Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, January 23, 1989

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, January 23, 1989
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
U.S. Attorney General Richard Thornburgh names Benito Romano as the interim replacement In Manhattan for recently retired U.S. Attorney Rudolph Giuliani. Romano becomes the first Puerto Rican to fill the prosecutor’s post in the New York borough...The U.S. Defense Department sends a letter of protest to the Panamanian government for the beating and threatened killing of Mike Nieves, a petty officer with the Navy, by members of the Panamanian Defense Forces...After weeks of protest by city council members, Mary Macias becomes the first woman to serve as mayor of Nogales, Ariz. The councilors objected to the fact Macias did not live in the city at the time of the election... Libya returns the body of Air Force Maj. Fernando Ribas-Dominicci, from
RECTO,
Utuado, Puerto Rico. The 33-year-old pilot was killed in the 1986 air raid on the Middle East nation...The Mianii F^ljjejOftbartment suspends officer William Lozano, a four-yem^merairofme rorce, for fatally shooting 23-year-old Clement Lloyd while he was fleeing from police on his motorcycle. The shooting sparked off rioting and looting by black youths in the Overtown district of Miami. Lloyd's passenger, Alan Blanchard, later died of head injuries suffered when the motorcycle collided with a car...Chula Vista, Calif., police return to Onecima Lripte, 30, her 10-month- old daughter. The girl was reportedly found after spending two days in a drainage ditch. Authorities claim the baby was part of a group of undocumented immigrants crossing a highway. Lopez, part of the group, was struck by a hit-and-run vehicle and had both legs broken...
;^J^ESsPANjTON^EEK^^EroR^f^^
Body Urges Civil Rights Restoration
Court Approves Award Against English Policy
The Los Angeles County Claims Court approved Jan. 13 an $85,000 settlement to a Hispanic court clerk who filed a discrimination lawsuit against three Huntington Park municipal judges. The suit charged that a rule they imposed forbade her to speak anything but English at work.
Alva Guti6rrez, who filed the suit more than four years ago, was given the settlement on the recommendation of county attorneys. The attorneys claimed that the settlement would be less costly than defending against the charge.
According to Gutierrez’s counsel, the three judges preferred to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. The settlement must be approved by a U.S. District Court judge.
Last November, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court's opinion that struck the English-only work rule. The settlement arose out of a complaint filed with county’s Civil Service Commission.
Citing evidence of persistent discrimination against Hispanics, blacks and other minorities during the Reagan administration's tenure, the Citizens’ Commission on Civil Rights called on incoming President Bush at a Jan. 17 Capitol Hill press conference to recommit the federal government to safeguarding the equal opportunity rights of its citizenry.
CCCR Chairman Arthur Flemming said, "Our basic recommendation is for Bush to set a new tone.” Flemming, a Republican who served under President Dwight D. Eisenhower as Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, was removed by President Reagan as chairman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights in 1981. Another member of the citizens’ commission, Manuel Rufz, also is aformer member of the federal agency.
The private bipartisan commission, composed of several former federal officials, including an attorney general, a secretary of the Department of Labor and chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission,
urged Bush to establish immediately a cabinet-level task force to address the discrimination problems cited in its report.
The report’s executive summary concludes that the Reagan administration was unsuccessful in its efforts to reverse civil rights policies, such as adherence to affirmative action or other “race conscious" processes, due to continued support from Congress, the courts and state and local governments.
It notes that the 1980s saw the Voting Rights Amendment of 1982, the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1988 and the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988.
The real culprit, according to the report titled "One Nation Indivisible," has been a dramatic decline in the enforcement of civil rights laws. This has left millions of people suffering from discrimination in housing, employment, health care and other areas without adequate redress, according to the report.
"The federal enforcement machinery (for civil rights laws) has rusted away under the Reagan administration," said William Taylor, CCCR member and former staff director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.
The study, to be published in its entirety in March, was based on papers written by 40 of the nation’s leading civil rights experts. Among the examples of discrimination and lack of enforcement of civil rights laws cited:
• The Office of Civil Rights of the Department of Education was found by a House subcommittee to have conducted a “nationwide scheme" in 1987 to backdate documents and persuade complainants to drop their charges.
• From 1975 to 1980, the Office of Civil Rights conducted 600 compliance reviews in the area of bilingual education in 573 school districts. From 1981 to 1986, OCR reviews dropped to 95 in 66 school districts, despite civil rights violations found in 58% of the cases.
• In 1986, 30% of all Hispanic students were enrolled in the nation's 25 largest school districts. Only four school desegregation cases have been filed since 1981.
Aid Comes Slowly for Immigrant Influx
Brownsville, Texas, and Miami, bracing themselves for what many say will be the largest influx of Central Americans in recent memory, have begun to receive assistance, although limited, from private groups to house and feed the new arrivals.
The influx will continue unabated at least until Jan. 31, when a federal judge will rule on the constitutionality of a policy by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. That policy ordered that people seeking asylum had to have their applications processed at their point of entry. The order, in effect, meant thousands of people were stuck in Brownsville.
The dramatic increase in Central Americans trekking to Texas and eventually Miami grew out of a temporary restraining order issued Jan. 9 by a U.S. District Court judge in Brownsville against the INS policy.
Delighted at the support, frantic city officials agree that the aid is a stopgap measure. The
only solution, they say, is for the federal government to release funds to the strapped municipalities and to issue temporary work permits to the asylum-seekers, most of whom are from Nicaragua. According to officials in Miami, most of the immigrants could find work if allowed to do so.
In the meantime, the American Red Cross has opened five shelters in Brownsville and the Catholic Archdiocese is providing shelter in Miami. Nearly 60 trailers have been given to Miami by the federal government, but authorities do not know who will foot the $38,000 bill to ship them from Georgia
Dade County, Fla., in fiscal year 1989 got $10.5 million of the $34.4 million in federal funds for refugee assistance. Reagan's budget proposal for 1990 cuts all such funds. County officials estimate that 100,000 new immigrants will arrive this year alone.
— F&P&ez
continued on page 2


Legislators Must Bring Latinos into Mainstream - Report
Policy-makers must pump more money into education, welfare and labor programs if Hispanics are to enter the economic mainstream in the next decade, according to a report issued by the Washington, D.C.-based Population Reference Bureau Jan. 11.
The authors of "U.S. Hispanics: Challenging Issues for the 1990s" also warn of a potential skirmish over limited government funds. In 1988, the median age for Hispanics at 25.5 years was nearly seven years less than that of the population as a whole. While the rest of the nation is graying, the Hispanic com-
munity will be just approaching middle age — a younger population with different needs.
The analysis, funded by the Ford Foundation, cites low educational achievement as a major obstacle to Hispanic advancement. It points out that Latinos in 25-34 age group were more than three times as likely to have dropped out of high school. Only 12% of Hispanics in this group completed at least four years of college, while more than 24% of non-Hispanics achieved the same.
The authors, Rafael Valdivieso and Cary Davis, state that “because educational attain-
ment is strongly associated with social and economic status, the high dropout rate is certain to contribute to Latino poverty."
According to the 1987 figures cited, Hispanics already suffer from the effects of poverty and low-wage earning. The report recommends a boost in the $3.35 minimum wage. Hispanics’ median income was $20,300 — two-thirds of the non-Hispanic median of $31,600. In addition, the number of poor Hispanics grew by 90% between 1979 and 1987, states the report.
— Sophia Nieves
Rights Advocates Expect Better Future
continued from page 1
• There was a 70% decline in the number of cases filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission between 1981 and 1982. By 1985, there were 22% fewer cases in court than in 1981; the backlog of complaints at the EEOC grew from 55,000 in 1980 to 62,000 in 1984.
• The Department of Housing and Urban Development estimated that 2 million instances of housing discrimination occur each year. Yet since 1981, an average of only 10 new discrimination cases have been filed per year; that compared with an average of 32 cases between 1969 and 1978.
