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Hispanic link weekly report, January 2, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, January 2, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Officials from the transition team of President-elect George Bush say that Federal Communications Commissioner Patricia Diaz Dennis, a Democrat, is one of the top candidates for the post of secretary of the Department of Labor...San Antonio Archbishop Patricio Flores leads hundreds of choir members and several actors on the city’s River Walk in a re-enactment of Joseph and Mary’s search for shelter and a place to give birth to Jesus, a rite more popularly known as Las Posadas. The event attracted 5,000 people...The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People gives to United Farm Workers leader G&ar Chavez its Roy Wilkins Civil Rights Award in a Los Angeles ceremony.
Chavez, still recuperating from his fast this summer, was not present...The Texas District and County Attorneys Association names Bexar County District Attorney Fred Rodriguez to its board of directors... Dallas undercover police officer Lawrence Cadena, 43, is fatally shot in a drug sting operation. Cadena, a 17-year veteran, is the fifth Dallas officer slain last year...Students of RamdnDiaz, a 43-year-old fourth-grade teacher in Bronx, N.Y., and their parents react with tears and disbelief to an apology from Dfaz after he was arraigned on charges of buying drugs...The U.S. Baseball Federation and Oscar Mayer Foods Corp. honor University of Miami freshman pitcher Alex Fem&idez with the 1988 Golden Diamond Amateur Junior Baseball Player of the Year Award. Fernandez was the first first-round pick in professional baseball from high school to bypass the pros since 1979...
â„¢^^^^mKWEEKLYREPORT^â„¢
Hispanic Leaders Welcome End of ‘Reagan Era’
Pointing to a slew of cuts in social service programs made by President Reagan’s administration in the past eight years, national Hispanic organization leaders breathed a collective sigh of relief at the prospect of its conclusion Jan. 20.
According to them, any positive developments over the past eight years were due not to the efforts of the president, but to the resilience of Latinos and to the increasing awareness of their growing numbers.
Noemf Santana, outgoing president of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women, exemplified the anger and frustration most Latino leaders expressed in reviewing the past eight years. "The Reagan administration was callous," she concluded simply.
Santana pointed to cuts in health benefits, housing assistance and education programs. She talked of Latinas and their children comprising the greatest numbers of welfare dependents, the highest share of female-headed households and the lowest earning power.
"Let us hope we’ve hit rock bottom," she said, "and that the only place to go is up."
U.S. Rep. Henry Gonzalez, chairman of the House subcommittee on housing since 1981, said the Reagan impact in that area was "devastating."
The Reagan administration provoked and deepened the housing crisis," said Gonza’lez. "It abandoned a national commitment...that had been there since the 1930s."
According to John Valencia, a housing subcommittee staff person, subsidized housing assistance was cut by 75% over the past eight years and homelessness is estimated to have increased from 1 million persons in 1981 to 3 millon today.
Unlike Hispanic leaders in New York who were interviewed, Gonzalez was not particularly pleased by President-elect George Bush’s Dec. 19 appointment of Jack Kemp (R-N.Y.) as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. "Kemp was a blind partisan in the House...who (as engineer of) supply-side economics was an integral part of (the problem)."
Still, Gonzalez looked forward to working with him. "He can’t be more of a challenge than (outgoing Secretary Samuel) Pierce."
For Latino workers in the civil rights arena, the major concern was the 300 judicial appointments made by Reagan over two terms. Antonia Hernandez, executive director of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, characterized the new occupants
INS Speeds Up Processing of Refugees
jn an effort to speed up the political asylum application process for a mushrooming number of Central American immigrants, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service plans this month to increase the number of INS examiners in South Texas and Miami, it was announced Dec. 14.
Previously, an applicant could be "in limbo" over one year waiting for a decision on asylum, said Texas INS spokesperson Virginia Kice. INS plans to decrease the time frame to 30 days
Procedural changes extend to the limiting of immigrant travel outside points of entry. According to Kice, the crackdown followed an influx of 28,810 Central Americans to Harlingen, Texas, between May 31, 1988, and Dec. 14,
1988. She estimated that half of them went on to Miami, where the backlog in application processing may be as high as 50,000.
Guarione Diaz, president of the Miami-based Cuban American National Council, said, "In a county of 2 million, this is a severe problem." The halt in the flow to Miami has created a problem for the Rio Grande Valley, where an estimated 5,000 Central American refugees are homeless and unemployable while they wait for asylum decisions to be handed down.
Besides directing 20 more ajudicators to Harlingen and opening a special processing center there, said Kice, "We hope in a short period the message will get back to Central America that Harlingen is no longer a free ride."
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
in federal and appellate courts as "conservative, white, young, male ideologues."
"Overall, civil rights laws have been eroded because of them," she said. "You either lose cases or they are watered down...It’s been a travesty."
One after another, Latino leaders or experts in fields such as employment and training, assistance to Salvadoran, Guatemalan and Nicaraguan refugees, education and health or voting rights, described the Reagan legacy as one of despair and disaster.
The sole tribute to Reagan’s initiative was an increased recognition of the Hispanic veteran emanating from his focus on defense, as was pointed out by Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza.
Continued on page 2
Prof. Fasts for Homeless
A part-time Chicano studies instructor in Northern California began the 28th day of a fast he vows to continue until President Reagan encourages the nation’s governors to open their armories to the homeless this winter.
"It’s easy for each state to help the homeless. There’s no significant expense to the taxpayers. The cots are there, the blankets are there, the showers are there," Ruben Botello told Weekly Report Dec. 21. He has lost 27 pounds on a diet of lemonade and a liquid nutrient supplement.
Botello plans to stop fasting when the president complies with his request. If that fails, he will continue until Jan. 20 when George Bush is sworn into office. "If President Reagan wants to ride off into the sunset, he will be dragging me with a noose around my neck," Botello said.
Founder of the year-old American Homeless Society, he holds three degrees, including one in law. Botello and his two sons, ages 9 and 12, were homeless for the second time in five years until he was hired as an instructor at Humboldt State University at in 1987.


N.Y. Regents Pass Sweeping Bilingual Ed. Blueprint
The New York State Board of Regents approved unanimously Dec. 16 in Albany an education blueprint for language-minority children that an official of the National Association for Bilingual Education hailed as being the most sweeping in the nation.
The blueprint "doesn’t treat language-minority kids as inferior, builds upon their skills and sees them as a resource for the entire state," said Jim Lyons, counsel to NABE. "The policy is breathtaking."
Unlike any other state, New York’s regents set educational policy for all public and private elementary, secondary and post-secondary institutions.
According to the state’s bilingual education division director, Carmen Perez, there are
128,000 limited-English-proficient students in New York, 75-80% of whom are Hispanic.
Among several recommendations contained in the blueprint was one which assures the state will encourage all students to become fully bilingual and have knowledge of other cultures.
The proposals in the blueprint will be phased in three stages, said Perez: those that can be done immediately, those with a short-range goal of 1992 and those to be instituted before the turn of the century. Many proposals can be implemented directly by the Board of Regents, while others require legislative action.
"We don’t expect it will be easy, but we see our chances as good because Jose Serrano heads the (House) education committee,"
said Perez. Serrano, said Perez, was formerly a bilingual education teacher.
Perez emphasized several points from the blueprint, among which is one to translate all documents for parents into their native language. Another called for beefed up recruitment of bilingual education teachers, while one stipulated that several accreditation exams be translated.
As a result of the blueprint, the state Education Department must now provide a bilingual education master plan every three years.
"We put in everything we ever wanted (into the blueprint) while being responsible, and it passed intact," said Perez happily. "It’s the most wonderful Christmas present we’ve ever had."
