Studies or related field. J.D. degree preferred. University teaching essential. Salary competitive. Women and minority candidates especially welcome.
Tarleton State University, part of the Texas A&M University System, isseeking candidates for Assistant Professor in government, 9-month, full-time tenure-track position beginning fall, 1989. Duties include teaching four courses per semester, drawn from American National and Texas State government, upper-division and graduate courses in comparative politics and international relations. One summer term generally available. Requires Ph.D. and demonstrated excellence in classroom teaching. Salary competitive. Women and minority candidates especially welcome.
Tarleton State University, part of the Texas A&M University System, is seeking candidates for Assistant Professor in economics, 9-month, full-time tenure track position, beginning fall, 1989. Duties include teaching four courses per semester including undergraduate principles and upper division courses to include Money and Banking and Economic Development. One summer term teaching generally available. Requires Ph.D. and demonstrated excellence in classroom teaching. Salary competitive. Women and minority candidates especially welcome.
Send resumes/vita, letter of interest, official transcripts and three letters of academic references to Tarleton State University, Dr. Wm. E. Adkinson, Head, Social Sciences Department, Box T-2006, Tarleton Station, Stephenville, TX 76402. Application deadline January 15,1989.
AA/EOE
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Arts& Entertainment
ART IN THE NEWS: Works by more than 130 20th century Latin American artists who worked in the United States can be seen this month in a major exhibit at The Bronx Museum of the Arts.
The Latin American Spirit: Art and Artists in the United States, 1920-1970 opened at the New York Museum Oct. 1 and will continue there through Jan. 29,1989.
“This exhibition will play a significant role in bringing the historical perspective of Latin American art and artists to mainstream public attention,” says Luis Cancel, executive director of the museum and coordinator of the project.
The 200 pieces in the exhibit will travel on a 15-month tour - to begin February- to museums in El Paso, San Diego, San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Vero Beach, Fla
Currently, San Juan is hosting some 130 artists from 14 Latin American countries for the VII Bienal del Grabado Latinoamericano y del Caribe, a biannual showing of prints from the region. Their 165
pieces in the juried showing are on exhibit at the city’s Inatituto de Culture Puertorriqueha.
In Washington, D.C., the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America will house various exhibits du ri ng the remainder of the year. Shows at the OAS Gallery of the museum will include The Image Makers (Oct. 7-22), an exhibit of photographs of Latin American film personalities; Process of Change: Young Costa Rican Painters (Oct 28 - Nov. 27); and Christmas Celebration at the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America (Dec. 7 to Jan. 6).
‘SEE’ ABOOK: Literature as a basis for filmmaking is the focus of the second annual San Antonio Inter-American Bookfair, which begins this week at that city’s downtown Hemisfair Park.
Highlight of the exhibit, Oct 14 to 16, will be an appearance by Carlos Fuentes (on the 15th), who will read from his novel The Old Gringo. Fuentes will attend a free book-signing reception and participate in a closing-day symposium titled Twice Removed: The Latin American Novel as North American Film.
The literature program of the Guadalupe Cultural Center is the event’s founding sponsor. - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
FALL READING LIST: Nowthatthe season is changing, our thoughts turn to other pursuit's Following is a list of recently published books by or relevant to Hispanics.
WEEDEE PEEPO, by Jos6 Antonio Burciaga (Pan American University Press, 1201 University Drive, Edinburg, Texas 78539), 207 pp., $10.95 paperbound.
A collection of 29 short, entertaining essays many of them previously published by the Hispanic Link News Service. In English and in Spanish, Burciaga’s witty insights on Latinos living in the United States make for pleasurable reading.
THE BURDEN OF SUPPORT, by David Hayes-Bautista, Werner Schink and Jorge Chapa (Stanford University Press, Stanford, Calif. 94305), 224 pp., $32.50 hardcover.
Hayes-Bautista, director of the Chicano Studies Research Center and UCLA medical school professor, examines the political and
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News service Inc. 1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa,
Sophia Nieves. 1
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118
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Display ads are $45 per column .inch. Ads placed by
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economic implications of California demographics, namely that of the aging white population and the soaring young Latino sector. Co-written by Schink, a research economist at the California Employment Development Department and Chapa, assistant professor at the U niversity of Texas at Austi n.
COYOTES-A JOURNEYTHROUGHTHE SECRET WORLD OF AMERICA’S ILLEGAL
(Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004), 300 pp, $9.50 paper-bound.
A look back at California in the 1800s to the early 1900s, this fictional book is laced with actual history of the brick industry that played an important role in California’s formation. It tells of the families who came from central Mexico to work the brick factories.
ALIENS, by Ted Conover (Vintage Books, | 201 E. 50th St, New York, N.Y., 10022), 264 pp, $6.95 paperbound.
This book gives an inside view of the treacherous lives of Mexicans crossing the border. The author spent a year with them.
CARTUCHO-MY MOTHER’S HAND, by Nellie Campobello, translated by Doris Meyer and Irene Matthews, (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713), 128 pp, $7.95 paperbound.
This book contains two novelettes and was written by an author known for her role in I Mexico’s cultural renaissance. Both stories are autobiographical accounts of her childhood during the Mexican revolution.
THE BRICK PEOPLE, by Alejandro Morales
THE APPLE IN THE DARK, by Clarice Lispector, translated by Gregory Rabassa (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713,361 pp, $10.95 paper-bound.
A winner of the National Book Award for Translation, this compelling story mixes biblical and Darwinian symbolism.
IGNORED VOICES - PUBLIC OPINION POLLS AND THE LATINO COMMUNITY, edited by Rodolfo O. de la Garza (The University of Texas Press, P.O. Box“7819, Austin, Texas 78713), 232 pp, $12.95 paperbound.
This collection of 19 essays examines why Latinos are often left out of public opinion polls and the effects this has.
- Angela Walker
MOST
WANTED
FBI seeks turncoat agent, Bernardo Perez, for filing discrimination lawsuit against the bureau. WARNING: Armed with federal ruling.
Bernardo Matt P6rez
CONTACT YOUR LOCAL FBI OFFICE IF YOU SEE THIS MAN.