Canadian immigration authorities were expected to decide late last week whether a Cuban family residing in the United States that unwittingly entered Canada would be granted a visa extension. The family — refused reentry into the United States — has been holed up in a motel room for the past four weeks, surviving through the kindness of others.
The Canadian visitors’ visas for Carlos Fajardo and his family expired Jan. 15. Technically, the Fajardos deported themselves Dec. 23 when they took a three-day trip by car from Miami to see the snow on the Canadian side of Niagara Falls. They were in Canada 20 minutes.
A 39-year-old boatwright, Fajardo met Jan. 16 with a lawyer from the Niagara Refugee Committee to prepare his appeal to Canadian immigration authorities for a two-month visa extension. He wants to return to Miami, where he, his parents and brothers have lived for several years, but says he will seek asylum in Canada rather than be repatriated to Cuba Fajardo, who entered the United States in 1985 and was awaiting consideration of his asylum application, nullified his application when he left the country, says the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. The INS has stood firm despite a plea from Sen. Bob Graham (D-Fla.). Fajardo’s Cuban wife, Ber-2
The report and an extensive set of recommendations have been forwarded to Bush, Congress and civil rights advocates.
CCCR members expressed a sense of optimism that fairness and equal opportunity might be made a national priority under a Bush administration. Former EEOC Chairman William Brown explained, “Maybe it's just because we're coming out from under very serious storm clouds."
Brown offered the possibility that Reagan-appointed judges might not "live up to their advance billing" as conservatives. “If the Justice Department takes a leadership position, it sends a very strong signal to the courts."
—Darryl Lynette Figueroa
maida, and her children Yordalys and Yoan-dys, who entered the United States in 1986 with fake passports from Venezuela, were ordered to leave the country last August when their application for asylum was rejected by the U.S. Justice Department’s Board of Immigration Appeals.
‘They are undergoing a lot of stress.. .and just want a rest," the manager of the Ontario motel where the Fajardos are staying told Weekly Report. They have referred all reporters’ questions to him.
The Fajardo family has been receiving help from local church groups and friends.
— Luis Restrepo
The Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, stating that it wants to maintain an "ongoing dialogue" with the media and entertainment industries on improving the image of Hispanics, announced Jan. 16 that it was withdrawing as a member of the National Hispanic Media Coalition.
"While NHMC has made significant efforts, we feel we must assert our goals and objectives, which require us to engage the industry in an ongoing dialogue to increase Hispanic hirings and improve our community's image in
Jan. 23,1989
Thornburgh Considers a Bureau for Citizenship
U.S. Attorney General Richard Thornburgh met with the Latino Issues Forum to discuss its proposal for the creation of a federal citizenship bureau separate from the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Thornburgh was described by those attending Jan. 13 as receptive to the idea, but noncommittal.
"I’m optimistic. He asked good questions,” said John Gamboa, president of the San Francisco-based group, adding that the attorney general seemed to see some of the difficulties inherent in the dual role played by the INS — enforcing immigration laws while serving as the agency that naturalizes new citizens.
Among those at the meeting were representatives from the National Council of La Raza, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, California Rural Legal Assistance and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.
Michael Zamba, a policy analyst with NALEO, said that any hopes for a speedy resolution need to be tempered by the realization that Congress will be putting a higher priority on other matters.
Zamba said that in the interim more of the INS budget should be devoted to programs encouraging citizenship. “Only 10% of the INS budget goes to naturalization. This is a travesty when one-third of the adult Latino population is not naturalized."
the media," said HAMAS Chairwoman Ivy Orta.
Armando Duron, chairman of NHMC and a lawyer by trade, said the withdrawal was "a total surprise,” adding that HAMAS “never communicated any dissatisfaction."
The most recent action by NHMC was when it filed petitions last November with the Federal Communications Commission to deny the license renewals of two television stations in Los Angeles for their failure to hire and promote Latinos.
Family’s Troubles in Canada Continue
— Sophia Nieves
HAMAS Says Quits to Media Coalition
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Coni Batlle, guest columnist
Hands Off, Por Favor
We Hispanics have now risen from an "invisible minority" to become the latest "market" to be courted by corporate America.
It’s just so much fun to see ourselves reflected In the ads and to hear Spanish over media outlets that never used it before. So one might ask, "What is there to complain about?"
Well, maybe nothing and maybe a lot.
Have you seen"SabadoGigante"?
"Gigantic Saturday," as It translates, is atop-rated variety/game show that beams out of Miami every Saturday for 3 1/2 hours. It reaches more than 400 Spanish-language television stations.
Products advertised on this program range from diapers to fast foods. They are manufactured by the same companies that for many years have reaped the benefits of a loyal, family-oriented market that is now estimated at $130 billion in annual purchasing power.
My concern-and I hope yours-is not what is being done to us as potential customers, but HOW it is being done.
The effects of TV on children are well known. Television, we have been warned, helps pre-school children make their first value judgments. It is this point that is disturbing about the way products are promoted on "SabadoGigante."
SEXISM STALKS OUR CULTURE The use of attractive young women wearing enticing clothes is commonplace on television game shows, but "SiibadoGigante" takes it one step further, one step too far. The announcer, Pedro de Poll, and the show's very popular host, Mario (Don Francisco) Kreutzberger, delight in making sexually loaded remarks while fondling the bare shoulders of their female models. The appalling manner in which these young women are used is painfully reminiscent of the 1950s’ views of a woman’s worth and place in our society.
It is also a chilling reminder that sexism still stalks our culture.
By allowing this type of behavior on nationally televised programs, we are saying to our children that, in parts of our collective culture, women are still objects. Here are some of Miami's most beautiful women garbed in frilly dresses designed to accentuate butt and bust. jPorDios! Good Lord!
Many of us have had to fight hard to maintain our cultural traditions and our language while attempting success in this society. We mean no falta de respeto-lack of respect-to our elders or to newly arrived Hispanics when we balk against perpetuating old "standards" or when we suggest that some “traditions" are not healthy.
WE EMBRACE DIFFERENT VALUES We still love them all as members of our extended families and as an important part of our community. But the truth is that our generation has embraced different values and priorities about sex roles, and we’re serious about passing those new values on to our children. The example set on "SibadoGigante" takes the movement for gender equality back 30 years.
If we as Latinos, male and female, can muster the necessary forces to oppose discrimination in employment, improve the quality of educational opportunity for our children, and work toward improving other ills of our society, we can certainly voice our displeasure about this offensive form of advertising.
Let the people at "SibadoGigante" know that those beautiful Latinas can be appreciated for their talents as models and actresses without the shameful, demeaning treatment given them by its host and announcer. Un poco mis de respeto...por favor. A little more respect, please.
(Coni Batlle, of Chicago, is a native of Ponce, Puerto Rico. She is a free-lance marketing consultant.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
THE EYES OF THE BEHOLDER: The Los Angeles Times, which for years ignored the Hispanic community except for an occasional "expose" on barrio gangs, finished the old year with another big scoop, starting on Page 1 and filling two full inside pages, on: "Chicano Gangs: A History of Violence.":
Across the country, The Miami Herald ran a thoroughly researched series Christmas Week on the development of the Cuban community there. Sample head: "Second-generation Cubans seek own destinies - Goals shaped by pride in parents’ struggle, exposure to new ideas."
Are the Chicano and Cubano communities that much different? Or is it the way the leading newspapers in each city choose to perceive and portray them?
GERALDO’S ASBESTOS AWARD: In its year-end assessment of TV’s 10 best and 10 worst programs during 1988, The Washington Post acknowledged Geraldo Rivera's “Devil Worship: Exploring Satan’s Underground" as No. 1 in the latter category.
Rivera, it said, proved that there really is a hell, managing to elicit sympathy for the Devil, "but none for himself," in the process.
"PRESIDENTIAL CONCUBINES": Geraldo, take note: A new book by that title is the rage of Caracas. It contends that nearly every Venezuelan president since Sim6n Bolivar has had one.
