Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, February 20, 1989

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, February 20, 1989
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
President Bush calls upon Congress to set up a referendum so that the residents of Puerto Rico can determine whether they wish to continue as a commonwealth, seek statehood or declare independence... Mother Teresa visits a shelter of teen-age Latino immigrants in Los Angeles...U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) nominates Mark Gallegos, president of the Hispanic National Bar Association, to serve as a member of the U.S. Senate Republican Conference Task Force on Hispanic Affairs...A U.S. District Judge in Los Angeles approves an $85,000 settlement for Huntington Park municipal court employee Alva Gutierrez, who was ordered by three
municipal court judges to speak only English on the job... Miami Police Officer William Lozano pleads not guilty to two manslaughter charges. Lozano's fatal shooting of a black motorcyclist touched off three days of racial riots...Thirty-four-year-old flight engineer Jorge Gonzalez, of Rex, Ga, dies along with 143 other people on board a U.S. jet that crashed into a mountain in the Azores...Farm worker contractor Agripina Flores de Pacheco, of Linden, Calif., pleads guilty to selling falsified documents to about 600 undocumented workers so that they could apply for legal residency under the Special Agricultural Worker provision of the federal immigration reform act...Cisco Andrade, considered by some to be the best U.S. boxer pound for pound during the 1950s, dies in Whittier, Calif., at the age of 59. He had been working as a gym instructor at a school for male juvenile offenders...

Reps. Shumway, Miller Sponsor Language Bills
Two bills to make English the official language of the United States await hearings in the U.S. House of Representatives before the Judiciary Committee’s Civil and Constitutional Rights Subcommittee.
The bills were introduced the same day, Jan. 19, by Reps. Clarence Miller (R-Ohio) and Norman Shumway (R-Calif.).
No date has been set for a hearing on either. If approved, each would still have to pass the Judiciary Committee before going to the House floor for a vote.
In the 100th Congress, a constitutional subcommittee hearing on four other official English bills was held last May. They died without reaching the Judiciary Committee.
Leaders Rap Commission’s Elitism
Latino leaders are protesting the failure of the new 35-member National Commission on Children to include a single Hispanic.
The body’s members were appointed by former President Ronald Reagan; John Sten-nis (D-Miss.), immediate past president pro tempore of the Senate; and House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Texas) to draft an action plan on the problems confronting the nation’s youth. Each was authorized to name 12 members.
The commission held its first meeting Feb. 6 in Washington, D.C.
Latinos called the failure inexcusable because Hispanic children are overrepresented on the poverty rolls and dropout charts and are increasingly coming from homes headed by young, single females.
Gutierrez Tests’ Black-Brown Coalition
The decision by Chicago City Council member Luis Gutierrez (26th Ward) to endorse State's Attorney and mayoral hopeful Richard Daley in the Feb. 28 Democratic primary is being seen as a major break from the so-called "Black-Brown Coalition" which existed under the late Mayor Harold Washington.
DNC Elects 2 Hispanics
Two Hispanics—Carmen Perez and Jack Otero — were among five vice chairs elected Feb. 10 to the Democratic National Committee. Polly Baca lost her vice chair position after eight years in the post.
Perez, of Long Beach, Calif., is the former head of the DNC’s Hispanic Caucus and also the former vice chair of the California Democratic Committee. Otero, of Washington, D.C., is vice president of the Brotherhood of Railway and Airline Clerks and the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement.
Baca, of Thornton, Colo., is a former state senator. The new head of the DNC’s Hispanic Caucus is former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya
Gutierrez’s move, announced last month, signals a division from the other three Hispanic aldermen on the 50-member council, The Chicago Reporter, a civil rights monthly, said in its February issue. The three support Aider-man Tim Evans (4th Ward), a black.
“Gutierrez’s goal has not changed; his means have," Chicago attorney and former school board president George Munoz told Weekly Report. “It's too early to call, but if Daley does win and he shows greater support to the Hispanic community, then people will judge Gutierrez's decision as fair."
Polls show Daley is supported by 65% of Mexican voters and 58% of Puerto Rican ones. Latinos account for 7.7% of the 1.5 million registered voters in Chicago. Because so many Latinos are young, they presently are about 9% of the city’s voting age population, though they comprise 20% of the city.
Gutierrez's realignment, coming as a surprise to many, was thought to have detracted from Hispanics' ability to vote as a bloc. “I’m not sure they won’t vote as a bloc,” said Munoz. “The key to Hispanics is that they do vote as a bloc. One reason Hispanic votes are pursued is that they are so shiftable.”
— Danilo Alfaro
The U.S. Census Bureau projects there will be 5.5 million more Hispanic children in the year 2030 than there were in 1985. Black children are estimated to have the second-highest growth rate in that period — there will be 2.6 million more 40 years from now.
Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, said, "While it is positive that such an initiative has been launched, I'm devastated that in ’89 such a commission can be appointed in areas so critical to Hispanics without their representation."
In 1987 some 35% of the 18.8 million Hispanics residing on the U.S. mainland were 17 years old or younger. Approximately 40% of these children lived in poverty as compared with 28% in 1979.
The National Commission on Children is the creation of a bill engineered by Democratic Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen. Funded at $790,000 for fiscal years 1989 and 1990, it is to present to the president and Congress by September 1990 recommendations to combat problems and deficiencies in the areas of health, education, social services, income and tax policy.
The commission’s first meeting — after members were sworn in by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia — came in the same two-week period in which two major national organizations released their blueprints for improving the lot of the nation’s children. One group, the Children's Defense Fund, called for spending $4.3 billion this year alone. The other, the National Governors' Association, urged a collaborative effort joining the federal government, states, service provider groups and families.
Describing the makeup of the bipartisan commission, Bill Acosta, regional administrator for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in Dallas, said, "To me it is benign neglect, a travesty with respect to the concerns of not only Hispanics but the nation." Addressing the problems of Hispanic youth benefits everyone because they will come to represent an ever-
continued on page 2


Justice’s Thornburgh Fails to Define Detention Proposal
U. S. Attorney General Dick Thornburgh proposed Feb. 7 the detention of immigrants waiting for their asylum applications to be reviewed.While he said the government would provide for the asylum seekers' “social service needs," he did not say to what degree.
Neither spokesman Loye Miller of the U.S. Justice Department nor Verne Jervis of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service would elaborate on Thornburgh’s statement. Cities that have received the brunt of the immigrant flow have sharply criticized the federal government for not paying for a problem local officials say it has created.
On Jan. 9 thousands of asylum applicants living in squatter camps in South Texas were allowed to leave their point of entry when U.S. District Court Judge Filemdn Vela in Brownsville, Texas, issued a temporary restraining order halting the INS from restricting their travel.
Vela said the order, to ease tension in border communities unable to handle the influx of immigrants, will expire Feb. 20 unless he is persuaded otherwise. During the last six months of 1988, 28,810 immigrants, mostly Nicaraguans, applied for asylum in South Texas. In all of 1987,405 persons applied for asylum in the area. At the current rate, about
100,000 immigrants are expected to come across the Texas border this year.
Brownsville Mayor Ignacio Garza said, "The city or the county has no financial resources, no ability to provide services to them. It shouldn’t be a burden on local communities; it is the federal government's responsibility.”
Thornburgh also said that his department is currently studying how to help ease the financial stress placed on cities like Brownsville and Miami by the immigrant influx. He said a plan would not be issued until Judge Vela hands down a decision.
— Luis Restrepo
Southern California Latinos Report Bias
Seventy-two percent of Latinos in Southern California feel that "quite a few" people in that area miss out on jobs or promotions because of racial or religious discrimination, according
Baytown, Tex., Calls Vote
The Baytown, Texas, City Council called for its first election in three years Feb. 9 despite complaints that the city’s election process remains discriminatory.
Newly appointed Councilman Pete Alfaro, the council’s first minority member, was the sole objector to the proposed May 5 election. The Houston suburb, which is 25% minority, is awaiting federal action on a 1985 lawsuit filed by two Hispanic and two black voters charging that the city’s at-large election system discriminates against minorities. In 1986 the U.S. District Court approved a plan supported by the plaintiffs calling for five singlemember district positions, with the other three council members and the mayor elected at large. When the city appealed, the plaintiffs then called for an 8-1 plan, wherein only the mayor would run at large.