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week California Gov . George Deukmejlan appoints David Velisquezof Mission Viejo as a municipal court judge for the South Orange County Judicial District. . . New York Mayor Ed Koch names Phil Rivera, director of human resources at WNET-TV, and Xavier Rodriguez, president of the Bronx-based Coalition for Housing Improvement, to the city's Human Rights Commission . .. A federal jury in Los Angeles convicts Jesus Fellx-Gutlerrez, a 38-year-old former Los Angeles seafood company owner, of aiding and abetting in the 1985 torture death of U . S . Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena. Two days earlier the jurors found convicted drug trafficker Rene Verdugo-Urquldez, kidnap ping and torture ... Ramlro Sinchez, the first Hispanic to become president of the Laredo (Texas) NationA{!lrnf ardi&Aifuthor, dies Sept. 25 from heart failure . He was . . lfntbrMI""'Mosqulto" Ordel'lana, one of Cuba's all-time premiere athletes who excelled at basketball and baseball, dies of a heart attack at the age of 69 in Miami ... Dawn Tenorio, 35, wins the women's division of the 1988 Eastern New Mexico State Fair Chili-Pepper Eating Contest by downing 10 heaters. She won a cool $300 ... Authorities solve the mystery of who placed a stick of dynamite into the lost suitcase .pf Miami couple Gregorio and Esther Martinez. The Metro-Dade Police Department forgot to remove the stick during an airport security-training exercise ... HI SPA IC LINK WEE Oct10, 1988 Court Says FBI Discriminated Against Hispanics A federal judge in western Texas ruled Sept 30 that the FBI systematically discrimi nated against its Hispanic agents in promotions and assignments that lead to career advance ment, as well as in disciplinary actions and other working conditions. The case has far-reaching impiications on several fronts. The decision by U.S. District Court Judge Lucius Bunton of Midland represents a major victory in the seven-year battle of FBI agent Bernardo Matt Perez to have the agency revamp its treatment of Hispanics. The 49year-old Perez was formerly the bureau's highest ranking Hispanic. He has worked for the bureau for 25 years. Said Hugo Rodriguez, one of Perez's lawyers, from his Albuquerque, N.M., office, "There's never been any case of this magnitude (at the federal leveO on behalf of professional His panics." The victory sets a precedent for a growing number of similar cases. In Los Angeles, Hispanic officers filed a formal complaint of the same type of discrimination practices against the city police department Sept. 21. In the District of Columbia, Latino agents filed a nearly identical lawsuit against the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in October 1985. In a 95-page statement, Judge Bunton said the FBI's Hispanic agents were put on a "taco circuif' where they were disproportionately assigned tedious work, such as wire tapping, requiring Spanish fluency but offering little in the way of experience looked for at promotion or reward time . The bureau had countered that it needed Spanish-speaking agents for the work, par ticularly in drug-related cases. Bunton said this did not justify"the discrimination demon strated at trial." 1992 Quincentenary Plans Underway Preparations for the celebration of the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' arrival on North American soil kicked off with the signing of a proclamation by President Reagan Oct. 3 that recognizes the event. John Goudie, chairman of the congressional ly mandated Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission, said, "The four Legal Group Picks Head Ruben Franco, a 41-year-old trial attorney, was named Sept 19 as president and general counsel of the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund in New York. Franco leaves his partnership with a New York law firm and his seat on the 2Q-member board of the PRLDEF to head the civil rights organization. He first worked for the 16year-old group as a staff attorney immediately after graduating from Howard University's law school in 197 4 . years leading up to 1992 will afford many opportunities to increase national awareness of the Quincentenary and its significance." Goudie is a Miami businessman born in Cuba Involvement of Hispanics in the activities leading up to the actual anniversary is important to the commission, according to Paco Martinez, deputy director . On Oct 5 a Columbus Day celebration was held in San Jose , Calif., featuring singer Juan Gabriel, folklorico dancing and mariachi music. Martinez said Hispanic interests are r& presented on the commission and pointed to the membership of Luis Ferre, former governor of Puerto Rico; and Jane Garcia, wife of U .S. Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N . Y .). Two other His panics are honorary members of the board composed of 24 individuals. Susan Herrera, director of Washington , D.C. based National HispanicOuincentEmnial Com mission, said the group will have its own activit ies. This includes a travelling exhibit in 1992 and a handbook to help communities plan their own events. She said the purpose of her group is to let the United States know of the role Hispanics . . . ! played in the nation's history. L-----------------Sophia Nieves He said the educational and drug problems of Latinos are the areas he first intends to . tackle . "I want to spearhead the effort to do something ab0ut that," said Franco. Bunton called the bureau's internal proc& dures for dealing with discrimination complaints "bankrupt." He found illegal retaliation taken against Perez for his complaints. Perez had been repeatedly demoted, even though his "record demonstrates .. character and courage..," the judge said. The sixth-generation Mexican American was formerly head of the FBI office in San Juan, Puerto Rico . He is now an assistant special agent in charge at the El Paso bureau, two rungs lower on the ladder. He fifed the lawsuit in January 1987 follow ing dismissal of his internal complaint, officially lodged in October 1983. It had taken more than three years for the FBI's equal employ ment opportunity office to reach a decision. "The truth is I was subjected to discrimination since I first entered, in Washington, D.C., in 1963. I just didn't want to admit it to myself," said Perez, who added that he feels "grand' right now. Perez explained that despite his rise to a rank higher than that previously attained by Hispanics , he began to see that he would go continued on page 2 1 0 Latino Olympians Win Medals for U.S. Among the 619 U.S. athletes participating in the 24th Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Koreaheld Sept. 16 through Oct. 2 -were 22 Hispanics. Ten won medals, six in demonstration events . Gold medal winners were: Ty Griffin, Tampa, Fla . Arlene Limas, Chicago Tlno Martinez, Tampa, Fla . . Robin Ventura, Santa Maria, Ca Silver medal winners were: Baseball Taekwondo Baseball Baseball Michael Carbajal, Phoenix Boxing Juan Moreno, Zion, Ill. Taekwondo Raoul Rodriguez, New Orleans Rowing Tracie Rulz..Conforto, Synchronized Bothell, Wash. Swimming Bronze medal winners were: Margaret Castro-G6mez, Groton, Conn. Dara Torres, Beverly Hills, Ca . Judo Swimming

PAGE 2

