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Hispanic link weekly report, February 13, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 13, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
U.S. Sens. Charles Grassley (R-lowa) and Connie Mack (R-Fla.) join the 12-member U.S. Senate Republican Task Force on Hispanic Affairs...New Yorkers United for Good Government, a Hispanic civic group headed by Marif6Hernandez, who served as vice chairwoman of the MichaeLDukakis campaign in New York, urges former Congressman Herman Badillo to run for mayor of New York...Texan Sherry Sanchez, formerly executive director of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, replaces Rudy Beserra as an associate director at the White House Office of Public Liaison. Beserra has accepted an offer in the private sector...New York state Sen. OlgaM6ndez becomes the first woman to serve on the chamber's Finance Committee. She
was appointed by Sen. Manfred Ohrenstein, Senate minority leader...California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Carlos Valder-rama, of La Verne, as the director of California’s Trade and Investment Office in Mexico City...The National Hispanic Corporate Council elects Jesse Aguirre, a vice president of corporate relations at Anheuser-Busch Cos., as its president. NHCC is comprised of executives of Fortune 500 companies...Cubans Carlos Fajardo, his wife, Bermaida Zamora, and their two children, stranded in Canada since they unwittingly entered in December, move into an apartment in Fort Erie. The family, which had been staying in a motel, has been refused re-entry into the United States because of counterfeit documents...Chi Chi Rodriguez receives the Bob Jones Award, presented by the U.S. Golf Association to golf’s man of the year...

Lujan’s Approval Puts 2 Latinos on Cabinet
Manuel Lujan was sworn in as U.S. Secretary of the Interior Feb. 3 after receiving unanimous Senate approval the day before.
The 60-year-old New Mexico Republican retired from the U.S. House of Representatives last year after serving 10 terms there.
His appointment was described by Sen. J.
Bennett Johnston (D-La.), chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee,as probably the Bush administration’s least controversial appointment. The committee also gave Lujan its unanimous support.
Lujan’s confirmation makes him the second Hispanic on the 13-member Bush Cabinet. The other is Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos.
Milwaukee Nixes Invitation
Just as he had for Armenian, Polish, German and Irish immigrants, Milwaukee Mayor John Norquist saw his open invitation to beleaguered Nicaraguan refugees as a way to tout the city as one with a generous heart. Besides, he told his constituents, new blood and fresh faces were needed by the city,which has lost 150,000 residents in the past 30 years.
Milwaukee, built by immigrants, now has a population of 600,000.
Norquist’s neighborly gesture, extended Jan. 29, met with widespread criticism. After receiving irate phone calls and letters from city aider-men and voters, the mayor quickly dropped his plan to send an emissary to Brownsville, Texas, to ''sell" the virtues of the city to the nation’s latest wave of immigrants.
“It’s a bad idea because the thought of putting thousands of non-English-speaking poor people in the city will overload the social service system and will do nothing to benefit their lives,” Alderman Steven Cullen told reporters.
Black Latinos Defy Double Jeopardy
Black Hispanics in the United States remain an ignored segment of society, say several Latinos in this category, but they increasingly see themselves as having greater access to both groups.
Washington, D.C., Superior Court Judge Ricardo Urbina, one of the most prominent Latinos in the country, described a situation noted by many: "Go to a White House assembly of prominent Hispanics and you almost never see a black Hispanic.” On the other hand, he said, "(As a black Hispanic,) you could have credibility with the Hispanic, black and white community."
Or you could lack validity with each group, said White House journalist Miguel Sandoval, founder of what he says is the only black Hispanic advocacy organization in the country, the National Alliance of Spanish-Speaking People for Equality. "When affirmative action comes for blacks, we’re not there. When it comes for Hispanics, we’re not there. It is
double jeopardy for Hispanic blacks in this country."
Estimates of their number range from 290,000, according to statistics from the 1980 census, to Sandoval’s claim that as many as one-third of the nation’s 20 million Hispanics have some black ancestry.
Black Latinos are concentrated in New York (102,900), California (35,500) and Florida (25,300), but are found in all 50 states.
A measure of the nebulous state in which black Latinos can find themselves is that there is no clear-cut definition of who they are. They note that classification is often loose and subjective. Most, however, are identified by having visible African roots. Using that standard, Mexicans would almost never fit the bill, while many Latinos in the Caribbean and along the coast of South America would. These are areas where native Indians, African slaves and colonizing Europeans intermingled.
continued on page 2
L.A.Cancers Low; Tobacco Use Rises
Cancer rates are about 25% lower among Latinos than whites and blacks in Los Angeles County, but tobacco use appears to be rising among Latino teen-agers.
These are some findings of the first comprehensive study of cancer in that county. It was released Jan. 31.
The study, first of its kind in the country, identified striking differences in the incidence and death rates of certain cancers among the county’s diverse racial and ethnic groups. It found the incidence of cervical cancer to be twice as high among Latinas than among white, non-Hispanic women. For Latinas it is 21 cases per 100,000 women; for whites and blacks, they are eight and 14, respectively.
The breast cancer rate among Latinas — 62 cases per 100,000 — is significantly lower than that of white and black women — 106 and 79.
The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Southern California and the University of California at Los Angeles. Its authors said they hope it will stimulate educa-
tional and screening programs that could reduce the county’s cancer rate by as much as 50% over the next decade.
— Mario Santana
LA. COUNTY CANCER RATES (By Race/Ethnicity, per 100,000)
WOMEN
Site Latinos Whites Blacks
All sites 259.7 350.7 284.8
Lung 18.7 38.5 32.0
Breast 62.2 105.7 79.0
Colon 20.1 30.2 33.5
Cervix 20.8 8.1 13.6
Uterus 17.0 27.4 12.3
MEN
All sites 324.6 424.7 458.8
Lungs 48.9 81.9 106.5
Colon 27.2 42.5 42.1
Prostate 68.6 76.6 112.5
Lymphomas 11.8 17.6 10.6


Some 30,000 People May Benefit from Asylum Lawsuit
More than 30,000 political asylum applicants may benefit from a class-action civil suit filed Jan. 30 against the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service in the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
It claims that INS immigration interviewers have failed to give asylum applicants enough time, that interviews are in English and without interpreters, and that they should be private.
Linton Joaquin, attorney for the Central American Refugee Center, said that the main problem is not enough INS interviewers.
"They have put on more people, but with no experience," he argued.
Vibiana Andrade, an attorney for The National Center for Immigrant’s Rights, added, "They are incompetent, hostile. They even yell at people."
The suit also claims that applicants are only given three to 15 minutes for interviews and that privacy and confidentiality are necessary.
“These people come to the United States fearing persecution from all sides, from the
guerrillas, the government, and the death squads. We are asking basic United Nation’s rights...due process protection," Andrade said.
The refugees are mostly homeless, and need work, Andrade told Weekly Report. "(Immigration officials) are not giving the permits within the required 60 days. Some people never got their permits. Some had them taken away or they were not renewed after they expired even though the case was still pending."
— Luis Restrepo
New York Counts Most Black Hispanics
continued from page 1
N.Y. State Senator Ruiz Awaits Fraud Sentence
Israel Ruiz, a Democratic state senator representing South Bronx, was found guilty Feb. 3 of filing a false application for a bank loan to build a supermarket in his district.
When Rufz is sentenced April 6 by Judge Peter Leisure in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, he could face up to two years in jail and $250,000 in fines.
Because he was convicted of a federal felony, his status as senator was questioned. State law requires a senator to leave his seat if he is convicted of a state felony, but not if he is convicted of a federal one. Ruiz’s lawyer, Murray Richman, said that the senator would lose his seat upon the sentencing. Ruiz has been a senator for 14 years.
"We are going to appeal the (court) decision," said an assistant to Ruiz.
"The whole situation is that everything is still under study by the (state) attorney general's office and the Senate counsel," said Bill Stevens, a spokesman for New York Senate Majority Leader Ralph Marino (R-Manhattan).
— Mario Santana
Baby Calvin Hanging On
Fourteen-month-old Calvin Oliveiras, the recipient of the world’s first liver and small intestine transplant, may overcome his newly arised lung illness, said doctors at the University of Wisconsin’s Children’s Hospital in Madison.
The infant’s new small intestine may be causing a reaction in his pulmonary system and it may have to be removed, they said. Calvin’s condition on Feb. 7, his 38th day of survival, fluctuated between critical and stable.
Calvin underwent nine hours of surgery on New Year’s Eve.
His parents, Adriana and Carlos of Deerfield, Fla., have been staying in Madison through the ordeal. The plight of the Oliveiras, who did not have enough money for a down payment for the operation, became well known to Floridians through local media. After the father turned to Gov. Bob Martfnez for help, $100,000 was raised.
Black Latinos predominate in the Dominican Republic. They are also concentrated in Panama, Puerto Rico and Cuba.
Among Hispanics, terms other than negros were developed for Hispanic blacks. Still in wide use are prietos (dark ones) and tigenos, (dark but not very). Writer Bob Heuer added a term used in Cuba, jabao, the lightest of the dark. "I think the terms reflect the fact that Latin Americans tended to create a classification system based on color."
However, everyone agrees the racism associated with that system was no preparation
Baytown, Tex., Marks First
Engineer Pete Alfaro was sworn in as the first minority member of the Baytown, Texas, City Council Feb. 6. He was appointed Feb. 2 after member Ron Embry resigned.
Baytown is awaiting federal action on a lawsuit charging that its at-large election system discriminates against Hispanics and blacks. Minorities make up 25% of Baytown’s 62,000 residents, but have yet to win election to the eight-member body under the at-large system.
Alfaro, who works for Exxon’s Baytown Refinery, said that the suit is one of the first issues he will address. Two Hispanic and two black voters filed the action in 1985.
The U.S. District Court approved a plan to have five single-member district positions, with the other three council members and the mayor elected at large. The plaintiffs supported it, but when the city appealed, they returned to their demand for eight single-member districts. Since then, the city agreed to accept the 5-3-1 solution, but the plaintiffs balked.
The U.S. Justice Department is now reviewing the matter while the city continues its appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.
Alfaro said he plans to run for the council in April if the case is resolved by then. He is urging other Hispanics and blacks to do so, too. If the court fails to act soon, the election may be delayed another year.
"My hope is that I will remain...I have had an unanimous positive reaction from the community," Alfaro told Weekly Report.
— Luis Restrepo
Feb. 13.1989
for the categorization by race used in the United States. For those who did not immigrate, confusion takes the place of shock. Urbina discussed his particular development. "It was a very confused situation growing up. I blended in well with black people until my cultural side came up — the food, speaking Spanish." The cultural distinction he says accounts for his primary identification as a Hispanic.