Explains author Carlos Capriles Ayala in a piece we saw in the Chicago Tribune:
"Venezuelan men are macho. The fact that they have mistresses is not seen as something bad...What upsets people is that presidents are allowing themselves to become influenced by their concubine." —KayBirbaro
Quoting...
THE MIAMI HERALD, in a Jan. 13 editorial, reacting to the Jan. 9 temporary restraining order issued by a federal judge in Texas that allowed refugee applicants freedom of movement in the United States:
"Within the next 48 hours, the droplets of Nicaraguans arriving in Miami will become a rivulet. Within days, that rivulet probably will become a torrent It has the potential of swelling into a tidal wave that would engulf Greater Miami, causing social and economic destruction more severe than any American anywhere has ever experienced...
"This is not scare talk...Behind these first refugees are not just the 15,000 contras encamped in Honduras, and their families. Behind them are as many of Nicaragua’s three million people as decide to flee San-dinista oppression and economic collapse. And behind those are untold others desperate to flee the guerrilla war in El Salvador and the poverty in Honduras..."
DORIS MEISSNER, former acting commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, in a Dec. 29 Washington Post commentary:
"Close to 1 million Salvadorans, i.e., about 20 percent of El Salvador’s population, reside in the United States...(M)ore than one third of Salvadoran families have one or more relatives in the United States. These relatives’ earnings supply more than 60 percent of the income for their families at home. Cumulatively, migrant remittances bring more than $1 billion annually into El Salvador...
"These figures tell a story in which migration has reached a scale where repatriation of any magnitude could threaten the economic stability of an entire country...
“Current estimates are that Nicaraguan migrants are sending $60 million from the United States this year...It is only a matter of time before the economic interdependency between Nicaragua and its nationals in the United States approximates that of El Salvador...
"Central American leaders are likely to remind us, with increasing forcefulness, that repatriation threatens economic recovery in the region. The new administration may well find that changing its foreign policy points to changing its immigration policy too."
Jan. 23.1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


COLLECTING
SECOND-STAGE LEGALIZATION: "ESL/Civics: Planning and Implementing English and Civics Programs" is an 86-page guide, prepared in part by the National Council of La Raza, on setting up or expanding services to the newly legalized. Copies are $12.50. Write to American Council for Nationalities Service, 95 Madison Ave., Third Floor, New York, N.Y. 10016.
CIVIL RIGHTS REPORT: A 39-page summary of a more comprehensive report, scheduled tor publication in March, assesses civil rights policy and enforcement during the Reagan administration. A copy of “One Nation Indivisible: The Civil Rights Challenge for the 1990s” is available for $5. Write Reginald Govan, Project Director, Citizens’ Commission on Civil Rights, 2000 M St. NW, Suite 400, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 659-5565.
NEW MAGAZINE: The magazine “Hispanic Today," targeting colleges and universities, begins 10-times-a-year publication with its December/January issue. Subscriptions are $10 annually. Weekly Report readers may receive a free copy of the publication by requesting it from Barbara Diamond, Editor, Hispanic Today, 21757 Devonshire St., Chatsworth, Calif. 91311 (818) 700-2408.
CONTRACEPTIVE STERILIZATION: The September/October (1988) issue of Family Planning Perspectives magazine contains the results of a survey that found that 30% of low-income women who planned to be sterilized incorrectly believed that sterilization would not stop them from having children in the future. For a copy send $5 to The Alan Guttmacher Institute, 111 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10003.
HISPANICS IN THE 90s: "U.S. Hispanics: Challenging Issues for the 1990s," a report by the Population Reference Bureau, details a future social crisis that will occur if trends continue without a change in public policy. The 16-page report is available by sending $6 to PRB, 77714th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 639-8040.
FUTURE WORK FORCE: "The Future World of Work: Looking Toward the Year 2000" is a 71 -page report analyzing trends in the work place, including a section on underused groups. For a copy send $17.50 ($12.50 for United Way organizations) to United Way of America, Strategic Planning and Markets Division, 701 N. Fairfax St., Alexandria, Va. 22314- 9989 (703) 836-7100.
JOURNALISM FELLOWSHIPS: Applicants with at least five years' experience in the media are invited to apply to the Michigan Journalism Fellows program. Fellows will engage in a full year of academic study at the University of Michigan in an area of research chosen by them. Fellowships include a stipend of $2,750 a month. Deadline is Feb. 1. For applications and information, contact Charles Eisendrath, Director, Michigan Journalism Fellows, 2072 Frieze Building, University oil Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48109 (313) 763-2400.
CONNECTING
PREPARING FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL Recognizing that Hispanic and other underrepresented students often are not accepted into graduate school because of their lack of experience in research, the U.S. Department of Education last month granted more than $87,000 to the University of California, Riverside, to fund a program that would give them that experience.
Twenty-five college juniors from the South and Southwest will spend eight weeks next summer conducting research with faculty mentors. The Southern and Southwest Regional Minority Honors Outreach Program will also include courses in research methodology as well as advise the students on careers, fellowship resources and graduate school application procedures. The students will be provided with transportation allowance, academic credit, fees, room and board, and a $1,500 stipend.
The deadline is Feb. 1. Anyone interested should contact Marie Steward, Graduate Division, Room B-24 Library South, University of California, Riverside, Calif. 92521 (714) 878-3680.
RESIDENCE TEST AVAILABLE Beginning next month, persons seeking permanent residence under the Immigration Reform and Control Act can take a standardized examination developed in part by a coalition of immigrant advocacy organizations and approved by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
Designed and funded by Educational Testing Service, the test consists of 20 multiple-choice questions and a writing exercise.
Some of the organizations represented on the coalition that oversaw the development of the test were the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials and the Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.
The $10 test fee will go to cover expenses in the non-profit venture. For test locations call NALEO’s hotline at 1-800-446-2536. In California call 1-800-346-2536.
UTERACY CENTER OPENS
Thanks to a $50,000 grant from the Allstate Foundation, the SER Family Learning Center in Waukegan, III., a computerized facility offering literacy and job training programs to Hispanics and other disadvantaged groups, opened last month.
Expecting to serve 150 people in its first year, the center will teach participants to read, write and communicate effectively so that they may go on to finish school and find a job.
Cajendar_______________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regarding your organization's event will be included in Hispanic Link's calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Unk Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC ELDERLY New York Jan. 25
The New York chapter of the National Hispanic Council on Aging will hold a breakfast with the theme "The Hispanic Elderly: The Aging of a Young Community." Among those expected to attend is Marta Sotomayor, NHCoA president, and Angelo Falc6n,
president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy. Mario Tapia (212) 477-3800
RECEPTION Newark, N.J. Jan. 27
A reception will be held by the Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey to honor Deborah Aguiar-Velez on her appointment as director of the New Jersey Division of Development of Small Business, Women and Minority Businesses.
Wanda Garcia (609) 757-6349
^TELECOMMUNICATIONS New York Jan. 27
A miniseminar will be held to explain the function and importance of tax certificates in encouraging the sale of telecommunications entities to minority-owned or minority-controlled companies. The seminar is sponsored by several groups, including the Federal Communications Commission and the Minority Telecommunications Development Program of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration.
Shawna Jones (202) 377-1835
RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS Washington, D.C. Jan. 28-Feb. 1 National Religious Broadcasters will hold its 46th Annual Convention. Among the featured activities will be a Hispanic worship service and a Hispanic broadcasters luncheon.
Audrey Langdon (201) 428-5400
SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT Denver Jan. 29
A performance hosted by the Denver Center Theatre Company and its Latino Task Force will raise money for scholarships for Hispanic actors to attend the National Theatre Conservatory. The performance will mark the start of a benefit tour of the play 'Cuentos' by Carlos Morton and Angel Vigil. Jacquie Kitzelman (303) 893-4200.