Compromises on StraetComer Hiring Dispute '" ' f ' j . . . Glendal' e ; became Sept 28 the first Control Act took effect this summer. laborers can meet in the yard between 6 Southern California city to reach a comIn Glendale, the Catholic Youth Organization and 9 a.m. daily. promise between angry residents and the provided its yard on the edge of town as a The search for an alternative in the city of primarily Hispanic laborers who gather on hiring site for the day workers. Sister Victoria Costa Mesa led to the Oct. 4 opening of a city streets to solicit work. It is also the first Trujillo said . the CYO had not considered hiring hall for those who prove legal residency. to include undocumented immigrants in the repercussions of including undocuOther cities, such as Long Beach,Piacientia the services it now provides to immigrants menteds, but would not now exclude them. and Orange, are debating similar solutions. who seek such temporary work. Trujillo, who runs CYO's seven branches Earlier this year, Redondo Beach passed At least half a dozen cities are considering from its Los Angeles headquarters, said the a law banning street-corner hiring. Glendale legislation to eliminate the street-corner crowd recently reached as high as 100 in tabled a similar ordinance until December. hiring, which opponents say leads to botherthe small yard. "It is inconvenient and there Trujillo was concerned that the Immigration some or intimidating crowds of men who always are one or two bad apples, but for and Naturalization Service might investigate then hang out all day. Such proposals have the most part these are just family men the CYO property, but CYO workers said multiplied since the employer sanctions looking for the opportunity to work." they would challenge the INS if it did. provisions of the Immigration Reform and UndertheagreementwithGiendaleofficials, -Darryl Lynette Figueroa 310 Agents Join Suit Against Bureau continued from page 1 . no further. "I got sick of being treated like a Mexican," he said. When the suit received class-action status this summer, 310 agents joined the claim. Hispanics are now439, or4:Ei%,ot the9,597 agents. Only one of the FBFs 58 field offices is headed by a Hispanic. No Latinos are found in the top two FBI grade levels. FBI Director WilHam Sessions said in a four-page statement that he was"diSa.ppointed" by the decision and might appeal, but by press time Justice Department officials said they might not Rodriguez pointed out that Sessions was formerly chief justice in the western Texas federal district and a former colleague of Bunton. "Coming from Bunton, this decision means so much more. It shows we didn't just . prove our case, we overwhelmed the court with evidence," he said. Within the overseeing Justice Department, the ruling was seen as an embarrassment to the agency that enforces the nation's civil rights laws. It is also under fire from a black agent who sued its Omaha, Neb., and Chicago offices for racial harassment last November. In the DEA case, a federal judge ruled Aug. 23 that the Justice Department had been "stalling" for three years through its failure to provide employment records required by the plaintiffs. The department "appears" to have complied with his order to produce the required records, said Amy Wind, attorney for lead agent Jesus Muniz in the class-action suit. DEA agents described his case as a "classic." After eight years as a special agent, Muniz was rejected on more than 55 requests for promotion. The suit charges that this is a consequence of a disproportionately large share of unfavorable work assignments which do not provide promo tional opportunities. Hispanics constitute 277, or 9.6%, of the DEA's 2,882 agents. Three of the 20 domestic field offices are headed by Hispanics. No Latinos are found in the top two DEA grade levels. DEA is a Justice Department agency which since 1982 has been overseen by the FBI. Its two top officials were formerly with the FBI. They report to Sessions. Rodriguez, who served with the FBI for 18 years himself, praised the Latino agents who participated in the Perez case. "I am just so proud that they had the guts to stand up against the company, because the company does not forget." There will be a separate trial next month to determine damages in that case. Agents are asking for$5 million in damages and procedural changes. -Darryl Lynette Figueroa INS Agents Arrest 7 Mass 2 U.S . Border Patrol Agents burst into a catholic church in Orange, Calif., during Mass and arrested seven undocumented workers sitting in the rear of the church Sept. 27. The men were among 160 taken in a sweep of the area where men gather to. solicit work during the early morning. U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service officials said the agent was in "hot putsuif' of two men who had ducked into the church to elude capture. "Our policy has not changed," said Harold Ezell, western regional commissioner for the INS, the following day. "We're not going to churches and kicking down doors looking for illegal aliens ... But I am not going to say to our agents that if someone runs to any particular building, with a cross on i t or not, that ifs ollie, ollie, oxel'l'free . " The Most Rev. Norman F. McFarland , bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange, said that while he has no i mmed iate plans to take action, the behavior of the agents was unwarranted. "It gives an im pression of police-state procedures. " The bishop added, "We know that sanc tuary doesn't exist, de facto . However, the broad concept of sanctuary is an outreach to people who are in trouble ... We're not going to ask them to show their green card." L.A. County Promises to Battle Redistricting Los Angeles County Counsel DeWitt Clinton said Sept. 27 the county has vowed to fight the U.S. Justice Departmenfs voting rights suit, claiming that the number of non-voting Latinos would make it impossible to form a new Latino majority supervisorial district. Richard Fajardo, of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, disputed this, saying that in a similar suit in 1985 the city of Los Angeles initially used the same tack. The city is 28.% Hispanic. Los Angeles now has two Latinos on its 15-member council. Three of the supervisors in the28% Hispanic county have indicated a willingness to realign district boundaries, but a fourth vote would be needed from one of two remaining members Pete Schabarum and Mike Antonovich -who have come out against redistricting. Latinos Hit N.Y.C. Report The second annual report on Hispanics released September 27 by the Mayor's Office of New York City has been met with criticism by some community group leaders. They say Hispanics did not have enough input. In his "Second Annual Report on Hispanic Concerns," Mayor Ed Koch credits his o wn leadership for "initiatives underway," including , the compilation of the city's dropout rates according to ethnicity. T he 1 03-page report breaks down progress according t o data drawn from heads of departments, rang i ng from immigration to housing. The president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, Angelo Falcon, sa i d improvements such as those in the area of education are not necessarily the result of the mayor's initiative . The report lacks credibility, he said , because Koch broke his promise to have meetings with Hispanic leaders. "We will never satisfy (critics)," said Luis Miranda, the mayor's advisor on Hispanic affairs. "Unless we met with every Hispanic , those leaders will say those people (chosen) aren't representative of the community." But he added, "Clearly there should be much more going on." Nieves Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Juan Gonzalez, 9uest columnist Puerto Ricans Learned Dependency Too Well Why are so many Puerto Ricans on welfare in New York? Readers, usually angry white ones, ask me that a lot. You dirty the streets, they say; you have too many babies , don't want to work for what you get. Worse, you refuse to speak English, then have the nerve to complain about America! Some Puerto Rican leaders refuse to talk about welfare in our community. They label as racist any look at the issue, preferring to stick their heads in sewers and spew muck from their mouths about oppression as if, by repeating the chant often enough, the problem will go away . It won't. So , let's talk about it. First , the facts. About 14% of New York families receive some sort of welfare. Among Puerto Ricans it skyrockets to 39% . Not only does that approach three times the city's rate, it's nearly double the rate(20%) of other Hispanic families. This according to a 1984 report of New York's Department of City Planning. In single-parent families headed by a female -the state most conducive to poverty Puerto Ricans are also sharply different, not only from the rest of the city but also from other Hispanics . Single mothers head half of all Puerto Rican families, compared to a third from other Hispanic and non-Hispanic families. ARE PUERTO RICANS LAZY? Those who thought it had something to do with Spanish genes will be surprised to learn that Cubans, Colombians and other Latin American immigrants are not experiencing the same degree of poverty as Puerto Ricans, even though these groups arrived here 