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Hispanic link weekly report, February 27, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 27, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Texas Gov. Bill Clements, following criticism that there were no minority or women members on the University of Texas board of regents, picks Mario Ramirez of Rio Grande City to fill a vacancy...Minnesota Gov. Rudy Perpich appoints Eduardo Wolle, assistant dean of admissions at Carlton College in Northfield, to a four-year term on the Minnesota Spanish Speaking Affairs Council...Florida state Sen. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen asks mayors of Dade County cities to declare March a month of liberty for anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch. Bosch, 61, was imprisoned a year ago for violating his parole after being convicted for attacking a freighter engaged in trade with
Cuba...Richard Castro, director of the agency for Human Rights and Community Relations for the City and County of Denver, announces he will run for the city’s Board of Education...Frank Cruz resigns abruptly as vice president and general manager of Los Angeles’ Spanish-language KVEA-TV, saying he will pursue personal interests. Cruz was replaced by station manager Steven Levin...Vernon "Lefty” Gfmez, New York Yankees pitcher of the 1930s known as much for his quick wit as for his throwing arm, dies Feb. 17 of congestive heart failure in Larkspur, Calif. The 80-year-old had a career record of 189-102... New York Yankee great Joe Dimaggio visits 18-year-old cancer patient Dimaggio Velasquez in San Francisco. Velasquez has lost a leg to cancer which has now spread to his lungs...
y^^^^SPAMIC
Hispanio-Black Friction: Reality or a Media Creation?
Recent press reports from cities across the nation have pointed to increasingly frayed relations between blacks and Hispanics, but leaders and officials in these cities say the media has overblown and oversimplified the situation.
They say that while in many cases there is a more pronounced competition between the groups for dwindling opportunities, there are also many areas where they are coming together.
Daryl Borgquist, a spokesman for the U.S. Justice Department’s Community Relations Service, acknowledged that there have been some rising tensions. But he quickly added, "Wherever you have mixing, there is always tension brewing."
The causes for the rising friction fall into many categories. In some cities it centers on police relations, in others government services and in others a constricted job market. There is also the distribution of political power and housing.
Making an observation about Chicago, one that was echoed elsewhere, attorney George Munoz, former Chicago school board chairman, said the media "officially interprets events depending on whom it quotes and how it slants things. The media plays a major role as a referee between the two groups."
Dorothy Bacon, director of Miami's largely black Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce, said of the press, "The good things that we do together are the things they don't print. And we
do 10 good things for every bad one they report."
MIAMI
Miami offers a stark example of where the media has painted two communities sitting atop a powder keg.
Most recently, it gave major play to the rejection by Police Chief Perry Anderson of a request by Hispanic police officers that they be reassigned out of the predominantly black neighborhoods ravaged by riots last month. The officers cited "unbearable" tension in the communities that had arisen from the fatal shooting of a young black man by a Latino officer.
Factored into the Miami equation is the variable represented by the recent mass arrivals of Nicaraguan asylum-seekers. The Nicaraguans are said to further strain the tight job market encountered by blacks. Resentment toward the recent arrivals has increased in some quarters because they see the city government as bending over backward to help the Nicaraguans while many blacks go wanting.
"In Miami the issue is not black/Hispanic,” said Guarione Diaz, president of the Cuban American National Council. "The animosity that exists is no more or no less than that which exists between Hispanics and whites or between whites and blacks."
To diffuse the bleak impression of Hispanic/black relations, Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce’s Bacon proudly pointed to
the fact that the chamber’s choice for small business of the year in 1988 was a market owned by Jorge Carbajal.
Examples from other cities:
CHICAGO
Members of the Chicago City Council's "black-brown coalition" reassess their cohesiveness after Alderman Luis Gutierrez abruptly jumped ship last month and endorsed mayoral candidate Richard M. Daley, son of the late Richard J. Daley.
The 50-member chamber had been in perpetual deadlock until three Latinos were elected in March 1986. The election victories brought to four the number of Hispanic aider-men, giving the late Mayor Harold Washington a tie-breaking vote in the council.
Two of the other Latino lawmakers support Tim Evans, a black who will run as an independent in the city’s general election April 4. Jennifer Juarez Robles, a reporter with the civil rights monthly The Chicago Reporter, said local media coverage of relations is lacking. "Hispanics are rarely represented in the media, and Hispanics and blacks together is even more rare. The times that it is covered it is done in a divisive way, not in terms of groups working together."
Steven Saunders, district director of Project Equality, an employment services agency, admitted to a certain amount of friction between the groups in the job arena. Despite this, he said, "There are coalitions between Mexican, Cuban, Central American and other Hispanic groups with blacks, working for political and economic goals that are similar. There is a mutual respect..."
DALLAS
Black and Hispanic residents in Dallas await anxiously a decision by the City Council’s charter review committee on the racial and ethnic makeup of a task force that will study the city’s election system. Currently, eight of the council’s 10 members are elected by single district; the remaining two council members and the mayor are elected at large.
continued on page 2
Judge Arguelles Quits Calif. Supreme Court
California Supreme Court Justice John Arguelles, the second Latino named to sit on the court in its history, will retire from the bench March 1, just two years after being sworn into office.
Arguelles, who announced his resignation in November, was selected by Gov. George Deukmejian to fill one of three vacancies created by the defeat of Chief Justice Rose Bird and Justices Joseph Grodin and the court’s first Latino, Cruz Reynoso, in 1986.
At press time Deukmejian had not yet revealed his list of nominees, although his final choice must be submitted for approval by the state Judicial Appointments Commission by next month. Of the jurists on whom speculation is centering, none are Hispanic, which could mean that California, which is 20% Latino, will be without a Hispanic on the Supreme Court for the first time since 1981. Reynoso was appointed by then-Gov. Jerry Brown in December 1981.
— Danilo Alfaro


Refugee Group Head Calls INS Detention Policy Unlawful
Sylvia Rosales, head of the Central American Refugee Center in Washington, D.C., charged Feb. 21 that the federal government is in violation of its own political asylum regulations for detaining hundreds of Central Americans near Bayview, Texas. The government said that as of that date refugees who file "frivolous" claims for asylum will be barred from leaving the area
The plan marks the first mass detention of an immigrant group since the restriction of Haitian asylum-seekers in Florida in 1981.
