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Hispanic link weekly report, January 16, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, January 16, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
John Sununu, President-elect George Bush's White House chief of staff, announces the appointment of retired Air Force Colonel Antonio Lbpez as a special assistant to the president and director of the White House military office...States News Service reports that Donna Alvarado, director of the federal volunteer agency ACTION, is a frontrunner for the position of commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service...U.S. District Judge Tom Hogan dismisses the case of Laura and Moises Escobar, in which they charged the immigration law to deter marriages of convenience between citizens and undocumented immigrants is unconstitutional. Moises was ordered deported because he married while undergoing deportation proceed-
ings... Jos6Santos wins the Eclipse AwarcUb^sggh^tfi^/fQiiiig’s prestigious prize, as outstanding jockey of the year...The FBI puts former Miami police officer Armando Garcia, 26, on its y) MqatjVManted list. He is wanted for alleged drug theft and at^^tell r/uraef-of government witnesses...A federal appeals court in Los Angeles upholds a $150,000 damage award to the family of Sergio Alvarez.Cabrales, holding that medical staff understaffing at the Los Angeles tjocinty Jail contributed to his suicide hanging...Unable to deal with his impending deportation to Cuba, Marielito Adolfo Aguilera, 34, hangs himself in his cell at the federal penitentiary in Leavenworth, Kan...Amparo Ortiz Almoddvar, born in Puerto Rico more than a century ago, dies in Miami at the reported age of 103. She stayed away from red meat, pork, eggs and milk...

Judge Stays INS Rule Blamed for New Homeless
A federal judge in Brownsville, Texas, issued remain in their area of entry until their cases a temporary restraining order Jan. 9 halting a are decided.
political asylum policy which requires ap- The order serves as a safety valve in the plicants, most of them Central Americans, to squatter camps that have sprung up, par-
Race Marks D.C. Latino Empowerment
Panamanian American Arturo Griffiths’ election to a two-year term as president of the Washington, D.C., Hispanic American Festival was upheld Jan. 3 in a contest that many see as an important step in the Latino community’s struggle to gain a voice in the nation’s capital.
The election “sends the message that we are becoming organized and ready to participate," said Griffiths, a construction contractor who defeated Spanish American Jose Sueiro, publisher of El Latino newspaper.
Griffiths’ victory was upheld by the festival’s election committee, which ruled against a complaint filed by Sueiro. He alleged that the Griffiths camp, which won 631-549 Dec. 17, bused in voters.
The election holds a special significance for Latinos because of their non-representation in area politics. While numbering 250,000, Hispanics do not hold any elective offices or significant appointive positions.
Being elected to head the festival has come to carry with it over recent years clout in the Hispanic and non-Hispanic community. The
summer weekend celebration, entering its 18th year, drew an estimated 350,000 people last year. The past two elections have received spirited and extensive coverage in The Washington Post and Washington Times, as well as in the community’s vocal Spanish-lan-guage media.
That the League of Women Voters conducted the election for the first time and that the D.C. registrar of elections oversaw it shows the importance of the race, said Griffiths.
Griffiths’ running mates, who included a Salvadoran, an Ecuadoran and a Guatemalan, reflect the diversity of the D.C. area’s Hispanic population, one where most of the Latinos are relatively recent arrivals who are not eligible for legalization under the federal immigration law.
Griffiths plans to use his victory to bring attention to the problems of the community: a large undocumented segment is being exploited and forced to go underground, there is an increasing number of Hispanic homeless persons and an unmet need for bilingual education in the schools. -Felix Peiez
ticularly in South Texas, as a result of the policy.
Late last week, U.S. District Judge Filemon Vela was expected to decide on a preliminary injunction that could stay the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service policy during the anticipated months of legal manuevering.
The Immigration Reform and Control Act, coupled with this month-old asylum policy, is cited by some critics for the exponential growth in the numbers of Hispanic homeless living in makeshift housing in South Texas, Miami and California's northern San Diego County.In addition to restricting movement of migrants, the new INS policy stopped automatic issuance of work permits to those awaiting an answer to their asylum requests.
According to Verne Jervis, an INS spokesman in Washington, D.C., the impact of the court's action will not be limited to Texas, but will affect petitioners nationwide. “We have to allow people to have their asylum petitions processed at the office closest to where they want to live," said Jervis.
In Dade County, Fla., news of the restraining order was met with apprehension by officials. Bobby Bernal, assistant to the county manager and coordinator of the county’s refugee effort, said he heard' that 900 Central American asylum applicants-primarily from Nicaragua-
continued on page 2
Education Budget Fails to Address Needs of Hispanics
The Reagan administration’s final education budget, released Jan. 9, proposes a 2.9% increase in education spending for fiscal year 1990, a hike which Hispanic education experts say will do little to address the educational needs of the country or Hispanics.
The proposal calls for outlays, or actual spending in fiscal year 1990, of $21.2 billion. This compares with $20.6 billion to be spent in 1989, a difference of $60 million.
While the outlays increased slightly, the total budget request is the same as the 1989 budget appropriation of $21.9 billion. Acknowledging what is in effect a freeze, U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos said, "We did well in
comparison to other departments...It was difficult."
He noted "the redirection of $750 million to those programs I’ve advocated." That money has been reallocated to expand existing programs for the disadvantaged, while two dozen others were eliminated. These were mostly research programs, but one was the English Literacy Grants program enacted last year with great support from Hispanic advocacy groups.
Bilingual education received an increase of $5 million to $115.8 million, which just exceeds the 4% rate of inflation. A $1.5 million increase went to immigrant and refugee education,
bringing the 1990 total to $46.9 million. Chapter 1 programs for disadvantaged children received a $151.3 million increase to $4.7 billion.
Overall, 68% of the budget targets the disadvantaged and needy student.
Said Jim Lyons, of the National Association for Bilingual Education, "It is a minor improvement in terms of focus on those (students) in most need, (but) the bottom line is the bottom line, and that's what's missing - dollars. This does nothing to restore cuts made previously."
Since 1980, the education budget has been slashed by 50% in real dollars.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa


Increase While Men Light Up Less
Hispana Smokers
Women from different Hispanic subgroups in the United States have increased or held steady in their cigarette smoking from the ’50s through the 70s while smoking by Hispanic men decreased, according to a report in the January issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
Dr. Luis Escobedo and Dr. Patrick Remington investigated the historical trends of cigarette smoking among Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans and Puerto Ricans. Their study, using a sample of 8,286 people, was based on data from the 1983 Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
It showed that smoking rates for all groups peaked during the ’50s and since then have decreased for most of them. Also, the study found that proportionally more Puerto Rican women smoked than did Mexican American or Cuban American women, and more men smoked than did women. Current rates among men of different Hispanic subgroups were sirtiilar.
"Rates of cigarette smoking among successive (generations of) Mexican American women changed little and actually increased markedly among Cuban American and Puerto Rican American women," the study reported.
HISPANIC SMOKING RATES: ’82-’83 ADULTS ADOLESCENTS* Males Females Males Females Mex. 43.6% 24.5% 12.9% 7.9%
Cuban 41.8 23.1 7.9 8.1
P.R. 41.3 32.6 21.7 19.1
"Persons 13 to 19 years of age
Source: The January issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association’s "Birth Cohort Analysis of Prevalence of Cigarette Smoking Among Hispanics in the United States'
Conversely, smoking has declined markedly among Mexican American men and slightly among Cuban American and Puerto Rican men.
- Luis Restrepo
INS Policy Increases Makeshift Shelters
continued from page 1
were headed from areas around other INS offices toward Dade County.
Contrary to what these immigrants have heard, housing and health services in the area are in short supply, he said. As of Jan. 9, 275 Nicaraguans were housed in the spartan accommodations of Bobby Maduro Miami Stadium.
Between 5,000-6,000 domestic homeless people live in Florida’s Dade, Broward and Monroe counties. Officials have no exact count of newcomers, but they say the influx is putting a strain on local resources.
"We’re looking to the federal government for their assistance. This is their policy," said Bernal. "But that doesn’t mean we’re going to turn our backs on these people."