20 years after the large Puerto Rican migrations. Only Dominicans, who also began arriving in the late 1960s, are close to Puerto Ricans in poverty and single-parent households . This despite the fact that Puerto Ricans, because of their longer' stay in this country, are more likely to understand and speak English. Even in the percentage of self-employed business people, Puerto Ricans have fallen behind other Hispanics. Walk into any bodega in New York. Increasingly, they are owned not by Puerto Ricans but by har6-working Dominicans. Are Puerto Ricans lazy? Certainly the Puerto Rican men who gave up their lives fort he United States on the battlefields from World War I to Vietnam showed they aren ' t afraid to tackle problems or make sacrifices . Or could it be something else? Could it have something to do with the unique conditions under which Puerto Ricans have evolved in Sin pelos en Ia lengua REBUTTAL: It must have been telepathy. No sooner had Weekly Report Editor Felix Perez selected Juan Gonzalez's commentary on Puerto Rican dependency as one of this week's guest columns than a call came from Gerson Borrero. Borrero is a vital d isk in the backbone of New York City's Institute for Puerto Rican Policy . When there's a political dispute brewing in the City, he and his boss, Angelo Falc6n, are sure to be somewhere in its midst. Earlier this year, Borrero and Falc6n expressed delight that columnist Gonzalez , a native of Puerto Rico who grew up in New York's streets, was moving to the New York Daily News from the Philadelphia Daily News. But this time Borrero was ready to buy Juan a one-way Amtrak ticket back to Ph illy. In response to the above column, which appeared in the New York Daily News Sept. 29, Falc6n composed t his response , : America? THEY ARE CITIZENS, FOREIGNERS Puerto Ricans are both citizens and foreigners at the same time: Citizens because, since 1917, they have been legally so; foreigners because they come from a different land, to which they can, and often do, return for periods of time. That land has for decades had Depression-like conditions. As of last June, unemployment in Puerto Rico-the last major U.S. colony was 15. 3%, triple the U.S . level . More than half the island's population lives in poverty . Sixty percent receive public assistance because thine are not enough jobs. That's why many come to the mainland. Jobs. Consider Yolanda Perez . Two years ago, she worked in a Star-Kist factory in Mayaguez, making $4.35 an hour, was divorced and had two children . She kept getting her ex-husband locked up for non-support but with no results . One day, she met Jose Luis Ruiz , who was married. She got pregnant and had his child. His wife found out. He ran out on both women and headed for New York. Yolanda, determined not to be deserted again, came here with the kids looking for him and found neither Jose Luis nor a job that pays well. An eighth-grade dropout, she's on welfare now, gets $287 a month in food stamps, $163 every two weeks for clothes and spending money, and a maximum rent allowance of $319. DEPENDENCE IS PART OF PSYCHE That's enough to pay for a hovel in the Bronx, one so bad she hasn't had running water for three months; she gets her water from the fire pump down the street. The city has condemned the building. She'll either find another hovel or head for a shelter to join the homeless army. "Some people get used to being on welfare," she says. "Not me. This is no kind of life . " She has a sister living in New Jersey who has a good job. Another one in Puerto Rico is on welfare. But on the island, welfare, like unemployment, is worse. "My sister gets $150 a month from welfare for rent, $200 a month for foOd and expenses. Prices are just as bad over there," Yolanda says. Ninety years ago, the United States invaded Puerto Rico and made its people U.S. citizens. Puerto Rico is now the poorest place under the U.S. flag. First Spain told the Puerto Ricans, "You can't live without us." Then the United States told them the same thing. You tell people something long enough, they believe it. Puerto Rico the colony became Puerto Ricans the dependent people. It's in the psyche now. Puerto Rican leaders are going to have to challenge the colonial mentally in too many Puerto Rican heads. Free men and women make their own future with their sweat and labor. Only dependent peoples need welfare. (Juan Gonzalez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.) Dear Editor: Juan Gonzalez's column on why so many Puerto Ricans are on welfare Is the most confused piece of junk I've ever seen. He reinforces the stereotype of all Puerto Ricans as lazy and promiscuous by the examples he uses. I had hoped he had come to the Dally News to correct stereotypes like this. At the same time he belittles those people who talk about oppression and racism as the causes of this dependency, his explanation of the cause as the colonial mentality of Puerto Ricans ... amounts to the same thing. Gonzalez does a great disservice and damage to the many hard-working Puerto Ricans who have contributed so much to this city. He also shows he doesn't understand the complexities of the Issues Involved ..• Welcome back to the Big Apple, Juan. You're not really a player there until you'v e been flogged publicly by the Institute. Kay Barbaro Hi s pani c Link Weekly Report Oct.10, 1988 3

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Guillermo Torres, guest columnist Latino Journalists, Be Wary The phone call came just after 10 am. The caller, representing an East Coast newspaper, politely asked whether she had awakened me. "No, not really," I lied, trying to sound wide awake after working a 12-hour shift the night before. "I don't know what you do at your newspaper, " her opening pitch began, "but we anticipate some openings in the near future ... " Another phone call, another recruiter asking-sight and experience unseen-if I would consider applying at her newspaper. Face it If you are Hispanic and a newspaper editor or reporter, you are a hot commodity. But be wary . Although newspapers are aggressively seeking brown and black faces, opportunities for advancement into managerial and " reporting positions are slow in coming. What kind of jobs are they offering? A dead-end copy editor's position? A reporting position that gives few opportunities , to showcase w riti ng talent, or worse , puts the reporter on the tamale-dinner beat? Some a n alys t s wonder why the Equal Opportunity Commiss ion hasn ' t been mak i ng inquiries about the news indus t ry's dismal performance in integrating not only its newsrooms, bu t bro adca s t s t udios as IND USTR Y AV OIDED SELF-E XAMINATION Even the industry's cheerleaders acknowledge that the news business was among the last of U.S. business sectors to integrate . Now, they say , there' s a good-faith effort be i ng made to remedy the situation. Through the years the industry has courageously taken the lead in denounc i ng discrimination and lack of opportunity for minorities. But for too long it pointed an accusing finger while avoiding self examination. Recent American Newspaper Publishers Association statistics indicate that minorities make up 16% of the work force at U . S . newspapers, yet only 8% work in newsrooms. Th i s is worrisome when considering that minorities make up 21% of the nation's overall work force. A few months earlier, in April, the American Society of Newspaper Editors came up with slightly lower newsroom numbers for minorities . It found that blacks, Hispanics, Asian Americans and American Indians constitute 7.02% this year , an increase from 6 . 56% in 1987 and l,IP from 3.95% in 1978, the first year an ASNE survey was taken. BEST AND WORST OF TIMES ASNE counted 12,600 supervisory positions in the newsrooms of U.S . dailies. Of that total, 520, or4. 