The new policy applies only to Texas’ Rio Grande Valley and calls for additional Border
Patrol agents and streamlined procedures to stem the tide of asylum-seekers into South Texas, said Immigration and Naturalization Service Commissioner Alan Nelson.
"The purpose of the plan," said Rosales, "is simply to start deporting people en masse."
The INS had originally begun confining asylum applicants in Brownsville, Texas, Dec. 16. U.S. District Court Judge Filemon Vela, acting on a suit brought on behalf of a group of refugees, temporarily suspended the restriction Jan. 9. He said he did so to ease the strain on border communities ill-
equipped to handle the influx. Vela allowed the restraining order to expire Feb. 17.
Under the new rules, applicants will be given immediate asylum hearings, usually on the day they cross into Texas. Those who are denied asylum will be served with deportation orders and sent immediately to an INS detention facility. Individuals apprehended by the Border Patrol before they have a chance to apply for asylum will also be arrested and served deportation orders.
"Pro bono attorneys have been denied the right to speak to the applicants,” said Rosales. —Danilo Alfaro
Hispanic and Black Activists Weigh Relations in Six Cities
continued from page 1
Dallas has one Hispanic councilor, Al Gonzalez. He has decided not to run for re-election in May.
Despite a widely held assessment that Hispanics are too spread out to have a district drawn in their favor, the proceedings of the charter committee will be scrutinized to ensure that neither group gets an unfair advantage.
Diana Navarrete, a former member of the Mayor’s Hispanic Task Force and a resident of Dallas for the past 18 years, said, "While I don’t see a lot of Hispanics celebrating black history month nor many blacks celebrating Hispanic holidays, in the time that I’ve been here, I’ve seen definite progress.
"We share common needs and the brunt of a lack of political participation," she said.
Billy Allen, president of Minority Search Inc. and a member of the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport Board, said relations have "been strained because of a number of incidents, but the two groups have put the issues on the table."
HARTFORD, CONN.
A group of relatively new Puerto Rican political and educational leaders in Hartford, Conn., attempt to reach an equitable power-sharing formula with black leaders, more apt to be found in and recruited from the city’s corporate sphere.
There are two Hispanics on Hartford's City Council, Marfa Gonzalez and Eugenio Caro. Blacks occupy three seats and the mayor’s office.
The school superintendent is Puerto Rican Hernan La Fontaine. Sitting on the school board is Marfa Sanchez, a long-time activist elected to the state legislature in November.
CORRECTION
Last week’s Weekly Report incorrectly stated that actress Rita Moreno has been the only Hispanic actor or actress to win an Oscar. Jose Ferrer won one for his best actor performance in "Cyrano de Bergerac"; so did Anthony Quinn for best supporting actor in "Viva Zapata” and “Lust for Life."
Councilman Caro, a Hartford resident for 35 years, talked of a common link between blacks and Hispanics due to their living together in several Northeast cities. "We know how to call each other names and laugh about it, then get down to business."
Puerto Rican Political Action President Edwin Vargas said there is discernible tension in terms of political clout in the city’s school system.
He said however, “We’re getting together more with (black) grassroots people, but our political leaders have difficulty dealing with (established) black leaders.”
LOS ANGELES
Los Angeles blacks and Hispanics are at a crucial crossroads as the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors finds itself the target of a suit filed August 1988 by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. It charges that the five supervisors' districts are drawn in a way that disenfranchises Latinos.
The county’s black leadership filed a suit to intervene in December, they explained, so that their interests would be represented in any remap effort.
In addition, blacks have been painted as wary of Latino moves to achieve employment parity in the county and city of Los Angeles. Any gain by one group is described as a loss for the other.
There are two Hispanics, Richard Alatorre and Gloria Molina, and three blacks on the 15-member Los Angeles City Council. The County Board of Supervisors has five white males.
Grace Montanez-Davis, deputy mayor of Los Angeles, conceded to a certain level of friction, saying, “We have learned to share, but there’s always this vigilance as to ’Is there too much going in that direction?”'
She said there is no overt tension and "given the diversity of the city, we get along very well," adding, "Among the leadership there is always dialogue.”
Mark Ridley-Thomas, head of the Los Angeles chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, in an interview with
Feb. 27, 1989
the Los Angeles Times about the county redistricting lawsuit, offered a somewhat different assessment. "What is most disconcerting... (among Latinos) is the extent in which there is a strong implication that ’blacks had their day.'”
NEW YORK
A story published Feb. 14 quoted the head of New York’s black police officers association saying that Police Commissioner Benjamin Ward, a black, was being treated unfairly by Hispanic officers. The detective said Hispanics had already gotten "more than their fair share” and were "out of line" in criticizing Ward for two recent speeches he gave that contained anti-Hispanic remarks.
New Yorkers have also been plied with stories playing black mayoral candidate David Dinkins, the popular Manhattan Borough president, against a Latino, former U.S. Congressman Herman Badillo, who is being urged to run by a well-connected group of Latinos.
Angelo Falcon, director of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, said, “There are some newspapers looking for dramatic stories, conflicts between blacks and Latinos." But, he said, "the black and Latino communities have in New York a unique situation — both are on the same side."
— F6lix Perez, with the reporting assistance of Danilo Alfaro and Mario Santana
Firm Buys 20% of Vista
Warner Publishing Inc., a division of Warner Communications, has acquired for $1 million a 20% share of Horizon Communications, publishers of Vista magazine. The Coral Gables, Fla., based, English-language weekly newspaper insert is the largest Hispanic oriented magazine in the United States, with an unpaid circulation of 1.4 million.
Arturo Villar, president of Horizon and publisher of Vista, welcomed the partnership, saying, "Warner brings to Vista resources that can enhance our presence and penetration in the market and the op-portunity to explore other media."____
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Juan Gonzalez
Felix’s Final Call
From the moment I pulled out of the Ortiz Funeral Home under the el on Westchester Ave. in the Bronx, there was no question where to stop or what to do before writing about the murder of Felix Resto. I headed t for the phone booth in East Harlem where Felix had been shot.