COMING SOON
BUSINESS DINNER Latin Business Association Los Angeles Feb. 4 Ana Barbosa (818) 965-4227
4
Jan. 23,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
DEAR PERSONNEL; OJREC- . TOR: ; No other publication or: •' system lets you target a national pool of Latino exe^iyq profes* s stonals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Lin);: Weekly Report; To piace: :an, >d in ; Marketplace, please caS or send s; yottr copy to: Hispanic Link , l420NSt NW,Washirigton(O.C, 2000$ (202) 234-0737 dr:{202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 piitt. (ET) Tuesday will be In. Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cento per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request
FULL-TIME TENURE TRACK THEATRE FACULTY POSITION
Opening for full-time, tenure track Assistant Professor in Design and Technical Theatre. MA, MFA or PhD and established teaching and design credentials required. Two courses each semester and design 2 or 3 shows. $26K + for nine months.
Submit application letter, resume and names of 3 references to: Brad Bowles, University of Colorado at Denver, Theatre, Box 177,1200 Larimer, Denver, Co. 80204, (303) 556-8529, by deadline of March 1, 1989.
Explore Employment Opportunities With Arlington County Government Seminar
Arlington County Government Department of Personnel is sponsoring an evening seminar to provide job-seekers with helpful information on employment opportunities with Arlington County.
Workshop presenter Marvin A. Cortez, Outreach Specialist with the Personnel Department, will cover topics such as:
• Identifying the appropriate job match
• Determining relevant skills and abilities
• Learning to compete effectively
Personnel Department staff will be able to accommodate individuals in English and Spanish.
WHEN: Thursday, February 2,1989
7:00 pm-9:00pm
(If cancelled due to inclement weather the make-up date will be Wednesday, February 8,1989.)
WHERE: Arlington County Courthouse
2100 Clarendon Boulevard Lobby - Conference Rooms C & D Arlington, Virginia
Interested persons must register by Tuesday, January 31,1989 by calling (703) 358-3501.
***No job interviews or job offers will be made at this workshop***
EOE
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES SUPERVISOR Ann. Number: 1087-9A-DHS Salary: $31,283
This position manages and supervises the Employment Services staff of the newly established Employment Center. Staff is responsible for providing an array of services to a variety of clients enabling them to define and pursue career goals, obtain training and secure employment. Requires BS in a related field and three years experience.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 pm on FEBRUARY 2, 1989. To request application material please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD(703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2100 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 511, Arlington, VA 22201 EOE/MFH
GOBIERNO DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS
AGENTES DE SEGURIDAD
ASECURE SU FUTURO CON EL GOBIERNO NORTEAMERICANO
Si desea hacer carrera como agente de seguridad, nada mejor que proteger a la Agencia de Seguridad Nacional ("National Security Agency"). Tenemos numerosas vacantes en el cuerpo de Agentes Umformados de Seguridad en el area de Fort Meade, Maryland.
El trabajo es responsable y excitante—proteger bienes de propiedad federal, mantener el orden y salvaguardar la seguridad del personal en todas las circunstancias.
• El Salario es de $20,463 o mas, segun la experiencia
Los candidatos deben ser graduados de la Escuela SuperiorfHigh School) y mayores de 18 anos con 2 ahos de experiencia laboral general, con experiencia militar o con 2 anos de estudios univer-sitarios.
• Los candidatos estan sujetos a una investigacion de seguridad.
Los solicitarTtes aprobados recibiran 8 semanas de errtrenamien-to en el "Federal Law Enforcement Training Center" en Georgia
• Se requiere tener licencia de conductor.
• Los candidatos aprobados deberan portar armas de fuego.
Se ruega enviar resumen/curriculum, carta explicativa o SF-I7I.
National Security Agency Attn. M322 (DBJ)
Ft. Meade, MD 20755-6000
Los solicitantes y sus familiares inmediatos deben ser ciudadanos de los Estados Unidos.
Igualdad de oportunidades laborales.
M
A
R
K
E
T
P
L
A
C
E
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report
Jan. 23,1989
5


Arts & Entertainment
FOR THE RECORD: The crossover power and longevity of Latino recording artists yielded several 1988 Grammy nominations. Nominees, announced Jan. 12, included the first-ever nod for the Cuban American act Gloria Estefan and the Miami Sound Machine — in the "best pop performance by a duo or group with a vocal" category. The group is nominated for the Spanish-language version of its hit Anything tor You (No te olvidarS), a single on the Epic label conspicuously absent among "Latin music" nominees.
Another Latino nominated in the "non-Latin" field is Carlos Santana, in the "best rock instrumental performance" category, for the Colum-bia/CBS album Blues tor El Salvador. Santana, who has one previous nod, is among various '60s rockers in the run for 1988.
Singers Montserrat Cabalfo and Pldcido Domingo compete in the "best opera recording” category with, respectively, Bellini's Norma and Wagner’s Lohengrin (both London).
Linda Ronstadt — who has earned three Grammys and multiple nominations in categories from pop to country—is up this year for "best Mexican-American performance" for her Canciones de mi padre album (Elektra).
The singer, who won an '87 Grammy for her Trio album (with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris), runs against two past winners: Flaco Jmdnez(Flaco's Amigos on the Arhoolie label) and LosTigres del Norte (Los (dobs del pueblo, Fonovisa).
Jose Jos6 earned his sixth nomination, in the "best Latin American* category, for his Soyasi album from Ariola. The Mexican singer has never won a Grammy.
Rubdn Blades is nominated the third year in a row in the "best tropical Latin performance" for his Antecedente album (Elektra).
The 1988 Grammy winners will be announced in Los Angeles Feb. 22. Other "Latin field" nominees are:
BEST LATIN POP: Dyango, Cae la noche (EMI); Raphael, Las apariendasengahan\ Roberto Carlos, Roberto Ca/ibs;Jos6 Luis Perales, Suehodelibertad (all on Discos CBS Int’l).
BEST TROPICAL LATIN: Oscar D’le6n, La salsa soyyo\ Eddie Santiago, Sigo atrevido (both TH-Rodven U.S.A.); Pete Escovedo, Mister E (Crossover); Johnny Pacheco and Pete"El Conde" Rodriguez, Sal-sobita (Fania).
BEST MEXICAN AMERICAN: Jos6 Javier Solis, No me olvidaris (Profono); Los Yonics, Petabyespinas (Fonovisa);PlbTrevino&Majic, Qu'iero verte otra vez (Discos CBS Int’l); Los Bukis, Si me recuerdas (Melody); Los Freddy's, Vida nueva (EMI).
—Antonio Mejiis-Rentas
Media Report
TORO ELECTED: Publisher Manuel Toro of the Spanish-language weekly La Prensa, Orlando, Fla, was elected president of the National Association of Hispanic Publications Jan. 14 during the body’s annual convention in Las Vegas, Nev. He defeated Tino Dur£n, publisher of El Informador, Fort Worth, Texas, by a 22-18 delegate vote.
Toro succeeds Zeke Montes, of Tele-Gula de Chicago, who stepped down after heading the eight-year-old organization for the past three years.
Some 200 people attended the Jan. 12-14 event.
Other national officers elected were: Vice president: Victor Field, MundoArtlstlco, Bur-
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Luis Restrepo.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch, if placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
bank, Calif.; secretary: Gilberto Morales, El Observador, San Jose, Calif.; and treasurer: A B. Collado, El Hlspano, Albuquerque, N.M.
Winners of regional posts were: Jos6 Sueiro, El Latino, Washington, D.C.; Luis Rossi, La Raza, Chicago; Tino Duran, El Informador, Fort Worth, Texas; Eddie Escobedo, El Mundo, Las Vegas, Nev.; Juan Piffarre, Horizontes, San Francisco; and Diane Lerner, La Gufa, Los Angeles. In the Northeastern region, there was a tie between Aaron L6pez, El Dlrectorio Hlspano, Reading, Pa., and Carlos Carrillo, Impacto, New York City. It will be resolved later.