1%, are held by blacks , Hispanics , Asian Americans and American Indians . That's the stuff of scandals. The industry wrings its collective hands and laments that there are few experienced minorities to recruit because the best and the brightest go into public relations, advertising , law and business . . Those who leave say they do so because other fields offer advance-ment and greater rewards. What a paradox. It is the best of times for minority journalists, and the worst. Such opportunity for jobs. Such dismal prospects for advancement. . . When well-meaning recruiters call, our egos are massaged and our spirits get a lift. So I offer them a couple of suggestions: When you make your solicitations, tell us about the openings for managerial positions or news beats with potential. Tell us about your excitement to discover that some of us have many years of experience . And remember that some of us work odd and long shifts. Try calling a little later than 10 a.m. (Guillermo Torres, a reporter for six years and editor for 10 with Texas and New Mexico newspapers, was copy desk chief at The New Mexican in Santa Fe, N.M., until his recent resignation.) Ramiro Burr, guest columnist Linda's Labor of Love It seems you can't please everyone no matter how hard you try . Ask Linda Ronstadt. She's celebrating her Mexican heritage in a Spanish-language album but is being accused by some critics of rediscovering her roots just to cash in on the country's new interest in Hispanics. "Some people are getting rich from this, but it's certainly not me . I started working on this project several years ago ... before Los Lobos and La Bamba hit, " says Ronstadt, who is of German and Mexican ancestry. Recording " Canciones de Mi Padre , " an album of songs written with her father, Gilbert, was a labor of love, she explains . " I would have done it for a loss. I love the music." The 41-yearold singer is not alone in her affection for the traditional Mexican ballads and rancheras -her latest effort has sold more than 500,000 copies. Ronstadt remembers growing up i n Tucson, Ariz., listening t o her father , who is a retired hardware store owner, playing the piano and singing the classics reco rded on her album. Hers was a family that valued music . " I sang Mexican music when I was three or four. So it's been nice for me to be able to stand on the stage . . . and sing a song that I sang in my back yard when I was six years old . Like "EI Adios del So/dado , " she recounts . " Whenever I get to it, it's like , oh, there's my Uncle Bill, my Aunt Luisa , and my brother and siste r singing with me and my father." 'YOU OWE ME THIS ONE' The album is not Ronstadt's first professional foray into Spanish music , although she does not speak Spanish . "I started recording in Spanish in the '70s on my second album after " Heart Like a Wheel. " I had songs in Spanish that I wrote with my father that I wanted to do, but I couldn ' t work with traditional music because I had to make records that sold . " Now , after proving her value with albums of commercially acceptable music , Ronstadt felt she had earned this. " When you give a record company a succession of platinum records, you can walk in and say , ' Look, I want to do this just for me . 1 don't even know if it's going to sell , but you owe me this one.' " Currently, her stage show "A Romantic Evening in Old Mexico" continues its North American tour with visits to several West Coast cities. Not just a concert, it's almost a theater production, with costly backdrops and choreography. "There were times in the past when I was standing on the stage and looked at the list of songs and I thought, 'Oh, I'm so tired of this song.' Now I feel like I could sing these songs for 20 years and not get tired of them," she says. HAS GONE FULL SPECTRUM Ronstadt's music has run nearly full spectrum . She started out performing folk music. In the '70s she was described by one critic as "pop perfectionist t-rying to make it as a rocker. " She astonished the music world in the early 1980s by putting out two albums of dreamy standards in collaboration with conductor Nelson Riddle. A country music album garnered Ronstadt and partners Em my Lou Harris and Dolly Parton a Grammy nomination in 1986. Throughout her career, each time she has broken with tradition, critics have pronounced with conviction that Ronstadt has found her niche in her new musical genre. But Linda Ronstadt has demonstrated it's notfairtocategorize her . She is notjust a folk singer, a pop performer or a torch singer; she is all of these, as well a singer of the Mexican music. Stiil, she regards the Mexican songs-the music that "gives us a . great desire to pay homage to our roots" -of special personal importance. ( Ramiro Burr is an entertainment writer with the San Antonio Light) i 4 Oct. 1 0 , 1988 Hispanic Link Weekly Report 1

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:;COLLECTING NEW YORK CITY PRIMARY VOTE: " The Puerto Rican/Latino • Vote in the New York City Democratic Primaries of September 15, 1988 " is a 20-page booklet by the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy. ' For a copy send $4.25 to IPRP, 286 Fifth Ave., Suite804, New York, N . Y . 10001 (212) 564. CONVENTION DELEGATE ATTITUDES: The August issue of Southwest Voter Research Notes contains a poll conducted by The r Los Angeles Times in conjunction with Southwest Voter Research Institute that looks at Latino, black and white Democratic and Republican convention delegate attitudes on several issues. For a r copy send $1 to SVRI, 403 E. Commerce, Suite 260, San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 222. U.S. POPULATION: "United States Population Est imates and > Components of Change: 1970 to 1987," a 22 page report by the U.S. Census Bureau , estimates that there were 245 million people in the United States as of Jan . 1 , 1988. For a copy (specify Series P-25, No. 1 023) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Governmen t Printing Office , Washington , D . C . 20402 (202) 783. (No price was available at press time. ) HERITAGE POSTER: " Pioneros " is a one-color poster commissioned by Nabisco B rands Inc . celebrating the achievemP.nts of seven outstanding Hispanics . Study guides on the subjects, who include Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez , entertainer R i ta Moreno, and Hartford (Conn.) Public Schools Superintendent Hernan LaFontaine, are also available . For free copies, write B&C Assocs . , P . O . Box 2636, High Po int, N.C . 27261. H E LPING AT RISK S TUDENTS : The National Education Association recently made available two publications, " At-Risk, Low-Achiev i ng Stud ents i n the Classroom " ($9 .95) and " At Risk Students and Thinking : Perspectives From Research " ($12 . 95) , to help educators. To obtain a copy, write NEA Professional Library, P . O . Box 509, West Haven , Conn. 06516. STUDENTS' SCIENCE SKILLS: "The Science Report Card : Elements of Risk and Discovery' ' is a 151 page report by the Educational Testing Service . In addition to measuring the science sk i lls of 9 , 13 and 17-yearold students, it does so according to race and ethnicity. For a copy send $14 to Nation's Report Card , P . O . Box 6710, Princeton, N . J . 08541 6710. CONNECTING DROPOUT PROJECT STARTS A group of 50, primarily Hispan i c community and education leaders from San Antonio met late last month to begin to form the outline for combating the alarming dropout rate of Hispanics in that city. Called the Hispanic Student Success Program , the project will initially reach out to 5,000 students in San Antonio, said Antonio Rigual , project director. Rigual also serves as executi ve director of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Among the projecrs goals is to decrease the Hispanic dropout rate from its current 45% to 30% by 1992. It will throw out a broad net to target dropouts by working with parents _ and educators as well as students. The Ford Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trust have donated more than $2 million to the venture . COLLEGES PROVIDE OUTREACH The Sept28 opening ofthe UniversityofTexas at Austin and Texas A&M' s University Outreach Center in predominantly Hispanic McAllen, Texas, will provide middle and high school students in that city a better chance to succeed in going on to college. The center will give university-staff support to the teachers and counselors in public schools. The McAllen facility will provide services such as career counseling, tutoring, visits to university campuses, advice on financial applications and how to apply to Texas public universities. The center is the third of its kind in Texas; the others are in Houston