The U.S. Justice Department is reviewing the matter and has until March 20 to approve or reject the 5-3-1 plan. If it is rejected, the city may not hold an election until the Justice Department approves its election process.
Olmos Gets Oscar Nod !
Edward James Olmos was nominated for "best actor" by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for his performance in "Stand and Deliver," it was announced Feb. 15.
Also in contention for the award are Gene Hackman for "Mississippi Burming," Tom Hanks for "Big," Dustin Hoffman for "Rain Man," and Max von Sydow for "Pelle the Conqueror."
Should Olmos win, he would become only the second Hispanic actor or actress to win an Oscar, joining Rita Moreno, who was voted "best supporting actress" in 1961 for her performance in "West Side Story."
to a poll that appeared in a special section of Los Angeles Times Feb. 13.
The poll, a sampling of 2,116 Southern California residents by telephone interview, also found that 70% of Latinos think discrimination has taken more subtle forms in the last 10 years. This compares with blacks (88%), Jews (84%) and Anglos (79%). Only Asians had a lower rate than Hispanics (69%).
Respondents also expressed opinions that:
Store signs should be in English only —
Anglos 44%
Jews 33%
Asians 26%
Blacks 23%
Latinos 21 %
Minority groups have gotten more economically than they deserve —
Anglos 31%
Asians 28%
Latinos 25%
Blacks 17%
Jews 15%
larger share of the country's college-age population and labor force, he said.
Rafael Valdivieso, vice president of research at the Hispanic Policy Development Project in Washington, D.C., called it "shocking" that there is not one Hispanic sitting on the commission. "There’s no excuse," he criticized. He reasoned that the individuals who appointed its members "must not be aware of the Hispanic situation."
One of the few people aware of the commission and its mandate before it was made public is Carmen Cortez, associate director of Avarice, a family support and educational service agency in San Antonio. Cortez, who cochairs a loose national network of groups and individuals helping Hispanic families, dashed off a telegram to Sen. Bentsen two weeks ago expressing the group’s disappointment. In ad-Feb. 20, 1989
Legislative Office Opens in Florida State House
The Office of Hispanic Affairs, intended to serve as a research and legislative arm of the seven Cuban American members of Florida's House of Representatives, opened Feb. 6 in Tallahassee.
Its creation is a result of the support they gave to state Rep. Tom Gustafson (D-Fort Lauderdale) to ensure his election as speaker of the House. All of the Cuban American legislators are Republicans. The office parallels another recently opened for black members in the House.
"We want to make the Cuban American group, if we can, the most effective coalition in Tallahassee,” Cuban American Caucus Chairman Rep. Al Gutnriein (R-Miami) said. According to Gutm&n, both Gustafson and Appropriations Committee Chairman T.K. Wetherell (D-Daytona Beach) have promised to have periodic meetings with the Cuban lawmakers.
"My goal as chairman," Gutm&n said, "is to keep anything from happening in the House without our knowing about it. That’s the problem with a lot of members, they find out about things on the floor."
dition, Cortez’s network, called Familias, sent a letter to President Bush with a list of possible Hispanic candidates.
Bentsen responded he will recommend to Bush that he appoint a Hispanic to the one remaining open slot. Bush can also replace any of the members appointed by Reagan.
At press time, appointing members in Congress failed to respond to inquiries by Weekly Report as to why Hispanics were overlooked.
Reacting to a rationale used in the past for the Hispanic absence on such bodies — that it is difficult to find any who are qualified and have a high profile — Arturo Madrid, president of the Tom£s Rivera Center, a think tank in Claremont, Calif., said, "Policy-makers on the national level are familiar with two or three people and see that as our universe." He added, "Once again we’re left out of the game."
— F@ixPetez Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Children’s Commission Ignores Hispanics
continued from page 1
2


Margarita Mondrus Engle, guest columnist
Latin America’s New Window
I have been traveling in Latin America since I was a small child. Thirty years ago,most rural areas (collectively known as provincias to distinguish them from the relatively modern capital cities) were quite primitive. On my great-uncle’s farm in Cuba, taking a shower meant pulling a string to dump a bucket of water over your head. Light was provided by candles or kerosene, and the bathroom was an outhouse.
Even 15 years ago, life in the countryside was primitive by North American standards. During the summer of 1974, I served as a community service volunteer in an isolated Mexican "village" of 5,000 people. There was no running water, sewage system, doctor, nurse or pharmacy.
Meat was available only on Sundays, when a pig or goat was slaughtered and deep-fried in a huge kettle in the town square. Vegetables were out of the question. Pigs devoured the seedlings as soon as they sprouted. Even wooden fences were unheard of. There were no trees.
Donkeys were the primary means of transportation, and the daily diet consisted of corn and beans.
The town boasted one refrigerator, one car, one telephone (open to the public on weekend evenings for the equivalent of 50 cents per hour), two record albums and a loudspeaker. (I heard those two albums day and night for six weeks!)
CAMPESINOS NOW WATCH AEROBICS
In rural Latin America, life is still primitive by North American standards, but one thing has changed: Television has reached las provincias. Doctors, sewers and running water are still scarce in many areas, but on a recent trip to southern Mexico, I spotted TV antennae on the palm-thatched roofs of many huts.
A fishing village I visited 15 years ago was accessible then only by bus over dirt roads or by small aircraft landing in a pasture. Today the town, now a minor beach resort, has a real airport as well as a video club and satellite dish repair shop.
Campesinos (peasants) now watch aerobics classes taught by tall, slim blondes in shiny leotards. Children too poor to finish school have access to U.S. movies with politely censored Spanish subtitles. And everyone watches novelas (soap operas).
Three years ago I observed a group of barefoot Peruvian Indians arrive in Cuzco to barter their potatoes on market day. These were people who dwell in stone huts tucked away on roadless, high-mountain expanses. Both people and llamas haul incredible loads over precariously steep, narrow paths. The only agricultural tool is a "digging stick." Thread is handspun, cloth is hand woven, and cui (guinea pigs) are the primary source of meat.
TELEVISION’S IMPACT THE GREATEST
Arriving in town, these men headed straight for the window of an appliance store, and there they stood, respectfully silent, eyes glued to the Saturday morning cartoons.
There are, of course, many other changes occurring In rural Latin America. Donkeys are gradually being replaced by bicycles. Pottery is giving way to plastic, most clothing is polyester rather than hand-woven cotton, and in basketry, synthetic fibers are used instead of palm leaves. Roads and schools have reached most areas.
But of all the changes, the one that will have the greatest impact on values and aspirations is television.
There are, of course, its positive influences: information, news, a sense of geography. Still, on New Year’s 1989, in southern Mexico, I found myself watching a car commercial featuring a tall blonde rich enough to discard diamond rings and toss aside full-length mink coats.
As I looked out of my hotel window at a predominantly Indian population, I wondered how they perceive this window into our modern world.
(Margarita Mondrus Engle, of Fall brook, Calif., is an agronomist.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
FEBRUARY’S POLITICAL INTRIGUE: In the minds of most Hispanic political activists, Polly Baca and the Democratic National Committee are practically synonymous. The popular former Colorado state senator, who heads Sierra Baca Systems in Thornton, Colo., has been a member of the DNC since 1973. She was elected as a DNC vice chair in 1981 and re-elected in 1985.
When the DNC met in Washington, D.C., this month, it looked as though the Baca era would carry forward. On the night of Feb. 9, she, along with another active Latina, Carmen P6rez, of Long Beach, Calif., and Lynn Cutler, a white, two-term incumbent from Iowa, appeared certain to gain election to the three open vice chair seats.
Then the smoky rooms got smokier. Lottie Shackelford, a black and past mayor of Little Rock, Ark., was set to challenge union leader Jack Otero, el cubano, for his voter registra-tion/voter participation vice chair post. At the last minute, she joined the field that included Cutler and chicanas Baca and Perez The DNC’s Hispanic Caucus had been committed to the three Hispanics, but what happened next depends on who's telling the story.
Did Otero cut a deal with Shackelford if she agreed to run for one of the three open seats instead of against him? Did Perez supporters abandon Baca?