This year, for the first time, the association conducted an elaborate awards competition, judged by non-NAHP professionals.
Top winner was El Mensajero de San Francisco with four awards:
Best Spanish-Language Weekly, Best Entertainment Section, Best Sports Section, and Best Editorial Column.
Other winners: Best Design: The Forum of San Diego; Best Spanish-Language TV Guide: Tele-Gula de Chicago-, Best Bilingual Weekly: La Voz de Colorado-, Best Less-Than-Weekly Publication: El Sol de San Diego.
Growth was also recognized. La Gufa of Los Angeles, with a 181,000 circulation, was cited for being the largest Spanish-language TV guide in the nation, and Extra of Chicago, with a 39,400 circulation, won Largest Hispanic Weekly honors.
Philip Morris Companies Inc. won an award as the Most Responsive National Corporation.
— Charlie Erickson
6
Jan. 23,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

RECD. (;If< Making The News This Week U.S. Attorney General Richard Thornburgh names Benito Romano as the interim replacement in Manhattan for recently retired U.S. Attor ney Rudolph Giuliani . Romano becomes the first Puerto Rican to fill the prosecutor's post in the New York borough ... The U .S. Defense Department sends a letter of protest to the Panamanian government for the beating and threatened killing of Mike Nieves, a petty officer with the Navy, by members of the Panamanian Defense Forces ... After weeks of protest by city council members, Mary Macias becomes the first woman to serve as mayor of Nogales, Ariz. The councilors objected to the fact Macias did not live in the city at the time of the election ... Libya returns the body of Air Force Maj. Fernando Ribas-Domlniccl, from Utuado Puerto Rico . The 33-year-old pilot was killed in the 1986 air raid the Middle East nation ... The MifJlit suspends officer William Lozano, a for fatally shooting 23-year-old Clement Lloyd wh1le flee1ng fr?m police on his motorcycle. The shooting sparked off not1ng and loot1ng by black youths in the ?f Miami. Lloyd's passenger, Alan Blanchard , later died of head lnJunes suffered when the motor cycle collided with a car ... Chula Vista, Calif. , police return to Onecima lip2, 30, her 1 0-monthold daughter .. The girl found after spending two days in a drainage d1tch. Authont1es baby was part of a group of undocumented immigrants cross1ng a highway. L6pez, part of the group, was struck by a hit-and-run vehicle and had both legs broken ... Body Urges Civil Rights Restoration Court Approves Award Against English Policy The Los Angeles County Claims Court ap proved Jan. 13 an $85,000 settlement to a Hispanic court clerk who filed a discrimination lawsuit against three Huntington Park municipal judges . The suit charged that a rule they imposed forbade her to speak anything but English at work . Alva Gutierrez, who filed the suit more than four years ago, was given the settlement on the recommendation of county attorneys. The at torneys claimed that the settlement would be less costly than defending against the charge. According to Gutierrez's counsel, the three judges preferred to appeal to the U . S . Supreme Court . The settlement must be approved by a U.S. District Court judge. Last November, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court ' s opinion that struck the English-only work rule. The settle ment arose out of a complaint filed with county's Civil Service Commission. Citing evidence of persistent discrimination against Hispanics, blacks and other minorities during the Reagan administration's tenure, the Citizens' Commiss ion on Civil Rights called on incoming President Bush at a Jan . 17 Capitol Hill press conference to recommit the federal government to safeguarding the equal oppor tunity ri,ghts of its citizenry . CCCR Chairman Arthur Flemming said, "Our basic recommendation is for Bush to set a new tone . " Flemming, a Republican who served under President Dwight D . Eisenhower as Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, was removed by President Reagan as chair man of the U . S . Commission on Civil Rights in 1981. Another member of the citizens' com mission, Manuel Rufz, also is a former member of the federal agency . The private bipartisan commission, com posed of several former federal officials, including an attorney general, a secretary of the Department of Labor and chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Aid Comes Slowly for Immigrant Influx Brownsville, Texas, and Miami, bracing only solution, they say, is for the federal themselves fo r what many say will be the government to release funds to the strapped largest influx of Central Americans in recent municipalities and to issue temporary work memory, have begun to receive assistance, permits to the •. most although limited, from private groups to Nicaragua . to offl house and feed the new arrivals. c1als 1n M1am1, most of the 1mm1grants could The influx will continue unabated at least find work if allowed to do so . until Jan . 31, when a federal judge will rule In the meantime, the American Red Cross on the constitutionality of a policy by the U . S . has opened five shelters in Brownsville and Immigration and Naturalization Service. That the Catholic Archdiocese is providing shelter policy ordered that people seeking asylum in Miami. Nearly 60 trailers have been given had to have their applications processed at to Miami by the federal government, but their point of entry . The order, in effect , meant authorities do not know who will foot the thousands of people were stuck in $38,000 bill to ship them from Georgia Brownsville. The dramatic increase in Central Dade County, Fla., in fiscal year 1989 got Americans trekking to Texas and eventually $10 . 5 million of the $34.4 million in federal Miami grew out of a temporary restraining funds for refugee assistance . Reagan's order issued Jan. 9 by a U.S . District Court budget proposal for 1990 cuts all such funds. judge in Brownsville against the INS policy . County officials estimate that 100,000 new Delighted at the support, frantic city officials immigrants will arrive this year alone. agree that the aid is a stopgap measure . The Fel
PAGE 2

Legislators Must Bring Latinos into Mainstream -Report Policy-makers must pump more money into education, welfare and labor programs if Hispanics are to enter the economic mainstream in the next decade, according to a report issued by the Washington, D.C . based Population Reference Bureau Jan. 11. The authors of "U.S. Hispanics: Challenging Issues for the 1990s" also warn of a potential skirmish over limited government funds . In 1988, the median age for Hispanics at 25.5 years was nearly seven years less than that of the population as a whole . While the rest of the nation is graying, the Hispanic community will be just approaching middle agea younger population with different needs. The analysis, funded by the Ford Founda tion, cites low educational achievement as a major obstacle to Hispanic advancement. It points out that Latinos in 25-34 age group were more than three times as likely to have dropped out of high school. Only 12% of Hispanics in this group completed at least four years of college, while more than 24% of non-Hispanics achieved the same. The authors, Rafael Valdivieso and Cary Davis, state that "because educational attainment is strongly associated with social and economic status, the high dropout rate is cer tain to contribute to Latino poverty." According to the 1987 figures cited, Hispanics already suffer from the effects of poverty and low-wage earning. The report recommends a boost in the $3.35 minimum wage. Hispanics' median income was $20,300 two-thirds of the non-Hispanic median of$31,600.1n addition, the number of poor Hispanics grew by 900A. between 1979 and 1987, states the report. -Sophia Nieves Rights Advocates Expect Better Future Thornburgh Considers a Bureau for Citizenship continued from page 1 • There was a 70% decline in the number of cases filed by the Equal Employment Oppor tunity Commission between 1981 and 1982 . . By 1985, there were 22% fewer cases in court than in 1981; the backlog of complaints at the EEOC grew from 55,000 in 1980 to 62,000 in 1984 . • The Department of Housing and Urban Development estimated that 2 million instan ces of housing discrimination occur each year . Yet since 1981, an average of only 10 new dis crimination cases have been filed per year; that compared with an average of 32 cases be tween 1969 and 1978. The report and an extensive set of recom mendations have been forwarded to Bush, Congress and civil rights advocates. CCCR members expressed a sense of op timism that fairness and equal opportunity might be made a national priority under a Bush administration. Former EEOC Chairman Wil liam Brown explained, " Maybe it's just be cause we ' re coming out from under very serious storm clouds . " Brown offered the possibility that Reagan-ap pointed judges might not "live up to their ad vance billing" as conservatives. "If the Justice Department takes a leadership position, it sends a very strong signal to the courts." -Darryl Lynette Figueroa U .S. Attorney General Richard Thornburgh met with the Latino Issues Forum to discuss its proposal for the creation of a federal citizen ship bureau separate from the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Thornburgh was described by those attending Jan . 