More than 30,000 Central Americans have crossed the Rio Grande near Brownsville since May, according to the INS. For those traveling to Miami and other destinations, their journey came to an abrupt halt last month. In order to comply with the Dec. 16 INS policy change, hundreds have been living in temporary shelters awaiting a response to asylum petitions.
The INS said the new procedure is necessary because many of those applying are not fleeing political persecution, but escaping
economic hardship. The class-action suit filed in Vela’s court charges the INS is violating a federal law requiring that 30 days notice be given for major changes in agency policy.
Meanwhile, some Texas-based asylum seekers are living in squatter camps in tents fashioned from discarded plastic hung from tree limbs.
In California’s affluent San Diego County, tension is growing as some workers with newly acquired legal immigrant status are moving about more freely on the streets, mingling with their middle-class neighbors. As many as 14,000 migrants are estimated to live there. Newspapers have quoted residents expressing outrage over their presence.
The county health department is bulldozing migrant camps. Once considered an acceptable part of the rural landscape, they are being closed in response to complaints from individuals who have moved to the area into $250,000-$1.5 million homes.
"We’re having a crisis," said the Rev. Rafael Martinez of the four-year-old North County Chaplaincy, which ministers to the migrants. He cited a recent closing where "about 300 to 400 people are thrown out on the street overnight. That’s no solution.
Guide Directs Leaders in Fight Against AIDS
In an effort to put the latest culturally appropriate information about AIDS in the hands of people who can make wide use of it, a Washington, D.C.-based Hispanic health advocacy group mailed Jan. 13 a guidebook to more than 5,000 Hispanic political, religious, business and organizational leaders nationwide.
The book, "AIDS: A Guide for Hispanic Leadership," presents strategies on prevention and tells the reader about resources in his or her area.
"We're concerned that there is not enough support and data (for these leaders) to fully utilize their roles," said Adolph Falcon, the project’s coordinator for the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations.
In addition to the guide, COSSMHO has set up a hotline—1-800-AIDS-123—to provide technical advice and to coordinate local and national efforts.
As well as being sent to members of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal, chairman of NALEO, will have a guide delivered to each member of Congress.
County Battles English Bill
Hispanic leaders in Suffolk County, N.Y., have coalesced this month to battle a bill introduced Dec. 14 that would make English the official language of the county.
Lawmakers there are expected to consider the bill in early February.
Latinos and many Democratic leaders have said the bill's sponsor, Joseph Rizzo (R-Islip Terrace), was motivated by racism. Rizzo legislative aide Conrad Chayes countered that the bill was introduced after 31 candidates with greater eligibility were bypassed to provide Suffolk with a Spanish-speaking welfare inspector.
According to the 1980 census, Hispanics account for 58,700, or 4.5%, of the county’s 1.3 million residents. Outside of New York City, Suffolk contains the greatest concentration of Hispanics in the state.
-Sophia Nieves
Twelve Police Officers Die on
Twelve of the 153 police officers—7.8%— who lost their lives in the line of duty in 1988 were Hispanic, a Weekly Report analysis of a list released by the National Association of Chiefs of Police this month showed.
California had the most Latino officers killed, with five. Florida and Texas each had three, and Illinois one.
Seven of the officers died of gunshot wounds, two were hit by cars, one each drowned, was in a helicopter crash and an automobile crash.
The officers and their cities were:
George Aguilar Lawrence Cadena Patricia Calderon Ernest de Leon Victor Estefan Manuel Gutierrez George Montoya Richard Romero Irma Ruiz Mario Salas Porfirio Soto David Vcisquez
Duty-’88
Inglewood, Calif. Dallas San Antonio Tallahassee, Fla. Miami
Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Bermuda Dunes, Calif.
Chicago
Del Rio, Texas
Tampa, Fla.
Cathedral City, Calif.
2
Jan. 16, 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Jonathan Higuera, guest columnist
David Vasquez—An Argument Against Capital Punishment
The most convincing arguments against the death penalty have been the stories of innocent men being put to death. In the United States, there are at least 23 documented cases of such fatal miscarriages of justice this century alone.
But the case of David Vasquez, a 42-year-old Mexican American, presents another argument for abolishing capital punishment.
For the last five Christmases, Vasquez, born in Stafford, Ariz., and raised in Tucson, has been locked in a Virginia prison for a crime he didn’t commit. On Jan. 4 Gov. Gerald Baliles granted Vasquez an unconditional pardon after police reopened the case and concluded he was not responsible for the grisly 1984 murder and rape of Carolyn Jean Hamm, a 38-year-old Washington, D.C., lawyer.
Vasquez said he pleaded guilty because he was afraid of being sent to the electric chair. In Virginia, where the murder occurred, 243 men have been put to death since capital punishment was enacted in 1908.
"No amount of money will erase the last five years," said Vasquez, sitting in his mother’s living room in Manassas, Va., holding hands with her. "I prayed to the Lord every night that they would catch the killer.”
‘THEY BRAINWASHED ME’
The basis for the conviction against Vasquez, who was described by court-appointed pyschiatrists as being of low-level intelligence, was a confession elicited by homicide detectives during a two-day interrogation period.
The confession, which Vasquez gave in a trance-like state after being fed details about the crime, was allowed into evidence despite his lawyers’ assertions that it was given under duress.
"They brainwashed me," Vasquez admitted. "One guy played the bad guy and the other one...told me he would help me out if I confessed."
Later, when asked if the questions were leading, one of the detectives, Robert Carrig, told me, "Looking back, in front of a possible murderer, it is possible it was being done, but at the time I didn’t know we were doing that."
Armed with a questionable confession, a hair taken from the body of the victim consistent with V&squez’s and a witness placing him in the vicinity of the murder, the state, led by former Arlington County Commonwealth’s Attorney Henry Hudson, an ambitious prosecutor
who has since become U.S. Attorney for Virginia’s Eastern District, pushed for the death penalty.
From the beginning, police and prosecutors had suspected that Vasquez, 5 feet 8 and 125 pounds, was only an accomplice in the slaying because of his meek personality and slight build. The victim, a robust woman, had been hanged from a water pipe in her basement.
Prosecutors also knew Vasquez did not drive. The question of how he could have reached the scene of the crime from his job at a McDonald’s restaurant in a neighboring city remained unanswered.
When prosecutors offered a plea bargain that would reduce the charge to second-degree murder, thus avoiding a trial that could have resulted in a death sentence, Vasquez entered a plea which allowed him to maintain his innocence but concede that the evidence against him was overwhelming.
"I had second thoughts about it the day it was entered into,” said Richard McCue, one of Vctsquez’s two lawyers, of the plea agreement. “I was never convinced he was guilty."
CASE RAISES DISTURBING QUESTIONS
A break in the case came in December 1987 when another Arlington County woman, Susan Tucker, was murdered in a strikingly similar manner. Tying the two cases together, homicide detective Joe Horgas, with some assistance from the FBI, convinced his skeptical superiors that whoever killed Hamm also killed Tucker.
On Jan. 20,1988, police arrested Timothy Wilson Spencer, a 26-year-old man with a long history of burglary convictions.
Using DNA evidence, prosecutors convicted Spencer in two murders, including the Tucker slaying. He has been sentenced to death in both cases and is awaiting trial for two other murders.
Arlington County Commonwealth’s Attorney Helen Fahey requested the full pardon for Vasquez last October. When the media reported her unusual request, it was expected that he would be home for Christmas. But in a climate where a furloughed prisoner like Willie Horton can become a major presidential campaign issue, politicians move gingerly. It took Gov. Baliles until this month to act.
Although Vasquez's ordeal has a seemingly happy ending, it also raises some disturbing questions: Why didn’t prosecutors drop the case because of insufficient evidence? Why did the defense lawyers allow him to accept the plea bargain?
How many other innocent persons have chosen the same course as Vasquez when told that the alternative could be death?
(Jonathan Higuera is a reporter with The Washington Times, in Washington, D.C.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
DUMB AND RACIST QUOTES: Briefing Hispanic leaders on narcotics crackdowns in Latino neighborhoods, New York Police Commissioner Benjamin Ward cautioned them: "Tell your relatives to be careful where they buy drugs. We don’t want to confiscate their cars."