Heuer, an expert on the history of Latino involvement in major league baseball, added that three of the four Latinos in the baseball Hall of Fame are black: Puerto Rican Roberto Clemente, Dominican Juan Marichal and Cuban Martin Dihigo.
In the music field, Cubana Celia Cruz may be the most famous black Latina. Mongo Santa Maria and Cheo Feliciano are other famous black Hispanics.
Outside those areas, Rafael Cortada these are but a few of those who are prominent within their fields: Puerto Rican/Trinidadian Rafael Cortada, president of. the University of .the . District ..of Columbia, Northeastern Illinois University Sociology Professor Samuel Betances, busi-nesswoman/consultant Miriam Cruz and Antonia Pantoja, one of the founders of ASPIRA and other Latino advocacy organizations.
There are other famous persons identified as American blacks who have a Hispanic heritage — like Reggie Jackson, Angela Bofill and New York Assemblyman Herman D. Farrell. This raises the point that for black Latinos, selfdefinition becomes paramount. In fact, it is even the measure by which the Census Bureau relies in counting all blacks.
WFSB-TV anchorperson Bertha Coombes, a Cuban American in Hartford, Conn., is further removed from easy categorization by her non-Spanish surname. "You just have to make your way as an individual...! have the best of all worlds and the frustrations of all of them as well.”
— Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


Antonio Mejias-Rentas, guest columnist
Black and Proud of It
There’s a saying in Puerto Rico, “El que no tiene dinga, tiene mandin-ga." Literally it translates into "He who lacks dinga, has mandinga* And though few Puerto Ricans may know the origin of the two African-sounding words, we know the meaning of the saying: No matter how light skinned some of us might be, or how softly our manes may curl, deep down inside there’s a bit of African (black) in all of us.
Dinga or mandinga, one thing our history will not let us forget. Puerto Ricans — like all of our neighbors in the West Indies and the Caribbean basin — are born of a race that took miscegenation to a level of perfection.
Look at us. The lovely hues we wear — the varying shades, from ebano (mahogany) to canela (cinnamon) and all the way to marfil (ivory) — are the product of the mixing of the three races that converged in the region in the early 16th century.
There were the tarn natives, the Spanish conquerors and the black slaves. In a small island the size of Puerto Rico, there was little the races could do but mix.
There is plenty in the Puerto Rican (and Latino) customs and lifestyles that we owe to our African heritage. It is palpable in our cookery, our speech, and for some among us, even the way we pray.
Perhaps the most visible inheritance from our African forefathers can be found in our music. The slaves that settled in the coastal villages of our island developed two original musical forms—the bomba and plena — that were as much a means of communicating important news as they were a form of entertainment.
The dance steps brought to the West Indies by the African slaves, combined with the Spanish rumba flamenca (and perhaps even the taho areyto) gave us the basis for what the world now knows as salsa.
The value and importance of our black heritage is not lost on Puerto Ricans of any political stripe through our reverence of such distinguished patriots as Jose Celso Barbosa (an advocate of statehood), Jose Albizu Campos (an independentista) and Ernesto Ramos Antonini (a musician, educator and legislator).
Today, black Puerto Ricans like former Commonwealth Senator Ruth Fernandez and University of District of Columbia President Rafael Cor-tada distinguish themselves on the island and the continental United States.
That is not to imply that there is no institutionalized racism in Puerto Rico and throughout Latin America. It exists even if in subtler terms than in the continental United States.
Luis Pales Matos, a light-skinned Puerto Rican poet who distinguished himself in the "negroid" genre, knew that some of his countrymen would go to any length to hide any trace of a black ancestry and wrote a funny poem about it.
It is a poem about someone who is fair and blond and proud of it. The poet asks, in a refrain: Ytuabuela, <>dondee’ta?" — Yourgrandma, where are you hiding her?"
(Antonio Mejias-Rentas, of Los Angeles, writes regularly for Hispanic Link News Service and other publications.)
Quoting...
GOAR MESTRE, 76-year-old Cuba-born "father of Latin American television," speaking after receiving the prestigious 1988 Founders Award from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in New York:
"As it is in the English-language networks, the Spanish-language networks are in the hands of people who only think of the bottom line. Television should be much more than a business. It should be a kind of ministry, a service with a bit of idealism and vocation."
Sin pelos en la lengua
SAY YES TO THE MONEY: While Congress was chickening out on slipping itself a 50% pay raise this month, beisbol star Jos6Canseco signed a $1.6 million, one-year contract with the Oakland A’s, a 351% increase over last season. Poor Henry Cisneros will pick up a third of his $4,400 annual salary when his contract as San Antonio mayor expires this spring.
Forget Harvard, chicos, pick up a bat.
SAY NO TO NEW YORK’S FINEST: Poor Benjamin Ward, too. He’s the Keystone Kop masquerading as New York City Police Commissioner.
A couple of months ago, while briefing the city's Hispanic leaders on a narcotics crackdown, he warned them: "Tell your relatives to be careful where they buy drugs. We don’t want to confiscate their cars.”
Meeting with the same group Jan. 31, Ward tried to explain his failure to appoint more Hispanics to key posts in the department.
He offered this parable, picked up from some South African white friends, presumably:
In South Africa they say, "Don't give Zulu white bread. Give them black bread because if you give Zulu white bread, tomorrow they will want butter, too."
Commented the Rev. Rub6nDiaz to The New York Times afterward: "I guess we are definitely moving up...At the last meeting we were drug addicts and drug pushers — now we are Zulus."
SAY MAYBE TO TED KOPPEL: There’s a group called Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR) — not to be confused with the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) — that released a report Feb. 6 knocking ABC-TV’s "Nightline” and Ted Koppel for the program's failure to use more minority and women guests.
It checked out 865 "Nightlines” between Jan. 1, 1985, and April 30, 1988. Of Koppel’s 2,498 domestic guests, it found, 92% were white and 89% were male.
The researchers lumped Hispanics in with "Other," but we appeared to be no more than 1%.
The show’s producer defended its choices of guests, maintaining that it seeks decision makers and holds their feet to the fire.
To a degree, that is true. If I’d been naughty, I’m not sure I’d want to appear on "Nightline." But how often does the program go to its shiny white Rolodex to find the many experts it uses?
! A better question is when — with the multitude of news interview shows on TV today — are the networks going to discover that Hispanic journalists are capable of asking questions, too?
SAY SOMETHING STUPID: A major publisher is readying to launch a national magazine in Spanish for U.S. Latinos soon. Searching for writing and editing talent, a representative contacted Evelyn Hern&ndez, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, for her help. Hernandez suggested that the magazine might do some successful staff recruiting at the NAHJ’s April 19-22 conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
After a lengthy pause, the representative inquired about prospective hires: "Would they have any trouble getting visas or working papers?"
— KayBarbaro
Quoting...
FRANK DELOLMO, columnist with the Los Angeles Times, commenting Jan. 27 on Los Angeles County job rivalries between blacks and Hispanics:
"The rhetoric is overblown on both sides. Blacks claim they deserve priority because they faced greater discrimination in the past. Latinos reply that their needs will be greater in the future. It sounds like a couple of poor drunks arguing over who is worse off — as if it were something to be proud of."
Feb. 13,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


Raoul Lowery Contreras, guest columnist
Wicked Ditch of the West
French geniuses conceived the Maginot Line to deter German military might. It failed. Hitler conceived Festung Europa, which crumbled at Omaha Beach. And now, our home-grown bureaucratic geniuses in Washington have come up with a Fortress Amerika idea, a U.S. Maginot Line, a concrete ditch on our border to keep out drug smugglers.
Will it work?
Tenyears ago, the brilliant men ofthe Immigration and Naturalization Service in Washington, D.C., conceived the Tortilla Curtain, a high-tech, chain-link metal fence between Mexico’s fourth largest city, Tijuana, and the USA's sixth largest city, San Diego. (One version of the fence was ballyhooed by its manufacturer to cut off fingers and toes of miscreant Mexicans.)
Within hours of the completion of the multimil-lion-dollar fence, wily coyotes (Mexican practitioners of the sophisticated art of alien smuggling) sliced holes in it large enough to drive trucks through — which coincidentally they did, and still do.
Then, as now, INS targeted land immediately east of the world’s busiest port of entry, the crossing between San Diego and Tijuana that annually handles in excess of 35 million legal border crossings. Through this land pass hundreds of thousands of illegal migrants, creeping through darkness to avoid bandits, the Border Patrol, and police as they move north and east to a dwindling supply of jobs.
INS NEEDS SOMETHING TO DO The Border Patrol annually arrests more than a million illegals in this area from Mexico, Central America, the Far East and Europe. For every one they arrest, they tell us, two or three make it.
When it failed miserably in its mission to protect our borders, the INS waged a public relations war with press releases screaming how it arrested more than 50,000 illegals monthly in San Diego, and how it needed more money and men to arrest even more.
It didn’t mention that 40% of those apprehended were the same people over and over again.
For keeping quiet during the congressional debate on immigration reform, the INS was voted millions of new budget dollars and thousands of new personnel to stop the flood. Except, a funny thing happened on the way to the border. The strong employer sanctions of the new law, with heavy penalties and fines, appear to be working.
Now the INS needs something to do. Observing a few dozen vehicles crossing the border east of San Diego’s port of entry without going through U.S. customs and immigration, it has proclaimed the vehicles full of drugs and drug smugglers.
ISSUE STINGER MISSILES PERHAPS Ergo, their new proposal: a four-mile, concrete-lined, five-foot-deep ditch, a moat, if you will (with alligators?). To patrol the ditch, the INS has just purchased several French helicopters — yes, French helicopters, at a cost of $500,000 per.
If anyone is truly serious about stopping drugs, shouldn't he demand all unidentified, unauthorized airplanes be shot down at the border as they enter our airspace? Most drugs come in by air, not car.
If radar and jet fighters can’t do the job, perhaps we can issue Stinger ground-to-air missiles to our Border Patrol. After all, goat herders humbled and defeated the mighty Russian army in Afghanistan with Stingers. Can’t we use them on drug smugglers?
Will the ditch do the job on drugs? What does America’s top narcotics cop say? Head narc John Lawn, administrator ofthe Drug Enforcement Agency, recently told The San Diego Union, "We were never asked about the ditch. I don’t see it deterring traffickers from bringing drugs into the country."
The Wicked Ditch of the West is a dumb idea. Anyone have a bucket of water to kill it?