13 as recep tive to the idea, but noncommittal. "I' m optimistic . He asked good questions," said John Gamboa, president of the San Fran cisco-based group, adding that the attorney general seemed to see some of the difficulties inherent in the dual role played by the INS enforcing immigration laws while serving as the agency that naturalizes new citizens. Family's Troubles in Canada Continue Among those at the meeting were repre sentatives from the National Council of La Raza, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, California Rural Legal Assistance and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Canadian immigration authorities were ex pected to decide late last week whether a Cuban family residing in the United States that unwittingly entered Canada would be granted a visa extension . The family -'refused re entry into the United Stateshas been holed up in a motel room for the past four weeks, sur viving through the kindness of others. The Canadian visitors' visas for Carlos Fajar do and his family expired Jan. 15. Technically, the Fajardos deported themselves Dec. 23 when they took a three-day trip by car from Miami to see the snow on the Canadian side of Niagara Falls. They were in Canada 20 minutes. A 39-year-old boatwright, Fajardo met Jan. 16 with a lawyer from the Niagara Refugee Committee to prepare his appeal to Canadian immigration authorities for a two-month visa extension. He wants to return to Miami, where he, his parents and brothers have lived for several years, but says he will seek asylum in Canada rather than be repatriated to Cuba. Fajardo, who entered the United States in 1985 and was awaiting consideration of his asylum application, nullified his application when he left the country, says the U . S . Im migration and Naturalization Service . The INS has stood firm despite a plea from Sen. Bob Graham (D-Fia.). Fajardo's Cuban wife, Ber-2 maida, and her children Yordalys and Yoan dys, who entered the United States in 1986 with fake passports from Venezuela, were or dered to leave the country last August when their application for asylum was rejected by the U.S. Justice Department's Board of Immigra tion Appeals . "They are undergoing a lot of stress ... and just want a rest," the manager of the Ontario . motel where the Fajardos are staying told Weekly Report. They have referred all reporters' ques tions to him. The Fajardo family has been receiving help from local church groups and friends. -Luis Restrepo Michael Zamba, a policy analyst with NALEO, said that any hopes for a speedy resolution need to be tempered by the realiza tion that Congress will be putting a higher priority on other matters. Zamba said that in the interim more of the INS budget should be devoted to programs en couraging citizenship . "Only 10% of the INS budget goes to naturalization . This is a traves ty when one third of the adult Latino population is not naturalized." -Sophia Nieves HAMAS Says Quits to Media Coalition The Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and the media," said HAMAS Chairwoman Ivy Sciences, stating that it wants to maintain an Orta . "ongoing dialogue" with the media and enterArmando Duron, chairman of NHMC and a tainment industries on improving the image of lawyer by trade, said the withdrawal was "a Hispanics, announced Jan. 16 that it was total surprise," adding that HAMAS "never withdrawing as a member of the National communicated any dissatisfaction." Hispanic Media Coalition. The most recent action by NHMC was when "While NHMC has made significant efforts, it filed petitions last November with the we feel we must assert our goals and objecFederal Communications Commission to deny tives, which require us to engage the industry the license renewals of two television stations in an ongo ing dialogue to increase Hispanic in Los Angeles for their failure to hire and hirings and improve our community's image in promote Latinos. Jan. 23, 1989 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Coni Batlle, guest columnist Hands Off, Por Favor We Hispanics have now risen from an "invisible minority" to be?ome the latest "market" to be courted by corporate Amen ca . It's just so much fun to see ourselves reflected in the ads and to hear Spanish over media outlets that never used it before . So one might ask, "What is there to complain about?" Well, maybe nothing and maybe a lot. Have you seen "saboooGigante"? "Gigantic Saturday," as it translates, is a top-rated variety/game show that beams out of Miami every Saturday for 3 1/2 hours . It reaches more than 400 Spanish language television stations. Products advertised on this program range from diapers to fast foods. They are manufac tured by the same companies that for many years have reaped the benefits of a loyal, fami ly-oriented market that is now estimated at $130 billion in annual purchasing power . My concern--and I hope yours--is not what is being done to us as potential customers, but HOW it is being done . The effects of 1V on children are well known . Television, we have been warned , helps pre-school children make their f i rst value judgments. It is this point that is disturbing about the way products are promoted on "saboooGigante . " SEXISM STALKS OUR CULTURE The use of attractive young women wearing enticing clothes is com monplace on television game shows, but "saboooGigante" takes it one step further, one step too far. The announcer, Pedro de Poll, and the show's very popular host, Mario (Don Francisco) Kreutzberger, delight in making sexually loaded remarks while fondling the bare shoulders of their female models. The appalling manner in wh i ch these young women are used is painfully reminiscent of the 1950s' views of a woman's worth and place in our society . It is also a chilling reminder that sexism still stalks our culture . By allowing this type of behavior on nationally televised programs, we are saying to our children that, in parts of our collective culture, women are still objects. Here are some of Miami's most beautiful women garbed in frilly dresses designed to accentuate butt and bust. iPorDios! Good Lord! Many of us have had to fight hard to maintain our cultural traditions and our language while attempting success in this society. We mean no falta de respeto--lack of respect--to our elders or to newly arrived Hispanics when we balk against perpetuating old "standards" or when we suggest that some "traditions" are not healthy. WE EMBRACE DIFFERENT VALUES We still love them all as members of our extended families and as an important part of our community . But the truth is that our generation has embraced different values and priorities about sex roles, and we 're serious about passing those new values on to our children. The ex ample set on "sabadoGigante" takes the movement for gender equality back 30 years. If we as Latinos, male and female, can muster the necessary forces to oppose discrimination in employment, improve the quality of educa tional opportunity for our children, and work toward improving other ills of our society , we can certainly voice our displeasure about this offen sive form of advertising. Let the people at "SfJ.ba:JoGigante" know that those beautiful Latinas can be appreciated for their talents as models and act r esses without the shameful, demeaning treatment given them by its host and an nouncer. Un poco mas de respeto ... por favor. A little more respect, please . (Coni Batlle, of Chicago, is a native of Ponce, Puerto Rico. She is a free-lance marketing consultant.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua THE EVES OF THE BEHOLDER: The Los Angeles Times, which for years ignored the Hispanic community except for an oc casional "expose" on barrio gangs, finished the old year with another big scoop, starting on Page 1 and filling two full inside pages, on: "Chicano Gangs: A History of Violence . " Across the country, The Miami Herald ran a thoroughly researched series Christmas Week on the development of the Cuban commun i ty there. Sample head: "Second-generation Cubans seek own destinies Goals shaped by pride in parents' struggle, exposure to new ideas . " Are the Chicano and Cubano communities that much different? Or is it the way the leading newspapers in each city choose to perceive and portray them? GERALDO'S ASBESTOS AWARD: In its year-end assess ment of TVs 1 0 best and 10 worst programs during 1988, The Washington Post acknowledged Geraldo Rivera's "Devil Wor ship : Exploring Satan's Underground" as No. 1 in the latter category . Rivera, it said, proved that there really is a hell, managing to elicit sympathy for the Devil, "but none for himself," in the process. "PRESIDENTIAL CONCUBINES": Geraldo, take note : A new book by that title is the rage of Caracas . It contends that nearly every Venezuelan president since Sim6nBolivar has had one. Explains author Carlos Capriles Ayala in a piece we saw in the Chicago Tribune : "Venezuelan men are macho . The fact that they have mistres ses is not seen as something bad ... What upsets people is that presidents are allowing themselves to become influenced by their concubine . " -KayBMJaro Quoting ... THE MIAMI HERALD, in a Jan . 