The short of it, according to Baca, is that she had a hard count of 274 votes (out of a possible 385) for her re-election the night before the election. But, she says, sometime that evening or the next morning, a deal was cut between California, with its 25 votes, and members of the DNC Black Caucus, representing about 70 votes, to band together and elect a black and a Latina — presumably Perez
Overnight, claims Baca, she lost 60 votes and the election.
Perez, assistant chief deputy to Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, tells Sin Pelos that she was too busy on the floor to know what movidas were taking place. "I wasn't running against Polly. I was running for me."
Former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya, newly elected to follow Perez as head of the DNC's Hispanic Caucus, also spoke with Sin Pelos. Ever a good politician, he admitted to hearing rumors that there were discussions among some members of the Hispanic and Black Caucuses. But, noting that delegates could vote for three candidates in the four-person field, he added, "I hope all of the Hispanic members voted for Polly and Carmen."
Cutler polled the most votes. Perez was second, and Shackelford beat out Baca for third.
The terrible thing about politics are the choices one must sometimes make. The nice thing about politics is that while sometimes you're down, you’re never out.
California offers incontestable proof of that. Remember when Richard Nixon lost that state’s gubernatorial race to Edmund G. (Pat) Brown and told reporters, "You won't have me to kick around anymore.” He went on to become President.
Come to think of it, later on they did kick him around some more.
— KayBarbaro
Quoting...
CARMEN PEREZ, newly elected vice chair of the Democratic Party’s National Committee:
" Yes, the party needs to retain traditional Democrats. But that doesn't mean it should be afraid to work with emerging Democrats."
JIM COTA, agent for Edward James Olmos, quoted in the L.A. Times Jan. 30 on Olmos’ bid to gain a "best actor" nomination for his portrayal of teacher Jaime Escalante in "Stand and Deliver":
"We got absolutely no support from (Warner Bros.) studio. It’s terrible."
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Feb. 20,1989
3


COLLECTING
THE FUTURE OF CHILDREN: "America in Transition: The International Frontier" is a 28-page report highlighting steps that must be taken to ensure an educationally and economically competitive future for the nation’s children. For a copy send $10.95 to National Governors’ Association Publications Office, 444 N. Capitol St. NW, Suite 250, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 624-5300.
IMMIGRATION DATA: “Immigration: Data Not Sufficient for Proposed Legislation," a report by the General Accounting Service, finds that information is lacking for a mandated annual report by the attorney general on the effects of immigration. For a free copy (specify GAO/PEMD- 89-8, Dec. 28) write U.S. GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877.
URBAN TEACHER SHORTAGES: The summer 1988 edition of The College Board Review contains an article which finds that the most qualified teachers are lured away from urban school districts by their more affluent counterparts. Suffering most, say the researchers, are bilingual education and special education. Copies of the publication (cite item No. 217716) are $6. Write College Board Publications, Box 886, New York, N.Y. 10101-0886.
IMPROVING HIGHER EDUCATION ACCESS: The General Electric Foundation will contribute $20 million over the next 10 years to upgrade the education of Hispanic and other disadvantaged high school students. Working with four to eight communities each year, GE’s College Bound program will offer SAT preparation courses, scholarships, afterschool and Saturday sessions to augment math, science and English teaching, new equipment and advanced teacher training. For more information contact Phyllis McGrath, GE Foundation, 3135 Easton Turnpike, Fairfield, Conn. 06431 (203) 373-3224.
INVESTING IN CHILDREN: “An Agenda for the 1990s: A Children’s Defense Budget" is a 204-page report by the Children's Defense Fund that paints a bleak picture about children in terms of education, poverty, care and health. Racial and ethnic data is provided. For a copy send $14.45 to CDF, 122 C St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-8787.
CHICAGO POLITICAL ALLIANCES: The February issue of the Chicago Reporter includes a three-page article on the shifting Hispanic alliances within the Chicago City Council and the impact on the upcoming mayoral election. For a copy send $2.50 ($38 for annual subscriptions) to Community Renewal Society, 332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60604(312)427-4836.
CONNECTING
HEALTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM UNDERWAY Twenty-five public officials and health professionals will be chosen this April as the first fellows in the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations and Harvard University Kennedy School of Government’s Hispanic Health Leadership Program. Funded in large part by a$966,874 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the program aims to improve the well-being of Hispanics by preparing leaders for health and human services development. The summer program combines seminars at the Kennedy School and in Washington, D.C., with yearlong policy-related projects in the fellows’ communities.
For more information contact Mossetta Hamlet at COSSMHO, 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 371-2100.
DRUG ABUSE PUBLICATION SPREADS Operativo Antidroga, a five-part Spanish-language publication from Los Angeles that seeks to educate parents about drug abuse prevention, will be available in Houston, Miami and New York beginning next month.
The publication, funded by the Scott Newman Center, includes information on AIDS, drug abuse symptoms and prevention methods. It will be distributed through school districts and local newspapers.
For more information contact the Scott Newman Center, 6255 Sunset Blvd„ Suite 1906, Los Angeles, Calif. 90028 (213) 469-2029.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES U.S. Secretary of Education Laura Cavazos will be the keynote speaker at the March 1 charter day celebration of Manhattanville College in Purchase, N.Y. Cavazos will also receive an honorary doctorate from the school...J.C. Penney executive Patricia Asip is elected the chairwoman of the Hispanic Policy Development Project, a nonprofit think tank that analyzes public policies and how they impact Hispanic youth...Southwestern Bell Telephone is launching an extensive Spanish-language print campaign in Texas to expand its business relationship with Hispanics. Handling the project is the Dallas-based marketing and advertising firm Martinez & Assocs. Contact Tory Syvrud at (214) 357-3400...
Correction
The Jan. 16 issue incorrectly listed the recipient of a $40,000 grant from the Campbell Soup Fund. Ohio State University received it.
Calendar_____________________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure your organization's event will be included in Hispanic Link's calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
FIESTA FUND-RAISER
Washington, D.C. Feb. 21
The Spanish Educational Development Center, an
18-year-old organization that serves D.C.’s Latino
immigrants and low-income residents, will hold a
winter fiesta fund-raiser to aid its programming.
Nhora Berrera (202) 462-8848
RECEPTION
Washington, D.C. Feb. 24
The D.C. chapter of National Image will hold a
reception in honor of district government officials
who assisted in recruitment of local Hispanic police
officers.
Sonia Davila (202) 443-5636
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Silver Spring, Md. Feb. 25 The second session of the National Hispanic Council on Aging/Proyecfo Amor's youth leadership program will have Francisco Nugent, president of the Latin Credit Corporation, speak about ‘Economic Development in the Hispanic Sector.' Tomasa Gonzales Ordonez (202) 265-1288
LABOR CONFERENCE New York Feb. 25
Cornell University's New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations will hold the first Northeast Latino labor conference. Participating in the conference, titled 'Latino Workers and the Changing Face of the Labor Movement,’ will be stewards, delegates, rank and file members, activists and students.
Edward Gonz&lez (212) 340-2800 BAR ASSOCIATION INSTALLATION
Los Angeles Feb. 25
Jimmy Smits from the TV show L.A. Law and Sylvia Lopez of KCBS-7V News will co-host the 29th annual Mexican American Bar Association's installation banquet. California Supreme Court Associate Justice John Arguelles will be the installing officer.
Martha Romero (213) 974-1831
COMING SOON
TAPPING THE MARKET The Marketing Institute New York City Feb. 27, 28 Conference Administrator (212) 883-1770 HISPANIC WOMEN
Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey Princeton, N.J. March 7, 8 Wanda Garcfa (609) 757-6349
TEACHING LIMITED-ENGLISH SPEAKERS Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages
San Antonio March 7-11 Juana Hopkins (202) 872-1271
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
4
Feb. 20,1989


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR/FRESHMAN STUDENT RECRUITMENT
UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA
Responsibilities
Under the general direction of the Director of Admissions, the incumbent is responsible for the planning, development, execution, and administration of a market oriented recruitment strategy designed to attract quality enrollments directly from high school. The Associate Director/Freshman Student Recruitment coordinates the duties of a professional and support staff, as well as student workers and volunteers who will assist with the recruitment and summer orientation activities.