(Raoul Lowery Contreras is a San Diego businessman.)
William O. Medina, guest columnist
The Medina Dating Evolution
Since my mom left her tiny village in Zacatecas, Mexico, to come to El Norte, dating in our family has gone through a metamorphosis.
According to Mom, in Mexico in the 1920s it was nearly impossible for a young girl to date. Many homes, including Mom’s, were enclosed by 10-foot adobe walls designed to keep maidens in isolation until their wedding day. The walls were thick and sturdy.
The only chance Mom got to see boys was at church or the market, but even then, flirting was strictly forbidden. A girl who wished to maintain her reputation just didn't make herself accessible to boys; no man wanted to marry a girl who talked to just anyone.
Mom particularly remembers one Valentine’s dance she was permitted to attend — with lots of relatives, of course. The local entertainment — a violin and a guitar — played romantic music into the night. It was an exhilarating experience for a 13-year-old girl.
Living in exile from boys made her nervous in their presence, but she mustered enough courage to dance with a third cousin.
MANY ELOPED IN FRUSTRATION
Grandfather's well organized intelligence network immediately relayed the shocking news that Mom was dancing with a boy in front of the whole town. It was late at night and he was asleep when the messenger came, but he had no choice but to get out of bed and protect his daughter’s good name in the community. As Mom relates the tale, he burst into the dance hall, snatched her in the middle of a twirl, and escorted her home in tears.
Because of harsh family restrictions, many Mexican girls ran away and eloped in frustration. In the 1920s, they had four basic options: turn into an old maid, enter the convent, marry, or the unthinkable, become a prostitute.
In our family, the custom of dating has changed through generations. My older sister Susie, now married and beyond teen-age servitude, was even allowed to date occasionally as a teen. As we grew up in Riverside, Calif., I can’t recall my parents ever insisting that my brother Jon or I accompany her on a date after she turned 15.
When boyfriends picked her up, usually they sat in the living room and chatted with Dad for a few minutes about football or the weather and departed with no firm command as to when they must return. As a matter of fact, Susie often invited Jon or me on any dates she felt required a chaperon.
These were great opportunities for us, at ages 11 and 12, to exploit • her suitors.
THE DEMILITARIZED ZONE
Instead of being protected by a massive wall, our house had a three-foot high, chain-link fence that the boys leaned on while talking with Susie. Sometimes her boyfriends would be so bold as to enter our front yard. My father recognized it as a demilitarized zone.
But there were limits to his understanding nature. Once Susie had a boyfriend who lived a distance away, in Los Angeles. Writing him a stream of letters wasn't enough for her. She also called him constantly to chat. She claimed that life was impossible without hearing his voice every day.
Over a three-month period, the phone bill amounted to more than $800. Dad disconnected the phone.
Since Mom’s Valentine's dance half a century ago, our family's social mores have changed dramatically. And as father of a 16-morrth-old daughter, I intend to continue that evolution of enlightenment.
I do, at least, until the traumatic moment when a young man appears on my doorstep some sunset and asks to take my child out alone.
(William O. Medina manages a family restaurant, Zacatecas, in Riverside, Calif.)
4
Feb. 13, 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
NATURALIZATION: "A Smoother Path to Citizenship — Increasing Naturalizations in California" is a 112-page book that lists barriers to becoming a citizen and offers suggestions for government and civic groups to minimize them. Copies are $10 from California Tomorrow, 849 S. Broadway, Suite 831, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014.
NEW YORK POLITICS: "Black and Latino Politics in New York City: Race and Ethnicity in a Changing Urban Context" is a 14-page article by Angelo Falcon, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, in the spring 1988 issue (Vol. XIV, No. 3) of New Community: Journal of the Commission for Racial Equality. To order a single issue, send $10 to New Community, College Hill Press, 21 Webber St., London SE1 8HQ, Great Britain 01-828-7022.
U.S. HISPANIC POPULATION: "The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1986 and 1987” is an 89-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau with data on Hispanic subgroups. Copies (specify Series P-20, No. 431) are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202)783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
MINNESOTA HISPANIC SERVICES: "Directorb BitingLie" is a 162-page booklet by the Minnesota Spanish Speaking Affairs Council with listings that include agencies that provide bilingual services in Minnesota, local organizations, media resources and religious centers. For a copy (specify Stock No. 1-3) send $8 to Minnesota’s Bookstore, 117 University Ave., Saint Paul, Minn. 55155 (612) 297-3000.
INCREASING HIGHER EDUCATION ENROLLMENT: "Minorities on Campus: A Handbook for Enhancing Diversity" offers strategies on how colleges and universities can increase minority enrollment. Copies of the 181 -page hard-cover are available for $17.50 from the Publications Department, American Council on Education, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C, 20036 (202) 939-9380.
ENCOURAGING READING: The U.S. Department of Education has released the brochure "Becoming a Nation of Readers: What Parents Can Do." To receive a copy, send 50(6,name and address to Consumer Information Center, Item #459V, Pueblo, Colo. 81009.
DRUG ABUSE: "Datos Sencillos Acerca delAbuso de los Narcoticos Para los Padres de Familia y los Jovenes" is a 29-page bilingual booklet on basic facts about drug abuse. For a copy send $5 to Transamerica Systems, JEC-B Assocs., 2717 Ontario Road NW, Suite 100, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 232-7373.
CONNECTING
TAX REFUND CAMPAIGN STARTS A national education campaign, in English and Spanish, kicked off Jan. 31 to inform low-income working families that they may be eligible for up to $874 from the federal government under an income tax program. j
Spearheaded by the Washington, D.C.-based Center on Budget andj Policy Priorities, the Earned Income Credit program aims to target] those families that are considering not filing tax returns because they] do not owe money. Families with at least one child at home are* eligible. The refund is automatically calculated for them by the federal { government.
Due to changes brought about by the Tax Reform Act of 1986, many more working families will not owe taxes for 1988. Most working families earning between $5,000 and $11,000 now qualify for the credit. Families that work and have children are likely to be eligible if their income was less than $18,576. More than 11 million families qualify, says the CBPP.
Some 10,000 campaign kits wilbbe ready for distribution by March. In addition, public service announcements for radio will air. For more information call your local Internal Revenue Service office, ask your employer or call the IRS toll-free hotline at 1 -800-424-1040.
NEW LEADERS CHOSEN
John Gavin, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico, is chosen as a director of the Atlantic Richfield Co., a petrochemical concern. Gavin is president of Univisa Satellite Communications, a division of the Spanish-language entertainment and news programmer Univisa...Grissel Sepulveda is named president of the New York-based National Hispanic Business Group, an organization dedicated to helping small Hispanic businesses. In 1987 she worked with New York City’s Charter Revision Commission. She’s the first Latina to head the NHBG...Gladys Alonzo, former communications staff member of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, is selected as executive director of the Texas Senate Hispanic Caucus in Austin. The six- member caucus was formed in 1987...At its January meeting, the Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs elected its11989 officers. They include Carmen Munoz, chair; Rita Olivares Suddl, vice chair; Guillermo Martinez, secretary; and Jose Garcia and Juanita Hernandez, trustees. ..
Calendar
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regarding your organization’s event will be included in Hispanic Link’s calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar i Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N ! St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
] SCHOLARSHIP FUND-RAISER j Washington, D.C. Feb. 14
The League of United Latin American Citizens I will hold a reception to raise scholarship money for local students. Proceeds will be matched by the LULAC National Scholarship Fund
Andres Tobar (703) 379-7487
BILINGUAL CONFERENCE Anaheim, Calif. Feb. 15-18 The California Association for Bilingual Education will be holding a conference with the theme "Bilingual Education — Because Our Future Demands It." Speaker for the Friday banquet will be Henry Cisneros, mayor of San Antonio CABE (213) 946-1422
BUSINESS CONFERENCE Phoenix, Ariz. Feb. 16,17 U.S. WEST SOMOS, a U.S. WEST Hispanic resource group, will be exploring business opportunities that the Hispanic market represents for this telecommunications company. The conference will include workshops focusing on topics such as Hispanic political power and cultural diversity.
David Rivera (303) 896-6053
SALUTE TO BANKERS Miami Feb. 17
A Banker's Gala will given by the Latin Chamber of Commerce of the United States. The keynote speaker will be Robert Forrestal,
president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
Manuela Fiallo (305) 642-3870
COMING SOON
LABOR MOVEMENT CONFERENCE Cornell University New York Feb. 25 Edward Gonzalez (212) 340-2800
YOUTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM Proyecto Amor/National Hispanic Council on Aging
Silver Spring, Md. Feb. 25
Tomasa Gonzales Ordonez (202) 265-1288
HISPANIC MARKET SYMPOSIUM The Marketing Institute New York Feb. 27, 28 Conference Administrator (212) 883-1770
WOMEN’S FORUM
Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey Princeton, N.J. March 7, 8 Wanda Garcia (609) 757-6349
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Feb. 13, 1989
5


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
T • H • E
OHIO
SPOE
UNIVERSITY
SPECIAL ASSISTANT — MINORITY CONCERNS
(Official University Title - Program Manager)
The Ohio State University Residence and Dining Halls, a department of the Division of Student Affairs, invites applications and nominations for the position of Special Assistant-Minority Concerns. The Special Assistant-Minority Concerns will coordinate and direct Residence and Dining Halls programs and services to (1) assist minority students and staff in addressing the realities of discrimination and isolation and (2) assist majority staff and students in recognizing and understanding the implications of their behavior. The incumbent will also have responsibility aimed at developing staff groups and residential communities in which differences are appreciated.
The Special Assistant - Minority Concerns reports to the Director of Residence and Dining Halls. The Residence and Dining Halls department provides housing, food services and living-learning environment for over 11,000 students. It has a staff of 50 professional, 40 graduate student, 500 civil service, and 12,000 undergraduate student employees.
Required Qualifications: Knowledge of minority concerns, race relations issues, affirmative action principles and regulations, and residence and dining halls and student affairs operations. Experience in the following areas is required: (1) developing and implementing education,Training, and other programs oh minority issues, race relations, affirmative action, and related topics (2) conducting assessments/evaluations (3) developing and implementing policy (4) organizational communications (5) conflict manage-ment/resolution. Demonstrated leadership skills and the ability to communicate effectively with a wide variety of staff and student populations. Preferred Qualifications: An advanced degree providing training in areas related to the required qualifications is preferred. Experience developing/administering affirmative action and minority retention plans is also preferred.