-Felix Petez
Hispanics Weigh the Legacy of Reagan
Continued from page 1
However, there was a beneficial flip side observed since 1981, often the result of the harder times. After listing several negatives, Yzaguirre, said "It’s not (been) completely oblique... (Reagan) forced Hispanic organizations to look closer at the private sector for funding." "For historical reasons, Hispanics took a onedimensional approach... Any solution was seen as a government-driven solution." More recently, he said, new partnerships had been forged with corporate America and small entrepreneurs.
Pedro Viera, president of SER Jobs for Progress, indicated that the 1980s saw increased independence and resourcefulness in the Latino community. "Reagan’s cuts created
Remap Effort Draws Funds
More than $32,000 has been pledged by Los Angeles Hispanic community leaders to pay legal costs for a suit filed against the county alleging discrimination in the way supervisorial districts were drawn up.
The class action suit was brought by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California in August. It is expected to be merged with a Justice Department lawsuit filed in September.
Joe Sanchez, a Mexican American Grocers Association board member who spearheaded the fund-raising, expects to collect nearly $50,000 by the end of January. A $500-a-p!ate breakfast raised $23,000. Other contributions have come from a variety of sources including the Latin Business Association, the state Hispanic Bar Association and state Assemblymen Chuck Calderon and Richard Polanco.
"We need a Hispanic supervisor," said Sanchez. "If we win this suit, everything’s going to change for Hispanics in areas closed to us. We have to show we can raise money for our own."
2
a new movement at the community and grass roots level...Overall we are taking charge in a new way."
Congressman Gonz&lez further illustrated the ironic point. He mentioned that the first congressional hearing on Hispanic housing issues did not occur until Pierce had eliminated funding for the only national Hispanic organization that dealt with housing issues.
It was followed by a major congressional hearing in September 1985, and now Latino experts regularly have input, he said.
Juan Andrade, executive director of the Mid-west/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project, was particularly proud of Hispanic accomplishments over the 80s. He pointed to an increase in Hispanic elected officials in recent years and an "all time high" of Hispanics registered to vote, "despite the Reagan administration," he said.
Finally, several of those interviewed considered greater unity among Latino groups a noteworthy development over the past eight years and often attributed it to necessity brought about by the conservative mood of the country. Said Santana, "Latinos made a special effort to pull together, to combine agendas. " - Darryl Lynette Figueroa
A Fairfax, Va., landscaping company has become the first firm to be convicted of violating the employment provisions of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act. Green Thumb Enterprises pleaded guilty Dec. 19 to filing false affidavits to help 10 Hispanic undocumented aliens qualify for legalization under the act’s Special Agriculture Worker provision.
The firm also admitted it lied about a worker’s qualifications to work in this country and harbored two undocumented workers.
Mariel Talks Result in Little Tangible Change
Miami Auxiliary Bishop Augustin Roman and others hoping to stop the involuntary return of Mariel refugees to Cuba met with Attorney General Richard Thornburgh Dec. 14. The repatriation process was not halted, but Rafael Penalver, Roman’s attorney, said he was optimistic talks with the Justice Department and the State Department would lead to an end to the deportation.'
"This is basically a State Department decision. The State Department has said it just wanted to have the mechanism available (in case) it wants to deport someone," said Penalver who was present at the meeting. Also present was the former president of the American Bar Association, Chesterfield Smith.
Cary Copeland, deputy associate attorney general, said following the meeting that the bishop’s focus was on the humanitarian aspect of the situation. "His concern was also for his parishioners-their worries that people who are not criminals could be deported to Cuba."
Dec. 16 the U.S. Federal District Court of Appeals in Birmingham, Ala., stayed the scheduled deportation of five Marielitos. They are appealing to the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta. The previous day four others had been flown back to the island.
The U.S. Attorney agreed to drop 26 similar charges against the owner of the firm, Gerard Chauvin, and Keith Peterman, an employee, in return for the guilty pleas. An agreement by both sides resulted in a recommendation to the judge that Green Thumb pay a $30,000 penalty instead of the $6.6 million dollars they could be fined.
An employee of the nursery in a separate plea admitted he aided and abetted an undocumented worker. William DeWitt faces a maximum jail term, of six months and a $5,000 fine.
Va. Firm Is First Victim of Sanctions Law
Jan. 2.1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Antonio Mejias-Rentas, guest columnist
Raul’s ‘Street Gallery’
This month Ratil Rodriguez celebrates his 43rd birthday in style. The fact that the Jan. 2 date coincides with the 100th anniversary of the Tournament of Roses Parade - seen by millions of television viewers worldwide - is a twist of fate for a man whose name is synonymous with the pageant that put the city of Pasadena, : Calif., on the map.
To date, Rodriguez has designed more than 200 floats for the parade and won more awards in it than any other designer. In 1988 alone his floats picked up six awards - among them his 11th "Tournament of Roses Sweepstakes" for the most beautiful float and the "Grand Mari’. shal Trophy" for best creative design.
Rodriguez, whose credits include the majestic j: neon facade of the Flamingo Hilton in Las j Vegas, is one of the country’s most sought-after |j "concept designers." To acquaintances he is a J level-headed and hard-working artist who | shuns fame. He acts almost nonchalant.
Rodriguez designed his first Rose Parade float at age 15 - the youngest designer ever to do so - when he won a contest sponsored by the California city of Whittier.
When he completed college, he joined the Army and traveled to Europe and the Far East as part of a graphic arts unit. The time spent in South Korea, Taiwan and Japan, he says, lent a definite Eastern perspective to an already positivist way of thinking.
RODRIGUEZ, ROXY ARE STAPLES j Fourteen years ago Rodriguez tied his destiny to the Tournament of Roses Parade when he took a designing job with the Los Angeles-based firm Fiesta Floats. The media immediately noticed his fancy designs.
| Now he is a free-lancer, contracted by several float construction com-| panies.
Rodriguez and his cockatoo Roxy are as much a staple of the parade j as are his designs. They usually ride on one of his floats as a special gesture toward a favorite client. Look for the man and the bird atop the China Airlines entry Jan. 2 - one of 16 Rodriguez is contributing in 1989. Will the designer ever run out of ideas for his floats? Rodriguez replies with a touch of his Eastern philosophy:
"Everything is hinged to the wonderful minds that have existed in the past. I can take one theme and develop it 10 different ways and make it new again."
PURPOSE? A FEW LITTLE SMILES His experience in the Far East had a stylistic effect on Rodriguez, complementing his own Latin flair for color and brightness. He prefers it when the Rose Parade has a musical theme - as will be the case in 1990 - because it gives him a chance to incorporate more Hispanic elements into some of his floats. Trained in the fine arts, Rodriguez expects someday to show his paintings and drawings in galleries. For now, the streets of Pasadena provide a larger viewing area than any museum.
Rodriguez recalls once being asked on television how he felt working on something "as superfluous" as the Tournament of Roses.
He was flabbergasted. His first reaction was to laugh.
"The interviewer did not account for the number of high school students who put in their Christmas vacations at the float construction sites, or the joy that senior citizens and handicapped (volunteers) receive from their effort, and the countless man-hours behind the scenes."
Least of all, the interviewer did not account for what was to become Rodriguez’s destiny:
"My purpose on this Earth is to put a little smile on a few faces."
Make that a few million faces.
(Antonio Mejias-Rentas writes regularly for Hispanic Link News Service and other publications.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
WHO’S BEEN PAYING ATTENTION? Another year of the fabulous Decade of the Hispanics has faded into the winter’s chill, so it’s time to test your knowledge of what’s been going on. Here are the answers: 2,8,16, 36.
Match them to the questions:
1. How many states had official-English laws or constitutional
amendments at the beginning of the decade?__
2. How many states do now?____
3. How many years has Henry Cisneros been mayor of San
Antonio?____
4. How many days did C6sarCh&vez fast this summer?__
PLAYING PERCENTAGES: Here, based on 1988 news stories and reports, are some percentages to fill in the blanks on the next six lines: 70,18.6,13, 9.4, 6,2.