When I reached the two public phones, I waited for several minutes,
I: hoping some young thug would pass by and claim them as his office
i lines, hoping that I might confront someone Felix spent his life trying to 1 help. Felix was 35 years old when he died on that corner in the arms of 1| his wife, Linda. He left behind three children.
Felix and I met some 20 years ago, when as a i; teen-ager he joined the Young Lords Party and v worked in one of our offices in the Bronx. Like nj most of us then, he was full of rebelliousness 3j and determination to get respect for Puerto 1 Ricans.
; When the Young Lords broke up in the mid-f j 70s, I moved to Philadelphia, and Felix’s life, like n | many, floundered for a while. We lost touch. For $j a few years the heroin habit got to him, but he n! met Linda and she became his anchor, stand-
ii ing by him until he cleaned himself up.
They married and the kids started coming, first Melody, then Felix Jr., tti then Daniel. While he loved music, he could never make a living at that. =]j For a while now, he had been a city employee, most recently with the rl Human Services Commission.
FELIX RECENTLY APPLIED TO LAW SCHOOL
Assigned to the Neighborhood Stabilization Office in Queens, Felix \i\ spent his time running education programs for immigrant workers and i helping tenants to organize.
j At the funeral home, the president of a block association talked about nlj how he had helped the people in her building get a rent reduction for 9! each apartment by teaching them housing law. Another friend remem-xfi bered, "His dream was to go to law school. I kept telling him, ’It's never o| too late.’"
! As we kneeled in front of the casket, Linda recalled, "He would joke lsl about starting Resto & Resto, a firm with our daughter." This year he :nJ had finally applied to law school. He hoped to start in September.
Then came the night of Feb. 10. His phone was out of service, so •3 around8p.m. Felix left their apartment to go to the corner phone booth.
When he got there, police say, three young men, apparently drug :o dealers, refused to let him use the phone — they needed it for busi-mI ness.
! "He came running upstairs and yelled at one of the kids to get his nil baseball bat," Linda said. "He told me some guys had jumped him out-ia! side and he was going to find them. I tried to stop him."
WHAT WOULD I HAVE DONE?
She threw a coat over her nightgown and rushed after him. "But it was ol too late. By the time I got down to the street, he was already on the :o; ground. They had shot him in the back."
; As she spoke, she kept staring at his body, kept caressing his off forehead, as if somehow her love could bring back her husband.
| I looked at the public phone where F6lix met his killers and tried to think vvj what I would have done in his place, what any of us can be expected ol to do in this age of crack, when young thugs tell you you can’t use a iq public phone on your own corner.
i And then I thought of all the politicians, including Gov. Mario Cuomo, wj who talk so much trash about fighting drugs while they play shell games wj with state and city budgets and end up throwing chump change at the tfci drug problem.
' I kept thinking about the billions of dollars somebody is coming up with oil to bail out a bunch of bankrupt savings banks.
! And I kept seeing F6lix Resto in a casket, having lived his life and having :f lost it for the same reason — a little respect, j (Juan Gonzalez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la iengua
RIDDLE: What costs $2 million, is five feet deep, 14 feet wide, four miles long, and will be under construction along California’s Otay Mesa within two months?
The U.S. State Department says it’s a Dual-Purpose Border Security Enhancement Project and Drainage Ditch (DPBSEPADD). The Border Patrol refers to it as a Vehicle Barrier and Drainage Facility (VBDF).
Weekly Report guest columnist Raoul Lowery Contreras prefers, simply: The Wicked Ditch of the West.
Mexican officials and journalists have referred to it as a "Berlin Wall'' and "act of hostility." At a Feb. 17 conference of border governors in Saltillo, Mexico, Romeo Flores Caballero, Mexico Counsel General in Los Angeles, waggled a figurative finger at INS Commissioner Alan Nelson and told him, "You should be building bridges, not ditches."
The only folks who haven’t gotten excited about the proposed excavation are those who live in Nogales, Ariz.
Last month they went quietly ahead and dug a nifty hole of their own: 3.5 feet deep, 8.5 feet wide and 540 feet long. The work was done, presumably for a lot less than $2 million, by some heavy earth-moving equipment operated by Air National Guard reservists.
The Nogales Border Patrol gave their trench no name or acronym. And unlike the California and Washington officials who can't get their stories straight about why they’re digging the Otay Mesa moat, Jos6 Marrufo, assistant agent in charge of the Nogales Patrol office, was up front about its purpose.
In no way is it intended to stop illegal entry of aliens. “They can walk right across it if they want," he told Nogales International reporter Kathy Scott. "We want to stop two types of illegal activity involving vehicles. There are those who drive loads of drugs north, specifically marijuana. And those who bring stolen cars south.”
Already his agents reported two scores. On Feb. 5, they found 1,039 pounds of marijuana near the ditch, apparently abandoned by smugglers who couldn’t drive through and then attempted to backpack the stuff in.
The other: "A reporter in high heels and a skirt fell in trying to take a picture.”
WHO’S HISPANIC? The man President Bush has announced as his ambassador to Mexico, John Negroponte — a State Department veteran who is receiving scathing reviews from the Mexican press for his major involvement in the secret Contra war against Nicaragua in the early '80s — is not Hispanic.
So how about Vernon (Lefty) G6mez, the New York Yankee pitching star who died at age 80 this month?
New York Times sportswriter Ira Berkow describes Lefty’s heritage: "He was part Spanish, part Irish and part zany." And very good. He won 189 games, had a 6-0 World Series record and was the winning pitcher in four out of the five All-Star games he started.
Born in Rodeo, Calif., northeast of San Francisco, Gomez claimed to have invented a revolving fish bowl for old fish too tired to swim. Asked the secret to his success, he once revealed, "Clean living and a fast outfield."
— KavBarbaro
Quoting...
MIGUEL PEREZ, New York Daily News columnist, in a Feb. 16 commentary, "Do Latinos mistrust Blacks?":
" The majority of Latinos realize that a black and Latino alliance is their key to the future in the city...But (black mayoral candidate David) Dinkins' biggest problem is that (some). Latinos are outright racists. Just like in the city’s white community, the first thing Dinkins has to overcome in the Latino community is racism."