and San Antonio. McAllen is nearly 75% Hispanic. The centers hope to tackle academic deficiencies long before they occur by followi ng a studenrs educational progress beginning in his or her middle school years. GROUP ELECTS OFFICERS The Mexican American Women's National Association elected a president and other national officers last month in Washington, D . C . Irma Maldonado, who has been a MANA member for seven years and who served as chairperson of the group's most recent convention, was elected president Among other officers elected to the 14-year old organization was Elvira Valenzuela Crocker, executive vice president; and Cristina Caballero-Robb, vice president of programs. Calendar THIS WEEK ment for the Humanities will be sponsoring a linguistic conference on th e Spanish language in the United States . Topics to be dealt with include the language ' s preservation, the cultural and historical significance of Spanish , and English as the off i cial language of the United States . DOMESTIC VIOLENCE New Yo r k Oct. 14 The Committee for Hispanic Children and Families will host the benefit premiere of"Dolores, • a Spanish l anguage film by Pablo Figueroa on the effects of domestic violence on a U .S. Hispanic family . Digna Silnchez (212) 206 090 CAVAZOS RECEPTION Washington , D . C . Oct 12 The National Council of La Raza will host a reception for the new U . S . Secretary of Education, Dr . Lauro Cavazos. Cavazos recently became the first His panic to serve on a U.S. Cabinet Co-hosts include the National Council of Hispanic Women , League of United Latin American C i tizens and National IMAGE. Tom Sharpe (202) 6289600 LATINO YOUTH Washington , D . C . Oct13 The Fourth Annual Celebration of Latino Youth will include music, a buffet dinner and dancing . Daniel Bueno , businessman andcommunityactivist, will be g i ven the Simon Bolivar Community Service Award . The Corporate Services Aware, the Youth Services Award , the Special Volunteer Award and the Youth Leadership Award will be presented . Mildred Perez (202) 4831140 SPANISH-LANGUAGE CONFERENCE Miam i Oct. 13 Florida International University and Florida EndowH is p a ni c Link Wee k ly R e por t Ana Roca (305) 554 LAW ENFORCEMENT Pasadena , Calif. Oct. 13 The Chicano Correctional Workers Association , the Latin American Law Enforcement Association and the Mexican American Correctional Association will present a conference for law enforcement and c r iminal justi-::e professionals . Workshops will include drug prevention , gang alternatives, AIDS and law enforcement , affirmative action and off icer street safety. Henry Corrales (213) 721 2310 MINORITIES AND THE LEGAL PROFESSION Washington D . C . Oct. 13 A national conference to review the recent history o f minority access to the legal profession and to make plans for improvement is being sponsored by the Law School Admission Council , the American Bar Association ' s Section on Legal Education , the Council on Legal Education Opportunity and others. Con ference themes include minority student recruitment and performance . Judith Hetrick (215) 968 Oct.10, 1988 BOOK FAIR San Antonio Oct. 14 The San Antonio Inter-American Book FairwiH include free admission to book exhibits by independent, university and small presses from the U .S. and Mexico . A public discussion on the adaptations of novels to film will be held featuring Larry McMurtry, author of "lonesome Dove. " Carlos Fuentes, winner of Spain's 1988 Cervantes Prize , will read from"The Old Gringo . " Rosemary Catacalos (512) 271 WOMEN NETWORKING San Antonio Oct. 1416 Hispanas Unidas will bring together during its con ference women from all walks of life to discuss issues that include employment , education, family life, human resources, arts and political awareness. Funds raised in preparation for the event will provide scholarsh ips, transportation and child care for econo mically disadvantaged participants . Mari a Antonietta Berriozabal (512) 299 7040 5

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6 -_I __ C_LA_S_S_I_FI_E_D_S ______ SOCIOLOGIST I i UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS . The Department of Sociology invites applica tions for a sociologist of religion who has a record of teaching and research ' in the sociology of religion and American culture . This is a tenure-track position with rank and salary open . A Ph. D . before July 1989 is required. If hired at a senior level, the person must I have a distinguished research record. The I I successful candidate will be expected to I ! teach cou r ses fulfilling program requirements . ' 1 in the American Studies and Religio u s Studies 1 Programs, but t hese cours e s may be taught in the Sociology Department. The appoint men t is allocated as a fulf time FTF position in sociology, but depending on the successful candidate ' s desires, he or she may' request a joint appointment in one of the other pro grams. TheappointmentbeginsJuly1, 1989 . Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and names of three references to : Gary Hamilton, Chair, Search Committee , Department of Sociology , University of Cali fornia, Davis, California 95616. Final Filing Date for applications is October 15, 1988 . The University of California is an equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achieve ment of diversity among its faculty and staff In that spirit, we are particularly interested in receiving applications from persons of under represented groups, including women, ethnic minorities, disabled veterans, Vietnam era veterans, and handicapped persons. 'tLLUSTRATOA!CARTOONIST, Washington , D.C., based, will do free-lance work at reasonable rates. Contact Michael Antonio Cava (703) 385-5873 , orH[Splfnic Link (202) 234-073'". WEEKLY REPORT WEEKLYREPORTSAVAILABLE: Hispanic Link has a limited number of unbound Weekly Report sets available : $18 for 18 issues in 1983 , $53 for 53 issues i n 1984 , $52 for 52 i ssues in 1985 , $50 each for 50 issues 986 an d 1987 . Order prepaid from Hispani c [ink B a ck C opies, 1420 N ' St. NW, Washington , D .C. 2 00 05 . "Mexico Lindo" Mexico Today!, a new travel, entertainment and leisure bi-monthly, is on sale now at your favorite news locations. This month's issue brings you train travel, pandas and fishing features . Look for this issue's columns on health and living better in Mexico Mexico Today! is geared for the active person in ; Mexico. Annual su bscriptions are $17 (US) Sample issues $2 .95 (US). Write to: Mexico Today!, 1420 N St., NW, #402, Washington, D . C . 20005 TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY University of California, Davis . The College of Letters and Science invites applications for an Assistant Professor Ill, in the sociology of development, effective July 1989 . This is a tenure-track position. Areas of research specialization could include women and international development, International organization, the sociology of agriculture, urbanization and development In the Third World, or economic development and social change. Teaching responsibilities Include a graduate course in development planning in the International Agriculture Development program . Employment or research expertise in a developing country Is desi r able . Ph.D. is required . The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology. To apply, send curr i culum vitae, letter of application and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to: Lyn Lofland , Chair, Development Search Committee, Sociology Department , University o f California , Davis, Calif . 