Responsibilities: Develops and coordinates programs to address the diverse training and education needs of Residence and Dining Halls students and staff; chairs, on a permanent basis, the department's
Minority Issues Committee; develops and conducts assessments of programs, policies, and procedures to determine impact on minority students and staff; advises Director and senior staff on minority issues and affirmative action concerns; monitors and reviews publications; serves as affirmative action advocate in all recruitment and selection processes; serves as departmental liaison to University offices which are charged with affirmative action and minority issues responsibilities; coordinates preparation of annual 1 reports; proposes and prepares departmental policies and communications on affirmative action and minority issues; serves as a member of departmental long range planning team.
Salary: $25,200 - $40,080
Benefits: The Ohio State University offers a comprehensive fringe benefits program, including both a traditional major medical/hospitalization program and a preferred provider medical program with enhanced benefits. Additional benefits provider medical program with enhanced benefits. Additional benefits include employer paid vision care, life, and disability insurance; dental care insurance after 1 year employment; paid vacation and sick leave; after satisfying eligibility requirements staff members and their spouses and de-j5ehtteHt'~*ehildren rriay enrolMn'-OSU cburses,vat charge or at a reduced rate; access to a wide variety of University events and facilities.
Applications: Candidates should submit a resume, a letter of application which addresses the qualifications, and the names, addresses, and phone numbers of three references to:
The Ohio State University 630 Lincoln Tower 1800 Cannon Drive Columbus, Ohio 43210
Applications received by March 3, 1989 will receive preference.
The Ohio State University Residence and Dining Halls is committed to diversity in its staffing and actively seeks the candidacy of women and minorities.
Feb. 13,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
KCET
Los Angeles, California Public TV has 4 job positions available:
Corporate Development Coordinator
KCET, LA Public TV, is currently recruiting for a development corporate coordinator to increase annual unrestricted local corporation contributions. Minimum 2 years market-ing/fundraising experience working with annual corporations support programs, extensive administrative responsibilities, knowledge of Los Angeles business community, and proven track record. To apply, please send resume and salary history to: KCET Human Resources Department, 4401 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles California 90027
EOE/AA
Account Executive
KCET, LA Public TV is currently recruiting for an Account Executive to market its high quality programming to major corporations. 30% travel would be required. 3-5 years in sales/marketing with proven track record, preferably in advertising. Bachelor's degree preferred, familiarity with market research, preparation of account plans, sales promotion and presentation is essential.
Human Resources Manager
KCET, LA Public TV, is currently recruiting a Human Resources Manager to handle recruiting and affirmative action function. We are looking for someone with 3 years experience as a recruiter or EEO/AA officer. Computer literacy a must. Thorough knowledge of EEOC/FEPC regulations. Bachelor’s degree preferred.
Manager National Public Affairs
KCET, LA Public TV, Public Affairs Department is currently recruiting a Manager for National Public Affairs to manage, coordinate and originate program development. Minimum 3 years experience in TV program development or production. Bachelor's degree preferred.
YWCA
Racial Justice Associate, YWCA of the U.S.A.
National world related major women’s organization headquartered in New York City seeks experienced person to give; leadership in the elimination of institutional racism. Summary of responsibilities: Provides orientation and leadership development with local Community and Student Associations; interprets trends and their implication on human and civil rights in global, national, regional and local arenas; serves as resource; provides timely materials to leadership; works with speakers bureau. Experience: five years strong involvement in racial justice, work with volunteers, coalition building, leadership development, analyzing data, presenting facts effectively in oral and written form. Bachelor's degree required; a graduate degree preferred. One-third travel time. Salary range—low 30’s to low 40’s. Liberal fringe benefits. Send letter of application, resume and names of three references to: Louis R. Fawcett, Director, National Personnel Service, YWCA of the U.S.A., 726 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10003
EDUCATION PROFESSOR
Assistant/associate professor of education, tenure track. Doctorate in educational psychology and or/human development. Areas of specialty may include cognitive science or educational technology. Three years of teaching required, preferably at the secondary school or middle school levels. Ability and commitment to perform research. Starting date is Sept. 1,1989. Review process to begin Feb.15,1989 and continue until position is filled.
The University of Wisconsin-River Falls is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For more information: Dr. Ross Korsgaard, College of Education, UW-River Falls, Wl 54022. Tel. (715) 425-3778.
FULL-TIME TENURE TRACK THEATRE FACULTY POSITION
Opening for full-time, tenure track Assistant Professor in Design and Technical Theatre. MA, MFA or PhD and established teaching and design credentials required. Two courses each semester and design 2 or 3 shows. $26K + for nine months.
Submit application letter, resume and names of 3 references to: Brad Bowles, University of Colorado at Denver, Theatre, Box 177, 1200 Larimer, Denver, Co. 80204, (303) 556-8529, by deadline of March 1,1989.
THEATRE HISTORY TEACHER
History of Theatre teacher sought for a tenure-track position. Individual will teach graduate and undergraduate courses in theatre history, including a large undergraduate service course in theatre history. Individual will also advise M.A. candidates. Assistant or Associate Professor level, academic year appointment, beginning 1989. Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience. Ph.D. in theatre history, university teaching, and some publication required. Letter of interest and full professional vitae, including names and addresses of at least three references to: Dr. Sam Smiley, Chair, Theatre History Search Committee, Department of Drama, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. Consideration of applications will begin March 15, 1989. Applications will close when the vacancy is filled.
The University of Arizona Faculty of Fine Arts is committed to increasing the-diversity of our faculty so our students, community and disciplines can benefit from multiple ethnic and gender perspectives in the arts. We seek faculty with a variety of ethnic backgrounds who can bring that special knowledge and experience to assist in our efforts.
Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Title IX, Section 504 Employer
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Feb. 13,1989
7


Arts & Entertainment
ART IN LA.: Several exhibits, lectures and other related events coincide with this month’s arrival in Los Angeles of the two-year-old travelling exhibit Hispanic Art in the United States: 30 Painters and Sculptors.
The exhibit, which originated at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, opened at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art Feb. 5 and continues there through April 16.
The County Museum is sponsoring various Latino-themed exhibits throughout the city. Among them:
• Pintura Fresca, Feb. 12 to March 10, at Self-Help Graphics in East LA.
• Errata: Not Included, Feb. 24 to March 31, Social and Public Arts Resource Center in Venice.
• LA. L. A.: Los Angeles Art by 15 Latino Artists, Feb. 25 to April 8, The Pico House, downtown Los Angeles.
Several of the local artists included in Hispanic Art in the United States have private showings at galleries throughout the city. Among them: Gronk, at Saxon-Lee...Robert Gil de Montes, at Jan Baum...Carmen Lomas Garza, at Navia...John Valadez, at B-1...And Frank Romero, at Lizardi/HARP.
LATINO OSCAR: Seven Spanish-language films — including rare entries from Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic — are among 270 films submitted for a possible nomination for a "best foreign film" Academy Award.
Films are submitted by government film boards or bodies akin to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
Hispanic films submitted this year are La deuda interna (Argentina), Cartas desdeelparque (Cuba), Boletode ida (Dominican Republic), El ultimo tunel (Mexico), El espectro de la guerra (Nicaragua), Tango Bar (Puerto Rico) and Mujeres al horde de un ataque de nervios (Spain).
The Dominican Republic had submitted an entry only once before, while Nicaragua had not done so since 1982. All Academy Award nominees will be announced Feb. 15.
— Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
RATING THE RATERS: After arguing for years that the nation's two largest television rating services "grossly underestimate" the size of the Spanish-language audience, Telemundo and Univision are in the process of jointly choosing between A.C. Nielson and Arbitron Ratings for a separate count of Latino viewers.
The networks expect to pay $40 million for the service over a five-year period, said Telemundo Marketing Vice President Peter Roslow. They hope that either Nielson or Arbitron will eventually incorporate the more accurate count of Latino households into their regular service.
More immediately, an increase in ratings should translate into an increase in advertising revenue. According to an annual survey conducted by Hispanic Business magazine, Spanjsh-language TV received $123 million in advertising last year, less than 1 % of the total
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amount spent on TV. Despite the huge gap in advertising revenue, Roslow noted that Telemundo and Univision will each be paying about the same $4.5 million spent annually by the major networks for the ratings count.
Roslow is one of three standing members of the Spanish Television Research Committee, a joint network panel created to choose a ratings company. Doug Darfield, vice president of research at Univision, and Norm Hecht, a private consultant, helped Roslow narrow the field of companies from an original five bidders. Roslow said a winner might be chosen within a month. The service, however, would not be in place until 1990. It is expected to take about that long for the winning company to install state-of-the-art people meters in 1,000 Latino households.
Currently, Telemundo and Univision measure their audiences through personal interviews conducted by the Miami-based Strategy Research Co., but that system lacks the credibility of Nielson or Arbitron with advertisers and agencies, said Roslow.
Network officials remain concerned that cultural differences will void the huge investment. "(The plan is) not going to fail because we don’t have the numbers, but because Hispanics don’t want to cooperate," he said. For that reason, said Millie Carrasquillo, director of network research for Univision, it is likely that a combination of people meters and telephone surveys will be relied upon.
Once a company is chosen, a test using the meters will be conducted in Los Angeles. Roslow said this component will take a year to develop and cost each network an additional $1-2 million.
NOTABLE: Washington Post reporter Zita Arocha resigned from the paper last month after nearly four years to pursue a free-lance writing career. Arocha, a journalist for 13 years, said she would like to expand to magazine and possibly book writing on immigration issues. She left behind one Hispanic reporter, Carlos Sanchez, at the Post.