Hispanics now comprise___% of the U.S. population.
Hispanics make up _____% of the nation’s public school
teachers, and the same percentage of its attorneys.
Latinos are__% of Death Row inmates.
Hispanic women account for___% of all U.S. abortions.
Latinas make up___% of all Hispanic elected officials.
Joining in a historic class-action discrimination suit against the FBI were___% of its Latino agents.
OFFICIAL ENGLISH: The three state initiatives promoting official English won by margins of 1%, 21.2% and 67.4% in
November. Match the percentages with the states: Arizona_,
Colorado____, and Florida__.
BONUS QUESTION: What is the national heritage of Dorothea Montalvo Puente, the Sacramento, Calif., boarding house landlady suspected of murdering seven of her tenants?
WHO’S BEEN PAYING ATTENTION? (ANSWERS): Only Nebraska and Illinois had English as their sole "official language" as the ’80s began. Their statutes had been on the books since 1920 and 1923 respectively. By the end of 1988,16 states claimed English as their only official language. (The media often, and mistakenly, use the figure 17. By virtue of a constitutional amendment passed in 1978, Hawaii recognizes both English and native Hawaiian as official.)
When Henry Cisneros finishes his current term this spring, he will have completed eight years as mayor. C6sarCh£vez fasted for 36 days, and is still suffering effects of the ordeal.
PLAYING PERCENTAGES (ANSWERS): We’re 9.4% of the U.S. population when Puerto Rico’s 3.3 million residents are included. On the mainland, we’re 8.1%, compared with 6.5% in 1980.
We’re 2% of teachers and lawyers (and only 1.9% of newspersons).
Six percent of the inmates on Death Row are Latino.
Latinas account for 13% of women seeking abortions and 18.6% of Hispanic elected officials.
And an incredible 70% of Latino FBI agents joined Bernardo Matt P6re2s successful discrimination action against the bureau.
OFFICIAL ENGLISH (ANSWERS): An official-English proposition barely passed in Arizona (50.5%-49.5%). Constitutional amendments cruised to victory in Colorado (60.6%-39.4%) and Florida (83.7%-16.3%).
BONUS QUESTION (ANSWER): Dorothea’s maiden name was Gray. She picked up Montalvo and Puente from past husbands. She’s not Latina, which gives Northern California Latinos who still shudder at Juan Corona’s deeds one less cross to bear.
-KayBarbaro
Jan. 2,1989
3


COLLECTING
CHICAGO CORPORATE REPRESENTATION: The December issue of The Chicago Reporter includes a four-page article on minority and female representation in Chicago corporations and the corporations’ purchases from minority firms. For a copy send $2.50 (annual subscriptions are $38) to Community Renewal Society, 332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60604 (312) 427-4830.
EEOC INVESTIGATIONS: "Equal Employment Opportunity: EEOC and State Agencies Did Not Fully Investigate Discrimination Charges" is a report by the U.S. General Accounting Office. For a free copy of the report (specify Acc. No. 137043, GAO/HRD-89-11, Oct. 11), write GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877.
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION: "High School Graduates in Entry Level Jobs: What Do Employers Want?" is a two-page synopsis of recent research in the area. For a free copy, send a self-addressed business-size envelope with 250 postage to ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027.
VIDEO ON THE ELDERLY: "Nosotros los viejos: Your Challenge, Your Reward" is a 22-minute video on the views of aging Hispanics with interviews with professionals on the need for more Hispanic gerontologists. For a copy, send $22 to Publications, National Hispanic Council on Aging, 2713 Ontario Road NW, Washington, D.C. 20009.
NEW MAGAZINE: The magazine "Hispanic Today," targeting colleges and universities, begins 10-times-a-year publication with its Decernber/January edition. Subscriptions are $10 annually. Weekly Report readers may receive a free copy of the publication by requesting it from Barbara Diamond, Editor, Hispanic Today, 21757 Devonshire St., Chatsworth, Calif. 91311 (818) 700-2408.
LITERACY REPORT: "Literacy in the Hispanic Community" is a report by the National Council of La Raza which finds that the nation’s literacy programs are too expensive or ignore the needs of Hispanics. To order the report, send $3 to NCLR, 20 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600.
IMMIGRATION IN CALIFORNIA: The Urban Institute has published a four-part policy paper series on the effects on immigration in California. The papers -"U.S. Immigration Policy and the Mexican Economy" (43 pp., $6); "Projected Imbalances Between Labor Supply and Labor Demand in the Caribbean Basin" (70 pp., $7.50); "The Political Adaption of Hispanic Immigrants to the United States" (38 pp., $6); "The Segregation and Residential Assimilation of Immigrants to the United States" (34 pp., $6) - can be ordered through the Library/lnformation Clearinghouse, Urban Institute, P.O. Box 7273, Dept. C, Washington, D.C. 20037.
CONNECTING
RESEARCH CENTER TO CLOSE The Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, a clearinghouse for mental health research on Hispanics based at the University of California at Los Angeles, ran out of funds last month and will close officially in March.
Begun 15 years ago and headed continuously by Amado Padilla, an education professor who recently moved to Stanford University, SSMHRC’s grant was discontinued by the National Institute of Mental Health. NIMH, said Padilla, felt there was no longer a need for the center. Padilla disagreed, saying the center still serves a purpose in the Southwest. There is a center at New York’s Fordham University, but it deals primarily with Puerto Ricans.
SSMHRC will continue to put out its quarterly Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences. Padilla, who will remain the journal’s editor, said anyone interested in subscribing or contributing to the journal should write him at Stanford University, School of Education, Stanford, Calif. 94305.
HOUSING PROJECT BREAKS GROUND El Pueblo Community Redevelopment Corporation, Los Angeles’ first Hispanic non-profit housing developer, broke ground last month on an apartment complex that will house primarily low-income Hispanic families.
The 22-unit Casa Guadalupe Apartments is a $2.4 million project funded by Los Angeles’ Community Redevelopment Agency and the National Equity Fund of the Local Initiatives Support Corp. Casa Guadalupe is El Pueblo’s second housing project. El Pueblo, a subsidiary of the Asociacion Nacional Pro Personas Mayores, was founded in 1985 in an effort to allow the Hispanic community to respond to its own needs.
HOCKEY GOES TO HARLEM A predominantly Hispanic group of 17 boys were treated last month to a Sunday afternoon of hockey in New York’s Central Park with the legendary Wayne Gretzky.
Not a sport that is popular among inner-city youth because of prohibitive costs and a lack of role models, hockey has been taught for free since last winter by a non-profit East Harlem group known as the Upward Fund. The organization’s Hockey in Harlem program has had ice skates, helmets and other equipment donated to it by several corporations. In addition to rink time, the boys must attend a weekly, two-hour session dealing with, among other things, the countries where hockey is popular.
Calendar^____________________________
To Our Readers: To ensure information regarding your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
THREE KINGS PARADE New York Jan. 6
A parade sponsored by El Museo del Barrio is one of the events planned in the city to commemorate the Epiphany. The parade features live camels, donkeys and sheep.
Robert Abramowitz (212) 889-2788 BENEFIT CONCERT New York Jan. 6
The National Puerto Rican Forum will hold a benefit concert at Carnegie Hall featuring singer Danny Rivera. Proceeds will go to NPRF’s Educational Training Centers.
Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311 DIA DE LOS REYES DINNER Immaculata, Pa.. Jan. 7
An evening of Caribbean food and entertainment is planned as part of the celebration of Three Kings Day.