Qualifications
We seek a highly creative and energetic person who has a solid understanding of student recruitment strategies. We desire to find a person who is professionally challenged through leadership and by participant activities relative to student marketing. Applicants must have a minimum of a master’s degree, at least five years in admissions and student recruitment, excellent communication and interpersonal skills.
Salary
Competitive, commensurate with experience and qualifications. Excellent benefits include TIAA/CREF retirement, group life, medical, and dental insurance.
Application
Application materials should include a letter of application addressing the position responsibilities; a current resume; the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of five references; and transcripts supporting degrees earned. Complete applications must be postmarked by March 15,1989. Send materials to:
Roland Carrillo Search Chair Director of Financial Aid University of Northern Iowa Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614
THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EDUCATOR AND EMPLOYER WITH A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR MATHEMATICS
Eastern Michigan University is accepting applications for the position of Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics. Responsibilities include teaching undergraduate and graduate mathematics courses, advising mathematics majors and minors, and conducting research. The position will be available Fall, 1989.
Qualifications: Ph.D. in Mathematics, and demonstrated achievement and potential in college-level teaching and research.
To apply, send letter of interest, vita, latest transcript and three letters of reference by March 10,1989, to:
Position FAAA89006 310 King Hall
EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY Ypsilanti, Mich. 48197
We take pride in the pursuit of our affirmative action objectives and encourage qualified women and minorities to consider this opportunity.
NATIONAL CATHOLIC CONFERENCE
The National Catholic Conference for interracial justice is inviting resume submissions for the following positions:
•Field director and coordinator for intercultural collaboration;
•Programs director and affirmative action coordinator,
•Administrative assistant/office manager,
•Secretary.
Send resum6 (no phone calls), including salary requirements to: NCCIJ, 12 Varnun St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20017.
Equal Opportunity Employer
RISK MANAGEMENT/ PROGRAM SERVICES SPECIALIST (#162)
The National Education Association is seeking an individual with a college degree including coursework in basic to intermediate inferential statistics and program evaluation techniques. Included in the tasks of the position are evaluating liability insurance and legal assistance programs; reviewing and analyzing statistical, financial, and technical information; recommending risk management and loss control efforts; and preparing reports and bid solicitations.
Applicants must demonstrate skill in these areas.- Travel required. MPA, MBA, JD, or advanced degree in related field with experience in conducting evaluations of programs operated by a large organization or government agency and in negotiating employee benefit and insurance agreements desirable. Professional insurance or benefits designation, e.g., Associate in Risk Management (ARM) or Certified Employee Benefits Specialist (CEBS) a plus. Writing samples required.
NEA offers many excellent benefits. Starting salary $39,271 to $45,165 depending on current salary history and benefits.
Qualified applicants should send current resume to:
Employment Manager National Education Association 1201 16th Street, NW, Room 221 Washington, D.C. 20036 EEO/M/F/H
DIRECTOR of the Institute for Labor Studies, University of Missouri-Kansas City/Longview Community College, equal opportunity employers. The director works to develop, promote, and teach in a wide variety of courses of value to the labor movement and administer all aspects of the program. Please write for position announcement to: Search Committee LS, 500 Longview Road, Lee’s Summit, Missouri 64081.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executive professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Ordered by_ Organization Street
City, State & Zip
Area Code & Phone
M
A
R
K
E
T
P
L
A
C
E
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Feb. 20,1989


Arts & Entertainment
AT THE GRAMMYS: The first-ever performance by a nominee in the "best Mexican American" category will be a highlight of the 31st annual Grammy Awards show.
Linda Ronstadt is scheduled to perform La charreada, a song from her Grammy-nominated Canciones de mi padre album during the telecast, which will air Feb. 22 on CBS at 8 p.m. ET (check local listings).
Hispanic recording acts are nominated this year in a variety of categories, including three in the "Latin" music field.
LA. WILL HAVE FESTIVAL: The first Festival Latino in LA. is scheduled for May of next year, organizers announced recently. Sponsored by the city’s Latino Ensemble company, the festival will include theater, music and dance performances, art exhibits and a screening of Spanish and Latin American films.
According to JoseArmand, director of Festival Latino in LA, visiting artists will offer symposia and workshops on their crafts. The event,
which has been in the planning stages since 1987, bears no relation to New York’s Festival Latino.
In a related item, two bilingual theater companies stage works at opposite ends of the country this week:
At Los Angeles’ Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, the English-language version of Luis Santeiro’s Our Lady of the Tortilla opens Feb. 22. Eduardo Pavlovsky’s play Camaralenta starts Feb. 23 at Gala Hispanic Theatre in Washington, D.C. Both companies continue their productions through April 2.
ONE LINERS: Gloria Estefan and Miami Sound Machine will be the first to receive a star next month in Miami’s version of the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The Latin Star Walk is located on Calle Ocho...The Miracle of Vietnam, a U.S.-Mexico co-production, begins filming south of the border in May...Shooting wraps up in New York this week for the CBS- TV movie Tarzan in Manhattan, in which actor Joe Lara has the title role...Leo Perez, an account manager for Showtime Networks Inc., has been elected president of the Hollywood chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences...
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
LATE WINTER READING LIST: Time once again for an overview of recently published books by or relevant to Hispanics.
DELIA’S SONG, by Lucha Corpi (Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, 2-L, Houston, Texas 77204), 191 pp., $8.50 paperbound.
This novel explores the world of social struggles, literary fantasy, introspection and poetic elation.
TOWARD A CHICANO SOCIAL SCIENCE, by Irene I. Blea (Praeger Publishers, 1 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10010), 159 pp., paper-bound. Biea, renowned scholar on the Mexican American experience, examines coping mechanisms of a minority culture in a dominant Anglo society, cultural values and gender roles within Chicano society.
CRAZY LOVE, by Elias Miguel Munoz (Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, 4800
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
Calhoun, 2-L, Houston, Texas 77204), 167 pp., $8.50 paperbound.
A coming-of-age novel which reflects Cuban American culture and challenges the "American Dream."
CAVE OF THE JAGUA, by Antonio M. Stevens-Arroyo (University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, N.M. 87131), 282 pp., $27.50 hardcover.
A study of the mythological and religious systems of the Tafnos, pre-Columbian inhabitants of the Caribbean islands. Stevens-Arroyo analyzes the Tafrro creation myth, the hero myth and includes an interpretation of the group’s mythology.
EL CONDOR AND OTHER STORIES, by Sabine Ulibarn (Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, 2-L, Houston, Texas 77204), 224 pp., $8.50 paperbound.
This collection of bedtime stories for adults contains a world of gypsies, witches, ghosts and other supernatural beings. The stories are in English and Spanish.
ODDSPLAYER, by Joe Rodriguez (Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, 4800
Calhoun, 2-L, Houston, Texas 77204), 136 pp., $8.50 paperbound.
This novel by Vietnam veteran Rodriguez deals with the Vietnam war from the perspectives of black, Chicano and Puerto Rican soldiers and presents Vietnam as a microcosm of the social and political problems of the United States.
TRISTAN AND THE HISPANICS, by Jose Yglesias (Simon and Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10020), 265 pp., $17.95 hardbound.
The humorous story of a white Yale freshman who, when sent to settle his late Cuban grandfather’s estate, embarks on a journey of self discovery.
CUBA: THE UNFINISHED REVOLUTION, by Enrique G. Encinosa (Eakin Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 23067, Austin, Texas 78737), 236 pp., $12.95 paperbound.
A collection of 23 true, first-person accounts from Cuban men and women who oppose Fidel Castro.