— Darryl Lynette Figueroa
8
Feb. 13, 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week was appointed by Sen. Manfred Senate minority leader ... California Gov. George DeukmeJ•an appo1nts Carlos Valder rama, of La Verne, as the director of California's Trade and Investment Office in Mexico City ... The National Hispanic Corporate Council elects Jesse Aguirre, a vice president of corporate relations at Anheuser Busch Cos., as its president. NHCC is comprised of executives of tune 500 companies ... Cubans Carlos Fajardo, his wife , Berma1da Zamora and their two children , stranded in Canada since they unwit tingly in December, move into an apartment in Fort Erie . The family, which had been staying in a motel, has been refused into the United States because of counterfeit documents ... Ch1 Ch1 Rodriguez receives the Bob Jones Award, presented by the U.S. Golf Association to golf's man of the year ... U.S. Sens. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) and Connie Mack (R-Fia . ) join the 12-member U.S. Senate Republican Task Force on Hispanic Affairs ... New Yorkers United for Good Government, a Hispanic civic group headed by Marifetiernllndez, who served as vice chairwoman of the Michaei .Dukakis campaign in New York, urges former Con gressman Herman Badillo to run for mayor of New York ... Texan Sher ry Sanchez, formerly executive director of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly , replaces Rudy Beserra as an associate director at the White House Office of Public Liaison. Beserra has accepted an offer in the private sector ... New York state Sen . OlgaMlmdez becomes the first woman to serve on the chamber's Finance Committee. She voi.7No.7ll HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Lujan's Approval Puts 2 Latinos on Cabinet Manuel Lujan was sworn in as U . S . Secretary of the Interior Feb. 3 after receiving unanimous Senate approval the day before. The 60-year-old New Mexico Republican retired from the U.S . House of Representatives last year after serv ing 1 0 terms there. His appointment was described by Sen . J . Bennett Johnston (D-La.), chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee,as probably the Bush administration's least controversial appointment. The committee also gave Lujan its unanimous support. Lujan's confirmation makes him the second Hispanic on the 13-member Bush Cabinet. The other is Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos . Milwaukee Nixes Invitation Just as he had for Armenian, Polish, German and Irish immigrants, Milwaukee Mayor John Norquist saw his open invitation to beleaguered Nicaraguan refugees as a way to tout the city as one with a generous heart. Be sides, he told his constituents, new blood and fresh faces were needed by the city, which has lost 150,000 residents in the past 30 years. Milwaukee, built by immigrants, now has a population of 600,000 . Norquist's neighborly gesture, extended Jan. 29, met with widespread criticism. After receiv ing irate phone calls and letters from city alder men and voters, the mayor quickly dropped his plan to send an emissary to Brownsville, Texas, to "sell" the virtues of the city to the nation's latest wave of immigrants. "It's a bad idea because the thought of putting thousands of non-English-speaking poor people in the city will overload the social ser vice system and will do nothing to benefit their lives," Alderman Steven Cullen told reporters . Black Latinos Defy Double Jeopardy Black Hispanics in the United States remain double jeopardy for Hispanic blacks in this an ignored segment of society, say several country." Latinos in this category, but they increasingly Estimates of their number range from see themselves as having greater access to 290 , 000 , according to statistics from the 1980 both groups . census, to Sandoval's claim that as many as Washington, D.C . , Superior Court Judge one-third of the nation's 20 million Hispanics Ricardo Urbina, one of the most prominent have some black ancestry. Latinos in the country, described a situation Black Latinos are concentrated in New York noted by many: "Go to a White House as(102 , 900), California (35,500) and Florida sembly of prominent Hispanics and you almost (25,300), but are found in all 50 states. never see a black Hispanic." On the other A measure of the nebulous state in which hand , he said, "(As a black Hispanic,) you black Latinos can find themselves is that there could have credibility with the Hispanic, black is no clear-cut definition of who they are . They and white community . " note that classification is often loose and subOr you could lack validity with each group, jective. Most, however, are identified by said White House journalist Miguel Sandoval, having visible African roots . Using that stand founder of what he says is the only black ard, Mexicans would almost never fit the bill, Hispanic advocacy organization in the country, while many Latinos in the Caribbean and along the National Alliance of Spanish-Speaking the coast of South America would . These are People for Equality . "When affirmative action areas where native Indians, African slaves and comes for blacks, we're not there. When it colonizing Europeans intermingled . comes for Hispanics, we're not there. It is continue d o n page 2 L.A.Cancers Low; Tobacco Use Rises Cancer rates are about 25% lower among Latinos than whites and blacks in Los Angeles County, but tobacco use appears to be rising among Latino teen-agers. These are some findings of the first com prehensive study of cancer in that county. It was released Jan . 31. The study , first of its kind in the country, iden tified striking differences in the incidence and death rates of certain cancers among the county's diverse racial and ethnic groups. It found the incidence of cervical cancer to be twice as high among Latinas than among white, non-Hispanic women. For Latinas it is 21 cases per 100,000 women; for whites and blacks, they are eight and 14, respectively . The breast cancer rate among Latinas-62 cases per 100,000is significantly lower than that of white and black women1 06 and 79. The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Southern California and the University of California at Los Angeles . Its authors said they hope it will stimulate educational and screening programs that could reduce the county's cancer rate by as much as 50% over the next decade. Mario Santana LA. COUNTY CANCER RATES (By Race/Ethnicity, per 1 00, 000) WOMEN Site Latinos Whites Blacks All sites 259.7 350 . 7 284 . 8 Lung 18.7 38. 5 32 . 0 Breast 62.2 105.7 79. 0 Colon 20.1 30. 2 33.5 Cervix 20.8 8.1 13. 6 Uterus 17.0 27.4 12 . 3 MEN All sites 324.6 424 . 7 458.8 Lungs 48.9 81.9 106 . 5 Colon 27.2 42 . 5 42 . 1 Prostate 68.6 76.6 112 . 5 Lymphomas 11. 8 17. 6 10. 6

PAGE 2

Some 30,000 People May Benefit from Asylum Lawsuit than political asylum ap"They have put on more people, but with no guerrillas, the government, and the death may beneflt.from a class-acti.on experience," he argued. squads. We are asking basic United Nation's suit flied 3? U.S. Vibiana Andrade, an attorney for The Narights ... due process protection," Andrade and Serv1ce m the U.S. D1stnct tional Center for Immigrant's Rights, added, said. Court l.n Los Angeles. "They are incompetent, hostile. They even It cla1r!ls that .INS immigration interviewers yell at people." failed t.o asylum enough The suit also claims that applicants are only tu:ne, mterv1ews are m English and given three to 15 minutes for interviews and Interpreters, and that they should be that privacy and confidentiality are necespnvate. sary. Linton Joaquin, attorney for the Central American Refugee Center, said that the main "These people come to the United States problem is not enough INS interviewers. fearing persecution from all sides, from the The refugees are mostly homeless, and need work, Andrade told Weekly Report. "(Immigration officials) are not giving the per mits within the required 60 days . Some people never got their permits. Some had them taken away or they were not renewed after they expired even though the case was still pending." Luis Restrepo N.Y. State Senator Ruiz Awaits Fraud Sentence New York Counts Most Black Hispanics Israel Ruiz, a Democratic state senator repre senting South Bronx, was found guilty Feb . 3 of filing a false application for a bank loan to build a supermarket in his district. When Ruiz is sentenced April 6 by Judge Peter Leisure in U.S. District Court in Manhat tan, he could face up to two years in jail and $250,000 in fines. Because he was convicted of a federal felony, his status as senator was questioned . State law requires a senator to leave his seat if he is convicted of a state felony, but not if he i s convicted of a federal one. Ruiz's lawyer, Murray Richman, said that the senator would lose his seat upon the sentencing . Ruiz has been a senator for 14 years. "We are going to appeal the (court) decision," said an assistant to Ruiz . "The whole situation is that everything is still under study by the (state) attorney general's office and the Senate counsel," said Bill Stevens, a spokesman for New York Senate Majority Leader Ralph Marino (A-Manhattan). Mario Santana Baby Calvin Hanging On Fourteen-month-old Calvin Oliveiras, the recipient of the world's first liver and small intestine transplant, may overcome his newly arised lung illness, said doctors at the University of Wisconsin's Children's Hospi tal in Madison. The infant's new small intestine may be causing a reaction in his pulmonary system and it may have to be removed, they said . Calvin's condition on Feb . 7, his 38th day of survival, fluctuated between critical and stable. Calvin underwent nine hours of surgery on New Year's Eve. His parents, Adriana and Carlos of Deer field, Fla . , have been staying in Madison through the ordeal. The plight of the Oliveiras, who did not have enough money for a down payment for the operation, be came well known to Floridians through local media. After the father turned to Gov. Bob Martinez for help, $100,000 was raised. 2 continued from page 1 Black Latinos predominate in the Dominican Republic. They are also concentrated in Panama, Puerto Rico and Cuba. Among Hispanics, terms other than negros were developed for Hispanic blacks. Still in wide use are prietos (dark ones) and trigefvs, (dark but not very). Writer Bob Heuer added a term used in Cuba, jabao, the lightest of the dark. "I think the terms reflect the fact that Latin Americans tended to create a classifica tion system based on color." However, everyone agrees the racism as sociated with that system was no preparation Baytown, Tex., Marks First Engineer Pete Alfaro was sworn in as the first minority member of the Baytown, Texas, City Council Feb. 6 . He was appointed Feb. 2 after member Ron Embry resigned. Baytown is awaiting federal action on a law suit charging that its at-large election system discriminates against Hispanics and blacks. Minorities make up 25% of Baytown's 62,000 residents, but have yet to win election to the eight-member body under the at-large system. Alfaro, who works for Exxon's Baytown Refinery, said that the suit is one of the first is sues he will address. Two Hispanic and two black voters filed the action in 1985. The U.S. District Court approved a plan to have five single-member district positions, with the other three council members and the mayor elected at large. The plaintiffs supported it, but when the city appealed, they returned to their demand for eight single-member districts. Since then, the city agreed to accept the 5-3-1 solution, but the plaintiffs balked. The U.S. Justice Department is now review ing the matter while the city continues its appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court . Alfaro said he plans to run for the council in April if the case is resolved by then. He is ur ging other Hispanics and blacks to do so, too. If the court fails to act soon, the election may be delayed another year. "My hope is that I will remain ... ! have had an unanimous positive reaction from the com munity," Alfaro told Weekly Report. Luis Restrepo Feb. 13, 1989 for the categorization by race used in the United States. For those who did not im migrate, confusion takes the place of shock. Urbina discussed his particular development. "It was a very confused situation growing up. I blended in well with black people until my cul tural side came up the food, speaking Spanish." The cultural distinction he says ac counts for his primary identification as a Hispanic. Heuer, an expert on the history of Latino involvement in major league baseball, added that three of the four Latinos in the baseball Hall of Fame are black: Puerto Rican