13 editorial, reacting to the Jan. 9 tem porary restraining order issued by a federal judge in Texas that allowed refugee applicants freedom of movement in the United States : " Within the next 48 hours, the droplets of Nicaraguans arriving in Miami will become a rivulet. Within days, that rivulet probably will become a torrent . It has the potential of swelling into a tidal wave that would en gulf Greater Miami, causing social and economic destruction more severe than any American anywhere has ever experienced ... "This is not scare talk ... Behind these first refugees are not just the 15,000 contras encamped in Honduras , and their families . Behind them are as many of Nicaragua's three million people as decide to flee Sandinista oppression and economic collapse. And behind those are un told others desperate to flee the guerrilla war in El Salvador and the poverty in Honduras ... " DORIS MEISSNER, former acting commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, in a Dec. 29 Washington Post commentary: "Close to 1 million Salvadorans, i . e . , about 20 percent of El Salvador ' s population, reside in the United States ... (M)ore than one third of Salvadoran families have one or more relatives in the United States. These relatives' earnings supply more than 60 percent of the income for their families at home . Cumulatively, migrant remittances bring more than $1 billion annually into El Salvador ... "These figures tell a story in which migration has reached a scale where repatriation of any magnitude could threaten the economic stability of an entire country ... "Current estimates are that Nicaraguan migrants are sending $60 mil lion from the United States this year. .. lt is only a matter of time before the economic interdependency between Nicaragua and its nationals in the United States approximates that of El Salvador ... "Central American leaders are likely to remind us, with increasing forcefulness, that repatriation threatens economic recovery in the region. The new administration may well find that changing its foreign policy points to changing its immigration policy too . " Hispanic Link Weekly Report Jan .23, 1989 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING SECOND-STAGE LEGALIZATION: "ESL/Civics: Planning and Im plementing English and Civics Programs" is an 86-page guide, prepared in part by the National Council of La Raza, on setting up or expanding services to the newly legalized . Copies are $12.50. Write to American Council for Nationalities Service, 95 Madison Ave., Third Floor, New York, N.Y. 10016. CIVIL RIGHTS REPORT: A 39-page summary of a more comprehen sive report, scheduled for publication in March, assesses civil rights policy and enforcement during the Reagan administration. A copy of "One Nation Indivisible: The Civil Rights Challenge for the 1990s" is available for $5. Write Reginald Govan, Project Director, Citizens' Commission on Civil Rights, 2000 M St. NW, Suite 400, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 659-5565. NEW MAGAZINE: The magazine "Hispanic Today," targeting col leges and universities, begins 1 0-times-a-year publication with its December/January issue. Subscriptions are $1 0 annually. Weekly Report readers may receive a free copy of the publication by request ing it from Barba r a Diamond, Editor, Hispanic Today, 21757 Devon shire St., Chatsworth, Calif. 91311 (818) 700-2408 . CONTRACEPTIVE STERILIZATION: The September/October (1988) issue of Family Planning Perspectives magazine contains the results of a survey that found that 30% of low-income women who planned to be sterilized incorrectly believed that sterilization would not stop them from having children in the future. For a copy send $5 to The Alan Guttmacher Institute, 111 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10003. HISPANICS IN THE 90s: "U.S. Hispanics : Challenging Issues for the 1990s," a report by the Population Reference Bureau, details a future social crisis that will occur if trends continue without a change in public policy. The 16-page report is available by sending $6 to PRB, 777 14th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 639-8040. FUTURE WORK FORCE: "The Future World of Work: Looking Toward the Year 2000" is a 71-page report analyzing trends in the work place, including a section on underused groups. For a copy send $17 . 50 ($12.50 for United Way organizations) to United Way of America, Strategic Planning and Markets Division, 701 N. Fairfax St., Alexandria, Va. 223149989 (703) 836-71 00. JOURNALISM FELLOWSHIPS: Applicants with at least five years' experience in the media are invited to apply to the Michigan Journalism Fellows program. Fellows will engage in a full year of academic study at the University of Michigan in an area of research chosen by them. Fellowships include a stipend of $2,750 a month. Deadline is Feb. 1 . For applications and information, contact Charles Eisendrath, Director, Michigan Journalism Fellows, 2072 Frieze Building, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48109 (313) 763-2400 . CONNECTING PREPARING FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL Recognizing that Hispanic and other underrepresented students often are not accepted into graduate school because of their lack of experience in research, the U.S. Department of Education last month granted more than $87,000 to the University of California, Riverside, to fund a program that would give them that experience . Twenty-five college juniors from the South and Southwest will spend eight weeks next summer conducting research with faculty mentors. The Southern and Southwest Regional Minority Honors Outreach Program will also include courses in research methodology as well as advise the students on careers, fellowship resources and graduate school application procedures. The students will be provided with transportation allowance, academic credit, fees, room and board, and a $1,500 stipend . The deadline is Feb. 1 . Anyone interested should contact Marie Steward, Graduate Division, Room B-24 Library South, University of California, Riverside, Calif. 92521 (714) 878-3680. RESIDENCE TEST AVAILABLE Beginning next month, persons seeking permanent residence under the Immigration Reform and Control Act can take a standardized ex amination developed in part by a coalition of immigrant advocacy or ganizations and approved by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service . Designed and funded by Educational Testing Service, the test con sists of 20 multiple-choice questions and a writing exercise. Some of the organizations represented on the coalition that over saw the development of the test were the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials and the Washington Lawyers' Com mittee for Civil Rights Under Law. The $10 test fee will go to cover expenses in the non-profit venture. For test locations call NALEO's hotline at 1-800-446-2536. In Califor nia call 1-800-346-2536. UTERACY CENTER OPENS Thanks to a $50,000 grant from the Allstate Foundation, the SER Family Learning Center in Waukegan, Ill., a computerized facility of fering literacy and job training programs to Hispanics and other dis advantaged groups, opened last month. Expecting to serve 150 people in its first year, the center will teach participants to read, write and communicate effectively so that they may go on to finish school and find a job . Calendar president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy. Mario Tapia (212) 477-3800 RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS Washington, D.C. Jan. 28-Feb . 1 TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regard ing your organization's event will be included in Hispanic Link's calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number . Address items to: Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20005. THIS WEEK HISPANIC ELDERL V New York Jan . 