He later apologized at length on Spanish-language radio for what he admitted was "an insensitive and insulting remark."
In reporting on the incident last month, Daily News columnist Miguel P6rez forgave the commissioner because he showed "class" in his apology, but rapped Mayor Ed Koch, who denied that Ward made the remark, and scolded the audience— of "mostly Koch’s Latino lackeys”—who failed to challenge the insult. Usually outspoken state Sen. Olga Mendez, the columnist wrote, "must have been stricken with a sudden hearing impairment."
Down the Atlantic a few miles, Washington Post associate Outlook editor Curt Suplee authored a Jan. 8 piece on "Sex in the ’90s," predicting we’re in for more wild times in spite of AIDS fears.
"The average adult’s sexual repertoire has expanded to include practices unthinkable outside Tijuana 20 years ago," he wrote cutely-
Does he really have to travel 3,000 miles West and cross the Mexican border to come up with that?
In Miami, down a few miles more, an appeals court last month threw out the January 1987 attempted murder conviction of a Haitian because Dade Circuit Judge Mary Ann MacKnight ridiculed a prospective juror who admitted that he didn't speak English "100 percent.”
Lectured MacKnight: "I think it’s a shame people come here and do not try to learn our language. However, they might learn something if they sit here for a while...It is incumbent upon all of you to go ahead and make an attempt to learn English."
Later, she called learning English a "moral duty." ________________________________________________-KayBirbaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Jan. 16,1989
3


COLLECTING
SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: “Su Plan de Negoclo"-’Your Business Plan“~is a 72-page, Spanish-language workbook on how to better manage a small business. For a copy send $10 to Oregon Small Business Development Center Network, Lane Community College, 1059 Williamette St., Eugene, Ore. 97401 (503) 726-2250.
TEACHING AT HOME: "Teaching at Home: Minimizing the Homework Hassle" is a 54-page handbook on how parents can reinforce what their elementary-age children learn at school. For a copy send $6.95 to National Community Education Association, 119 N. Payne St., Alexandria, Va. (703) 683-6232.
CORPORAL PUNISHMENT: The National Coalition of Advocates for Students recently released a report that shows that the rates of corporal punishment administered to students differ by racial and ethnic group. Reports on each region of the country are $8 from NCAS, 100 Boylston St., Suite 737, Boston, Mass. 02116 (617) 357-8507.
LITERACY REPORT: “Literacy in the Hispanic Community" is a report by the National Council of La Raza which finds that the nation’s literacy programs are too expensive or ignore the needs of Hispanics. For a copy of the 37-page report, send $3 to NCLR, 20 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600.
IMMIGRATION IN CALIFORNIA: The Urban Institute has published a four-part policy paper series on the effects of immigration in California. The papers—"U.S. Immigration Policy and the Mexican Economy" (43 pp., $6); "Projected Imbalances Between Labor Supply and Labor Demand in the Caribbean Basin" (70 pp., $7.50); "The Political Adaption of Hispanic Immigrants to the United States" (38 pp., $6); "The Segregation and Residential Assimilation of Immigrants to the United States" (34 pp., $6)—can be ordered through the Library/lnformation Clearinghouse, Urban Institute, P.O. Box 7273, Dept. C, Washington, D.C. 20037.
CIGARETTE SMOKERS: "Birth Cohort Analysis of Prevalance of Cigarette Smoking Among Hispanics in the United States" is a four-page article in the January issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association that breaks down data by Hispanic subgroups and gender. For a copy send $5 to AMA, Dept, of Fulfillment, 535 N. Dearborn, Chicago, III. 60610.
AIDS LEADERSHIP HOTLINE AND GUIDE: The National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations has made available to Hispanic leaders its publication "AIDS: A Guide for Hispanic Leadership." The group also has a hotline—1-800-AIDS-123—available to these leaders. The hotline is in service weekdays from 10 am. to 4 p.m. ET.
CONNECTING
LURING STUDENTS TO STUDY Early last month a group of 15 primarily Hispanic boys from Los Angeles went on a fishing-boat excursion as a reward in a unique venture to get the youngsters to improve their grades.
The brainchild of Marina del Rey tackle shop owner Mark Aguilera, the fishing trip "group" consisted of one boy when it started in September.
It began after Aguilera noticed a 10-year-old hanging around the dock during what were normal school hours. Discovering that the boy was turned off by school but had a keen interest in fishing, Aguilera promised him he would take him out on his boat as an inducement. Aguilera also served as tutor out of his bait shop.
Ranging from 9 to 14 years of age, the boys now have a tutor, paid for by a local fishing club, who works with them twice a week.
FIRM RENEWS MIGRANT SCHOLARSHIPS A scholarship program aimed at Ohio migrant farm worker students in need of financial assistance to attend college has been renewed with a $40,000 grant from Campbell Soup Co., it was announced Jan. 3.
Based at Ohio University, the program was established in 1984. The university says it is the only effort of its kind in the nation.
The program was initiated to cut into the high dropout rate among migrant farm worker students by providing role models and to ease the financial burden of those students who do go to college. The scholarships, awarded to some 12 students yearly, range from $1,000 to $1,500.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Ben Benitez, currently director of personnel, safety and equal opportunity programs at the U.S. Mint, is named director of personnel and labor relations of the Library of Congress...Tessa Martinez Tagle, a former dean at San Antonio College, becomes vice president of Miami-Dade Community College’s Medical Center Campus...The board of directors of the Latin American Manufacturers Association selects Albert Jacquez as its president and chief executive officer. Jacquez had served as a senior aide to U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres since 1983...Remigio Valdez, founder of the Mexican American Betterment Organization 20 years ago in San Antonio and its director ever since, announces that the organization will disband. It is closing because of its inability to meet the Internal Revenue Service’s guidelines for tax exemption and to pay liability insurance for volunteers...
Calendar___________________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regarding your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
AIDS AMONG MINORITIES Rockville, Md. Jan. 16
John Diggs, an infectious disease expert with the National Institutes of Health, will speak on the impact of AIDS on minority communities as part of local Martin Luther King Day festivities. The drama troupe Proyecto Amor will perform at the commemoration.
Jane English (301) 424-8000, ext. 382 4
HISPANIC BALL Washington, D.C. Jan. 18 The Republican National Hispanic Assembly of the United States and California will be hosting an inaugural fiesta to honor President-elect George Bush and Vice President-elect Dan Quayle.
Robert de Posada (202) 252-3200
EDUCATION MEETING San Diego Jem. 18-21
The National Association for Bilingual Education will holds its yearly meeting with the theme "Education for the Common Good." Among the areas of focus for the workshops will be international cooperation in education, education and jobs in the 21 st century, increasing educational opportunities and improving the teaching environment.
Marlene Ross (202) 939-9410
COMING SOON
BUSINESS DINNER Latin Business Association Los Angeles Feb. 4 Ana Barbosa (818) 965-4227
Jan. 16, 1989
ENGINEERING CAREER CONFERENCE Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles Feb. 10, 11 Du Ice Cordero (213) 725-3970
BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE California Association for Bilingual Education Anaheim, Calif. Feb. 15-18 CABE (213) 946-1422
HISPANIC MARKET SYMPOSIUM The Marketing Institute New York Feb. 27, 28 Conference Administrator (212) 883-1770
AT-RISK YOUTH
70001 Training & Employment Institute New Orleans March 19-22 Delores Parker 1-800-424-9105
Correction: In last week's calendar of events for 1989, the dates indicated for the Hispanic Designers Gala should have been San Antonio, Sept. 9, and Washington, D.C., Sept. 14.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
â„¢TESTING ANNOUNCEMENT CALIFORNIA STATE LOTTERY MARKETING ANALYST I & II
Q -------------------------------------------
TM
MARKETING ANALYST I ($1,755-$2,740/mo)
Position! Incumbent will receive training and perform work of average difficulty and complexity in the planning, development and evaluation of short-term marketing projects such as point-of-sale execution, implementing consumer promotions, and geographic sales analysis.
Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor's Degree, preferably with a specialization in marketing or a closely related area; (additional qualifying experience may be substituted for education on a year-for-year basis); and one year of cumulative experience performing professional-tor, technical duties involving research, analysis, public relations, promotions, advertising, media or related areas.
MARKETING ANALYST II ($2,740-$3,307/mo)
Position: Incumbents perform the more difficult marketing analytical work. Responsibilities primarily encompass the planning, development and evaluation of midterm marketing projects such as point-of-sale strategy, designing consumer promotions, providing copy and media review and game design work.
Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor's Degree preferably with a specialization in marketing or a closely related area; (additional qualifying experience may be substituted for education on a year-for-year basis); and two years of experience performing professional or technical duties in consumer marketing management and services, such as new product development, advertising, promotion, research, market and sales forecasting, consumer-oriented public relation, or closely related area; OR a Master's Degree in Business Administration, preferably with specialization in marketing and one year of experience as stated above.
FELONY DISQUALIFICATION: Pursuant to Government Code 8800.71, persons convicted of a felony or any gambling related offense are disqualified from employment with the California State Lottery and your application for this examination will not be accepted.
FINAL FILING DATE: State Application must be postmarked no later than January 26, 1989.
CALIFORNIA STATE LOTTERY - AA PERSONNEL OFFICE P. O. BOX 1359 BRODERICK, CA 95605-1359
For More Information Call (916) 322-0007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
BUSINESS WRITER
CARIBBEAN BUSINESS, Puerto Rico’s 42,500 circulation English-language weekly, has an opening for a staff writer in its San Juan office’s special projects section. Applicants must be able to conduct interviews in Spanish, and have exceptionally strong English-language feature writing skills, two years of newspaper or magazine writing experience, and an affinity for business subjects.
Send resume, together with cover letter, salary history and writing samples, to: Editorial/Unit 5, CARIBBEAN BUSINESS, P.O. Box 6253, Loiza Street Station, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00914-6253.
THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
Several tenure-eligible, academic-year appointments are available at the assistant professor level beginning August 16, 1989. An earned doctorate is required, and successful candidates will be expected to maintain a research agenda in the appropriate scholarly field. Salaries are commensurate with qualifications and experience. Materials should be submitted to the indicated search committee chairs at the following address: The University of Arizona, College of Education, Tucson, AZ 85721.
Elementary Social Studies Education. Instruction in undergraduate teacher preparation and graduate programs in teaching and teacher education. Fteply to Dr. Bill Ranniger, Division of Teaching and Teacher Education, (602) 621-1602.
Bilingual Education. Spanish-ianguage proficient in the area of bilingual education teacher education. Reply to Dr. Kathy Carter, Division of Teaching and Teacher Education, (602) 621-1602.
Children’s Literature. Teaching in undergraduate teacher education and graduate reading programs. Reply to Dr. William J. Valmont, Division of Language, Reading and Culture, (602) 621-1311.
Bilingual/Multicultural Education. Teaching in undergraduate teacher education and graduate bilingual/multicul-tural programs with experience in teacher education or staff development. Reply to Dr. Richard Ruiz, Division of Language, Reading and Culture, (602) 621-1311.
Educational Psychology with specialization in early childhood cognition. Teaching in undergraduate and teacher education and graduate specialty areas. Application deadline: March 15, 1989. Reply to Dr. John Bergan, Division of Educational Psychology, (602) 621-7825.
Application deadline (unless otherwise indicated): February 20, 1989.
Application procedures: Submit a letter of interest, curriculum vita, three letters of reference, and the names of two additional references.
The University of Arizona is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Women and minorities are strongly urged to apply.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in the Weekly Report mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES:
90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES:
Ads with borders, varied type sizes $45 per column inch.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Jan. 16.1989
5


Arts & Entertainment
MORE NOMINATIONS, MORE AWARDS: Latinos are faring well in this year’s entertainment awards season, with four Golden Globe nominations and one recording industry Lifetime Achievement Award. The big winner so far is Edward James Olmos, who captured two Golden Globe nominations from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in the “best actor in a film drama” category for his role in Stand and Deliver and as "best supporting actor in aTV drama” for his role in Miami Vice.
Olmos won a Golden Globe in the latter category in 1986.
"I am stunned,” Olmos said about the two nominations. "If nothing else happens this year, I’ll be satisfied.”
Olmos, who won a special Golden Apple award from the Hollywood Women’s Press Club late last year, will not be directing a film this year as was reported here.
“The project could not wait for me,” Olmos told Weekly Report, explaining that he leaves this month for Europe to co-star with Willem Dafoe in a film.
Also nominated for Golden Globes this yearwereRaijl Julia and Sonia Braga, both for "supporting roles" in the comedy Moon Over Parador.
The HFPA gives out its awards Jan.28.The event will be telecast nationally by the TBS cable network.
In a related item, the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences—which hands out its Grammy Awards in February—has named Spanish cellist Pablo Casals as one of nine Lifetime Achievement Award winners for 1989.
Casals, one of the most celebrated cellists of all time, lived his last years in Puerto Rico. He is the namesake of the island’s international Festival Casals.
Scores of Latinos were expected to be among Grammy nominees— at least in the three "Latin” categories— when they were announced late last week. (Those nominees, unavailable at press time, will be listed here next week.)
ONE LINER: Latino comedy troupes Culture Clash and Latins Anonymous, plus singers Irma Rangel and Lalo Guerrero, are the featured performers at A Night of Music, Theater and Comedy, a fundraiser for Americas 2001 magazine. It will be held Jan. 21 at the Ingall's Auditorium of East Los Angeles College...
-Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media report
JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES. The Institute for Journalism Education in San Francisco offers reporting, editing and management training programs for minority journalists with support from three universities. Northwestern University, for example, houses IJE's Management Training Center in Evanston, III. It is accepting applications through Feb. 15 for an eight-week program for reporters and editors. IJE also provides a fellowship for minority persons already in management; its application deadline is May 16. Contact IJE Management Training Center, Leverone Hall, Room 3080, 2001 E. Sheridan Road, Northwestern University, Evanston, III. 60201 (415) 642-5962.
The institute’s eight-week editing program is hosted by the University of Arizona and includes copy editing for The Tucson Citizen
and The Arizona Daily Star. Trainees are guaranteed placement with a newspaper after completion of the course. Applications are being accepted through Feb. 1. Contact Editing Program for Minority Journalists, Journalism Dept., Franklin Bldg., 101M, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz. 85721 (602) 621-5777.
An 11-week reporting program takes place each summer at the University of California, Berkeley, which serves as IJE's home office. Reporter trainees are guaranteed a job upon completion of the program. Applications are invited through Feb. 15. Contact Summer Program for Minority Journalists, Room B-28 North Gate Hall, School of Journalism, University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 94720 (415) 642-5962.
C.P.B. RADIO: National Public Radio's Latin File and a series to be produced by KSJV public radio in Fresno, Calif., will receive funds in fiscal year 1989 from the Corporation
for Public Broadcasting, said Rick Madden, CPB’s director of radio program funds.
The KSJV series will focus on immigrant students in Fresno public schools.
Madden would not specify funding because contracts have not yet been signed but said that CPB has spent $1.4 million over three years in Hispanic-related projects. This includes the two proposed programs.