Migdalia Questell (215) 647-4400
COMING SOON
MINORITY STUDENT RETENTION
Ohio State University, Division of Student Affairs
Columbus, Ohio Jan. 10,11
Jan. 2,1989
Carmen Alvarez-Breckenridge (614) 292-2917
PUBLICATIONS CONVENTION
National Association of Hispanic Publications
Las Vegas Jan. 12-14
Eddie Escobedo (703) 384-1514
EDUCATION MEETING American Council on Education San Diego Jan. 18-21 Marlene Ross (202) 939-9410
POLITICAL EMPOWERMENT Union del Barrio Riverside, Calif. Jan. 20 Juan Castellanos (619) 233-7279
ENGINEERING CAREER CONFERENCE Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles Feb. 10,11 Dulce Cordero (213) 725-3970
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
CHAIR
Department of Management/Marketing Southwest Texas State University
POSITION - The university is seeking a well-qualified, energetic individual to chair the Department of Management/Marketing at Southwest Texas State University.
QUALIFICATIONS - Applicants must have a doctorate in management or marketing and a minimum of 5 years of full-time teaching experience. A commitment to scholarly research, service and professional activity is expected. Administrative experience is desirable.
RESPONSIBILITIES - Program and curriculum development at both the undergraduate and graduate level; faculty recruitment and evaluation; fostering relationships with the profession and the community.
RANK/SALARY - Full Professor - $62,904; Associate Professor - $59,884. Salary is for 12-month appointment.
DEPARTMENT/UNIVERSITY - One of four departments in the School of Business. The department has 22 FTE faculty and approximately 600 declared majors at the junior/senior level. The University has an enrollment of over 20,000 students.
APPLICATIONS - Send Vita, three letters of recommendation, and doctoral transcript by FEBRUARY 15, 1989 to: Dr. Mary Ann Stutts, Chair of Search Committee, Department of Management/Marketing, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666.
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO
PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Tenure track Assistant Professor in any of the following areas: Applied Clinical, Industrial/Organizational, Experimental Social Psychology. Ph.D. in Psychology required and proven record of research essential. Research interests in bilingual/bicultural context desirable as person chosen will assist in planning a possible doctoral program in Psychology with cross-culture emphasis.
Send vita, reprints of published articles, and three letters of reference to: Dr. Donald Moss, Chair, Applied Psychology, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968-0553.
Deadline for applications is 04-15-89 or until position is filled. The University is an EEO/AA employer.
PRODUCT MANAGER
The California State Lottery is currently recruiting for qualified product managers.
Just over three years old, the California Lottery will sell over $2.5 billion tickets this year with two successful products, Lotto, and seven Scratcher games per year. These are just the beginning of a comprehensive product line designed to sustain steady annual revenue increases for our beneficiary, California’s public education system.
We need experienced product managers to coordinate the consumer marketing of each of these products, championing their long term growth, playership goals, and marketing plans and budget. The California Lottery’s Marketing Division works with two advertising agencies, one P.R. agency, and has a comprehensive consumer research program already in place.
We are looking for the following minimum qualifications: Three years of progressively responsible consumer marketing management experience, and a Bachelor’s degree, preferably with a specialization in Marketing or closely related technical area OR
Two years of progressively responsible consumer marketing management experience, and a Master’s degree in Business Administration.
The salary range for this position is $36,132-$43,596 annually, in addition to an excellent benefits package.
The position is based in Sacramento, California, which has an outstanding quality of life and very reasonable cost of living. Send resume with salary history (or California State Application Form 678) to:
California State Lottery Personnel Office P.O. Box 1359 Broderick, CA 95605-1359
All applications must be received by January 13.1989. Applicants meeting minimum qualifications will be interviewed for Civil Service eligibility as a Marketing Specialist I, during March/April 1969. The State of California is an Affirmative Action employer—equal opportunity to all regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, ancestry, sex, marital status, disability, religious or political affiliation, age or sexual orientation.
DIRECTOR OF
THE PROGRAM IN HISPANIC AMERICAN HISTORY THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY
The National Museum of American History is seeking candidates for the position of Director of the Program in Hispanic American History (GS-1001- 12, $33,218). The program provides museum visitors with an opportunity to learn about the history and culture of Hispanic peoples in the United States through lectures, seminars, writings, performances, recordings and audiovisual products.
Qualifications: Three years of general experience (knowledge of the principles of organization, management and administration). Three years of specialized experience (administrative, program, or managerial experience in a type of work related to this position). Ability to speak, read, and write in Spanish fluently. Knowledge of the history and culture of the various aspects of Hispanic American life in the United States with emphasis on traditional culture. Knowledge of research methods. Knowledge of complex organizations and administra-tive/functional requirements of large museums, cultural organizations and educational institutions.
Candidate should submit form SF-171, form SI-622, and a copy of his/her most recent performance appraisal to the Office of Personnel Administration, Arts & Industries Building, Room 1410, 900 Jefferson Drive, SW, Washington, D.C. 20560. Candidate may write for job announcement (88- 473-F) to Harold Closter, Department of Public Programs, National Museum of American History, 14th & Constitution, Room 5101, Washington, D.C. 20560.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in the Weekly Report mailed Friday of the same week.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Jan. 2,1989
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Arts & Entertainment
TALENT ON PARADE: Puerto Rican singer Danny Rivera will perform at a special Three Kings Day concert at New York’s Carnegie Hall. Rivera has just completed work on his first film role, East Side Story, in which he plays the father of a young rock and roll performer. Rivera’s Jan. 6 concert is a fund-raiser for the literacy program of the National Puerto Rican Forum.
Chicano actor Edward James Olmos takes a break from his Miami Vice duties this month to prepare to direct two feature films. He will star in and direct American Me (for Universal Pictures), a drama about a Latino criminal. Sean Penn is expected to be the lead in his Blood In, Blood Out (New Visions).
DOUBLETAKE: Actor Richard Yniguez rescinded his decision to resign as president of the Nosotros organization, as reported here last month. He made the surprise announcement in December.
In a related item, actor Victor Contreras has assumed the presidency j of the Hollywood chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, a post vacated by Alex Nogales. The organization plans elections in February to fill existing vacancies on its board of directors.
ART & FILM: Mira! The Canadian Club Hispanic Art Tour III is on view at Chicago’s Terra Museum of Art through Jan. 28...An exhibition of paintings and drawings by late fashion illustrator Antonio is on view at New York’s F.I.T. Gallery through Jan. 29...Folklore! Traditional Crafts from Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico Made In New York, presented by the Association of Hispanic Arts and New York’s El Museo del Barrio, continues until Feb. 19 at El Museo...The works of major directors and movements in Spanish cinema have been on view at a five-week film series at New York’s Museum of Modern Arts. The series, titled Images in the Shadows: A Brief History of Spanish Cinema, runs through Jan. 23. It emphasizes works from the ’40s, '50s and ’60s
-Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
FELLOWSHIPS: Harvard University is accepting applications through Jan. 31 from journalists with at least three years experience for its Nieman Fellowship program. Winners receive a $22,000 stipend and tuition for one year. Contact: Program Officer, Nieman Foundation, Walter Lippmann House, 1 Francis Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 02138 (617) 495-2237...The Michigan Journalism Fellows program seeks applications through Feb. 1 from journalists, photographers and documentary film-makers with at least five years experience. Recipients receive tuition, plus a $2,750 monthly stipend to pursue research of a chosen subject during the 1989-90 academic year. Contact: Charles Eisendrath, Michigan Journalism Fellows, 2072 Frieze Bldg. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48109 (313) 763-2400...Stanford University invites journalists with seven years of experience or more to apply for the John S. Knight Fellowship. Winners receive a $25,000 stipend, plus tuition for one year. Contact: John S. Knight Fellow-
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas. Darryl Lynette Figueroa Sophia Nieves.
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ships, Department of Communication, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. 94305 (415) 723-4937.