— Danilo Alfaro
6
Feb. 20, 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week municipal court judges to speak only English on the job ... Miami Police Officer William Lozano pleads not guilty to two manslaughter charges . Lozano ' s fatal shooting of a black motorcyclist touched off three days of racial riots ... Thirty-four-year-old flight engineer JorgeGonzfllez, of Rex, Ga., dies along with 143 other people on board a U.S. jet that crashed into a mountain in the Azores ... Farm worker contractor Agripina Flores de Pacheco, of Linden, Calif., pleads guilty to selling falsified documents to about 600 undocumented workers so that they could apply for legal residency under the Special Agricultural Worker provision of the federal immigration reform act... Cisco Andrade, con sidered by some to be the best U . S . boxer pound for pound during the 1950s, dies in Whittier, Calif., at the age of 59. He had been working as a gym instructor at a school for male juvenile offenders ... President Bush calls upon Congress to set up a referendum so that the residents of Puerto Rico can determine whether they wish to con tinue as a commonwealth, seek statehood or declare inde pendence ... Mother Teresa visits a shelter of teen-age Latino immigrants in Los Angeles ... U .S. Sen. Orrin Hatch (A-Utah} nominates Mark Gallegos, president of the Hispanic National Bar As sociation, to serve as a member of the U .S. Senate Republican Con ference Task Force on Hispanic Affairs ... A U.S. District Judge in Los Angeles approves an $85,000 settlement for Huntington Park municipal court employee Alva Gutierrez, who was ordered by three vot?No.•l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Reps. Shumway, Miller Sponsor Language Bills Two bills to make English the officiallanguage of the United States await hearings in the U .S. House of Representatives before the Judiciary Committee's Civil and Constitutional Rights Subcommittee . The bills were introduced the same day, Jan. 19, by Reps. Clarence Miller (A-Ohio) and Norman Shumway (A-Calif .}. No date has been set for a hearing on either . If approved, each would still have to pass the Judiciary Committee before going to the House floor for a vote . In the 1 OOth Congress, a constitutional sub committee hearing on four other official English bills was held last May . They died without reaching the Judiciary Committee . Leaders Rap Commission's Latino leaders are protesting the failure of the The U . S . Census Bureau proJects there Will be new 35-member National Commission on 5 . 5 million more Hispanic children in the year Children to include a single Hispanic . 2030 than there were in 1985 . Black children The body's members were appointed by former President Ronald Reagan ; John Sten nis (D-Miss .), immediate past president pro tempore of the Senate; and House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Texas) to draft an action plan on the problems confronting the nation's youth. Each was authorized to name 12 members . The commission held its first meeting Feb. 6 in Washington, D. C. Latinos called the failure inexcusable be cause Hispanic children are overrepresented on the poverty rolls and dropout charts and are increasingly coming from homes headed by young , single females . are estimated to have the second-highest growth rate in that period-there will be 2 . 6 million more 40 years from now. Raul Yzaguirre, president ofthe National Coun cil of La Raza, sa id, "While it is positive that such an initiative has been launched, I'm devastated that in '89 such a commission can be appointed in areas so critical to Hispanics without their representation." In 1987 some 35% of the 18 . 8 million Hispanics residing on the U.S . mainland were 17 years old or younger. Approximately 40% of these children lived in poverty as compared with 28% in 1979 . Gutierrez 'Tests' Black-Brown Coalition The National Commission on Children is the creation of a bill engineered by Democratic Texas Sen. Lloyd Bentsen. Funded at $790,000 for fiscal years 1989 and 1990, it is to present to the president and Congress by September 1990 recommendations to combat problems and deficiencies in the areas of health, education, social services, income and tax policy. The decision by Chicago City Council member Luis Gutierrez (26th Ward} to endorse State's Attorney and mayoral hopeful Richard Daley in the Feb . 28 Democratic primary is being seen as a major break from the so-called "Black-Brown Coalition" which existed under the late Mayor Harold Washington. DNC Elects 2 Hispanics Two Hispanics-Carmen Perez and Jack Otero were among five vice chairs elected Feb. 10 to the Democratic National Committee . Polly Baca lost her vice chair position after eight years in the post. Perez, of Long Beach, Calif., is the former head of the DNC's Hispanic Caucus and also the former vice chair of the California Democratic Committee. Otero, of Washington, D . C . , is vice president of the Brotherhood of Railway and Airline Clerks and the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement. Baca, of Thornton, Colo., is a former state senator. The new head of the DNC's Hispanic Caucus is former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya. Gutierrez's move, announced last month , sig nals a division from the other three Hispanic aldermen on the 50-member council, The Chicago Reporter, a civil rights monthly, said in its February issue. The three support Alder man Tim Evans (4th Ward}, a black. "Gutierrez's goal has not changed; his means have," Chicago attorney and former school board president George Munoz told Weekly Report . "It ' s too early to call, but if Daley does win and he shows greater support to the Hispanic community, then people will judge Gutierrez's decision as fair." Polls show Daley is supported by 65% of Mexican voters and 58% of Puerto Rican ones. Latinos account for 7 .7% of the 1.5 million registered voters in Chicago . Because so many Latinos are young, they presently are about 9% of the city's voting age population, though they comprise 200A> of the city. Gutierrez's realignment, coming as a surprise to many, was thought to have detracted from Hispanics' ability to vote as a bloc . "I'm not sure they won't vote as a bloc," said Munoz . "The key to Hispanics is that they do vote as a bloc. One reason Hispanic votes are pursued is that they are so shiftable . " Danilo Alfaro The commission's first meeting-after mem bers were sworn in by U . S . Supreme Court Jus tice Antonin Scalia came in the same two-week period in which two major national or ganizations released their blueprints for im proving the lot of the nation's children. One group, the Children's Defense Fund , called for spending $4 . 3 billion this year alone . The other, the National Governors' Association, urged a collaborative effort joining the federal govern ment, states, service provider groups and families. Describing the makeup of the bipartisan com mission, Bill Acosta, regional administrator for the U .S. Department of Health and Human Ser vices in Dallas, said, "To me it is benign neglect, a travesty with respect to the concerns of not only Hispanics but the nation . " Addressing the problems of Hispanic youth benefits everyone because they will come to represent an ever-continued on page 2

PAGE 2

Justice's Thornburgh Fails to Define Detention Proposal U . S. Attorney General Dick Thornburgh proposed Feb. 7 the detention of immigrants waiting for their asylum applications to be reviewed.While he said the government would provide for the asylum seekers' "social service needs," he did not say to what degree. Neither spokesman Loye Miller of the U.S . Justice Department nor Verne Jervis of the U . S . Immigration and Naturalization Service would elaborate on Thornburgh's statement. Cities that have received the brunt of the immigrant flow have sharply criticized the federal government for not paying for a problem local officials say it has created . On Jan . 9 thousands of asylum applicants living in squatter camps in South Texas were allowed to leave their point of entry when U.S . District Court Judge Filem6n Vela in Brownsville, Texas, issued a temporary restraining order halting the INS from restrict ing their travel . Vela sa i d the order, to ease tension in bor der communities unable to handle the influx of immigrants, will expire Feb . 20 unless he is persuaded otherwise. During the last six months of 1988, 28,81 0 immigrants, mostly Nicaraguans, applied for asylum in South Texas . In all of 1987, 405 persons applied for asylum in the area. At the current rate, about Southern California Latinos Report Bias Seventy-two percent of Latinos in Southern California feel that "quite a few" people in that area miss out on jobs or promotions because of racial or religious discrimination , according Baytown, Tex., Calls Vote The Baytown, Texas, City Council called for its first election in three years Feb. 9 despite complaints that the city's election process remains discriminatory. Newly appointed Councilman Pete Alfaro, the council's first minority member, was the sole objector to the proposed May 5 election . The Houston suburb, which is 25% minority, is awaiting federal action on a 1985 lawsuit filed by two Hispanic and two black voters charging that the city's at-large election sys tem discriminates against minorities. In 1986 the U.S . District Court approved a plan sup ported by the plaintiffs calling for five single member district positions, with the other three council members and the mayor elected at large. When the city appealed, the plaintiffs then called for an 8-1 plan, wherein only the mayor would run at large. to a poll that appeared in a special section of Los Angeles Times Feb . 