95616. Application s must be postm a r ked Janu ary 1 , 1989 , or earlie r t o be considered . The Univ e rsity of Californi a i s an a ffi r mative action/ e qual opportunity employer. TE NU R ETRACK POS I TION I N S O C I OLO GY The University o f California, Davis. T h e College of Letters and Science Invites application s for a sociologist with an emerging or established r e putation for-quantitative research and publication and a strong commitment to teaching. The level of appointment may be at the Assistant or Associate Profesaor levels. A Ph. D.Is required It Ia desired that field or specialization be in one of the following areas: Gender and famliy, sociology of organization, economic sociology , historical, comparative sociology, International political economy, or poverty anc:l social welfare. The position Is reserved for someone actively engaged In quantitative research and able to participate regularly In teaching a graduate-level sequence In methods and statistics. The appointment will be In the Department of Sociology. To apply, aend curriculum vitae, letter of application, and the names of three reference . s whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to: James Cramer, Chair, Quantitative Search Committee, Sociology Department, University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616. Applications must be postmarked by January 10, 1989, or earlier to be considered The University of California is an affl;mative action/equal opportunity employer. PROFESSOR CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, BAKERSFIELD -Department of Political Sc1ence seeks cand1dates w1th teach1ng and public service experience for a temporary position as Visiting Professor. The appointment could be either full -time or part-time for the Winter and/or Spring quarters commencing January 3, and ending June 15, 1989 . Area most preferred: Communist systems and/or China and Japan. The teaching area could be American public law and policy for the right candidate . Minor i ties and women are strongly encouraged to apply. Salary and support are negotiable. Send vi t ae and names o f t hre e re f e renc e s to Dr. S . E. C l a rk, C hair , Dept. of P o li tical Scien c e , 9001 Sto ckdale Hwy. , Bakersfield, Calif. 93311'10199 Writers! Free lan ce writers sought for Mexico Today!, a new English-language bi-monthly for retirees in. Mexico and frequent travelers to that beautiful coun try. Be a contributor to this new travel, entertain ment and leisure magazine. Writers ' guidelines available with self-addressed , stamped envelope. Sample issues are $2. Send manuscripts and/or query letters to: Mexico Today!, 1420 N St., NW, #402, Washington, D.C. 20005 Telephone: (202) 38 7-51 42. Oct 10,1988 EMPLEADOS OUBERNAMENTALES GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES You can ensure that your contribution goes to the Hispanic organization that will maximize your SSs impact on your community. NA TIONAL IMAGE INC . has pledged that all funds received will be used to " Promote the health and welfare of Hispanics," particularly , decrease the high school dropout rates, unem ployment , social, ethnic and sexual discrimi nation , and to provide training on how t o successfully navigate the Federal employmen t sys tem . NATIONAL IMAGE INC . helpedo v er3 , 000 His p anics l ast yea r thr o ugh tra ining , s cholarships, and a m nesty ass i sta n ce . T arget you r Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) code #0443 contr i but io n to NATI ONAL IMAGE, INC., 20 F St reet, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20001. For membership information please call Ms. Aurora Mojica , Executive Director, at (202) 737-9220 . HEALTH EDUC A TOR HEALTH EDUCATOR with at least 2 year s experience in adolescent substance abuse pre vention. Good writing and communication skills. Knowledge of adolescent educational program ming and "evaluation. Mastel's degree preferred Please send CV immediately to AMSA-CD, 1890 Preston White Dr., Reston, Virginia 22091. EOE Hispani c Lin k Weekl y Rep o r t

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TARLETON STATE UNIVERSITY ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Tarleton State University , part of the Texas A&M University System , i s seeking candidates for Assistant Professor , criminal justice, 9-month , full-time, tenure-track position beginning fall, 1989. Duties include teaching four courses per semester , one summer term usually available , and perform other university and departmental duties . Specialty in criminal and civil rights law preferred . Requires Ph.D. in C r iminal Justice, Justice Studies or related field. J.D. degree preferred. University teaching essential . Salary competitive . Women and minority candidates especially welcome. Tarleton State University , part of the TexasA&M Univers ity System, isseekingcandidates for Assistant Professor in government , 9-month, full-time tenure-track position beginning fall, 1989. Duties include teaching four courses per semester, drawn from American National and Texas State government , upper division and graduate courses in comparative politics and international relations. One summer term generally ava i lable . Requires Ph. D . and demonstrated excellence in classroom teaching. Salary competitive . Women and minority candidates especially welcome . Tarleton State University , part of the Texas A&M University System, is seeking candidates for Assistant Proiessor in economics, 9 month, fuiHime tenure track position, beginning fall, 1989. Duties include teaching four courses per semester including undergraduate principles and upper division courses to include Money and Banking and Economic Development. One summer term teaching generally available. Requires Ph. D . and demonstrated excellence in classroom teaching. Salary competitive . Women and minority candidates especially welcome . Send resumes/vita, letter of interest, official transcripts and three letters of academic references to Tarleton State University, Dr. Wm. E . Adkinson , Head , Social Sciences Department, Box T-2006, Tarleton Station , Stephenville, TX 76402. Application deadline January 15, 1 989. AAIEOE MIDWEST COORDINATOR OF of the 1990 CENSUS PROGRAM MALDEF , a national Hispanic civil rights organization, seeks an individual to develop and coordinate a community education program to inform Hispanics about the importance of the 1990 Census . The requirements for the Chicago-based position include: an undergraduate degree, 3-5 years community organizing or related activity; working knowledge of Midwest Hispanic organizations, experience working with local and state policy makers; researcl\ writ i ng and oral communications skills and bilingual in English/Spanish pre ferred. Send resume, writing sample and a list of 3 references to R. Calder6n , MALDEF; 634 S. Spring St., 11th Fl., Los Angeles, Calif . 90014 by 10/21/88. ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County , Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252. JOURNALISTS/CREATIVEWRITERS: Sub missions are welcome for Weekly Report's " guest column i st' ' feature. Approx. 500 words. For . write(s gu i delines, send self-addressed, sta mped envelope to : Guest Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report , 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D.C. 20005. LATINO PUBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHIPS FOR 1989 PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT CHAIRMAN The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council announce their 1989 Grants Com petition for Public Polley Research on Contempor ary Hispanic Issues. Grants will vary from small individual awards to support for collaborative research projects. Awards will range f rom $20,000 to $30,000 . Priority will be given to the following themes : children and youth at risk; culture and eco nom i c behavior, political organization and empowerment nat ional policy initiatives and t h e ir im pac t on La t ino communi t ies; a nd other c i ty-spe ci f i c t h emes. For mor e information contact Raq uel Qvryn Rivera, Socia l Sci ence Research C ouncil , 605 Thir d Ave., New York, N .Y. 10158 (212) 661-0280 or Harr i ett Romo, C e nt e r f o r Mex i can American Studies, Uni ver sit y of Texas at Austin , Stude nt Services Bldg. 4.1 20, Austi n , Tex as 78 712 (512) 471-1817 . CORDOVA PRINT ING SERVICE 190418th St. NW Wa shington , D .C . 