Roberto Cle mente, Dominican Juan Marichal and Cuban Martin Dihigo. In the music field, Cubana Celia Cruz may be the most famous black Latina. Mongo Santa Maria and Cheo Feliciano are other famous black Hispanics. Outside those areas, these are but a few of those who are prominent within their fields: Puerto Rican(Trinidadian Rafael Cortada preside.nt of the . University of . the District _of Columbia, Northeastern lliinciis University Sociology Professor Samuel Betances, busi nesswoman/consultant Miriam Cruz and An tonia Pantoja, one of the founders of ASPIRA and other Latino advocacy organizations. There are other famous persons identified as American blacks who have a Hispanic heritage like Reggie Jackson, Angela Bofill and New York Assemblyman Herman D. Farrell. This raises the point that for black Latinos, self definition becomes paramount. In fact, it is even the measure by which the Census Bureau relies in counting all blacks. WFSB-1V anchorperson Bertha Coombes, a Cuban American in Hartford, Conn . , is further removed from easy categorization by her nonSpanish surname. "You just have to make your way as an individual ... ! have the best of all worlds and the frustrations of all of them as well." Darryl Lynette Figueroa Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Antonio Mejias-Rentas, guest columnist Black and Proud of It There's a saying in Puerto Rico, "EI que no tiene dinga, tiene mandin ga . " Literally it translates into "He who lacks dinga, has mandinga." And though few Puerto Ricans may know the origin of the two African-sounding words, we know the meaning of the saying : No matter how light skinned some of us might be, or how softly our manes may curl, deep down inside there's a bit of African (black) in all of us . Dinga or mandinga, one thing our history will not let us forget. Puer to Ricanslike all of our neighbors in the West Indies and the Carib bean basin are born of a race that took miscegenation to a level of perfect i on . Look at us . The lovely hues we wear the varying shades, from ebano (mahogany) to cane/a (cinnamon) and all the way to marfil (ivory) are the product of the mixing of the three races that converged in the region in the early 16th century . There were the tafno natives, the Spanish con querors and the black slaves. In a small island the size of Puerto Rico, there was little the races could do but mix . There is plenty in the Puerto Rican (and Latino) customs and lifestyles that we owe to our African heritage . It is palpable in our cookery, our speech, and for some among us, even the way we pray . Perhaps the most visible inheritance from our African forefathers can be found in our music. The slaves that settled in the coastal villages of our island developed two original musical forms-the bomba and plena that were as much a means of communicating important news as they were a form of entertainment. The dance steps brought to the West Indies by the African slaves, combined with the Spanish rumba flamenca (and perhaps even the tafno areyto) gave us the basis for what the world now knows as sa/sa. The value and importance of our black heritage is not lost on Puerto Ricans of any political stripe through our reverence of such distin guished patriots as Jose Celso Barbosa (an advocate of statehood), Jose Albizu Campos (an independentista) and Ernesto Ramos Antonini (a musician , educator and legislator) . Today, black Puerto Ricans like former Commonwealth Senator Ruth Fernandez and University of District of Columbia President Rafael Cor tada distinguish themselves on the island and the continental United States . That is not to imply that there is no institutionalized racism in Puerto Rico and throughout Latin America . It exists even if in subtler terms than in the continental United States . Luis Pales Matos , a light-skinned Puerto Rican poet who distinguished himself in the "negroid" genre, knew that some of his countrymen would go to any length to hide any trace of a black ancestry and wrote a funny poem about it. It is a poem about someone who is fair and blond and proud of it. The poet asks, in a refrain : Ytuabuela, idondee'ta?"Yourgrandma, where are you hiding her?" (Antonio Mejias-Rentas, of Los Angeles, writes regularly for Hispanic Link News SeNice and other publications . ) Quoting ... GOAR MESTRE, 76-year-old Cuba-born "father of Latin American television," speaking after receiving the prestigious 1988 Founders Award from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in New York : "As it is in the English-language networks, the Spanish-language net works are in the hands of people who only think of the bottom line . Television should be much more than a business. It should be a kind of ministry, a service with a bit of idealism and vocation." Sin pelos en Ia lengua SAY YES TO THE MONEY: While Congress was chickening out on slipping itself a 50% pay raise this month , beisbol star seco signed a $1.6 million, one year contract w1th As, a 351% increase over last season . Poor Henry C1sneros w1ll p1ck up a third of his $4,400 annual salary when his contract as San Antonio mayor expires this spring . Forget Harvard, chicos, pick up a bat. SAY NO TO NEW YORK'S FINEST: Poor Benjamin Ward, too. He ' s the Keystone Kop masquerading as New York City Police Commissioner . A couple of months ago, while briefing the city ' s Hispanic leaders on a narcotics crackdown, he warned them: "Tell your relat1ves to be careful where they buy drugs . We don't want to confiscate their cars." Meeting with the same group Jan . 31, Ward tried to explain his failure to appoint more Hispanics to key posts in the He offered this parable , picked up from some South Afncan wh1te friends, presumably : In South Africa they say, "Don ' t give Zulu white bread. Give them black bread because if you give Zulu white bread, tomorrow they will want butter , too. " Commented the Rev. Rl.benDiaz to The New York Times after ward : "I guess we are definitely moving up ... At the last meeting we were drug addicts and drug pushers now we are Zulus." SAY MAYBE TO TED KOPPEL: There ' s a group called Fairne ss and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR)not to be confused with the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) that released a report Feb. 6 knocking ABC-TV ' s " Nightline" and Ted Koppel for the program's failure to use more minority and women guests . It checked out 865 "Nightlines" between Jan. 1, 1985, and April 30, 1988 . Of Koppel ' s 2 , 498 domestic guests, it found, 92% were white and 89% were male. The researchers lumped Hispanics in with "Other," but we ap peared to be no more than 1 % . The show ' s producer defended its choices of guests, maintaining that it seeks decision makers and holds their feet to the fire . To a degree , that is true. If I ' d been naughty, I ' m not sure I ' d want to appear on "Nightline." But how often does the program go t o its shiny white Rolodex to find the many experts it uses? A better question is when-with the multitude of news inter v iew shows on TV today are the networks going to discover that Hispanic journalists are capable of asking questions, too? SAY SOMETHING STUPID: A major publisher is readying to launch a national magazine in Spanish for U . S . Latinos soon. Searching for writing and editing talent, a representative conta c ted Evelyn Hernandez, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists , for her help . Hernandez suggested that the magazine might do some successful staff recruiting at the NAHJ 's April 19-22 conference in San Juan , Puerto R i co . After a lengthy pause , the representative inquired about pro spec tive hires : " Would they have any trouble getting visas or working papers?" Kay Barbaro Quoting • • • FRANK DEL OLMO, columnist with the Los Angeles Times , comment ing Jan . 27 on Los Angeles County job rivalries between blacks and Hispanics: "The rhetoric is overblown on both sides . Blacks claim they deserve priority because they faced greater discrimination in the past. Latinos reply that their needs will be greater in the future . It sounds like a co uple of poor drunks arguing over who is worse off-as if it were som et hing to be proud of." Hispanic Link Weekly Report Feb. 13, 1989 3

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Raoul Lowery Contreras, guest columnist Wicked Ditch of the West French geniuses conceived the Maginot Line to deter German military might. It failed. Hitler conceived Festung Europa, which crumbled at Omaha Beach. And now, our home-grown bureaucratic geniuses in Washington have come up with a Fortress Am erika idea, a U.S . Maginot Line, a concrete ditch on our border to keep out drug smugglers. Will it work? Ten years ago, the brilliant men of the Immigra tion and Naturalization Service in Washington , D.C., conceived the Tortilla Curtain, a high-tech, chain-link metal fence between Mexico's fourth largest city, Tijuana, and the USA's sixth largest city, San Diego. (One version of the fence was ballyhooed by its manufacturer to cut off fingers and toes of miscreant Mexicans.) Within hours of the completion of the multimil lion-dollar fence, wily coyotes (Mexican prac titioners of the sophisticated art of alien smuggling) sliced holes in it large enough to drive trucks through -which coincidentally they did, and still do . Then, as now, INS targeted land immediately east of the world's busiest port of entry, the crossing between San Diego and Tijuana that annually handles in excess of 35 million legal border crossings. Through this land pass hundreds of thousands of illegal migrants, creeping through darkness to avoid bandits, the Border Patrol, and police as they move north and east to a dwindling supply of jobs . INS NEEDS SOMETHING TO DO The Border Patrol annually arrests more than a million illegals in this area from Mexico , Central America, the Far East and Europe. For every one they arrest, they tell us, two or three make it. When it failed miserably in its mission to protect our borders, the INS waged a public relations war with press releases screaming how it ar rested more than 50,000 illegals monthly in San Diego, and how it needed more money and men to arrest even more . It didn't mention that 40% of those apprehended were the same people over and over again. For keeping quiet during the congressional debate on immigration reform, the INS was voted millions of new budget dollars and thousands of new personnel to stop the flood . Except, a funny thing happened on the way to the border. The strong employer sanctions of the new law, with heavy penalties and fines, appear to be working. Now the INS needs something to do. Observing a few dozen vehicles crossing the border east of San Diego's port of entry without going through U. S . customs and immigration, it has proclaimed the vehicles full of drugs and drug smugglers. ISSUE STINGER MISSILES PERHAPS Ergo, their new proposal: a four-mile, concrete-lined, fiye-foot-deep ditch, a moat, if you will (with alligators?). To patrol the ditch, the INS has just purchased several French helicopters-yes, French helicop ters , at a cost of $500,000 per . If anyone is truly serious about stopping drugs, shouldn't he demand all unidentified, unauthorized airplanes be shot down at the border as they enter our airspace? Most come in by air, not car. If radar and jet fighters can't do the job, perhaps we can issue Stinger ground-to-air missiles to our Border Patrol. After all, goat herders humbled and defeated the mighty Russian army in Afghanistan with Stingers. Can't we use them on drug smugglers? Will the ditch do the job on drugs? What does America's top narcotics cop say? Head narc John Lawn, administrator of the Drug Enforcement Agency, recently told The San Diego Union, "We were asked about the ditch. I don ' t see it deterring traffickers from bnng1ng drugs into the country . " The Wicked Ditch of the West is a dumb idea. Anyone have a bucket of water to kill it? (Raoul Lowery Contreras is a San Diego businessman.) William 0. Medina, guest columnist The Medina Dating Evolution Since my mom left her tiny village in Zacatecas, Mexico, to come to El Norte, dating in our family has gone through a metamorphosis . According to Mom, in Mexico in the 1920s it was nearly impossible for a young girl to date. Many homes, including Mom's , were enclosed by 1 0-foot adobe walls designed to keep maidens in isolation until their wedding day . The walls were thick and sturdy. The only chance Mom got to see boys was at church or the market, but even then, flirting was strictly forbidden . A girl who wished to maintain her reputation just didn't make herself acces sible to boys; no man wanted to marry a girl who talked to just