Feb. 27,1989
3


COLLECTING________________________________________________
CANCER RATES IN LA.: "Cancer in L.A. County" is a 120-page study that breaks down different cancer rates in Los Angeles County according to gender, and racial and ethnic group. To receive a copy, send $10 to University of California at Los Angeles, Division of Cancer Control,
1100 Glendon, Suite 711, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024.
STUDENT PERFORMANCE: "Crossroads in American Education," a 56-page report by the Nation’s Report Card, concludes that although the declining performance trends among students in the ’70s have eased, they still have difficulty applying their knowledge. For a copy send $9 to Nation’s Report Card, P.O. Box 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541-0001.
ADVERTISING PRACTICES: The March issue of American Demographics contains a five-page article that says that negative ethnically oriented advertising is disappearing while ethnic advertising that motivates buyers increases in sophistication. For a copy send $5 to American Demographics, P.O. Box 68, Ithaca, N.Y. 14851 1-800-828-1133.
PUERTO RICAN AND LATINO HEALTH IN NEW YORK: The fall issue of Boletfn del Centro de Estudios Puertorriquenos, a 104-page publication, contains several articles on the health status of Puerto Ricans and other Latinos in New York City. For a free copy, send a self-addressed postcard to Boletfn, Centro de Estudios Puertorriquenos, Hunter College, Box 540,695 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 10021 (212) 772-5689.
MATH SKILLS: “Everybody Counts: A Report to the Nation on the Future of Mathematics Education" says that steps must be taken to keep Hispanic and black students in school because they will make up an increasing share of the nation’s future work force. For a copy of the 96-page report by the National Research Council, send $7.95 to National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20418 (202) 334- 3313.
INVESTING IN CHILDREN: "An Agenda for the 1990s: A Children’s Defense Budget" is a 204-page report by the Children’s Defense Fund that paints a bleak picture about children in terms of education, poverty, care and health. Racial and ethnic data is provided. For a copy send $14.45 to CDF, 122 C St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-8787.
CHICAGO POLITICAL ALLIANCES: The February issue of The Chicago Reporter includes a three-page article on the shifting Hispanic alliances within the Chicago City Council and the impact on the upcoming mayoral election. For a copy send $2.50 ($38 for annual subscriptions) to Community Renewal Society, 332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60604(312)427-4836.
CONNECTING
CISNEROS TO START INVESTMENT FIRM San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, who last year said that he would not seek re-election due to personal problems, announced two weeks ago that he plans to open an asset management firm when he leaves office this spring.
Tentatively called the Cisneros Group, the firm will have Cisneros as its president; Narciso Cano, head of San Antonio’s Department of Economic and Employment Development, as chairman; and Victor Miramontes, a Laredo Bancshares Inc. officer, as vice president. The Houston-headquartered Criterion Group, which manages $10 billion in accounts, has purchased 15% of the venture. It has promised to train the principals, who lack formal investment management experience.
Currently, the Cisneros Group has $1.2 million pledged by investors. The firm, said Cisneros, will target pension systems and university endowments. He said he anticipates the firm will manage $350 million in its first year.
Cisneros said he has promised his partners and Criterion Group that he would stay with the firm at least five years.
PROGRAM SEEKS GRADUATE STUDENTS Thirty Hispanic, black and other disadvantaged sophomore and junior college students from California post-secondary institutions will be chosen to participate in a summer program at the University of California at Santa Barbara that seeks to enlarge the pool of minorities admitted to graduate schools.
Funded by a $111,800 grant from the U.S. Department of Education, the Summer Academic Research Institute places the students on research teams that include UCSB graduate students and faculty members. In addition, they participate in workshops on writing and research, mathematics and microcomputers. Students receive a $1,500 stipend, travel assistance, housing and academic credit. Deadline for applying is March 17. For more information call UCSB’s graduate division office at (805) 961-2277.
GROUP RECEIVES GRANT
The National Hispanic University announced Feb. 1 it received a $250,000 grant from the Campbell Soup Fund. The money will be used to strengthen academic programs and operations of the eight-year-old institution, the only four-year national Hispanic university on the U.S. mainland. NHU is based in Oakland, Calif.
Calendar_______________________
To Our Readers: To ensure information regarding your organization’s upcoming event /vill be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. °lease include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
MARKETING CONFERENCE New York Feb.27, 28
The Marketing Institute will hold a conference on new opportunities in the Hispanic market featuring speeches by top marketing and advertising executives.
Conference Administrator 1-800-345-8016
PTA LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE Washington D.C. Feb. 27-March 2 PTA leaders and U.S. legislators will hold a conference to discuss children and teen issues, including dropouts, child care, AIDS, child nutrition, homeless children and public education.
John Mirallegro (202) 484-1000
jVIVA EL MARIACHI!
Fresno, Calif. March 5
Radio Bilingue presents the seventh annual Mariachi Festival. It will feature music, entertainment, Mexican food, dance and art.
Kathy O’Rourke (209) 486-5174
COMING SOON
HISPANIC WOMEN’S FORUM Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey Princeton, N.J. March 7, 8 Wanda Garcfa (609) 757-6349
MIGRANT HEAD START National Migrant Head Start Directors Association
Mesa, Ariz. March 19-22 Isaac Salcido (602) 231 -6967
SPOTLIGHT
IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE POLICY:The Center for Migrant Studies will hold a two-day conference on the consequences of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, legal immigration reform and the basis for U.S. refugee policy. The conference will feature international and national experts from a range of agencies, government, legal practice, the social sciences, law schools and volunteer organizations. Registration for the conference, to be held April 6,7 in Washington, D.C., costs$140, For more information call LydioTomasi at (718) 351-8800.
Feb. 27,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
PRESIDENT UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE
Nominations and expressions of interest are invited for the position of President of the University of Delaware. The President is chief executive officer of the University and reports to the Board of Trustees which operates under a perpetual charter originally granted in 1883. The appointment of the new President will become effective as soon as possible and not later than July 1,1990.