TRAINING PROGRAMS: The University of South Carolina is accepting applications through Feb. 1 for its minority newspaper workshop. Residents, workers or senior college students in Florida, Georgia or North and South Carolina are trained as reporters, copy editors and layout and design artists. Participants are then placed with a newspaper in one of the four states. Contact: Director, Southeastern Minority Newspaper Workshop, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C. 29208 (803)777-5166...The American Newspaper Publishers Association is accepting applications through Jan. 18 from minority newspaper managers or would-be managers. AN PA will sponsor 13 management training seminars from February through May 1989. The organization covers travel, hotel and registration expenses for the winners. Contact: Ardis Pruess, ANPA Foundation, The Newspaper Center, Box 17407 Dulles Airport, Washington, D.C. 20041 (703) 648-1000...The American Association of Advertising Agen-
cies sponsors a summer internship program for minority juniors, seniors or graduate students interested in advertising careers. Deadline is Jan. 31. Winners are placed with agencies in Chicago, New York, San Francis- J co, Los Angeles and Detroit. Contact Michelle Tomeo, AAAA, 666Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017 (212)682-2500.
SE HABLA ESPANOL AWARDS: The Los Angeles-based Agenda de Ocorci & Asociados was the recipient of an award of excellence from Hispanic Business magazine for its "No Se QuedeAtras" print ad created for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
Forty-one awards were presented by the magazine last month at its SeHabla Espahol media and marketing conference in New York. Among the winners were:
Sosa & Associates, headquartered in San Antonio, for its AIDS awareness TV campaign created for the Centers for Disease Control.
Zubi Advertising Services in Miami won a merit award for its"Leeme, Yo Soy Nuevo" print ad created for El Nuevo Herald newspaper.
-Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Jan. 2, 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Chavez, still recuperating from his fast this summer, was not present. .. The Texas District and County Attorneys Association names Bexar County District Attorney Fred Rodriguez to its board of direc tors ... Dallas undercover police officer Lawrence Cadena, 43, is fatally shot in a drug sting operation. Cadena, a 17 -year veteran, is the fifth Dallas officer slain last year ... Students of Ram6n0iaz, a 43-year-old fourth-grade teacher in Bronx, N.Y., and their parents react with tears and disbelief to an apology from Dfaz after he was arraigned on char ges of buying drugs ... The U.S. Baseball Federation and Oscar Mayer Foods Corp. honor University of Miami freshman pitcher Alex Fernandez with the 1988 Golden Diamond Amateur Junior Baseball Player of the Year Award. Fernandez was the first first-round pick in professional baseball from high school to bypass the pros since 1979 ... Officials from the transition team of President-elect George Bush say that Federal Communications Commissioner Patricia Diaz Dennis, a Democrat, is one of the top candidates for the post of secretary of the Department of Labor ... San Antonio Archbishop Patricio Flores leads hundreds of choir members and several actors on the city's River Walk in a re-enactment of Joseph and Mary's search for shelter and a place to give birth to JesUs, a rite more popularly known as Las Posadas. The event attracted 5,000 people ... The National Association for the Advan cement of Colored People gives to United Farm Workers leader cesaOl{r.ez its Roy Wilkins Civil Rights Award in a Los Angeles ceremony. vot7No.11 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Jan.2,1989 Hispanic Leaders Welcome End of 'Reagan Era' Pointing to a slew of cuts in social service programs made by President Reagan's ad ministration in the past eight years, national Hispanic organization leaders breathed a col lective sigh of relief at the prospect of its con clusion Jan. 20. According to them, any positive develop ments over the past eight years were due not to the efforts of the president, but to the resilience of Latinos and to the increasing awareness of their growing numbers. NoemfSantana, outgoing president of the Na tional Conference of Puerto Rican Women, ex emplified the anger and frustration most Latino leaders expressed in reviewing the past eight years. "The Reagan administration was cal lous," she concluded simply. Santana pointed to cuts in health benefits, housing assistance and education programs. She talked of Latinas and their children com prising the greatest numbers of welfare de pendents, the highest share of female-headed households and the lowest earning power. "Let us hope we've hit rock bottom," she said, " and that the only place to go is up." U.S. Rep. Henry Gonzalez, chairman of the House subcommittee on housing . since 1981, said the Reagan impact in that area was "devastating." The Reagan administration provoked and deepened the housing crisis," said Gonza'lez. "It abandoned a national commitment. .. that had been . there since the 1930s." According to John Valencia, a housing sub committee staff person, subsidized housing assistance was cut by 75% over the past eight years and homelessness is estimated to have increased from 1 million persons in 1981 to 3 millon today. Unlike Hispanic leaders in New York who were interviewed, Gonzalez was not particularly pleased by President-elect George Bush's Dec. 19 appointment of Jack Kemp (R-N.Y.) as Secretary of Housing and Urban Develop ment. "Kemp was a blind partisan in the House ... who (as engineer of) supply-side economics was an integral part of (the problem)." Still, Gonzalez looked forward to working with him. "He can't be more of a challenge than (outgoing Secretary Samuel) Pierce." For Latino workers in the civil rights arena, the major concern was the 300 judicial ap pointments made by Reagan over two terms. Antonia Hernandez, executive director of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educa tional Fund, characterized the new occupants INS Speeds Up Processing of Refugees In an effort to speed up the political asylum application process for a mushrooming num ber of Central American immigrants, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service plans this month to increase the number of INS ex aminers in South Texas and Miami, it was an nounced Dec. 14. Previously, an applicant could be "in limbo" over one year waiting for a decision on asylum, said Texas INS spokesperson Virginia Kice. INS plans to decrease the time frame to 30 days Procedural changes extend to the limiting of immigrant travel outside points of entry. Ac cording to Kice, the crackdown followed an in flux of 28,81 0 Central Americans to Harlingen, Texas, between May 31, 1988, and Dec . 14, 1988. She estimated that half of them went on to Miami, where the backlog in application processing may be as high as 50,000. Guarione Dfaz, president of the Miami-based Cuban American National Council, said, "In a county of 2 million, this is a severe problem." The halt in the flow to Miami has created a problem for the Rio Grande Valley, where an estimated 5,000 Central American refugees are homeless and unemployable while they wait for asylum decisions to be handed down. Besides directing 20 more ajudicators to Har lingen and opening a special processing cen ter there, said Kice, "We hope in a short period the message will get back to Central America that Harlingen is no longer a free ride." -Darryl Lynette Figueroa in federal and appellate courts as "co.oserv_a tive, white, young, male ideologues." "Overall, civil rights laws have been eroded because of them," she said. "You either lose cases or they are watered down ... lt's been a travesty." One after another, Latino leaders or experts in fields such as employment and training, as sistance to Salvadoran, Guatemalan and Nicaraguan refugees, education and health or voting rights, described the Reagan legacy as one of despair and disaster. The sole tribute to Reagan's initiative was an increased recognition of the Hispanic veteran emanating from his focus on defense, as was pointed out by Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza. Continued on page 2 Prof. Fasts for Homeless A part-time Chicano studies instructor in Northern California began the 28th day of a fast he vows to continue until President Reagan encourages the nation's gover nors to open their armories to the home less this winter. "It's easy for each state to help the home less. There's no significant expense to the taxpayers. The cots are there, the blankets are there, the showers are there, " Ruben Botello told Weekly Report Dec. 21. He has lost 27 pounds on a diet of lemonade and a liquid nutrient supplement. Botello plans to stop fasting when the president complies with his request. If that fails, he will continue until Jan. 20 when George Bush is sworn into office. "If Presi dent Reagan wants to ride off into the sunset, he will be dragging me with a noose around my neck," Botello said. Founder of the year-old American Home less Society, he holds three degrees, in cluding one in law. Botello and his two sons, ages 9 and 12, were homeless for the second time in five years until he was hired as an instructor at Humboldt State University at in 1987.