NOTABLE: Washington, D.C., correspon-dent/bureau chief for Nddmesc, Jose Carreno 40, moves to Mexico City to become deputy general director of the worldwide Mexican news agency. Carreno was a member of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C....AIso in the nation’s capital, Channel 4 morning news anchor Linda Lopez is being credited for doubling the station’s ratings in the 6:30 a.m. time slot allotted for WRC’s News4 Today Show. Lopez has signed a new multiyear contract with the station... -
-Darryl Lynette Figueroa
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Luis Restrepo. No portion of Hispanic Link Weakly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
6
Jan. 16. 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week John Sununu, President elect George Bush's White House chief of staff, announces the appointment of retired Air Force Colonel Antonio l...{p2 as a special assistant to the president and director of the White House military office ... States News Service reports that Donna AI varado, director of the federal volunteer agency ACTION, is a front runner for the position of commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service ... U.S. District Judge Tom Hogan dismisses the case of Laura and Moises Escobar, in which they charged the im migration law to deter marriages of convenience between citizens and undocumented immigrants is unconstitutional. Moises was ordered deported because he married while undergoing deportation proceedings ... JoseSantos wins the Eclipse pres tigious prize, as outstanding jockey of the year .. .The FBI puts former Miami police officer Armando Garcia, 26, on its \0 list. He is wanted for alleged drug theft and attJfdltell govern ment witnesses ... A federal appeals court 1n Los Angeles upholds a $150,000 damage award to the family of Sergio holding that medical staff understaffing at the Los Angeles Coanty Ja1l contributed to his suicide hanging ... Unable to deal with his impending deportation to Cuba, Marie/ito Adolfo Aguilera, 34, hangs himself in his cell at the federal penitentiary in Leavenworth, Kan ... Amparo Ortiz Almod6var, born in Puerto Rico' more than a century ago, dies in Miami at the reported age of 1 03. She stayed away from red meat, pork, eggs and milk ... Vol. 7 No.3 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Jan. 16,1989 Judge Stays INS Rule Blamed for New Homeless A federal judge in Brownsville, Texas, issued a temporary restraining order Jan . 9 halting a political ' asylum policy which" requires ap plicants, most of them Central Americans, to remain in their area of entry until their cases are decided. The order serves as a safety valve in the squatter camps that have sprung up, par-Race Marks D.C. Latino Empowerment Panamanian American Arturo Griffiths' elec tion to a two-year term as president of the Washington, D.C., Hispanic American Festival was upheld Jan. 3 in a contest that many see as an important step in the Latino community's struggle to gain a voice in the nation's capital. The election "sends the message that we are becoming organized and ready to participate," said Griffiths, a construction contractor who defeated Spanish American Jose Sueiro, publisher of El Latino newspaper . Griffiths' victory was upheld by the festival's election committee, which ruled against a com plaint filed by Sueiro . He alleged that the Grif fiths camp, which won 631-549 Dec. 17, bused in voters. The election holds a special significance for Latinos because of their non-representation in area politics . While numbering 250,000, Hispanics do not hold any elective offices or significant appointive positions. Being elected to " head the festiVal has come to carry with it over recent years clout in the Hispanic and non-Hispanic community. The summer weekend celebration, entering its 18th year, drew an estimated 350,000 people last year. The past two elections have received spirited and extensive coverage in The Washington Post and Washington Times, as well as in the community's vocal Spanish-lan guage media. That the League of Women Voters conducted the election for the first time and that the D . C. registrar of elections oversaw it shows the im portance of the race, said Griffiths. Griffiths' running mates, who included a Sal vadoran, an Ecuadoran and a Guatemalan, reflect the diversity of the D.C. area's Hispanic population, one where most of the Latinos are relatively recent arrivals who are not eligible for legalization under the federal immigration law. Griffiths plans to use his victory to bring atten tion to the problems of the community : a large undocumented segment is being exploited and forced to go underground, there is an increas ing number of Hispanic homefess persons and an unmet need for bilingual education in the schools. -FelixPerez ticularly in South Texas, as a result of the policy. Late last week, U.S. District Judge Filem6n Vela was expected to decide on a preliminary injunction that could stay the U.S . Immigration and Naturalization Service policy during the anticipated months of legal manuevering . The Immigration Reform and Control Act, coupled with this month-old asylum policy, is cited by some critics for the exponential growth in the numbers of Hispanic homeless living in makeshift housing in South Texas, Miami and California's northern San Diego County . ln ad dition to restricting movement of migrants, the new INS policy stopped automatic issuance of work permits to those awaiting an answer to their asylum requests. According to Verne Jervis, an INS spokes man in Washington, D . C., the impact of the court's action will not be limited to Texas , but will affect petitioners nationwide. "We have to allow people to have their asylum petitions processed at the office closest to where they want to live," said Jervis . In Dade County, Fla., news of the restraining order was met with apprehension by officials. Bobby Bernal, assistant to the county manager and coordinator of the county's refugee effort, said he heard that 900 Central American asylum applicants-primarily from Nicaragua-continued on page 2 Education Budget Fails to Address Needs of Hispanics The Reagan administration's final education budget, released Jan. 9, proposes a 2.9% in crease in education spending for fiscal year 1990, a hike which Hispanic education experts say will do little to address the educational needs of the country or Hispanics. The proposal calls for outlays, or actual spending in fiscal year 1990, of $21. 2 billion. This compares with $20 . 6 billion to be spent in 1989, a difference of $60 million. While the outlays increased slightly, the total budget request is the same as the 1989 budget appropriation of $21.9 billion . Acknowledging what is in effect a freeze, U .S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos said, "We did well in comparison to other departments ... lt was dif ficult." He noted "the redirection of $750 million to those programs I've advocated . " That money has been reallocated to expand existing programs for the disadvantaged, while two dozen others were eliminated. These were mostly research programs, but one was the English Literacy Grants program enacted last year with great support from Hispanic ad vocacy groups. Bilingual education received an increase of $5 million to $115.8 million, which just exceeds the 4% rate of inflation. A $1. 5 million increase went to immigrant and refugee education, bri nging the 1990 total to $46 . 9 million . Chap ter 1 programs for disadvantaged children received a $151.3 million increase to $4.7 billion. Overall, 68% of the budget targets the disad vantaged and needy student. Said Jim Lyons, of the National Association for Bilingual Education, "It is a minor improve ment in terms of focus on those (students) in most need, (but) the bottom line is the bottom line, and that's what's missing-dollars. This does nothing to restore cuts made previously . " Since 1980, the education budget has been slashed by 50% in real dollars. -Darryl Lynette Figueroa

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Hispana Smokers Increase While Men Light Up Less Women from different Hispanic subgroups in the United States have increased or held steady in their cigarette smoking from the '50s through the '70s while smoking by Hispanic men decreased, according to a report in the January issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr . Luis Escobedo and Dr. Patrick Remington investigated the historical trends of cigarette smoking among Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans and Puerto Ricans . Their study, using a sample of 8 , 286 people , was based on data from the 1983 Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey . It showed that'smoking rates for all groups peaked during the '50s and since then have decreased for most of them . Also, the study found that proportionally more Puerto Rican women smoked than did Mexican American or Cuban American women, and more men smoked than did women . Current rates among men of different Hispanic subgroups were similar. 0 "Rates of cigarette smoking among succes sive (generations of) Mexican American women changed little and actually increased markedly among Cuban American and Puer to Rican American women , " the study reported. INS Policy Increases Makeshift Shelters continued from page 1 were headed from areas around other INS of fices toward Dade County . . Contrary to what these immigrants have heard, housing and health services in the area are in short supply , he said . As of Jan. 9, 275 Nicaraguans were housed in the spartan ac commodations of Bobby Madura Miami Stadium. Between 5,000-6,000 domestic homeless people live in Florida ' s Dade, Broward and Monroe counties . Officials have no exact count of newcomers, but they say the influx is putting a strain on local resources. "We're looking to the federal government for their assistance . This is their policy," said Bernal. "But that doesn't mean we're going to turn our backs on these people." More than 30,000 Central Americans have crossed the Rio Grande near Brownsville since May, according to the INS . For those traveling to Miami and other destinations, their journey came to an abrupt halt last month. In order to comply with the Dec . 