13 . The poll, a sampling of 2,116 Southern California residents by telephone interview, also found that 70% of Latinos think dis crimination has taken more subtle forms in the last 1 0 years. This compares with blacks (88%), Jews {84%) and Anglos (79%). Only Asians had a lower rate than Hispanics {69%). Respondents also expressed opinions that: Store signs should be in English only-Anglos 44% Jews 33% Asians 26% Blacks 23% Latinos 21% Minority groups have gotten more economi cally than they deserve Anglos Asians Latinos Blacks Jews 31% 28% 25% 17% 15% 100,000 immigrants are expected to come across the Texas border this year . Brownsville Mayor Ignacio Garza said, "The city or the county has no financial resources, no ability to provide services to them . It shouldn't be a burden on local communities; it is the federal government's responsibility." Thornburgh also said that his department is currently studying how to help ease the finan cial stress placed on cities like Brownsville and Miami by the immigrant influx . He said a plan would not be issued until Judge Vela hands down a decision. Luis Restrepo Legislative Office Opens in Aorida State House The Office of Hispanic Affairs, intended to serve as a research and legislative arm of the seven Cuban American members of Florida's House of Representatives, opened Feb. 6 in Tallahassee. Its creation is a result of the support they gave to state Rep. Tom Gustafson (D-Fort Lauder dale) to ensure his election as speaker of the House. All of the Cuban American legislators are Republicans . The office parallels another recently opened for black members in the House. "We want to make the Cuban American group, if we can, the most effective coalition in Tallahassee," Cuban American Caucus Chair man Rep. AI Gutman (A-Miami) said. According to Gutman, both Gustafson and Appropriations Committee Chairman T.K. Wetherell (D Daytona Beach) have promised to have peri odic meetings with the Cuban lawmakers. "My goal as chairman," Gutman said, "is to keep anything from happening in the House without our knowing about it. That's the problem with a lot of members , they find out about things on the floor . " The U.S . Justice Department is reviewing the matter and has until March 20 to approve or reject the 5-3-1 plan. If it is rejected, the city may not hold an election until the Justice Department approves its election process. Children's Commission Ignores Hispanics Olmos Gets Oscar Nod Edward James Olmos was nominated for "best actor" by the Academy of Motion Pic ture Arts and Sciences for his performance in "Stand and Deliver," it was announced Feb. 15. Also in contention for the award are Gene Hackman for "Mississippi Burrning," Tom Hanks for "Big," Dustin Hoffman for "Rain Man," and Max von Sydow for "Pelle the Conqueror . " Should Olmos win, he would become only the second Hispanic actor or actress to win an Oscar, joining Rita Moreno, who was voted "best supporting actress" in 1961 for her performance in "West Side Story . " 2 continued from page 1 larger share of the country's college-age population and labor force, he said. Rafael Valdivieso, vice president of research at the Hispanic Policy Development Project in Washington, D.C., called it "shocking" that there is not one Hispanic sitting on the com mission. "There's no excuse, " .he criticized. He reasoned that the individuals who appointed its members "must not be aware of the Hispanic situation." One of the few people aware of the commis sion and its mandate before it was made public is Carmen Cortez, associate director of Avance, a family support and educational ser vice agency in San Antonio. Cortez, who co chairs a loose national network of groups and individuals helping Hispanic families, dashed off a telegram to Sen. Bentsen two weeks ago expressing the group's disappointment. In adFeb . 20 , 1989 dition, Cortez's network, called Familias, sent a letter to President Bush with a list of possible Hispanic candidates. Bentsen responded he will recommend to Bush that he appoint a Hispanic to the one remaining open slot. Bush can also replace any of the members appointed by Reagan . At press time, appointing members in Con gress failed to respond to inquiries by Weekly Report as to why Hispanics were overlooked. Reacting to a rationale used in the past for the Hispanic absence on such bodies that it is difficult to find any who are qualified and have a high profileArturo Madrid, president of the Tomas Rivera Center, a think tank in Claremont, Calif., said, "Policy-makers on the national level are familiar with two or three people and see that as our universe." He added, "Once again we're left out of the game." Ft!ib
PAGE 3

Margarita Mondrus Engle, guest columnist Latin America's New Window I have been traveling in Latin America since I was a small child. Thir ty years ago, most rural areas (collectively known as provincias to dis tinguish them from the relatively modern capital cities) were quite primitive. On my great-uncle's farm in Cuba, taking a shower meant pulling a string to dump a bucket of water over your head . Light was provided by candles or kerosene, and the bathroom was an outhouse . Even 15 years ago, life in the countryside was primitive by North American standards. During the summer of 1974, I served as a com munity service volunteer in an isolated Mexican "village" of 5,000 people. There was no running water, sewage system, doctor, nurse or pharmacy . Meat was available only on Sundays, when a pig or goat was slaughtered and deep-fried in a huge kettle in the town square. Vegetables were out of the question . Pigs devoured the seedlings as soon as they sprouted. Even wooden fences were unheard of. There were no trees. Donkeys were the primary means of transpor tation, and the daily diet consisted of corn and beans. The town boasted one refrigerator, one car, one telephone (open to the public on weekend evenings for the equivalent of 50 cents per hour), two record albums and a loudspeaker . (I heard those two albums day and night for six weeks!) CAMPES/NOS NOW WATCH AEROBICS In rural Latin America, life is still primitive by North American stand ards, but one thing has changed : Television has reached /as provincias. Doctors , sewers and running water are still scarce in many areas, but on a recent trip to southern Mexico, I spotted TV antennae on the palm-thatched roofs of many huts. A fishing village I visited 15 years ago was accessible then only by bus over dirt roads or by small aircraft landing in a pasture . Today the town, now a minor beach resort, has a real airport as well as a video club and satellite dish repair shop. Campesinos (peasants) now watch aerobics classes taught by tall, slim blondes in shiny leotards. Children too poor to finish school have access to U.S. movies with politely censored Spanish subtitles. And everyone watches nove/as (soap operas). Three years ago I observed a group of barefoot Peruvian Indians ar rive in Cuzco to barter their potatoes on market day . These were people who dwell in stone huts tucked away on roadless, high-mountain ex panses. Both people and llamas haul incredible loads over precarious ly steep , narrow paths. The only agricultural tool is a "digging stick . " Thread is handspun, cloth is hand woven, and cui (guinea pigs) are the primary source of meat. TELEVISION'S IMPACT THE GREATEST Arriving in town, these men headed straight for the window of an ap pliance store , and there they stood, respectfully silent, eyes glued to the Saturday morning cartoons . There are, of course, many other changes occurring in rural Latin America. Donkeys are gradually being replaced by bicycles . Pottery is giving way to plastic, most clothing is polyester rather than hand-woven cotton, and in basketry, synthetic fibers are used instead of palm leaves . Roads and schools have reached most areas . But of all the changes, the one that will have the greatest impact on values and aspirations is television . There are, of course, its positive influences: information, news, a sense of geography. Still, on New Year's 1989, in southern Mexico, I found myself watching a car commercial featuring a tall blonde rich enough to discard diamond rings and toss aside full-length mink coats. As 1 looked out of my hotel window at a predominantly Indian popula tion, 1 wondered how they perceive this window into our modern world. (Margarita Mondrus Engle, of Fallbrook, Calif., is an agronomist.