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N.Y. Regents Pass Sweeping Bilingual Ed. Blueprint The New York State Board of Regents ap128,000 limited-English-proficient students in said Perez. Serrano, said Perez, was formerly a proved unanimously Dec. 16 in Albany an New York, 75-80% of whom are Hispanic. bilingual education teacher. education blueprint for language-minority Among several recommendations conPerez emphasized several points from the Children that an. official of the National Astained in the blueprint was one which assures blueprint, among which is one to translate all soc1at1on for Bilingual Education hailed as the state will encourage all students to bedocuments for parents into their native ian being the most sweeping in the nation. come fully bilingual and have knowledge of guage. Another called for beefed up recruit-The blueprint "doesn't treat languageother cultures. ment of bilingual education teachers, while minority kids as inferior, builds upon their The proposals in the blueprint will be phased one stipulated that several accreditation skills and sees them as a resource for the en-in three stages, said Perez: those that can be exams be translated. tire state," said Jim Lyons, counsel to NABE. done immediately, those with a short-range As a result of the blueprint, the state Educa "The policy is breathtaking." goal of 1992 and those to be instituted before tion Department must now provide a bilingual the turn of the century. Many proposals can education master plan every three years. Unlike any other state, New York's regents set educational policy for all public and private elementary, secondary and post-secondary institutions. be implemented directly by the Board of "We put in everything we ever wanted (into Regents, while others require legislative acthe blueprint) while being responsible, and it lion. passed intact," said Perez happily. " It's the "We don't expect it will be easy, but we see most wonderful Christmas present we've According to the state's bilin9ual education our chances as good because Jose Serrano ever had." diVISIOn director, Carmen Perez, there are heads the (House) education committee," -Feti>
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Antonio Mejias-Rentas, guest columnist Raul's 'Street Gallery' This month Raul Rodriguez celebrates his 43rd birthday in style. The fact that the Jan. 2 date coincides with the 1 OOth anniver sary of the Tournament of Roses Parade seen by millions of television viewers worldwide is a twist of fate for a man whose name is synonymous with the pageant that put the city of Pasadena, Cali f . , on the map. To date, Rodriguez has designed more than 200 floats for the parade and won more awards in it than any other designer. In 1988 alone his floats picked up six awards among them his 11th "Tournament of Roses Sweepstakes" for the most beautiful float and the "Grand Mar shal Trophy " for best creative design. Rodriguez, whose credits include the majestic neon facade of the Flamingo Hilton in Las Vegas , is one of the country's most sought-after " concept designers." To acquaintances he is a level-headed and hard-working artist who shuns fame. He acts almost nonchalant. Rodriguez designed his first Rose Parade float \ at age 15-the youngest designer ever to do so when he won a contest sponsored by the California city of Whittier. When he completed college, he joined the Army and traveled to Europe and the Far East as part of a graphic arts unit. The time spent in South Korea, Taiwan and Japan, he says, lent a definite Eastern perspective to an already positivist way of thinking. RODRIGUEZ, ROXY ARE STAPLES Fourteen years ago Rodriguez tied his destiny to the Tournament of Roses Parade when he took a designing job with the Los Angeles based firm Fiesta Floats. The media immediately noticed his fancy design s . Now he is a free-lancer , contracted by several float construction com p anies. Rodriguez and his cockatoo Roxy are as much a staple of the parade as are his designs. They usually ride on one of his floats as a special gesture toward a favorite client. Look for the man and the bird atop the China Airlines entry Jan. 2-one of 16 Rodriguez is contributing in 1989 . Will the designer ever run out of ideas for his floats? Rodriguez replies w ith a touch of his Eastern philosophy: " Everything is hinged to the wonderful minds that have existed in the past. I can take one theme and develop it 10 different ways and make i t ne w again." PURPOSE? A FEW LITTLE SMILES His experience in the Far East had a stylistic effect on Rodriguez, com plementing his own Latin flair for color and brightness. He prefers it when the Rose Parade has a musical theme as will be the case in 1990because it gives him a chance to incorporate more Hispanic ele ments into some of his floats. Trained in the fine arts, Rodriguez ex pects someday to show his paintings and drawings in galleries. For now, the streets of Pasadena provide a larger viewing area than any museum. Rodriguez recalls once being asked on television how he felt working on something "as superfluous" as the Tournament of Roses. He was flabbergasted. His first reaction was to laugh. "The interviewer did not account for the number of high school stu dents who put in their Christmas vacations at the float construction site s , or the joy that senior citizens and handicapped (volunteers) r e cei ve from their effort, and the countless man-hours behind the s cenes. " Least of all, the interviewer did not account for what was to become R o driguez's destiny: "My purpose on this Earth is to put a little smile on a few faces. ' Make that a few million faces . {Antonio Mejias-Rentas writes regularly for Hispanic Link News Ser vice and other publications.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua WHO'S BEEN PAYING ATTENTION? Another year of the fabulous Decade of the Hispanics has faded into the winter ' s chill, so it's time to test your knowledge of what ' s been going on. Here are the answers: 2, 8, 16, 36. Match them to the questions: 1. How many states had official-English laws or constitutional amendments at the beginning of the decade? _ 2. How many states do now? _ 3. How many years has Henry Cisneros been mayor of San Antonio? 4. How ;:;;;;;;,y days did Cl!sarChavez fast this summer? _ PLAYING PERCENTAGES: Here, based on 1988 news stories and reports, are some percentages to fill in the blanks on the next six lines: 70, 18.6, 13, 9.4, 6, 2. Hispanics now comprise_% of the U.S. population. Hispanics make up _% of the nation ' s public school teachers, and the same percentage of its attorneys. Latinos are_% of Death Row inmates. Hispanic women account for_% of all U.S . abortions. Latinas make up_% of all Hispanic elected officials . Joining in a historic class-action discrimination suit against the FBI were_% of its Latino agents. OFFICIAL ENGLISH: The three state initiatives promoting of ficial English won by margins of 1%, 21.2% and 67.4% in November. Match the percentages with the states: Arizona_, Colorado_, and Florida_. BONUS QUESTION: What is the national heritage of Dorothea Montalvo Puente, the Sacramento , Calif., boarding house landlady suspected of murdering seven of her tenants? WHO'S BEEN PAYING ATTENTION? (ANSWERS): Only Nebraska and Illinois had English as their sole "official lan guage " as the '80s began . Their statutes had been on the books since 1920 and 1923 respectively . By the end of 1988, 16 states claimed English as their only official language . (The media often, and mistakenly, use the figure 17. By virtue of a constitu tional amendment passed in 1978, Hawaii recognizes both English and native Hawaiian as official.) When Henry Cisneros finishes his current term this spring, he will have completed eight years as mayor. cesarChl!vez fasted for 36 days, and is still suffering effects of the ordeal. PLAYING PERCENTAGES (ANSWERS): We're 9.4% of the U.S. population when Puerto Rico's 3.3 million residents are in cluded . On the mainland , we're 8.1 %, compared with 6.5% in 1980 . We're 2% of teachers and lawyers (and only 1.9% of newsper sons). Six percent of the inmates on Death Row are Latino. Latinas account for 13% of women seeking abortions and 18.6% of Hispanic elected officials . And an incredible 70% of Latino FBI agents joined Bernardo Matt Perez's successful discrimination action against the bureau. OFFICIAL ENGLISH (ANSWERS): An official-English proposition barely passed in Arizona (50 . 5%-49.5%) . Constitu tional amendments cruised to victory in Colorado (60 . 6%39.4%) and Florida (83.7%-16.3%). BONUS QUESTION (ANSWER): Dorothea's maiden name was Gray. She picked up Montalvo and Puente from past hus bands . She's not Latina, which gives Northern California Latinos who still shudder at Juan Corona ' s deeds one less cross to bear. -Kay Barbaro His p anic Link W eekly Report Jan. 2 , 1969