16 INS policy change , hundreds have been living in tem porary shelters awaiting a response to asylum petitions . The INS said the new procedure is necessary because many of those applying are not flee ing political persecution, but escaping economic hardship . The class-action suit filed in Vela's court charges the INS is violating a federal law requiring that 30 days notice be given for major changes in agency policy . Meanwhile, some Texas-based asylum seekers are living in squatter camps in tents fashioned from discarded plastic hung from tree limbs. In California's affluent San Diego County, tension is growing as some workers with newly acquired legal immigrant status are moving about more freely on the streets, mingling with their middle-class neighbors . As many as 14,000 migrants are estimated to live there. Newspapers have quoted residents express ing outrage over their presence . The county health department is bulldozing migrant camps . Once considered an accept able part of the rural landscape, they are being closed in response to complaints from in dividuals who have moved to the area into $250,000-$1.5 million homes . "We're having a crisis," said the Rev . Rafael Martinez of the four-year-old North County Chaplaincy, which ministers to the migrants. He cited a recent closing where "about 300 to 400 people are thrown out on the street over night. That's no solution." --Sophia Nieves Twelve Police Officers Die on Duty-'88 Twelve of the 153 police officers--7 .8%-George Aguilar Inglewood, Calif. who lost their lives in the line of duty in 1988 Lawrence Cadena Dallas were Hispanic, a Weekly Report analysis of Patricia Calderon San Antonio a list released by the National Association of Ernest de Le6n Tallahassee, Fla. Chiefs of Police this month showed. Victor Estefan California had the most Latino officers killed, with five . Florida and Texas each had three, and Illinois one. Manuel Gutierrez George Montoya R i chard Romero Seven of the officers died of gunshot wounds, two were hit by cars, one each Irma Ruiz drowned, was in a helicopter crash and an automobile crash . The officers and their cities were : Mario Salas Porfirio Soto David Vasquez Miami Los Angeles Los Angeles Bermuda Dunes , Calif. Chicago Del Rio, Texas Tampa, Fla . Cathedral City, Calif. Jan. 16 , 1989 HISPANIC SMOKING RATES: '82-'83 ADULTS ADOLESCENTS* Males Females Males Females Mex. 43.6% 24.5% 12 .9% 7 .9% Cuban 41.8 23.1 7.9 8.1 P .R. 41. 3 32.6 21.7 19. 1 "Persons 13 to 19 years of age Source : The January issue of the Journal of the American Medi cal Association ' s 'Birth Cohort Analysis of Prevalerce of Cigarette Smoking Among Hispanics in the United States' Conversely, smoking has declined markedly among Mexican American men and slightly among Cuban American and Puerto Rican men. Luis Restrepo Guide Directs Leaders in Fight Against AIDS In an effort to put the latest culturally ap propriate infbrmation about AIDS in the hands of people who can make wide use of it, a Washington, D.C . -based Hispanic health ad vocacy group mailed Jan . 13 a guidebook to more than 5,000 Hispanic political, religious , business and organizational leaders nation wide. The book, " AIDS : A Guide for Hispanic Leadership," presents strateg ies on preven tion and tells the reader about resources in h i s or her area . "We ' re concerned that there is not enough support and data (for these leaders) to fully util izetheir roles," said Adolph Falcon, the project ' s coordinator for the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Or gan i zations . In addition to the guide, COSSMHO has set up a hotline-1-800-AI DS-123-to provide technical advice and to coordinate local and national efforts . As well as being sent to members of the Na tional Association of Latino Elected and Ap pointed Officials, U.S. Rep . Edward Roybal, chairman of NALEO, will have a guide delivered to each member of Congress . County Battles English Bill Hispanic leaders in Suffolk County, N . Y . , have coalesced this month to battle a bill intro duced Dec. 14 that would make English the official language of the county . Lawmakers there are expected to consider the bill in early February . Latinos and many Democratic leaders have said the bill's sponsor, Joseph Rizzo (R-Islip Terrace), was motivated by racism . Rizzo legislative aide Conrad Chayes countered that the bill was introduced after 31 candidates with greater eligibility were bypassed to provide Suffolk with a Spanish-speaking welfare in spector. According to the 1980 census, Hispanics ac count for 58,700, or 4. 5%, of the county ' s 1 . 3 million residents . Outside of New York City, Suffolk contains the greatest concentration of Hispanics in the state. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Jonathan Higuera, guest columnist David Vasquez-An Argument Against Capital Punishment The most convincing arguments against the death penalty have been the stories of innocent men being put to death. In the United States, there are at least 23 documented cases of such fatal miscarriages of justice this century alone . But the case of David Vasquez, a 42 year-old Mexican American, presents another argument for abolishing capital punishment. For the last five Christmases, Vasquez, born in Stafford, Ariz., and raised in Tucson, has been locked in a Virginia prison for a crime he didn ' t commit. On Jan . 4 Gov . Gerald Baliles granted Vasquez an un conditional pardon after police reopened the case and concluded he was not responsible for the grisly 1984 murder and rape of Carolyn Jean Hamm, a 38-year-old Washington, D.C . , lawyer . Vasquez said he pleaded guilty because he was afraid of being sent to the electric chair . In Virginia , where the murder occurred, 243 men have been put to death since capital punish ment was enacted in 1908 . "No amount of money will erase the last five years," said Vasquez, sitting in his mother ' s living room in Manassas, Va . , holding hands with her . "I prayed to the Lord every night that they would catch the killer." 'THEY BRAINWASHED ME' The basis for the conviction against Vasquez, who was described by court-appointed pyschiatrists as being of low level intelligence, was a confession elicited by homicide detectives during a two-day interroga tion period. The confession, which Vasquez gave in a trance-like state after being fed details about the crime, was allowed into evidence despite his lawyers ' assertions that it was given under duress. " They brainwashed me," Vasquez admitted. "One guy played the bad guy and the other one ... told me he would help me out if I confessed. " Later , when asked if the questions were leading , one of the detectives , Robert Carrig, told me , "Looking back, in front of a possible murderer , it is possible it was being done, but at the time I didn't know we were doing that." Armed with a questionable confession, a hair taken from the body of the victim consistent with Vasquez's and a witness placing him in the vicinity of the murder, the state , led by former Arlington County Commonwealth ' s Attorney Henry Hudson, an ambitious prosecutor Sin pelos en Ia lengua DUMB AND RACIST QUOTES: Briefing Hispanic leaders on nar cotics crackdowns in Latino neighborhoods, New York Police Com missioner Benjamin Ward cautioned them: "Tell your relatives to be careful where they buy drugs . We don ' t want to confiscate their cars." He later apologized at length on Spanish-language rad i o for what he admitted was "an insensitive and insulting remark . " In reporting on the incident last month, Daily News columnist Miguel Perez forgave the commissioner because he showed "class" i n his apology , but rapped Mayor Ed Koch, who denied that Ward made the remark, and scolded the audience-of " mostly Koch ' s Lat i no lackeys"-who failed to challenge the insult. Usually out spoken state Sen . Olga Mendez, the columnist wrote, "must have been stricken with a sudden hearing impairment." who has since become U.S. Attorney for Virginia's Eastern District , pushed for the death penalty . From the beginning , police and prosecutors had suspected that Vasquez, 5 feet 8 and 125 pounds, was only an accomplice in the slay ing because of his meek personality and slight build. The victim, a robust woman, had been hanged from a water pipe in her basement. Prosecutors also knew Vasquez did not drive . The question of how he could have reached the scene of the crime from his job at a McDonald ' s restaurant in a neighboring city remained unanswered . When prosecutors offered a plea bargain that would reduce the charge to second-degree murder , thus avoiding a trial that could have resulted in a death sentence, Vasquez entered a plea which allowed him to maintain his innocence but concede that the evidence against him was overwhelming . " I had second thoughts about it the day it was entered into," said Richard McCue , one of Vasquez's two lawyers, of the plea agreement. "I was never convinced he was guilty . " CASE RAISES DISTURBING QUESTIONS A break in the case came in December 1987 when another Arlington County woman, Susan Tucker , was murdered in a strikingly similar manner. Tying the two cases together , homicide detective Joe Horgas, with some assistance from the FBI, convinced his skeptical super i ors that whoever killed Hamm also killed Tucker . On Jan . 