A state-assisted, land-grant and sea-grant institution, the University of Delaware has characteristics of both a public and private corporation. The University is located in Newark, Delaware, midway between Baltimore and Philadelphia. It has a faculty of 855 and an enrollment of approximately 19,000 undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education students. With an endowment ranked 33rd in the nation, the University of Delaware’s annual budget is in excess of $200 million. The University is organized into 10 colleges: Agricultural Sciences; Arts and Sciences; Business and Economics; Education; Engineering; Human Resources; Marine Studies; Nursing; Physical Education, Athletics and Recreation; and Urban Affairs and Public Policy. The University is committed to teaching, research, and public service.
The University of Delaware is seeking an individual with a distinguished record of accomplishment in the field of higher education, or another professional field. The President must be able to communicate the needs and achievements of the University to a variety of groups and enlarge and administer the financial resources of the institution. He or she must also possess the qualities of integrity, stamina, and intellectual depth necessary to lead a complex University that seeks continued improvement in the quality and effectiveness of its academic programs.
Nominations and expressions of interest should be submitted to:
Mr. John E. Burris Presidential Nominating Committee of the Board of Trustees University of Delaware P.O. Box 5598 Newark, DE 19714-5598
Nominations and expressions of interest will continue to be received until the position is filled. Since the Board will begin the screening of candidates on March 27, such submissions should be made and received prior to that date.
The University of Delaware is an equal opportunity and affirmative action employer which actively seeks and encourages nominations of, and expressions of interest from, minority and female candidates..
DIRECTOR, DIVISION OF EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
The National Institutes of Health is accepting nominations and applications for the position of Director, Division of Equal Opportunity. The Director is responsible for planning, directing, coordinating, and evaluating a comprehensive equal opportunity program encompassing equal employment and special emphasis programs, affirmative action, civil rights and contracts compliance.
This is a Civil Service position at the GM-15 grade level, with a salary range of $57,158 to $74,303 per annum. Applicants must have substantive experience performing work of an analytical, interpretative, and judgmental nature which demonstrates knowledge of equal employment opportunity principles, practices, laws, and regulations.
For questions concerning this position please contact Patricia Middleton at (301) 496-6521. Application packets may be obtained by calling the above number. Completed packets must be submitted to:
Ms. Patricia Middleton National Institutes of Health Office of the Director, Personnel Building 31, Room 1C-23 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland 20892
APPLICATIONS MUST BE POSTMARKED NO LATER THAN MARCH 31, 1989.
All qualified candidates will receive consideration without regard to race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin, lawful political affiliation, marital status, union membership, or nondisqualifying physical or mental handicap. U.S. Citizenship required.
NIH IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
BROWN UNIVERSITY. The program in American Civilization and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America invite nominations and applications for a Howard Foundation post-doctoral fellowship in Latino Studies for 1989-90. The stipend for the academic year is $28,000.
The fellow would be expected to teach one course each semester in a particular area of Latino history or culture and to work closely with the Center to develop an interdisciplinary plan for Latino Studies at Brown University.
Applicants should have some teaching experience and training in interdisciplinary methods. Ph.D. required.
Closing date for applications is April 1, 1989. Please send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and three letters of recommendation to Mari Jo Buhle, Chair, American Civilization, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912.
NATIONAL CATHOLIC CONFERENCE
The National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice is inviting resume submissions for the following positions:
•Field director and coordinator for intercultural collaboration;
•Programs director and affirmative action coordinator,
•Administrative assistant/office manager,
•Secretary.
Send resume (no phone calls), including salary requirements to: NCCIJ, 1200 Varnun St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20017.
Equal Opportunity Employer
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Feb. 27,1989
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Arts & Entertainment
MUSIC NORTH AND SOUTH: Two extreme points in the Americas — Los Angeles and Vina del Mar, Chile — held major music events last week.
Los Angeles was home to the 31st annual Grammy Awards ceremony that yielded six Latino winners, half of them in non-Hispanic categories.
Mexican guitarist Carlos Santana won a Grammy in the "best instrumental rock” category for his album Blues for Salvador. Two Spaniards won in classical categories — pianist Alicia de Larrocha for "best classical instrumental" recording, Albeniz, and tenor Placido Domingo as one of the principal soloists in Wagner: Lohengrin, which was named "best opera recording."
Gloria Estefan and Miami Sound Machine, nominated in the "best pop vocal group or duo" category for the Spanish-language version of the single Anything For You was edged out by Manhattan Transfer and its album Brasil.
As expected, Linda Ronstadt captured the Grammy in the "best Mexican American" category for her first-ever Spanish-language album, Canciones de mi padre. Ronstadt was the nominee in that category to perform at the ceremony, which was telecast by CBS Feb. 22.
Ruben Blades won the Grammy in the "best tropical latin" category for the album Antecedente.
It was the fourth Grammy for Ronstadt and the second for Blades.
Brazilian singer Roberto Carlos was a surprise winner in the "best latino pop category" for his album Roberto Carlos. Jose Jose, who had been nominated five times before and won once, was favored for Soy asi.
Roberto Carlos could not travel to Los Angeles to pick up the award, because he was scheduled to close the XXX Festival de la Cancion de Vina del Mar at that Chilean beach resort.
Singers and composers from around the globe — including Cuban American singer Gloria Alfonso — were represented at Latin America’s major song competition. Roberto Carlos was among guest performers that included British singer Shirley Bassett and U.S. rock group REO Speedwagon.
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
By Evelyn Hernandez, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists
When the Pulitzer Prize jurors gather at Columbia University in New York City next month to award journalism’s most prestigious prize, five talented Latino journalists will be among the judges.
It was a long time coming.
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Just a year ago, there were no Hispanics among the 66 jurors. Not one. The Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., noticed the omission and, together with the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and Jerry Apodaca, at that time publisher of I "Hispanic” magazine, sent letters of protest to Bfl the Pulitzer Prize Board. ||ff
The board took the I hint and appointed five g| Mm
Hispanics to this year’s jury: Manuel Galvan of HQp the Chicago Tribune, '
Norma Sosa of the Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Ernie Sotomayor of the Dallas Morning News, Frank del Olmo of The Los Angeles Times, and David Medina, then of The Miami News, which ceased publishing in December. "There was a sense that there had been a change, a development in journalism that we hadn’t kept up with," Robert Christopher, administrator of the prize, said recently. “There were many more Hispanic Americans than there were 20 years ago."