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua FEBRUARY'S POLITICAL INTRIGUE: In the minds of most . Hispanic political activists, Polly Baca and the Democratic Na tional Committee are practically synonymous. The popular former Colorado state senator, who heads Sierra Baca Systems in Thornton, Colo . , has been a member of the DNC since 1973 . She was elected as a DNC vice chair in 1981 and re-elected in 1985 . When the DNC met in Washington, D . C., this month, it looked as though the Baca era would carry forward. On the night of Feb. 9, she, along with another active Latina, Carmen Perez , of Long Beach, Calif., and Lynn Cutler, a white, two-term incumbent from Iowa , appeared certain to gain election to the three open vice chair seats. Then the smoky rooms got smokier. Lottie Shackelford, a black and past mayor of Little Rock, Ark., was set to challenge union leader Jack Otero , e/ cubano, for his voter registra tion/voter participation vice chair post. At the last minute, she joined the field that included Cutler and chicanas Bacaand Perez. The DNC's Hispanic Caucus had been committed to the three Hispanics , but what happened next depends on who's telling the story. Did Otero cut a deal with Shackelford if she agreed to run for one of the three open seats instead of against him? Did Perez sup porters abandon Baca? The short of it, according to Baca, is that she had a hard count of 274 votes (out of a possible 385) for her re-election the night before the election . But, she says, sometime that evening or the next morning, a deal was cut between California, with its 25 votes, and members of the DNC Black Caucus, representing about 70 votes, to band together and elect a black and a Latina presumably Perez . Overnight, claims Baca, she lost 60 votes and the election . Perez, assistant chief deputy to Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, tells Sin Pe/os that she was too busy on the floor to knowwhatmovidasweretaking place . "I wasn ' t running against Polly . I was running for me." Former New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya, newly elected to fol low Perez as head ofthe DNC's Hispanic Caucus, also spoke with Sin Pelos . Ever a good politician, he admitted to hearing rumors that there were discussions among some members of the Hispanic and Black Caucuses . But, noting that delegates could vote for three candidates in the four-person field, he added, "I hope all of the Hispanic members voted for Polly and Carmen . " Cutler polled the most votes. Perez was second, and Shackelford beat out Baca for third. The terrible thing about politics are the choices one must some times make. The nice thing about politics is that while sometimes you're down, you're never out. California offers incontestable proof of that . Remember when Richard Nixon lost that state ' s gubernatorial race to Edmund G. (Pat) Brown and told reporters , "You won ' t have me to kick around anymore." He went on to become President. Come to think of it, later on they did kick him around some more. -Kay Barbaro Quoting ... CARMEN PEREZ. newly elected vice chair of the Democratic Party's National Committee : "Yes, the party needs to retain traditional Democrats . But that doesn't mean it should be afraid to work with emerging Democrats . " JIM COTA, agent for Edward James Olmos, quoted in the L.A. Times Jan. 30 on Olmos' bid to gain a "best actor" nomination for his portrayal of teacher Jaime Escalante in "Stand and Deliver" : "We got absolutely no support from (Warner Bros.) studio . It ' s ter rible." Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Feb .20, 1989 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING THE FUTURE OF CHILDREN: "America in Transition: The Interna tional Frontier" is a 28-page report highlighting steps that must be taken to ensure an educationally and economically competitive future for the nation's children. For a copy se. nd $1 0.95 to National Governors' As sociation Publications Office, 444 N. Capitol St. NW, Suite 250, Washington, D.C . 20001 (202) 624-5300 . IMMIGRATION DATA: "Immigration: Data Not Sufficient for Proposed Legislation," a report by the General Accounting Service, fin'ds that information is lacking for a mandated annual report by the at torney general on the effects of immigration. For a free copy (specify GAO/PEMD-89-8, Dec. 28) write U.S . GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877. URBAN TEACHER SHORTAGES: The summer 1988 edition of The College Board Review contains an article which finds that the most qualified teachers are lured away from urban school districts by their more affluent counterparts. Suffering most, say the researchers, are bilingual education and special education. Copies of the publication (cite item No . 217716) are $6. Write College Board Publications, Box 886, New York, N.Y. 10101-0886. IMPROVING HIGHER EDUCATION ACCESS: The General Electric Foundation will contribute $20 million over the next 1 0 years to upgrade the education of Hispanic and other disadvantaged high school stu dents. Working with four to eight communities each year, GE's College Bound program will offer SAT preparation courses, scholarships, after school and Saturday sessions to augment math, science and English teaching, new equipment and advanced teacher training. For more in formation contact Phyllis McGrath, GE Foundation, 3135 Easton Turnpike, Fairfield, Conn . 06431 (203) 373-3224. INVESTING IN CHILDREN: "An Agenda for the 1990s: A Children's Defense Budget" is a 204-page report by the Children's Defense Fund that paints a bleak picture about children in terms of education, pover ty, care and health. Racial and ethnic data is provided. For a copy send $14.45 to CDF, 122 C St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20001 (202) 6288787. CHICAGO POLITICAL ALLIANCES: The February issue of the Chicago Reporter includes a three-page article on the shifting Hispanic alliances within the Chicago City Council and the impact on the upcom ing mayoral election . For a copy send $2. 50 ($38 for annual subscrip tions) to Community Renewal Society, 332 S . Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60604 (312) 427-4836. Washington, D . C . Feb . 24 CONNECTING HEALTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM UNDERWAY Twenty-five public officials and health professionals will be chosen this April as the first fellows in the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations and Harvard University Kennedy School of Government's Hispanic Health Leadership Program. Funded in large part by a$966,874 grant from theW.K. Kellogg Foun dation, the program aims to improve the well-being of Hispanics by preparing leaders for health and human services development. summer program combines seminars at the Kennedy School and m Washington, D . C . , with yearlong policy-related projects in the fellows ' communities. For more information contact Mossetta Hamlet at COSSMHO, 1 030 15th St. NW, Suite 1 053 , Washington , D. C. 20005 (202) 371-2100 . DRUG ABUSE PUBLICATION SPREADS Operativo Antidroga, a five-part Spanish-language publication from Los Angeles that seeks to educate parents about drug abuse preven tion, will be available in Houston, Miami and New York beginning next month . The publication, funded by the Scott Newman Center , includes infor mation on AIDS, drug abuse symptoms and prevention methods . It will be distributed through school districts and local newspapers . For more information contact the Scott Newman Center, 6255 Sun set Blvd . , Suite 1906, Los Angeles, Calif. 90028 (213) 469-2029 . OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos will be the keynote speaker at the March 1 charter day celebration of Manhattanville Col lege in Purchase, N.Y . Cavazos will also receive an honorary doc torate from the schooi ... J.C. Penney executive Patricia Asip is elected the chairwoman of the Hispanic Policy Development Project, a non profit think tank that analyzes public policies and how they impact Hispanic youth ... Southwestern Bell Telephone is launching an exten sive Spanish-language print campaign in Texas to expand its busi ness relationship with Hispanics. Handling the project is the Dallas-based marketing and advertising firm Martinez & Assocs . Con tact Tory Syvrud at (214) 357-3400 ... Correction The Jan . 16 issue incorrectly listed the recipient of a $40,000 grant from the Campbell Soup Fund . Ohio State University received it. Los Angeles Feb. 25 Calendar TO OUR READERS: To ensure your organization's event will be included in Hispanic Link ' s calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge . Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. The D . C . chapter of National Image will hold a reception in honor of district government officials who assisted in recruitment of local Hispanic police officers . Jimmy Smits from the TV show L.A. Law and Syl via Lopez of KCBS TV News will oo-host the 29th an nual Mexican American Bar Association's installation banquet. California Supreme Court As sociate Justice John Arguelles will be the installing officer. THIS WEEK FIESTA FUND-RAISER Washington, D.C. Feb. 21 The Spanish Educational Development Center, an 18-year-old organization that serves D.C.'s Latino immigrants and low-income residents, will hold a winter fiesta fund-raiser to aid its programming. Nhora Berrera (202) 462-8848 RECEPTION 4 Sonia Davila (202) 443-5636 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Silver Spring, Md. Feb. 25 The seoond session of the National Hispanic Coun cil on Aging/Proyecto Amor's youth leadership program will have Francisoo Nugent, president of the Latin Credit Corporation, speak about 'Economic Development in the Hispanic Sector.' Tomasa Gonzales Ord6iiez (202) 265-1288 LABOR CONFERENCE New York Feb . 25 Cornell University's New York State School of In dustrial and Labor Relations will hold the first North east Latino labor conference. Participating in the conference, titled 'Latino Workers and the Chang ing Face of the Labor Movement,' will be stewards, delegates, rank and file members, activists and stu dents. Edward Gonzalez (212) 340-2800 BAR ASSOCIATION INSTALLATION Feb.20, 1989 Martha Romero (213) 974 -1831 COMING SOON TAPPING THE MARKET The Marketing Institute New York City Feb . 