20 , 1988, police arrested Timothy Wilson Spencer, a 26-year old man with a long history of burglary convictions . Using DNA evidence, prosecutors convicted Spencer in two murders , including the Tucker slaying . He has been sentenced to death in both cases and is awaiting trial for two other murders. Arlington County Commonwealth's Attorney Helen Fahey requested the full pardon for Vasquez last October. When the media reported her unusual request, it was expected that he would be home for Christmas . But in a climate where a furloughed prisoner like Willie Horton can be come a major presidential campaign issue, politicians move gingerly . It took Gov. Baliles until this month to act. Although Vasquez ' s ordeal has a seemingly happy ending , it also raises some disturbing questions : Why didn't prosecutors drop the case be cause of insufficient evidence? Why did the defense lawyers allow him to accept the plea bargain? How many other innocent persons have chosen the same course as Vasquez when told that the alternative could be death? (Jonathan Higuera is a reporter with The Washington Times, in Washington, D . C.) Down the Atlantic a few miles, Washington Post associate Out look editor Curt Suplee authored a Jan . 8 piece on "Sex in the '90s , " predicting we 're in for more wild times in spite of AIDS fears . " The average adult's sexual repertoire has expanded to include practices unthinkable outside Tijuana 20 years ago," he wrote cute ly. Does he really have to travel 3,000 miles West and cross the Mexican border to come up with that? In Miami , down a few miles more, an appeals court last month threw out the January 1987 attempted murder conviction of a Haitian because Dade Circuit Judge Mary Ann MacKnight ridiculed a prospective juror who admitted that he didn't speak English "100 percent." Lectured MacKnight: "I think it's a shame people come here and do not try to learn our language. However, they might learn some thing if they sit here for a while ... lt is incumbent upon all of you to go ahead and make an attempt to learn English." Later , she called learning English a "moral duty . " -Kay Barbaro H i s p a ni c Link Weekly Report Jan . 16 , 1989 3

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COLLECTING SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: "Su Plan de Negocio"--"Your Business Plan"--is a 72-page, Spanish-language workbook on how to better manage a small business . For a copy send $1 0 to Oregon Small Business Development Center Network, Lane Community College , 1059 Williamette St., Eugene, Ore. 97401 (503) 726-2250. TEACHING AT HOME: "Teachi ng at Home : Minimizing the Homework Hassle" is a 54 page handbook on how parents can rein force what their elementary-age children learn at school. For a copy send $6 . 95 to National Community Education Association, 119 N . Payne St., Alexandria, Va . (703) 683-6232 . CORPORAL PUNISHMENT: The National Coalit i on of Advocates for Students recently released a report that shows that the rates of corporal punishment administered to students differ by rac ial and ethnic group . Reports on each region of the country are $8 from NCAS, 1 00 Boylston St., Suite 737 , Boston, Mass. 02116 (617) 357 -8507 . LITERACY REPORT: " Literacy in the Hispanic Community" is a report by the National Council of La Raza which finds that the nation's literacy p r ograms are too expensive or ignore the needs of Hispanics. For a copy of the 37-page report, send $3 to NCLR, 20 F St. NW , Washington , D . C . 20001 (202) 628-9600. IMMIGRATION IN CALIFORNIA: The Urban Institute has published a fou r -part policy paper series on the effects of immigration in Califor nia. The papers-"U. S . Immigration Policy and the Mexican Economy" (43 pp., $6); "Projected Imbalances Between Labor Supply and Labor Demand in the Caribbean Basin" (70 pp., $7.50) ; " The Political Adap tion of Hispanic Immigrants to the United States" (38 pp. , $6); "The Segregat i on and Residential Assimilation of Immigrants to the United States " (34 pp., $6)-can be ordered through the Library/Information Clearinghouse, Urban Institute , P . O . Box 7273 , Dept. C , Washington , D . C . 20037 . CIGARETTE SMOKERS : "Birth Cohort Analysis of Prevalance of Cigarette Smoking Among Hispanics in the United States " is a four page article in the January issue of the Journal of the American Medi cal Association that breaks down data by Hispanic subgroups and gender . For a copy send $5 t o AMA , Dept. of Fulfillment , 535 N . Dear born , Chicago , Ill. 6061 0 . AIDS LEADERSHIP HOTLINE AND GUIDE : The National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations has made avail able to Hispanic leaders its publication "AIDS : A Guide for Hispanic Leadership. " The group also has a hotline-1-800-AIDS-123-avail able to these leaders . The hotline is in service weekdays from 1 0 a.m. to 4 p . m . ET . HISPANIC BALL Washington, D . C . Jan . 18 CONNECTING LURING STUDENTS TO STUDY Early last month a group of 15 primarily Hispanic boys from Los An geles went on a fishing-boat excursion as a reward in a unique ven ture to get the youngsters to improve their grades . The brainchild of Marina del Rey tackle shop owner Mark Aguilera , the fishing trip "group" consisted of one boy when it started in Sep tember . It began after Aguilera noticed a 1 0-year-old hanging around the dock during what were normal school hours . Discovering that the boy was turned off by school but had a keen interest in fishing, Aguilera promised him he would take him out on his boat as an inducement. Aguilera also served as tutor out of his bait shop. Ranging from 9 to 14 years of age, the boys now have a tutor , pai d for by a local fishing club , who works with them twice a week. FIRM RENEWS MIGRANT SCHOLARSHIPS A scholarship program aimed at Ohio migran t farm worker students in need of financial assistance to attend college has been renewed with a$40,000 grant from Campbell Soup Co., it was announced Jan. 3 . Based at Ohio University , the program was established in 1984 . The university says it i s the only effort of its kind in the nation. The program was initiated to cut into the high dropout rate among migrant farm worker students by providing role models and to ease the financial burden of those students who do go to college . The scholarships, awarded to some 12 students yearly , range from $1,000 to $1,500. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Ben Benitez, currently director of personnel, safety and equal oppor tunity programs at the U.S. Mint, is named director of personnel and labor relations of the Library of Congress .. .Tessa Martinez Tagle , a former dean at San Anton i o College , becomes vice president of Miami-Dade Community College ' s Medical Center Campus ... The board of directors of the Latin American Manufacturers Association selects Albert Jacquez as its president and chief executive officer. Jacquez had served as a senior a i de to U. S . Rep . Esteban Torres since 1983 ... Remigio Valdez , founder of the Mexican American Betterment Organization 20 years ago in San Antonio and its director ever since, announces that the organization will disband . It is closing because of its inability to meet the Internal Revenue Service ' s guidelines for tax exemption and to pay liability insurance for volunteers ... Calendar TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regarding your organ i zation 's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link ' s calendar , it must be r e ce i ved at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge . Please include date, location , contact name and phone number . Address items to: The Republican National Hispanic Assembly of the Uni ted States and California will be hosting an in augural fiesta to honor President-elect George Bush and Vice Pr e sident-elect Dan Quayle . ENGINEERING CAREER CONFERENCE Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles Feb . 1 0, 11 Dulce Cordero (213) 725-3970 BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE California Association for Bilingual Education Anaheim, Calif. Feb . 15-18 Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washing t on, D . C . 20005 . THIS WEEK AIDS AMONG MINORITIES Rockville , Md . Jan . 16 John Diggs , an infectious disease expert with the National Institutes of Health , will speak on the im p a ct of AIDS on minority communities as part of local M a rtin Luther King Day festivities. The drama troupe Pro y ecto Amor w ill perform at the com memorat i on . Jane English (301) 424-8000, ext. 382 4 Robert de Posada (202) 252 3200 EDUCATION MEETING San Diego Jan . 18 -21 The National Association for Bilingual Education will holds its yearly meeting w ith the theme ' Education for the Common Good.' Among the areas of focus for the workshops will be international cooperation in education, education and jobs i n the 21st century , increasing educational opportunities and improving the teaching environment. Marlene Ross (202) 939 9410 COMING SOON BUSINESS DINNER Latin Business Association Los Angeles Feb . 4 Ana Barbosa (818) 965 4227 Jan . 16 , 1989 CABE (213) 946-1422 HISPANIC MARKET SYMPOSIUM The Marketing Institute New York Feb . 27, 28 Conference Administrator (212) 883 1770 AT-RISK YOUTH 70001 Training & Employment Institute New Orleans March 19-22 Delores Parker 1-800 424-9105 Correction: In last week ' s calendar of events for 1989, the dates indicated for the H i spanic Des i gners Gala should have been San Antonio, Sept. 9 , and Washington , D.C., Sept. 14. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS TESTING ANNOUNCEMENT CALIFORNIA STATE LOTTERY MARKETING ANALYST I & II MARKETING ANALYST I ($1, 755-$2,740/mo) Position: Incumbent will receive training and perform work of average difficulty and complexity in the planning, development and evaluation of short-term marketing projects such as poi nt-of sale execution, implementing consumer promotions, and geographic sales analysis . Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor's Degree, preferably with a specialization in marketing or a closely related area ; (additional qualifying experience may be substituted for education on a year-for-year basis) ; and one year of cumulative . experience p _ erforming duties involving research , analysis, public relations , promotions, advertising, media or related areas. MARKETING ANALYST II ($2,740-$3,307/mo) Position: Incumbents perform the more difficult marketing analytical work . Responsibilities primarily encompass the planning. development and evaluation of midterm marketing projects such as point-of-sale strategy , des i gning consumer promotions, provid ing copy and media review and game design work. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor's Degree preferably with a specialization in marketing or a closely related area ; (additional qualifying experience may be substituted for education on a year-for-year basis) ; and two years of experience performing professional or technical duties in consumer marketing management and services, such as new product development, advertising, promotion , research , market and sales forecasting, consumer-or iented public relation , or closely related area; OR a Master"s Degree in Business Admin i strat ion, prefe rabl y with specialization in marketing and one year of experience as stated above. FELONY DISQUALIFICATION: Pursuant to Government Code 8800.71, person. s convicted of a felony or any gambling related offense are disqualified from employment with the California State Lottery and your application for this examination will not be accepted. FINAL FILING DATE: State Application must be postmarked no later than January 26, 1989. CALIFORNIA STATE LOTTERY-AA PERSONNEL OFFICE P. d. BOX 1359 BRODERICK, CA 95605-1359 For More Information Call (91 6) 322-0007 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER BUSINESS WRITER CARIBBEAN BUSINESS, Puerto Rico ' s 42,500 circulation English-language weekly, has an opening for a staff writer in its San Juan office's special projects section . Applicants must be able to conduct interviews in Spanish , and have exceptionally strong English-language feature writing skills, two years of newspaper or magazine writing experience, and an affinity for busi nes s subjects. Send resume, together with cover letter , salary history and writing samples, to : Editorial/Unit 5, CARIBBEAN BUSINESS, P .O. Box 6253, Loiza Street Station, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00914-6253. Hispanic Link Weekly Report Jan. 16. THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Several tenure-eligible , academic-year appointments are available at the assistant professor level beginning August 16, 1989 . An earned doctorate is required, and successful can didates will be expected to maintain a research agenda in the appropriate scholarly field . Salaries are commensurate with qualifications and experience . Materials should be submitted to the indicated search committee chairs at the following ad dress : The University of Arizona , College of Education, Tuc son, AZ 85721 . Elementary Social Studies Educat ion. Instruction in under graduate teacher preparation and graduate programs in teach ing and teacher education. Reply to Dr . Bill Ranniger, Division of Teaching and Teacher Education, (602) 621-1602 . Bilingual Education . Spanish-language proficient in the area of bilingual education teacher education . Reply to Dr. Kathy Carter , Division of Teaching and Teacher Education, (602) " 621-1602 . Children's Literature . Teaching in undergraduate teacher education and graduate reading programs . Reply to Dr . Wil liam J. Valmont, Division of Language , Reading and Culture, (602) 621-1311. Bilingual/Multicultural Education. Teaching in under graduate teacher educat i on and graduate bilingual/multicul tural programs with experience in teacher education or staff development. Reply to Dr . Richard Rufz, Division of Language, Reading and Culture, (602) 621-1311 . Educational Psychology with specialization in early childhood cognition. Teaching in undergraduate and teacher education and graduate specialty areas . Application deadline: March 15, 1989 . Reply to Dr. John Bergan, Divis i on of Educational Psychology, (602) 621-7825 . Application deadline (unless otherwise indicated): February 20 , 1989. Application procedures: Submit a letter of interest, cur riculum vita, three letters of reference, and the names of two additional references . The University of Arizona is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer . Women and minorities are strongly urged to apply. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR : No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in the Weekly Report mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED )\D RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES:

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Arts & Entertainment Also nominated for Golden Globes this year were Raul Julia and Sonia Braga , both for "supporting roles" in the comedy Moon Over Parador . MORE NOMINATIONS, MORE AWARDS: Latinos are faring well in this year's entertainment awards season, with four Golden Globe nominations and one recording industry Ufetime Achievement Award. The HFPA gives out its awards Jan.28.The event will be telecast na tionally by the TBS cable network. In a related item, the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences-which hands out its Grammy Awards in February-has named Spanish cellist Pablo Casals as one of nine Ufetime Achieve ment Award winners for 1989. The big winner so far is Edward James Olmos , who captured two Gol den Globe nominations from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in the "best actor in a film drama" category for his role in Stand and Deliver and as "best supporting actor in a lV drama" for his role in Miami Vice. Casals, one of the most celebrated cellists of all time , lived his last years in Puerto Rico . He is the namesake of the island's international Festival Casals . Olmos won a Golden Globe in the latter category in 1986. Scores of Latinos were expected to be among Grammy nominees at least in the three "Latin" categories-when they were announced late last week. (Those nominees, unavailable at press time, will be listed here next week . ) "I am stunned," Olmos said about the two nominations . "If nothing else happens this year, I'll be satisfied." Olmos, who won a special Golden Apple award from the Hollywood Women's Press Club late last year, will not be directing a film this year as was reported here . "The project could not wait for me," Olmos told Weekly Report, ex plaining that he leaves this month for Europe to co-star with Willem Dafoe in a film . ONE LINER: Latino comedy troupes Culture Clash and Latins Anonymous , plus singers Irma Rangel and Lalo Guerrero, are the fea tured performers at A Night of Music, Theater and Comedy, a fund raiser for Americas 2001 magazine. It will be held Jan . 21 at the lngall's Auditorium of East Los Angeles College ... JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES: The In stitute for Journalism Education in San Francisco offers reporting, editing and management training programs for minority journalists with support from three universities . Northwestern University, for example, houses IJE ' s Management Training Center in Evanston , Ill. It is accepting applications through Feb . 15 for an eight-week program for reporters and editors . IJE also provides a fel lowship for minority persons already in management; its application deadline is May 16. Contact IJE Management Training Center, Leverone Hall, Room 3080, 2001 E. Sheridan Road, Northwestern University , Evanston, Ill. 60201 (415) 642-5962. The institute's eight-week editing program is hosted by the University of Arizona and in cludes copy editing for The Tucson Citizen HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT " A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher : Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Ecfrtor: Felix Perez !-."Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Luis Restrepo . No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission . Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 and The Arizona Daily . Star . Trainees are guaranteed placement with a newspaper after completion of the course . Applications are being accepted through Feb . 1 . Contact Edit ing Program for Minority Journalists, Jour nalism Dept. , Franklin Bldg., 101M, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz . 85721 (602) 6215777. An 11-week reporting program takes place each summer at the University of California, Berkeley, which serves as IJE's home office . Reporter trainees are guaranteed a job upon completion of the program. Applications are in vited through Feb . 15. Contact Summer Program for Minority Journalists, Room B-28 North Gate Hall, School of Journalism, Univer sity of California, Berkeley , Calif. 94720 (415) 642-5962 . C.P.B. RADIO : National Public Radio's Latin File and a series to be produced by KSJV public radio in Fresno , Calif., will receive funds in fiscal year 1989 from the Corporation --Antonio Mejias-Rentas for said Rick Madden, CPB's director of radio program funds . The KSJV series will focus on immigrant stu dents in Fresno public schools . Madden would not specify funding because contracts have not yet been signed but said that CPB has spent $1.4 million over three years in Hispanic-related projects . This in cludes the two proposed programs . NOTABLE: Washington, D . C . , correspon dent/bureau chief for N(timex, Jose Carreno 40, moves to Mexico City to become deputy general director of the worldwide Mexican news agency. Carreno was a member of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D . C ... . Also in the nation ' s capital, Channel4 morning news anchor Linda Lopez is being credited for doubling the station's ratings in the 6 : 30 a.m . time slot allotted for WAC ' s News4 Today Show. Lopez has signed a new multiyear contract with the station ... ----Darryl Lynette Figueroa "That's my grandfather, the big white one. • Jan . 16, 1989 Hispanic Link Weekly Report