Christopher said he was unsure if other Hispanics have served as jurors before. Certainly there have never been as many as five, he said.
But we still have a problem. In the news business, except in very few instances, Hispanics continue to be excluded from high-level decision-making positions. The Pulitzers are no exception.
The 66 jurors make recommendations to the 16-member Pulitzer board, the group that makes the final decision about who wins. The board can overrule the jurors’ recommendations and select its own winners.
There are no Hispanics on that board.
There isn’t much turnover on the board, either.
There is an empty slot now. A member will step down after this year's judging. The board will select a replacement soon.
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists has sent another letter to the Pulitzer board, strongly recommending that a Hispanic be named to the position. I urged other journalism associations to do the same, and quickly. As Hispanic journalists, we must remain ever vigilant that equality be guaranteed at all levels.
No doubt Hispanics will bring journalistic excellence and a new perspective to the judging. But it’s newsroom managers who can help more Hispanic journalists excel and be nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. They can do so by providing professional guidance and support. And more of these managers should be Hispanic.
Norma Sosa, managing editor of the Corpus Christi Caller-Times, made the simple point: "Hispanics excel when they are given the opportunity to develop, the same as other journalists.”
(Hernandez is a reporter with Newsday in New York.)
6
Feb. 27,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Gov . Bill Clements, following criticism that there were no m1nonty or women members on the University of Texas board of regents, picks Mario Ramirez of Rio Grande City to fill a vacancy ... Min nesota Gov . Rudy Perpich appoints Eduardo Wolle assistant dean of at Carlton College in to a term on the Minnesota Spanish Speaking Affairs Councii ... Fiorida state Sen . Ileana Ros-Lehtinen asks mayors of Dade County cities to declare March a month of liberty for anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch. 61, was imprisoned a year ago for violating his parole after being convicted for attacking a freighter engaged in trade with Cuba ... Richard Castro, director of the agency for Human Rights and Community Relations for the City and County of Denver, announces he will run for the city's Board of Education ... Frank Cruz resigns abruptly as vice president and general manager of Los Angeles' Spanish-language KVEA-lV, saying he will pursue personal interests . Cruz was replaced by station manager Steven Levin ... Vernon "Lefty" Glt&, New York Yankees pitcher of the 1930s known as much for his quick wit as for his throwing arm, dies Feb . 17 of congestive heart failure in Larkspur, Calif. The 80-year-old had a career record of 189102 ... New York Yankee great Joe Dimaggio visits 18-year -old cancer patient Dimaggio Velasquez in San Franc i sco. Velasquez has lost a leg to cancer which has now spread to his lungs ... vot?N•-•Il HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT IF•b27,•••• Hispanic-Black Friction: Reality or a Media Creation? from across the do 1 0 good things for every bad one they the fact that the chamber's choice for small have pointed to relareport." business of the year in 1988 was a market t1ons between and but MIAMI owned by Jorge Carbajal. leaders and officials 1n these c1t1es say the Ex 1 f th media has overblown and oversimplified the Miami offers a stark example of where the amp es rom o er c1t1es: situation. media has painted two communities sitting CHICAGO They say that while in many cases there is a atop a powder k .eg. . . more pronounced competition between the . Most recently, 1t maJor play to the reJecgroups for dwindling opportunities , there are t1on by Pol!ce of a re also many areas where they are coming quest by Hispanic police off1cers that they be together . out of the predominantly black Daryl Bergquist a spokesman for the U S ravaged by riots last month. Justice Community The off1c. e .rs Cited "unbear . able" tension in the Service, acknowledged that there have been that had ansen from fatal some rising tensions. But he quickly added of a young black man by a Latino of"Wh h . . h . I ' fleer. erever you ave m1x1ng, t ere 1s a ways tension brewing." Factored into the Miami equation is the variT able represented by the recent mass arr1' vals he causes for the rising friction fall into many categories . In some cities it centers on police of Nicaraguan asylum-seekers. The relations, in others government services and Nicaraguans are said to further strain the tight in others a constricted job market. There is job market encountered by blacks. Resent ment toward the recent arrl vals has 1'ncreased also the distribution of political power and housing . in. some quarters because they see the city government as bending over backward to help Making an observation about Chicago, one the Nicaraguans while many blacks go want that was echoed elsewhere , attorney George 1ng. Munoz, former Chicago school board chairman, said the media "officially interprets events "In Miami the issue is not black/Hispanic," depending on whom it quotes and how it slants said Guarione Dfaz, president of the Cuban things . The media plays a maJ' or role as a American National Council. "The animosity referee between the two groups . " that exists is no more or no less than that which exists between Hispanics and whites or be Dorothy Bacon , director of Miami's largely tween whites and blacks . " black Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce, ' d f h T To diffuse the bleak impression of sal 0 t e press, " he good things that we do Hispanic/black relations, Miami-Dade Chamtogether are the things they don ' t print. And we ber of Commerce ' s Bacon proudly pointed to Judge Arguelles Quits Calif. Supreme Court California Supreme Court Justice John Ar guelles, the second Latino named to sit on the court in its history, will retire from the bench March 1, just two years after being sworn into office . Arguelles, who announced his resignation in November, was selected by Gov. George Deukmejian to fill one of three vacancies created by the defeat of Chief Justice Rose Bird and Justices Joseph Grodin and the court's first Latino, Cruz Reynoso, in 1986. At press time Deukmejian had not yet revealed his list of nominees , although his final choice must be submitted for approval by the state Judicial Appointments Commis sion by next month . Of the jurists on whom speculation is centering, none are Hispanic , which could mean that California, which is 20% Latino , will be without a Hispanic on the Supreme Court for the first time since 1981. Reynoso was appointed by then-Gov . Jerry Brown in December 1981. Danilo Alfaro Members of the Chicago City Council's "black-brown coalition" reassess thei r cohesiveness after Alderman Luis Gutierrez abruptly jumped ship last month and endorsed mayoral candidate Richard M. Daley, son of the late Richard J . Daley . The 50-member chamber had been in per petual deadlock until three Latinos were elected in March 1986 . The election victories brought to four the number