25 The New York chapter of the National Hispanic Council on Aging will hold a breakfast with the theme 'The Hispanic Elderly: The Aging of a Young Com munity.' Among those expected to attend is Marta Sotomayor, NHCoA president, and Angelo Falc6n, 4 RECEPTION Newark, N.J. Jan. 27 A reception will be held by the Hispanic Women's Task Force of New Jersey to honor Deborah Aguiar Velez on her appointment as director of the New Jer sey Division of Development of Small Business, Women and Minority Businesses. Wanda Garcia (609) 757-6349 TELECOMMUNICATIONS New York Jan. 27 A miniseminar will be held to explain the function and importance of tax certificates in encouraging the sale of telecommunications entities to minority owned or minority-controlled companies. The semi nar is sponsored by several groups, including the Federal Communications Commission and the Minority Telecommunications Development Program of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration. Shawna Jones (202) 377-1835 Jan.23, 1989 National Religious Broadcasters will hold its 46th Annual Convention. Among the featured activities will be a Hispanic worship service and a Hispanic broadcasters luncheon. Audrey Langdon (201) 428-5400 SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT DenverJan.29 A performance hosted by the Denver Center Theatre Company and its Latino Task Force will raise money for scholarships for Hispanic actors to attend the National Theatre Conservatory. The per formance will mark the start of a benefit tour of the play 'Cuentos' by Carlos Morton and Angel Vigil. Jacquie Kitzelman (303) 893-4200. COMING SOON BUSINESS DINNER Latin Business Association Los Angeles Feb. 4 Ana Barbosa (818) 965-4227 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS GOBIERNO DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS AGENTES DE SEGURIDAD ASECURE SU FUTURO CON EL GOBIERNO NORTEAMERICANO Si desea hacer carrera como agente de seguridad . nada meJor que proteger a Ia Agencia de Seguridad Nacional ("National Security Agency"). Tenemos numerosas vacantes en el cuerpo de Agentes Uniformados de Seguridad en el area de Fort Meade, Maryland. El trabaJO es responsable y e x citante -proteger bienes de propiedad federal , mantener el arden y salvaguardar Ia seguridad del personal en todas las circunstancias . • El Salario es de $20,463 o mas, segun Ia experiencia Los candidates deben ser graduades de Ia Escuela Superior(High School} y mayores de 18 afles con 2 alios de experiencia !aboral general, con experiencia militar o con 2 afles de estudios univer sitaries. • Los candidates estan sujetes a una investigaci6n de seguridad. Los solicitantes aprobados recibiran 8 semanas de entrenamiento en el "Fede r al Law Enforcement Training Center" en Georgia • Se requiere tener licencia de conductor . • Los candidates aprobades deberan portar armas de fuego . Se ruega enviar resumen/curriculum, carta explicativa o SF-171. National Security Agency Attn. M322 (DBJ) Ft. Meade, MD 20755-6000 Los solicitantes y sus familiares inmediatos deben ser ciudadanos de los Estados Unidos. lgualdad de oportunidades laborales. E x plore Employment Opportunities With Arlington County Government Seminar Arlington County Government Department of Personnel is sponsoring an evening seminar to provide job-seekers with helpful information on employ ment opportunities with Arlington County . Workshop presenter Marvin A . Cortez , Outreach Specialist with the Personnel Department, will cover topics such as: • Identifying the appropriate job match • Determining relevant skills and abilities • Learning to compete effectively Personnel Department staff will be able to accommodate individuals in English and Spanish. WHEN: Thursday, February 2, 1989 7:00 pm-9:00pm (If cancelled due to inclement weather the make-up date will be Wednes day , February 8, 1989.) WHERE: Arlington County Courthouse 21 00 Clarendon Boulevard Lobby Conference Rooms C & D Arlington, Virginia Interested persons must register by Tuesday, January 31, 1989 by calling (703) 358-3501 . ***No job interviews or job offers will be made at this workshop*** EOE port . 23 , 1989 FULL-TIME TENURE TRACK THEATRE FACULTY POSITION Opening for full-time, tenure track Assis tant Professor in Des i gn and Technical Theatre . MA, MFA or PhD and established teaching and design credentials required. Two courses each semester and des i gn 2 or 3 shows . $26K + for nine months . Submit application letter, resume and names of 3 references to: Brad Bowles, Uni versity of Colorado at Denver, Theatre, Box 177 , 1200 Larimer, Denver, Co. 80204, (303) 556-8529, by deadline of March 1 , 1989 . EMPLOYMENT SERVICES SUPERVISOR Ann. Number: 1087-9A-DHS Salary: $31 ,283 This position manages and supervises the Employ ment Services staff of the newly established Employ ment Center. Staff is responsible for providing an array of services to a variety of clients enabling them to def i ne and pursue career goals, obtain training and secure employment. Requires BS in a related field and three years experience. All applicants must submit an offic i al Arlington County application form . Resumes submitted without a com pleted official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5 :00 pm on FEBRUARY 2, 1989. To request application material please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD(703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only). ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 21 00 Clarendon Boulevard, Suite 511 , Arlington, VA 22201 EOE!MFH

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment FOR .THE The crossover power and longevity of Latino recordtng arttsts yielded several 1988 Grammy nominations. Nominees, announced Jan. 12, included the first-ever nod for the Cuban American act Gloria Estefan and the Miami Sound Machine in the "best pop performance by a duo or group with a vocal" category. The group is nominated for the Spanish-language version of its hit Anything for You (Note olvidare), a single on the Epic label conspicuous ly absent among "Latin music" nominees. Another Latino nominated in the "non-Latin" field is Carlos Santana, in the "best rock instrumental performance" category, for the Columbia/CBS album Blues for El Salvador. Santana, who has one previous nod, is among various '60s rockers in the run for 1988. Singers Montserrat Caballe and Placido Domingo compete in the "best opera recording" category with, respectively, Bellini's Norma and Wagner's Lohengrin (both London). has earned three Grammys and multiple nomtnattons tn categones from pop to country-is up this year for "best Mexican-American performance" for her Canciones de mi padre album (Eiektra). The singer, who won an '87 Grammy for her Trio album (with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris), runs against two past winners: Flaco Jrnllnaz(Raco's Amigos on the Arhoolle labeQ and Los Tigres del Norte (Los fdo/os del pueblo, Fonovlsa). Jose Jose earned his sixth nomination, in the "best Latin American" category, for his Soy asf album from Ariola. The Mexican singer has never won a Grammy. Ruben Blades is nominated the third year in a rCJN in the "best tropical Latin performance" for his Antecedente album (Eiektra). The 1988 Grammy winners will be announced in Los Angeles Feb. 22. Other "Latin field" nominees are: BEST LATIN POP: Dyango, Cae Ia noche (EMI); Raphael, Las apariencias engaiian; Roberto Carlos, Roberto Carlos; Jose Luis Perales, Suenodelibertad (all on Discos CBS lnt'l). BEST TROPICAL LATIN: Oscar D'le6n, La salsa soy yo; Eddie San tiago, Sigo atrevido (both TH-Rodven U.S.A.); Pete Escovedo, Mister E (Crossover); Johnny Pacheco and Pete "EI Conde" Rodrfguez, Sal sobita (Fanla). BEST MEXICAN AMERICAN: Jose Javier Solis, No me olvidaras (Profono); Los Yonics, Petaloyespinas (Fonovlsa); PfoTrevirio&Majic, Quiero verte otra vez (Discos CBS lnt'l); Los Bukis, Si me recuerdas (Melody); Los Freddy's, Vida nueva (EMI). -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report bank, Calif.; . secretary: Gilberte Morales, El Best Spanish-Language Weekly, Best EnterObservador, San Jose, Calif.; and treasurer: tainment Section, Best Sports Section, and A B. Collado, El Hlspano, Albuquerque, N.M. Best Editorial Column. TORO ELECTED: Publisher Manuel Toro of the Spanish-language weekly La Prensa, Or lando, Fla, was elected president of the Na tional Association of Hispanic Publications Jan. 14 during the body's annual convention in Las Vegas, Nev. He defeated Tino Duran, publisher of Ellnformador, Fort Worth, Texas, by a 22-18 delegate vote. Toro succeeds Zeke Montes, of de Chicago, who stepped down after heading the eight-year-old organization for the past three years. Some 200 people attended the Jan. 12-14 event. Other national officers elected were: Vice president: Victor Field, MundoArtfstlco, BurHISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Luis Restrepo. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 Winners of regional posts were: Jose Sueiro, El Latino, Washington, D.C . ; Luis Rossi, La Raza, Chicago; Tino Duran, El lnformador, Fort Worth, Texas; Eddie Escobedo, El Mundo, Las Vegas, Nev.; Juan Piffarre, Horlzontes, San Francisco; and Diane Lerner, La Gufa, Los Angeles . In the Northeastern region, there was a tie between Aaron L6pez, El Dlrectorlo Hlspano, Reading, Pa., and Carlos Carrillo, lmpacto, New York City. It will be reSolved later . This year, for the first time, the association conducted an elaborate awards competition, judged by non-NAHP professionals . Top winner was El Mensajero de San Fran cisco with four awards: Other winners: Best Design: The Forum of San Diego; Best Spanish-Language TV Guide: Tele-Guia de Chicago; Best Bilingual Weekly: La Voz de Colorado; Best Less Than-Weekly Publication: El Sol de San Diego. Grc:Hith was also recognized. La Guia of Los Angeles, with a 181,000 circulation, was cited for being the largest Spanish-language TV guide in the nation, and Extra of Chicago, with a 39,400 circulation, won Largest Hispanic Weekly honors. Philip Morris Companies Inc. won an award as the Most Responsive National Corporation. -Charlie Ericksen Hispanic Unk Weekly Report