2 000 9 (202) 2657 9 70 Servin g the growi ng Hispani c community in th e n at ion 's capital. Fas t. Friendly. L et us h e l p y o u w ith your pri n ting service needs. NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE Employment referral service for Hispanic pro fessionals and students In the media Opportunities f or internships, entry-level and advanced positions in new s papers, magazines, television, radio and oth er media , English or Spanish language. C o nta c t Jocelyn Cordova , National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228. Hi s p a nic Lin k Weekly Report Southwest Texas State University of San Marcos, Texas, invites applications or nominations for the position of Chair of the Department of Psychology . Applicants should qualify for a tenurable appointment at the rank of associate or professor, should show ev idence of leadership and provide evidence of substantial achievement in teaching and research, as well as skills at interpersonal communication, program development and resource procure ment. Area of specialization is not a major consideration . The appointment will be effect i ve Sep tember 1 , 1989 , and it is a 12-month appointment. SouthwestTexas State University enrolls approximately 20,000 students . The Department of Psychology enrolls approximately 4 , 000 st u d e nts per semester with over 600 majors . The faculty includes 18 full -time and 7 part time members. A mas ters level program is under consi deration . Applicants sho u ld submit a complete r e sum e w ith a cove r letter , a one -page s tatement of leadership phi losophy, an d a t le astth re e r eferen c es t o Dr. Karen Br o w n , Chair , Search Co m m i ttee, Institu te o f So ci a l W ork, Southwe s t Tex a s St a t e Univ e r s ity, San Marcos, Tex as 78666 . C OMPL ETE D A P PLICATIONS M U ST BE R ECEIVED B EF ORE JANUARY 15, 198 9 . Southwest Texas St ate University is an Affi rmati ve Act i on /E qual Opportunity Employer. DEAR PERSONNEL D IRECTOR: N o o ther publication or system lets you target a national p ool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness a n d speed of H ispanic Link Weekly Report. T o place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach you r ad cop y and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, W ashing t o n , D . C. 20005 or phone (202) 2 34-0 7 3 7 or(202) 234-0280. A d copy receiv e d (mail o r phone) b y 5 p . m . (El) Tuesday will b e in W eekl y R eports m a iled F riday of the same w e e k. CLASSIFIED Ab RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. Ordered b y Organization Street _____________ _ DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES City, State & (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone ________ _ 7

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Arts & Entertainment pieces in the juried showing are on exhibit at the city's lnatituto de Culture Puertorriquefta. ART IN THE NEWS: Works by more than 130 20th century Latin American artists who worked in the United States can be se.en this month in a major exhibit at The Bronx Museum of the Arts. In Washington, D .C., the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America will house various exhibits during the remainder of the year. Shows at the OAS Gallery of the museum will include The Image Makers (Oct. 7-22), an exhibit of photographs of Latin American film personalities; Process of Change: Young Costa Rican Painters (Oct 28-Nov. 27); and Christmas Celebration at the Museum of Modern Art of Latin America (Dec. 7 to Jan. 6). The Latin American Spirit: Art and Artists in the United States, 19201970 opened at the New York Museum Oct. 1 and will continue there through Jan. 29, 1989. "This exhibition will play a significant role in bringing the historical perspective of Latin American art and artists to mainstream public attention," says Luis Cancel, executive director of the museum and coordinator of the project. 'SEE' A BOOK: Literature as a basis for filmmaking is the focus of the second annual San Antonio Inter-American Bookfair, which . begins this week at that city's downtown Hemisfair Park. Highlight of the exhibit, Oct. '14 to 16, will be an appearance by Carlos Fuentes (on the 15th), who will read from his novel The Old Gringo. Fuentes will attend a free book-signing reception and participate in a closing-day symposium titled Twice Removed: The Latin American Novel as North American Film. The 200 pieces in the exhibit will travel on a 15-month tour-to' begin February..: to museums in El Paso, San Diego, San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Vero Beach, Fla Currently, San Juan is hosting some 130 artists from 14 Latin American countries forthe VII Bienal del Grabado Latinoamericano y del Caribe, a biannual showing of prints from the region. Their 165 The literature program of the Guadalupe Cultural Center is the evenfs founding sponsor. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report • FALL READING LIST: Now that the season . is changing, our thoughts turn to other pursuits. Following is a list of recently published books by or relevant to Hispanics. WEEDEE PEE PO, by Jose Antonio Burciaga (Pan American University Press, 1201 University Drive, Edinburg, Texas 78539), 207 pp., $10.95 paperbound. A colleCtion of 29 short, entertaining essays, many of them previously published by the Hispanic Link News Service. In English and in Spanish, Burciaga's witty insights on Latinos living in the United States make for pleasurable reading. THE BURDEN OF SUPPORT, by David Hayes-Bautista, Werner Schink and Jorge. Chapa (Stanford University Press, Stanford, Calif. 94305), 224 pp., $32.50 hardcover. Hayes-Bautista, director of the Chicano Studies Research Center and UCLA medical school professor, examines the political and HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic '-ink News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-Q280 or 234-Q737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves.\ GraphicS/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hispan i c Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without a dvance permission. Annua l subscripti o n (50 i ss u es): InstitutionS/agencies $118 Personal $ 1 0 8 Trial (13 issue s ) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word . Display ads are $45 per column .. inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Report mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 8 economic implications of California demo(Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, graphics, namely that of the aging white Houston, Texas 77004), 300 pp., $9.50 paper population and the soaring young Latino bound . . sector. Co-written by Schink, a research A look back at California in the 1800s to the economist at the California Employment early 1900s, this fictional book is laced with Development Department, and Chapa, assistant actual history of the brick industry that played professor at the University of Texas at Austin. an important role in California's formation. It COYOTES-AJOURNEYTHROUGHTHE tells of the families who came from central SECRET WORLD OF AMERICA'S ILLEGAL Mexico to work the brick factories. ALIENS, by Ted Conover (Vintage Books , 1 THE APPLE IN THE DARK, by Clarice 201 E. 50th St., New York, N.Y., 1 0022), 264 Lispector, translated by Gregory Rabassa pp. , $6.95 paperbound. (University of Texas Press , P.O. Box 7819, This book gives an inside view of the treactr . Au&tin, Texas 78713,361 pp., $10.95 paper erous lives of Mexicans crossing the border . bound. Theauthorspentayearwiththem. A winner of the National Book Award for CARTUCHO-MY MOTHER'S HAND, by . Translation, this compelling story mixes biblical Nellie Campobello, translated by Doris Meyer and Darwinian symbolism . and Irene Matthews, (Univer sity of Texas IGNORED VOICES-PUBLIC.OPINION Press, P .O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713), POLLS AND THE L,ATINO COMMUNITY, 128 pp., $7.95 paperbound. edited by RodolfoO. de laGarza(The University This book contains two nove ; lellites and was of Texas Press, P. 0 . Box7819, Austin, Texas written by an author known for her role in 78713), 232 pp., $12.95 paperbound. \ Mexico's cultural renaissance. Both stories This collection of 19 essays examines why are autobiographical accounts of her childLatinos are often left out of public opinion hood during the Mexican revolution. polls and the effects this has. THE BRICK PEOPLE, by Alejandro Morales -Angela Walker MOST WANTED FBI seeks turncoat agent, Bernardo Perez, for filing d iscrimination lawsuit a gainst the bureau . WARNING : Ar m ed with federal ruli ng . Bernardo Matt Perez CONTACT YOUR LOCAL FBI OFFICE IF YOU SEE THIS MAN. Hi s pani c Link Weekly Report