27, 28 Conference Administrator (212) 883 1770 HISPANIC WOMEN Hispanic Women's Task Force of New Jersey Princeton, N.J. March 7, 8 Wanda Garcia (609) 757-6349 TEACHING LIMITEDENGLISH SPEAKERS Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages San Antonio March 7-11 Juana Hopkins (202) 872-1271 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIED ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR/FRESHMAN STUDENT RECRUITMENT UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA Responsibilities Under the general direction of the Director of Admissions , the incumbent is responsible for the planning, development, execution , and administration of a market oriented recruit ment strategy designed to attract quality enrollments directly from high school. The As sociate Director/Freshman Student Recruitment coordinates the duties of a professional and support staff, as well as student workers and volunteers who will assist with the recruit ment and summer orientation activities . Qualifications We seek a highly creative and energetic person who has a solid understanding of student recruitment strategies. We desire to find a person who is professionally challenged through leadership and by participant activities relative to student marketing . Applicants must have a minimum of a master's degree, at least five years in admissions and student recruitment, excellent communication and interpersonal skills. Salary Competitive, commensurate with experience and qualifications . Excellent benefits in clude TIAA!CREF retirement, group life , medical , and dental insurance . Application Application materials should include a letter of application addressing the position respon sibilities; a current resume; the names , addresses, and telephone numbers of five referen ces ; and transcripts supporting degrees earned. Complete applications must be postmarked by March 15, 1989 . Send materials to : Roland Carrillo Search Chair Director of Financial Aid University of Northern Iowa Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614 THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EDUCATOR AND EMPLOYER WITH A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION . ASSISTANT PROFESSOR MATHEMATICS Eastern Michigan University is accepting applications for the position of Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathe matics . Responsibilities include teaching undergraduate and graduate mathematics courses , advising mathematics majors and minors, and conducting research. The position will be available Fall, 1989. Qualifications: Ph.D . in Mathematics, and demonstrated achievement and potential in college-level teaching and re search . NATIONAL CATHOLIC CONFERENCE The Nat i onal Catholic Conference for interra cial justice is inviting resume submissions for the following positions : •Field director and coordinator for intercultural collaboration; Programs director and affirmative action coordinator; •Administrative assistant/office manager; •Secretary . Send resume (no phone calls), including salary requirements to : NCCIJ , 12 Varnun St. NE, Washington, D . C . 20017. Equal Opportunity Employer RISK MANAGEMENT/ PROGRAM SERVICES SPECIALIST (#162) The National Education Association is seeking an individual with a college degree including coursework in basic to inter mediate inferential statistics and program evaluation techniques . Included in the tasks of the position are evaluating liability insurance and legal assistance programs ; reviewing and analyzing statistical, finan cial , and technical information; recom mending risk management and loss control efforts; and preparing reports and bid solicitations . Applicants must demonstrate sk ill in these areas . Tr a vel required . MPA, MBA, JD, or advanced degree in related field with ex perience in conducting evaluations of programs operated by a large organization or government agency and in negotiating employee benefit and insurance agree ments desirable . Professional insurance or benefits designation, e . g . , Associate in Risk Management (ARM) or Certified Employee Benefits Specialist (CEBS) a plus. Writing samples required . NEA offers many excellent benefits. Starting salary $39,271 to $45,165 depending on current salary history and benefits. Qualified applicants should send current resume to: Employment Manager Nation a l Education Association 1201 16th Street , NW , Room 221 Washington, D .C. 20036 EEO / M / F/H DIRECTOR of the Institute for Labor Studies, University of Missouri-Kansas City/Longview Community College, equal opportunity employers. The director works to develop, promote, and teach in a wide variety of courses of value to the labor movement and administer all aspects of the program. Please write for position announcement to: Search Committee LS, 500 Longview Road , Lee's Summit , Mis souri 64081. To apply, send letter of interest , vita, latest transcript and three letters of reference by March 10, 1989, to: Position FAAA89006 DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executive professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report . To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. 310 King Hall EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY Ypsilanti , Mich. 48197 We take pride in the pursuit of our affirm ative action objectives and encourage qualified women and minorities to consider this opportunity . Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES : (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch . Feb.20, 1989 Ordered by ______________ _ Organization _______________ _ Street. __________________ _ City, State & Zip ____________ _ Area Code & Phone ____________ _

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment which has been in the planning stages since 1987, bears no relation to New York's Festival Latino . In a related item, two bilingual theater companies stage works atopposite ends of the country this week : AT THE GRAMMYS: The first-ever performance by a nomi nee in the "best Mexican American" category will be a highlight of the 31st annual Grammy Awards show . At Los Angeles' Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, the English-language version of Luis Santeiro's Our Lady of the Tortilla opens Feb . 22. Eduardo Pavlovsky ' s play Camaralenta starts Feb . 23 at Gala Hispanic Theatre in Washington, D .C. Both companies continue their produc tions through April2. Linda Ronstadt is scheduled to perform La charreada , a song from her Grammy-nominated Canciones de mi padre album during the telecast, which will air Feb. 22 on CBS at 8 p . m . ET (check local listings). His p anic recording acts are nominated this year in a variety of categories, including three in the "Latin" music field . LA. WILL HAVE FESTIVAL: The first Festival Latino in LA. is scheduled for May of next year, organizers announced recently . Sponsored by the city's Latino Ensemble company, the festi val will in clude theater, music and dance performances, art exhibits and a screening of Spanish and Latin American films . According to Jose Ar mand , director of Festival Latino in LA., visiting artists will offer symposia and workshops on their crafts. The event, ONE LINERS: Gloria Estetan and Miami Sound Machine will be the first to receive a star next month in Miami's version of the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The Latin Star Walk is located on Calle Ocho ... The Miracle of Vietnam, a U.S . -Mexico co-production, begins filming south of the border in May ... Shooting wraps up in New York this week for the CBSTV movie Tarzan in Manhattan , in which actor Joe Lara has the title role ... Leo Perez, an account manager for Showtime Networks Inc., has been elected president of the Hollywood chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences ... Media Report LATE WINTER READING LIST: Time once again for an overview of recently published books by or relevant to Hispanics. DELIA'S SONG, by Lucha Carpi (Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, 2-L, Houston, Texas 77204), 191 pp. , $8 . 50 paperbound . This novel explores the world of social struggles, literary fantasy, introspection and poetic elation. TOWARD A CHICANO SOCIAL SCIENCE, by Irene I. Blea (Praeger Publishers, 1 Madison Ave., NewYork, N . Y . 10010), 159pp. , paper bound . Blea, renowned scholar on the Mexican American experience, examines coping mechanisms of a minority culture in a dominant Anglo society, cultural values and gender roles within Chicano society. CRAZV LOVE, by Elias Miguel Munoz (Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, 4800 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher : Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal$108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch . If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 Calhoun, 2-L, Houston, Texas 77204), 167 pp. , $8.50 paperbound. A coming-of-age novel which reflects Cuban American culture and challenges the "American Dream." CAVE OF THE JAGUA, by Antonio M. Stevens Arroyo (University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, N . M . 87131), 282 pp., $27 . 50 hardcover. A study of the mythological and religious sys tems of the Tafnos, pre-Columbian inhabitants of the Caribbean islands . Stevens-Arroyo analyzes the Taro creation myth, the hero myth and includes an interpretation of the group ' s mythology . EL CONDOR AND OTHER STORIES, by Sabine Ulibarri (Arte Publico Press, University of Houston , 4800 Calhoun , 2-L , Houston, Texas 77204), 224 pp. , $8.50 paperbound. This collection of bedtime stories for adults contains a world of gypsies , witches, ghosts and other supernatural beings . The stories are in English and Spanish. ODDSPLAYER, by Joe Rodriguez (Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, 4800 Antonio Mejias-Rentas Calhoun, 2-L , Houston, Texas 77204), 136 pp., $8 . 50 paperbound . This novel by Vietnam veteran Rodriguez deals with the Vietnam war from the perspec tives of black, Chicano and Puerto Rican sol diers and presents Vietnam as a microcosm of the social and political problems of the United States . TRISTAN AND THE HISPANICS, by Jose Yglesias (Simon and Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y . 1 0020), 265 pp. , $17 .95 hardbound . The humorous story of a white Yale freshman who, when sent to settle his late Cuban grandfather ' s estate, embarks on a journey of self discovery. CUBA: THE UNFINISHED REVOLUTION, by Enrique G . Encinosa (Eakin Publications, Inc . , P . O. Box 23067, Austin, Texas 78737), 236 pp. , $12 . 95 paperbound . A collection of 23 true, first-person accounts from Cuban men and women who oppose Fidel Castro . Danilo Alfaro .. Trust me, George, I know this continent better than you ... 20, 1989 Link Weekly Report