anyone. Mom particularly remembers one Valentine's dance she was permitted to attend -with lots of relatives, of course. The local entertainment -a violin and a guitar played romantic • music into the night. It was an exhilarating ex perience for a 13-year-old girl. Living in exile from boys made her nervous in their presence, but she mustered enough courage to dance with a third cousin . MANY ELOPED IN FRUSTRATION Grandfather's well organized intelligence network immediately relayed the shocking news that Mom was dancing with a boy in front of the whole town . It was late at night and he was asleep when the mes senger came, but he had no choice but to get out of bed and protect his daughter's good name in the community. As Mom relates the tale, he burst into the dance hall, snatched her in the middle of a twirl, andes corted her home in tears . Because of harsh family restrictions, many Mexican girls ran away and eloped in frustration . In the 1920s, they had four basic options : turn into an old maid, enter the convent, marry , or the unthinkable, become a prostitute. In our family, the custom of dating has changed through generations . My older sister Susie, now married and beyond teen-age servitude, was even allowed to date occasionally as a teen. As we grew up in River side, Calif . , I can ' t recall my parents ever insisting that my brother Jon or I accompany her on a date after she turned 15. When boyfriends picked her up, usually they sat in the living room and chatted with Dad tor a few minutes about football or the weather and departed with no firm command as to when they must return. As a mat ter of tact, Susie often invited Jon or me on any dates she felt required a chaperon. These were great opportunities for us, at 1 and 12, to < exploit-. her suitors . THE DEMILITARIZED ZONE Instead of being protected by a massive wall, our house had a three toot high, chain-link fence that the boys leaned on while talking with Susie . Sometimes her boyfriends would be so bold as to enter our front yard. My father recognized it as a demilitarized zone. But there were limits to his understanding nature. Once Susie had a boyfriend who lived a distance away, in Los Angeles. Writing him a stream of letters wasn't enough for her . She also called him constant ly to chat. She claimed that life was impossible without hearing his voice every day . Over a three-month period, the phone bill amounted to more than $800 . Dad disconnected the phone . Since Mom's Valentine's dance half a century ago, our family's social mores have changed dramatically. And as father of a 16-month-old daughter, I intend to continue that evolution of enlightenment. I do, at least, until the traumatic moment when a young man appears on my doorstep some sunset and asks to take my child out alone. (William 0. Medina manages a family restaurant, Zacatecas, in River side, Calif.) 4 Feb. 13, 1989 Hispanic link Weekly Report

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COLLECTING NATURALIZATION: "A Smoother Path to CitizenshipIncreasing Naturalizations in California" is a 112-page book that lists barriers to becoming a citizen and offers suggestions for government and civic groups to minimize them. Copies are $10 from California Tomorrow, 849 S . Broadway, Suite 831, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 . NEW YORK POLITICS : "Black and Latino Politics in New York City : Race and Ethnicity in a Changing Urban Context" is a 14-page article , by Angelo Falcon, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, in the spring 1988 issue (Vol. XIV, No . 3) of New Community: Journal of the Commission for Racial Equality . To order a single issue, send $10 to New Community, College Hill Press, 21 Webber St., London SE1 8HQ, Great Britain 01-828-7022 . U.S. HISPANIC POPULATION: "The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1986 and 1987" is an 89-page report by the U.S . Census Bureau with data on Hispanic subgroups. Copies (specify Series P-20, No. 431) are available from the Superintendent of Docu' ments, U . S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D . C . 20402 (202)783-3238. (Price was not available at press time . ) MINNESOTA HISPANIC SERVICES: "Directorio Bilingiie" is a 162page booklet by the Minnesota Spanish Speaking Affairs Council with listings that include agencies that provide bilingual services i n M innesota , local organizations, media resources and religious centers . For a copy (specify Stock No . 1-3) send $8 to Minnesota's Bookstore, 117 University Ave., Saint Paul, Minn. 55155 (612) 297-3000 . INCREASING HIGHER EDUCATION ENROLLMENT : "Minorities on Campus : A Handbook for Enhancing Diversity" offers strategies on how colleges and universities can increase minority enrollment. Copies of the 181-page hard-cover are available for $17 .50 from the Publications Department , American Council on Education, 1 Dupont Circle , Washington, D .C, 20036 (202) 939-9380 . ENCOURAGING READING: The U .S. Department of Education has released the brochure "Becoming a Nation of Readers: What Parents Can Do . " To receive a copy, send 50,name and address to Consumer Information Center, Item #459V , Pueblo, Colo. 81 009. DRUG ABUSE: "Datos Sencil/os Acerca del Abuso de los Narc6ticos Para los Padres de Familia y los Jovenes" is a 29-page bilingual book let on basic facts about drug abuse . For a copy send $5 to Transamerica Systems, JEC-8 Assocs., 2717 Ontario Road NW , Suite 100, Washington, D . C . 20009 (202) 232-7373. CONNECTING TAX REFUND CAMPAIGN STARTS A national education campaign, in English and Spanish, kicked off Jan . 31 to inform low-income working families that they may be eligible for up to $874 from the federal government under an income , tax program. i. Spearheaded by the Washington , D . C.-based Center on Budget and J Policy Priorities , the Earned Income Cred i t program aims to those families that are considering not filing tax returns because they ! do not owe money . Families with at least one child at home are , eligible . The refund is automatically calculated for them by the federal i government. Due to changes brought about by the Tax Reform Act of 1986 , many more working families will not owe taxes for 1988. Most working families earning between $5,000 and $11,000 now qualify for the credit. Families that work and have children are likely to be eligible if their income was less than $18 , 576 . More than 11 million families qualify, says the CBPP . Some 10 , 000 campaign kits will be-ready for distribut ion by March . In addition, public service announcements fo r radio will air. For more information call your local Internal Revenue Serv ice off i ce , a s k your employer or call the IRS t ollfree ho t line at 1-800 424 1040 . NEW LEADERS CHOSEN John Gav i n , former U.S. ambassador to Mexico, is cho sen as a director of the Atlantic Richfield Co., a petrochemical concern. Gavin is president of Univisa Sa t ellite Communications , a div ision of t h e Spanish-language entertainment and news programmer Uni v isa. .. Grissel Sepulveda i s named president of the New York based National Hispanic Business Group, an organization ded i cated to help ing small H i spanic businesses . In 1987 she worked with New Yor k City ' s Charter Revision Commission . She ' s the first Latina to head the NHBG ... Giadys Alonzo , former communications staff member of the Southwest Voter Regi st r a t ion Edu cati on Proje ct, i s select e d a s ex ecutive director of the Te xas Senate Hispanic Caucus in Austin . The sixmember caucus was formed in 1987 ... At its January m e eting , the Michigan Commis s ion on Spanish Speaking Affairs elected its 1989 officers . They include Carmen Munoz , cha i r ; R i ta Olivare s Sud o l , vice chair; Guillermo Martinez, sec retary ; and Jose Garda and Juanita Hernandez, trustees ... BILINGUAL CONFERENCE Calendar Anaheim , calif. Feb . 15-18 presid e n t o f the Federal Res erve B a n k of At• l a nta. _.. .. .,._,:..-.,. ......... -... -..;.•-........ -. .............. .:.;."o:...;;..;o--..;:...;. .J:he California Association for Bilingual TO OUR READERS: To ensure information r egarding your organization's event will be in cluded in Hispanic Link ' s calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the pub l i cation date of the issue in which you would like it to appear . There is no charge . Please include date , location , contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor , Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D . C . 20005 . THIS WEEK SCHOLARSHIP FUND-RAISER Washington, D .C. Feb . 14 The League of United Latin American Citizens will hold a reception to raise scholarship money for local students . Proceeds will be matched by the LULAC National Scholarship Fund Andres Tobar (703) 379-7487 His p a nic Link W e ekly Report Education will be holding a conference wit h the theme "Bilingual Education Because Our Future Demands lt." Speaker for the Friday banquet will be Henry Cisneros, mayor of San Antonio CASE (213) 946-1422 BUSINESS CONFERENCE Phoenix, Ari z . Feb . 16, 17 U . S . WEST SOMOS , a U.S . WEST Hispanic resource group, will be exploring business op portunities that the Hispanic market repre sents for this telecommunications company. The conference will i nclude workshops focus ing on topics such as Hispanic political power and cultural diversity. David Rivera (303) 896-6053 SALUTE TO BANKERS Miami Feb . 17 A Banker ' s Gala will given by the Latin Cham ber of Commerce of the United States . The keynote speaker will be Robert Forrestal, Feb . 13, 1969 ManuelaFiallo (305) 6 4 2 <3870 COMING SOON LABOR MOVEMENT CONFERENCE Cornell University New York Feb . 25 Edw ard Gonz alez (212) 340 2800 YOUTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM Proye cto Amo r / National Hispanic C o uncil on Aging S i lver Spring , Md. Feb . 25 Tomasa Gonzales Ordonez (202 ) 265 1288 HISPANIC MARKET SYMPOSIUM The Marketing Institute New York Feb . 27, 28 . Conference Administrator (212) 883 1770 WOMEN ' S FORUM His p a nic Women ' s Task For c e of N ew J ersey Prin ceto n , N . J . March 7, 8 Wand a Garcia (609) 757-6349 5

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6 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED T H E OHIO srAlE UNIVERSITY SPECIAL ASSISTANT-MINORITY CONCERNS (Official University Title Program Manager) The Ohio State University Residence and Dining Halls, a department of the Division of Student Affairs, 'T invites applications and nominations for the position of Special Assistant-Minority Concerns . The Special As sistant-Minority Concerns will coordinate and direct Residence and Dining Halls programs and services to (1) assist minority students and staff in addressing the realities of discrimination and isolation and (2) assist majority staff and students in recogn i zing and under standing the implications of their behav i or . The incum bent will also have respons i bility aimed at developing staff groups and residential communities in which dif ferences are appreciated. The Special AssistantMinority Concerns reports to the Director of Residence and Dining Halls. The Residence and Dining Halls department provides housing , food services and living-learning environment for over 11,000 students. It has a staff of 50 profes sional, 40 graduate student, 500 civil service, and 12 , 000 undergraduate student employees . Required Qualifications: Knowledge of minority con cerns, race relations issues , affirmat i ve action prin ciples and regulations, and residence and dining halls and student affairs operations . Experience in the fol lowing areas is required: (1) developing and im. plementing education, training, and other programs on minority issues, race relations, affirmative action, and related topics (2) conducting assessments/evaluations (3) developing and implementing policy (4) organizational communications (5) conflict manage ment/resolution. Demonstrated leadership skills and the ability to commun i cate effectively w i th a wide variety of staff and student populations . Preferred Qualifications: An advanced degree providing training in areas related to the required qualifications is preferred . Experience developing/administering af firmative action and minority retention plans is also preferred. Responsibilities: Develops and coordinates programs to address the diverse training and educa tion needs of Residence and Dining Halls students and staff; chairs, on a permanent basis, the department's Feb. 13, 1989 Minority Issues Committee ; develops and conducts as sessments of programs , policies, and procedures to determine impact on minority students and staff; ad v i ses Director and senior staff on minority issues and affirmative action concerns; monitors and reviews pub lications ; serves as affirmative action advocate in all recruitment and selection processes ; serves as departmental liaison to University offices which are charged w i th affirmative action and minority issues responsibilit i es ; coordinates preparation of annual reports; proposes and prepares departmental policies and communications on affirmative action and minority issues; serves as a member of departmental long range planning team . Salary : $25,200 $40,080 Benefits : The Ohio State University offers a com prehensive fringe benef i ts program , including both a traditional major medical/hospitalization program and a preferred provider medical program with enhanced benefits . Additional benefits provider medical program with enhanced benefits . Additional benefits include employer paid vision care, life , and disability insurance ; dental care insurance after 1 year employment ; paid vacation and sick leave ; after satisfying eligibility re quirements staff members and their spouses and de penderitc'children ma y enroll--in'' OSU courses v a t • n d : ,,...,, .,., . • charge or at a reduced rate; access to a wide variety of University events and facilities . Applications : Candidates should submit a resume, a letter of application which addresses the qualifications, and the names, addresses, and phone numbers of three references to : The Ohio State University 630 Lincoln Tower 1800 Cannon Drive Columbus, Ohio 4321 0 Applications received by March 3, 1989 will receive preference . The Ohio State University Residence and Dining Halls is committed to diversity in its staffing and active ly seeks the candidacy of women and minorities . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED KCET YWCA Los Angeles, California Public TV has 4 job positions available: Raci al Justice Associate, YWCA of the U . S.A. Corporate Development Coordinator National world related major women's organization headquartered in New York City seeks experienced person to leadership in the elimination of institution al racism . Summary of responsibilities: KCET, LA Public TV , is currently recruiting for a development corporate coordinator to in crease annual unrestricted loca l corporation contributions . Minimum 2 years market ing/fundraising experience working with annual corporations support programs, extensive administrative responsibilities, knowledge of Los Angeles business community, and proven track record. To apply, please send resume and salary history to : KCET Human Resources Department, 4401 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles California 90027 Provides orientation and leadership development w ith local Community and Student Associations; interprets trends and their implication on human and civil rights in global, national, regional and local arenas; serves as resource; provides timely materials to leadership; works with speakers bureau. Ex perience: five years strong involvement in racial justice, work with volunteers, coalition building, leadership develop ment , analyzing data, presenting facts ef fectively in oral and written form. Bachelor' s degree required; a graduate degree preferred . One-third travel time. Salary range-low 30's to low 40's. Liberal fringe benefits . Send letter of ap plication, resume and names of three references to: Louis R. Fawcett, Director, National Personnel Service, YWCA of the U.S.A., 726 Broadway, New York, N .Y. 10003 EOE/AA Account Executive KCET, LA Public TV is currently recruiting for an Account Executive to market its high quality programming to major corporat i ons. 30% travel would be required . 3-5 years in sales/marketing with proven track record, preferably in advertising. Bachelor's degree preferred, familiarity with market research, preparation of account plans, sales promotion and presentation is essential. Human Resources Manager KCET , LA Public TV, is currently recruiting a Human Resources Manager to handle recruit ing and affirmative action function. We are looking for someone with 3 years experience as a recruiter or EEO/AA officer . Computer literacy a must. Thorough knowledge of EEOC/FEPC regulations. Bachelor's degree preferred. Manager National Public Affairs KCET, LA Public TV, Public Affairs Department is currently recruiting a Manager for Na tional Public Affairs to manage, coordinate and originate program development. Minimum 3 years experience in TV program development or production . Bachelor ' s degree preferred. EDUCATION PROFESSOR AssistanVassociate professor of education, tenure track. Doctorate in educational psychol ogy and or/human development. Areas of specialty may include cognitive science or educational technology. Three years of teaching required , preferably at the secondary school or middle school levels . Ability and commitment to perform research . Starting date is Sept. 1, 1989 . Review process to begin Feb . 15, 1989 and con tinue until position is filled . The Uni versity of Wisconsin-River Falls is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution . For more information : E>r. Ros !r l(orsgaard, Cot lege of Education, UWRiver Falls, WI 54022 . Tel. (715) 425-3778 . FULL-TIME TENURE TRACK THEATRE FACULTY POSITION Open ing for full-time , tenure track Assis tant Professor in Design and Technical Theatre . MA, MFA or PhD and estab lished teaching and design credentials re quired . Two courses each semester and design 2 or 3 shows . $26K + for nine months. Submit application letter, resume and names of 3 references to : Brad Bowles, University of Colorado at Denver, Theatre, Box 177, 1200 Larimer, Denver, Co . 80204, (303) 556 8529, by deadline of March 1 , 1989. Hispanic Link Weekly Report THEATRE HISTORY TEACHER History of Theatre teacher sought for a tenure-track posit ion. Individual will teach graduate and undergraduate courses in theatre history, including a large undergraduate service course in theatre history . Indi vidual will also advise M . A . candidates. Assistant or Associate Professor level, academic year appointment , beginning 1989. Salary com mensurate with qualifications and experience. Ph.D . in theatre history, university teach ing, and some publication required. Letter of interest and full professional vitae , including names and addresses of at least three references to: Dr . Sam Smiley, Chair, Theatre History Search Committee, Department of Drama, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. Consideration of applications will begin March 15 , 1989 . Applications will close when the vacancy is filled. The University of Arizona Faculty of Fine Arts is committed to increasing the diversity of our faculty so our students, community and disciplines can benefit from multiple eth nic and gender perspectives in the arts. We seek faculty with a variety of ethni . c back grounds who can bring that special knowledge and experience to assist in our efforts. Equal Opportunity, Affirmat ive Action Title IX, Section 504 Employer DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executive professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report . To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280 . Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSI FlED AD RATES : 90 cents per word (city , state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word) . Multiple use rates on re quest. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Feb. 13 , 1989 Ordered by ______________ _ Organization. _______________ _ Street _________________ _ City, State & Zip Area Code & Phone ____________ _

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Arts & Entertainment Several of the local artists included in Hispanic Art in the United States have private showings at galleries throughout the city . Among them : Gronk, at Saxon-Lee ... Robert Gil de Montes, at Jan Baum ... Carmen Lomas Garza, at Navia ... John Valadez, at B-1 ... And Frank Romero, at Lizardi/HARP. IN LA.: Several exhibits, lectures and other related events coin cide with this month's arrival in Los Angeles of the two-year old travel ling exhibit Hispanic Art in the United States: 30 Painters and Sculptors. LATINO OSCAR : Seven Spanish-language films including rare entries from Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic-are among 270 films submitted for a possible nomination for a "best foreign film" Academy Award. The exhibit, which originated at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, opened at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art Feb. 5 and continues there through April 16. Films are submitted by government film boards or bodies akin to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The County Museum is sponsoring various Latino themed exhibits throughout the city . Among them: Hispanic films submitted th i s year are La deuda interna (Argentina), Cartas desde e/ parque (Cuba) , Boleto de ida (Dominican Republic), El ultimo tune/ (Mexico), El espectro de Ia guerra (Nicaragua), Tango Bar (Puerto Rico) and Mujeres at borde de un ataque de nervios (Spain) . • Pintura Fresca, Feb. 12 to March 1 0, at Self-Help Graphics in East LA. • Errata: Not Included, Feb. 24 to March 31, Social and Public Arts Resource Center in Venice. The Dominican Republic had submitted an entry only once before, while Nicaragua had not done so since 1982. All Academy Award nominees will be announced Feb. 15 . • L.A. L.A.: Los Angeles Art by 15 Latino Artists, Feb . 25 to April 8, The Pico House ; downtown Los Angeles. Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report RATING THE RATERS: After arguing for years that the nation's two largest television rating services "grossly underestimate" the size of the Spanish-language audience, Telemundo and Univision are in the process of jointly choosing between A.C. Nielson and Arbitron Ratings for a separate count of Latino viewers . The networks expect to pay $40 million for the service over a five-year period, said Telemun do Marketing Vice President Peter Roslow. They hope that either Nielson or Arbitron will eventually incorporate the more accurate count of Latino households into their regular service. More immediately, an increase in ratings should translate into an increase in advertising revenue. According to an annual survey con ducted by Hispanic Business magazine, Spanish-language TV received $123 million in advertising last year, less than 1% of the total HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl L. Figueroa, Sophia Nieves, Mario Santana. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): llistitutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 8 amount spent on TV. Despite the huge gap in advertising revenue, Roslow noted that Te/emundo and Univision will each be paying about the same $4 . 5 million spent annually by the major networks for the ratings count. Roslow is one of three standing members of the Spanish Television Research Committee, a joint network panel created to choose a ratings company. Doug Darfield, vice president of research at Univision, and Norm Hecht, a private consultant, helped Roslow narrow the field of companies from an original five bidders. Roslow said a winner might be chosen within a month. The service, however, would not be in place until 1990. It is expected to take about that long for the winning company to install state-ofthe-art people meters in 1,000 Latino households. Currently, Te/emundo and Univision measure their audiences through personal interviews conducted by the Miami-based Strategy Research Co . , but that system lacks the credibility of Nielson or Arb i tron with adver tisers and agencies, said Roslow. Network officials remain concerned that cul tural differences will void the huge investment. "(The plan is) not going to fail because we don't have the numbers, but because Hispanics don't want to cooperate," he said. For that reason, said Millie Carrasquillo, direc tor of network research for Univision, it is likely that a combination of people meters and telephone surveys will be relied upon . Once a company is chosen, a test using the meters will be conducted in Los Angeles. Roslow said this component will take a year to develop and cost each network an additional $1-2 million. NOTABLE : Washington Post reporter Zita Arocha resigned from the paper last month after nearly four years to pursue a free-lance writing career . Arocha, a journalist for 13 years, said she would like to expand to magazine and possibly book writing on immigration issues . She left behind one Hispanic reporter, Carlos Sanchez, at the Post. -Darryl Lynette Figueroa MAY:PJE rr IS 11-\E LAND Of 11\E 'fREf;, WT 1-\0W D\FflC..U L-T IT IS To Hispani Link Weekly Report