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COLLECTING CHICAGO CORPORATE REPRESENTATION: The December issue of The Chicago Reporter includes a four-page article on minority and female representation in Chicago corporations and the corporations' purchases from minority firms. For a copy send $2.50 (annual subscriptions are $38) to Community Renewal Society, 332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60604 (312) 427-4830. EEOC INVESTIGATIONS: "Equal Employment Opportunity: EEOC and State Agencies Did Not Fully Investigate Discrimination Charges" is a report by the U.S. General Accounting Office. For a free copy of the report (specify Ace. No. 137043, GAO/HRD-89-11, Oct.11), write GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877. VOCATIONAL EDUCATION: "High School Graduates in Entry Level Jobs: What Do Employers Want?" is a two-page synopsis of recent research in the area. For a free copy, send a self-addressed business size envelope with 25 postage to ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027. VIDEO ON THE ELDERLY: "Nosotros los viejos: Your Challenge, Your Reward" is a 22-minute video on the views of aging Hispanics with interviews with professionals on the need for more Hispanic geron tologists. For a copy, send $22 to Publications, National Hispanic Council on Aging, 2713 Ontario Road NW, Washington, D.C. 20009. NEW MAGAZINE: The magazine "Hispanic Today," targeting col leges and universities, begins 1 0-times-a-year publication with its December/January edition. Subscriptions are $10 annually. Weekly Report readers may receive a free copy of the publication by requesting it from Barbara Diamond, Editor, Hispanic Today, 21757 Devon shire St., Chatsworth, Calif. 91311 (818) 700-2408. LITERACY REPORT: "Literacy in the Hispanic Community" is a report by the National Council of La Raza which finds that the nation's literacy programs are too expensive or ignore the needs of Hispanics. To order the report, send $3 to NCLR, 20 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. IMMIGRATION IN CALIFORNIA: The Urban Institute has published a four-part policy paper series on the effects on immigration in California. The papers -"U.S. Immigration Policy and the Mexican Economy" (43 pp., $6); "Projected Imbalances Between Labor Supply and Labor Demand in the Caribbean Basin" (70 pp., $7.50); "The Political Adap tion of Hispanic Immigrants to the United States" (38 pp., $6); "The Segregation and Residential Assimilation of Immigrants to the United States" (34 pp., $6) can be ordered through the Library/Information Clearinghouse, Urban Institute, P.O. Box 7273, Dept. C, Washington, D.C. 20037. CONNECTING RESEARCH CENTER TO CLOSE The Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, a clearinghouse for mental health research on Hispanics based at the University of California at Los Angeles, ran out of funds last month and will close officially in March. Begun 15 years ago and headed continuously by Amado Padi lla, an education professor who recently moved to Stanford University, SSMHRC's grant was discontinued by the National In stitute of Mental Health. NIMH, said Padilla, felt there was no longer a need for the center. Padilla disagreed, saying the center still serves a purpose in the Southwest. There is a center at New York's Fordham University, but it deals primarily with Puerto Ricans. SSMHRC will continue to put out its quarterly Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences. Padilla, who will remain the journal's editor, said anyone interested in subscribing or contributing to the journal should write him at Stanford University, School of Educa tion, Stanford, Calif. 94305. HOUSING PROJECT BREAKS GROUND El Pueblo Community Redevelopment Corporation, Los Angeles' first Hispanic non-profit housing developer, broke ground last month on an apartment complex that will house primarily low-income Hispanic families. The 22-unit Casa Guadalupe Apartments is a $2.4 million project funded by Los Angeles' Community Redevelopment Agency and the National Equity Fund of the Local Initiatives Support Corp. Casa Guadalupe is El Pueblo's second housing project. El Pueblo, a subsidiary of the Asociaci6n Nacional Pro Personas Mayores, was founded in 1985 in an effort to allow the Hispanic community to respond to its own needs. HOCKEY GOES TO HARLEM A predominantly Hispanic group of 17 boys were treated last month to a Sunday afternoon of hockey in New York's Central Park with the legendary Wayne Gretzky. Not a sport that is popular among inner-city youth because of prohibitive costs and a lack of role models, hockey has been taught for free since last winter by a non-profit East Harlem group known as the Upward Fund. The organization's Hockey in Harlem program has had ice skates, helmets and other equipment donated to it by several corporations. In addition to rink time, the boys must attend a weekly, two-hour session dealing with, among other things, the countries where hockey is popular. Calendar Robert Abramowitz (212) 889-2788 BENEFIT CONCERT Carmen Alvarez-Breckenridge (614) 292-2917 PUBLICATIONS CONVENTION To Our Readers: To ensure information regarding your organization's upcoming event will be in cluded in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. THIS WEEK THREE KINGS PARADE New York Jan. 6 A parade sponsored by El Museo del Barrio is one of the events planned in the city to commemorate the Epiphany. The parade features live camels, donkeys and sheep. 4 New York Jan. 6 The National Puerto Rican Forum will hold a benefit concert at Carnegie Hall featuring singer Danny Rivera. Proceeds will go to NPRF's Educational Training Centers. Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311 DIA DE LOS REYES DINNER Immaculata, Pa .. Jan. 7 An evening of Caribbean food and entertainment is planned as part of the celebration of Three Kings Day. Migdalia Questell (215) 647-4400 COMING SOON MINORITY STUDENT RETENTION Ohio State University, Division of Student Affairs Columbus, Ohio Jan. 10, 11 Jan. 2, 1989 National Association of Hispanic Publications Las Vegas Jan. 12-14 Eddie Escobedo (703) 384-1514 EDUCATION MEETING American Council on Education San Diego Jan. 18-21 Marlene Ross (202) 939-941 0 POLITICAL EMPOWERMENT Union del Barrio Riverside, Calif. Jan. 20 Juan Castellanos (619) 233-7279 ENGINEERING CAREER CONFERENCE Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles Feb. 1 0, 11 Dulce Cordero (213) 725-3970 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS CHAIR Department of Management/Marketing Southwest Texas State University POSITION The university is seeking a well-qualified, energetic individual to chair the Department of ManagemenVMarketing at Southwest Texas State University. QUALIFICATIONS Applicants must have a doctorate in management or marketing and a minimum of 5 years of full-time teaching experience. A commitment to scholarly research, service and prof e ssional activity is expected. Administrative experience is desirable. RESPONSIBILITIES Program and curriculum development at both the undergraduate and graduate level; faculty recruitment and evaluation; fostering relationships with the profession and the com munity. RANK/SALARY Full Professor-$62,904; Associate Professor $59,884. Salary is for 12-month appointment. DEPARTMENT/UNIVERSITY One of four departments in the School of Business. The department has 22 FTE faculty and ap proximately 600 declared majors at the junior/senior level. The University has an enrollment of over 20,000 students. APPLICATIONS Send Vita, three letters of recommendation, and doctoral transcript by FEBRUARY 15, 1989 to: Dr . Mary Ann Stutts, Chair of Search Committee, Department of Manage ment/Marketing, Southwest Texas State University , San Marcos, Texas 78666. UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT Tenure track Assistant Professor in any of the following areas: Applied Clinical, Industrial / Organizational, Experimental Social Psychology . Ph.D. in Psychology required and proven record of research essential. Research interests in bilingual/bicultural context desirable as person chosen will assist in planning a possible doctoral program in Psychology with cross-culture emphasis. Send vita, reprints of published articles, and three letters of reference to: Dr. Donald Moss, Chair, Applied Psychology, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968-0553. Deadline for applications is 04-15-89 or until position is filled . The University is an EEO/AA employer. DIRECTOR OF PRODUCT MANAGER The California State Lottery is currently recruiting for qualified product managers. Just over three years old, the California Lottery will sell over $2.5 billion tickets this year with two successful products, Lotto, and seven Scratcher games per year. These are just the beginning of a comprehensive prod uct line designed to sustain steady annual revenue increases for our beneficiary, California's public educa tion system. We need experienced product managers to coordi nate the consumer marketing of each of these products, championing their long term growth, playership goals, and marketing plans and budget. The California Lottery's Marketing Division works with two advertising agencies, one PR. agency, and has a comprehensive consumer research program already in place. We are looking for the following minimum qualifications: Three years of progressively responsible con sumer marketing management experience, and a Bachelor's degree, preferably with a specialization in Marketing or closely related technical area. OR Two years of progressively responsible consumer marketing management experience, and a Master's degree in Business Administration. The salary range for this position is annually, in addition to an excellent benefits package. The position is based in Sacramento, California, which has an outstanding quality of life and very reasonable cost of living. Send resume with salary history (or California State Application Form 678) to: California State Lottery Personnel Office P.O. Box 1359 Broderick, CA 95605-1359 Speci alist!, during The State of Catiforma is an All1rmative Action employer-equal o pportunity to all re9ardless of. race. color, creed, national ori!;Jm. sex, marital status, diSability, religious or politiCal alfillation. age or sexual orientation. THE PROGRAM IN HISPANIC AMERICAN HISTORY THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY No other publication or system Jets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: The National Museum of American History is seeking candidates for the position of Director of the Program in Hispanic American History (GS-100112, $33,218). The program provides museum visitors with an opportunity to Jearn about the history and culture of Hispanic peoples in the United States through lectures, seminars, writings, performances, recordings and. audiovisual products. Qualifications: Three years of general experience (knowledge of the principles of organiza tion, management and administration). Three years of specialized experience (administra tive, program, or managerial experience in a type of work related to this position). Ability to speak, read, and write in Spanish fluently. Knowledge of the history and culture of the various aspects of Hispanic American life in the United States with emphasis on traditional culture. Knowledge of research methods . Knowledge of complex organizations and administra tive/functional requirements of large museums, cultural organizations and educational institu tions. Candidate should submit form SF-171, form Sl-622, and a copy of his/her most recent per formance appraisal to the Office of Personnel Administration, Arts & Industries Building , Room 1410 , 900 Jefferson Drive, SW, Washington, D.C. 20560. Candidate may write for job an nouncement (88473-F) to Harold Closter, Department of Public Programs, National Museum of American History , 14th & Constitution, Room 5101, Washington, D.C . 20560. Hispanic Link Weekty Report Jan. 2. 1989 Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in the Weekly Report mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state &zipcodecountas2 words; telephone number, 1 word) . Multiple use rates on request. . DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: Ads with borders , varied type sizes $45 per column inch . .

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Arts & Entertainment TALENT ON PARADE: Puerto Rican si nger Danny Rivera will form at a s pecial Three Kings Day concert at New York 's Carnegie Hall. Rivera has just completed work on his first film role , East Side Story , in wh;ch he plays the father of a young rock and roll performer. Rivera ' s Jan. 6 concert is a fund-raiser for the literacy program of the Nat i onal Puert o Rican Fo rum. In a related item , actor Vi c tor Contreras has assumed the pre s idency of the Hollywood chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, a post vacated by Alex Nogales . The organization plans elections in February to fill existing vacancies on its board of directors . ART & FILM: Mira! The Canadian Club Hispanic Art T o ur Ill is o n view at Chicago ' s Terra Museum of Art through Jan . 28 ... An exhibition of paintings and drawings by late fashion illustrator Antonio is on view at New York ' s F.I.T. Gallery through Jan . 29 .. .Folklore! Traditional Crafts from Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico Made In New York, presented by the Association of Hispanic Arts and New York's El Museo del Barrio, continues until Feb. 19 at El Museo .. .The works of major directors and movements in Spanish cinema have been on view at a five-week film series at New York's Museum of Modern Arts . The series, titled Images in the Shadows: A Brief History of Spanish Cinema, runs through Jan. 23 . It emphasizes works from the '40s, '50s and '60s Chicano actor Edward James Olmos takes a break from his Miami Vice duties this month to prepare to direct two feature films. He will star in and direct American Me (for Universal Pictures), a drama about a Latino criminal. Sean Penn is expected to be the lead in his Blood In, Blood Out (New Visions). DOUBLETAKE: Actor Richard Yniguez rescinded his decision t resign as president of the Nosotros organization , as reported here last month . He made the surprise announcement in December . Media Report FELLOWSHIPS : Harvard University is ac cept ing appl i cat ion s through Jan. 31 from jour nalists with at least three years experience for its Nieman Fellow s hip program. Winners receive a $22,000 s tipend and tuition for one year. Contact: Program Officer, Nieman Foun dation , Walter Lippmann House , 1 Francis Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 02138 (617) 4952237 ... The Michigan Journalism Fellows program seeks applications through Feb . 1 from journalists , photographers and documen tary film-makers with at least five years ex perience . Recipients receive tuition , plus a $2,750 monthly stipend to pursue research of a chosen subject during the 1989-90 academic yea r . Contact: Charles Eisendrath, Michigan Journalism Fellows , 2072 Frieze Bldg. Univer sity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 481 09 (313) 763-2400 ... Stanford University invites jour nalists with seven years of experience or more to apply for the John S . Knight Fellowship. Winners receive a $25,000 stipend, plus tuition for one year. Contact: John S. Knight Fellow-HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication o f Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washingt.on, D . C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publisher: H ec tor Eri c k sen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Report i ng : Antonio Mej ias-Rentas. Darryl Lynette Ftgueroa Sophia N1eves . No portio n o f H i span i c Link Week l y Report m a y be reproduced or broadcast i n any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal ' $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 ships , Department of Communication , Stan ford University , Stanford , Calif . 94305 (415) 723-4937. TRAINING PROGRAMS : The Unive rsity of SouH; Carolina is accepting applications through Feb. 1 for its minority newspaper workshop. Residents, workers or senior col lege s tudents in Florida, Georgia or North and South Carolina are trained as reporters, copy editors and layout and design artists. Par ticipants are then placed with a newspaper in one of the four states. Contact: D i rector, Southeastern Minority Newspaper Workshop, University of South Carolina , Columbia, S . C . 29208 (803) 777-5166 .. . The American Newspaper Publishers Association is ac cepting applications through Jan . 18 from minority newspaper managers or would-be managers . ANPA will sponsor 13 management training seminars from February through May 1989 . The organization covers travel, hotel and registration expenses for the winners. Contact: Ardis Pruess, ANPA Foundation , The Newspaper Center, Box 17407 Dulles Airport, Washington, D.C. 20041 (703) 648-1000 ... The American Association of Advertising Agen--Antonio Mej(as-Rentas cies sponsors a summer internship program for minority juniors , seniors or graduate stu dents interested in advertising careers . Dead line is Jan. 31. Winners are placed with agencies in Chicago , New York , San Francis co, Los Angeles and Detroit. Contact Michelle Tomeo, AAAA, 666 Third Ave., New York, N.Y . 1001 7 (212) 682-2500. SE HABLA ESPANOL AWARDS: The Los Angeles-based Agencia de Ocorci & Asociadas was the recipient of an award of excellence from Hispanic Business magazine for its "NoSe Quede Atras " print ad created for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Ser vice . Forty-one awards were pre se nted by the magazine last month at its Se Hab/a Espana/ media and marketing conference in New York. Among the winners were: Sosa & Associates, headquartered in San Antonio, for its AIDS awareness TV campaign created for the Centers for Disease Control. Zubi Advertising Services in Miami won a merit award for its "Leeme, Yo Soy Nuevo" print ad created for El Nuevo Herald new spaper. -Darryl Lynette Figueroa CORP ORAT E CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 c e nts per w ord . Display ads are $ 4 5 per column mch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekl y Reports mailed Fr iday o f same week. M ul t iple use rates on request. YOUR NEW DESK CALENDAR IS HERE, MR. CUANITLAXCALLI . Jan. 2, 1989 Hisp anic Link Weekly Report