of Hispanic alder men, giving the late Mayor Harold Washington a tie-breaking vote in the council. Two of the other Latino lawmakers support Tim Evans, a black who will run as an inde pendent in the city's general election April 4 . Jennifer Juarez Robles, a reporter with the civil rights monthly The Chicago Reporter , said local media coverage of relations is lacking. "Hispanics are rarely represented in the media , and Hispanics and blacks together is even more rare . The times that it is covered it is done in a divisive way, not in terms of groups working together." Steven Saunders, district director of Project an employment serv i ces agency, ad mitted to a certain amount of friction between the groups in the job arena. Despite this , he said, "There are coalitions between Mex ican Cuban, Central American and other groups with blacks, working for political and economic goals that are similar . There is a mutual respect..." DALLAS Black and Hispanic resi dents in Dallas await anxiously a decision by the City Council's charter review committee on the r acial and eth nic . makeup of a task force that will study the c1ty s election system. Currently, eight of the c?uncil's 10 are elected by single dis tnct ; the rema1nmg two council members and the mayor are elected at large . co ntinued o n p age 2

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Refugee Group Head Calls INS Detention Policy Unlawful Sylvia Rosales, head of the Central Patrol agents and streamlined procedures to equipped to handle the inf!ux . Vela allowed American Refugee Center in Washington, stem the tide of asylum-seekers into South the restraining order to exp1re Feb. 17 . D . C., charged Feb. 21 that the federal Texas, said Immigration and Naturalization government is in violation of its own political Service Commissioner Alan Nelson. asylum regulations for detaining hundreds of Central Americans near Bayview, Texas. The government said that as of that date refugees who file "frivolous" claims for asylum will be barred from leaving the area. The plan marks the first mass detention of an immigrant group since the restriction of Haitian asylum-seekers in Florida in 1981 . The new policy applies only to Texas' Rio Grande Valley and calls for additional Border "The purpose of the plan," said Rosales, "is simply to start deporting people en masse." The INS had originally begun confining asylum applicants in Brownsville, Texas, Dec . 16. U .S. District Court Judge Filem6n Vela, acting on a suit brought on behalf of a group of refugees, temporarily suspended the restriction Jan. 9 . He said he did so to ease the strain on border communities illUnder the new rules, applicants will be given immediate asylum hearings , usually on the day they cross into Texas. Those who are denied asylum will be served with deportation orders and sent immediately to an INS deten tion facility . Individuals apprehended by the Border Patrol before they have a chance to apply for asylum will also be arrested and served deportation orders. "Pro bono attorneys have been denied the right to speak to the applicants," said Rosales. -Oanilo Alfaro Hispanic and Black Activists Weigh Relations in Six Cities continued from page 1 Dallas has one Hispanic councilor, AI Gonzalez. He has decided not to run for re-elec tion in May. Despite a widely held assessment that Hispanics are too spread out to have a district drawn in their favor , the proceedings of the charter committee will be scrutinized to ensure that neither group gets an unfair advantage . Diana Navarrete, a former member of the Mayor's Hispanic Task Force and a resident of Dallas for the past 18 years, said, "While I don't see a lot of Hispanics celebrating black history month nor many blacks celebrating Hispanic holidays, in the time that I 've been here, I've seen definite progress . "We share common needs and the brunt of a lack of political participation," she said . Billy Allen, president of Minority Search Inc . and a member of the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport Board, said relations have "been strained be cause of a number of incidents, but the two groups have put the issues on the table." HARTFORD, CONN. A group of relatively new Puerto Rican politi cal and educational leaders in Hartford, Conn., attempt to reach an equitable power-sharing formula with black leaders, more apt to be found in and recruited from the city's corporate sphere . There are two Hispanics on Hartford's City Council, Marfa Gonzalez and Eugenio Caro. Blacks occupy three seats and the mayor's of fice . The school superintendent is Puerto Rican Hernan La Fontaine . Sitting on the school board is Marfa Sanchez, a long-time activist elected to the state legislature in November. CORRECTION Last week's Weekly Report incorrectly stated that actress Rita Moreno has been the only Hispanic actor or actress to win an Oscar. Jose Ferrer won one for his best actor performance in "Cyrano de Bergerac"; so did Anthony Quinn for best supporting actor in "Viva Zapata" and "Lust for Life." 2 Councilman Caro, a Hartford resident for 35 years, talked of a common link between blacks and Hispanics due to their living together in several Northeast cities. "We know how to call each other names and laugh about it, then get down to business." Puerto Rican Political Action President Edwin Vargas said there is discernible tension in terms of political clout in the city's school sys tem . He said however, "We're getting together more with (black) grassroots people , but our political leaders have difficulty dealing with (established) black leaders." LOS ANGELES Los Angeles blacks and Hispanics are at a crucial crossroads as the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors finds itself the target of a suit filed August 1988 by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. It charges that the five supervisors' dis tricts are drawn in a way that disenfranchises Latinos . The county ' s black leadership filed a suit to intervene in December, they explained, so that their interests would be represented in any remap effort. In add i tion, blacks have been painted as wary of Latino moves to achieve employment parity in the county and city of Los Angeles . Any gain by one group is described as a loss for the other. There are two Hispanics, Richard Alatorre and Gloria Molina, and three blacks on the 15-member Los Angeles City Council. The Coun ty Board of Supervisors has five white males . Grace Montanez-Davis, deputy mayor of Los Angeles, conceded to a certain level of friction, saying, "We have learned to share, but there's always this vigilance as to 'Is there too much going in that direction?"' She said there is no overt tension and "given the diversity of the city, we get along very well," adding, "Among the leadership there is always dialogue." Mark Ridley-Thomas, head of the Los Angeles chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference , in an interview with Feb.27, 1989 the Los Angeles Times about the county redistricting lawsuit, offered a somewhat dif ferent assessment. "What is most disconcert ing ... (among Latinos) is the extent in which there is a strong implication that ' blacks had their day ."' NEW YORK A story published Feb. 14 quoted the head of New York's black police officers association saying that Police Commissioner Benjamin Ward, a black, was being treated unfairly by Hispanic officers . The detective said Hispanics had already gotten "more than their fair share" and were "out of line" in criticizing Ward for two recent speeches he gave that contained anti Hispanic remarks. New Yorkers have also been plied with stories playing black mayoral candidate David Dinkins , the popular Manhattan Borough presi dent, against a Latino, former U . S . Con gressman Herman Badillo, who is being urged to run by a well-connected group of Latinos. Angelo Falcon, director of the Institute for Puer to Rican Policy, said, "There are some newspapers looking for dramatic stories, con flicts between blacks and Latinos." But , he said, "the black and Latino communities have in New York a unique situation-both are on the same side." Felix Perez , with the reporting assistance of Oanilo Alfaro and Mario Santana Firm Buys 20% of Vista Warner Publishing Inc . , a division of Warner Communications, has acquired for $1 million a 20% share of Horizon Com munications, publishers of Vista magazine . The Coral Gables, Fla. , based, English language weekly newspaper insert is the largest Hispanic oriented magazine in the United States, with an unpaid circulation of 1.4 million. Arturo Villar, president of Horizon and publisher of Vista, welcomed the partner ship, saying, "Warner brings to Vista resources that can enhance our presence and penetration in the market and the op portunity to explore other media . " Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Juan Gonzalez d--------Felix's Final Call From the moment I pulled out of the Ortiz Funeral Home under the el 1 on Westchester Ave. in the Bronx, there was no question where to stop 11 or what to do before writing about the murder of Felix Resto . 1 headed l for the phone booth in East Harlem where Felix had been shot. When I reached the two public phones, I waited for several minutes, I. hoping some young thug would pass by and claim them as his office ' lines, hoping that I might confront someone Felix spent his life trying to help . Felix was 35 years old when he died on that corner in the arms of his wife, Linda. He left behind three children . Felix and I met some 20 years ago, when as a .....-----------..., I! teen-ager he joined the Young Lords Party and worked in one of our offices in the Bronx . Like nr most of us then, he was full of rebelliousness sj and determination to get respect for Puerto 1• Ricans. When the Young Lords broke up in the mid i' '70s , I moved to Philadelphia, and Felix ' s life, like n1 many, floundered for a while. We lost touch. For sl a few years the heroin habit got to him, but he n, met Linda and she became his anchor , stand1i[ ing by him until he cleaned himself up. They married and the kids started coming , first Melody, then Felix Jr., iP then Daniel. While he loved music, he could never make a living at that. "11 For a while now, he had been a city employee, most recently with the HI Human Services Commission. FELIX RECENTLY APPLIED TO LAW SCHOOL Assigned to the Neighborhood Stabilization Office in Queens, Felix f
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COLLECTING CANCER RATES IN L.A.: "Cancer in L.A. County" is a 120-page study that breaks down different cancer rates in Los Angeles County accord ing to gender, and racial and ethnic group. To receive a copy, send $10 to University of California at Los Angeles, Division of Cancer Control, 11 00 Glendon, Suite 711 , Los Angeles, Calif. 90024 . STUDENT PERFORMANCE: "Crossroads in American Education," a 56-page report by the Nation's Report Card, concludes that although the declining performance trends among students in the '70s have eased, they still have difficulty applying their knowledge. For a copy send $9 to Nation's Report Card, P . O . Box 6710, Princeton, N . J . 08541-0001 . ADVERTISING PRACTICES: The March issue of American Demographics contains a five-page article that says that negative eth nically oriented advertising is disappearing while ethnic advertising that motivates buyers increases in sophistication. For a copy send $5 to American Demographics, P.O. Box 68, Ithaca, N.Y. 14851 1-800-8281133. PUERTO RICAN AND LATINO HEALTH IN NEW YORK: The fall issue of Boletfn del Centro de Estudios Puertorriquenos, a 1 04-page pub lication, contains several articles on the health status of Puerto Ricans and other Latinos in New York City. For a free copy, send a self-ad dressed postcard to Boletfn, Centro de Estudios Puertorriquenos, Hunter College, Box 540, 695 Park Ave . , New York, N . Y . 10021 (212) 772-5689 . MATH SKILLS: "Everybody Counts: A Report to the Nation on the Fu ture of Mathematics Education" says that steps must be taken to keep Hispanic and black students in school because they will make up an in creasing share of the nation's future work force . For a copy of the 96page report by the National Research Council, send $7 . 95 to National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D . C . 20418 (202) 3343313. INVESTING IN CHILDREN: "An Agenda for the 1990s : A Children's Defense Budget" is a 204-page report by the Children's Defense Fund that paints a bleak picture about children in terms of education, poverty, care and health. Racial and ethnic data is provided. For a copy send $14.45 to CDF, 122 C St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-8787. CHICAGO POLITICAL ALLIANCES : The February issue of The Chicago Reporter includes a three-page article on the shifting Hispanic alliances within the Chicago City Council and the impact on the upcom ing mayoral election . For a copy send $2.50 ($38 for annual subscrip tions) to Community Renewal Society, 332 S . Michigan Ave . , Chicago, Ill. 60604 (312) 427-4836. CONNECTING CISNEROS TO START INVESTMENT FIRM San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, who last year said that he would not seek re-election due to personal problems, announced two weeks ago that he plans to open an asset management firm when he leaves office this spring. Tentatively called the Cisneros Group, the firm will have Cisneros as its president; Narciso Cane, head of San Antonio's Department of Economic and Employment Development, as chairman; and Vfctor Miramontes, a Laredo Bancshares Inc. officer, as vice president. The Houston-headquartered Criterion Group, which manages $10 billion in accounts, has purchased 15% of the venture. It has promised to train the principals, who lack formal investment management ex perience. Currently, the Cisneros Group has $1.2 million pledged by investors. The firm , said Cisneros, will target pension systems and university en dowments. He said he anticipates the firm will manage $350 million in its first year. Cisneros said he has promised his partners and Criterion Group that he would stay with the firm at least five years. PROGRAM SEEKS GRADUATE STUDENTS Thirty Hispanic, black and other disadvantaged sophomore and junior college students from California post-secondary institutions will be chosen to participate in a summer program at the University of California at Santa Barbara that seeks to enlarge the pool of minorities admitted to graduate schools. Funded by a $111,800 grant from the U.S . Department of Education , the Summer Academ i c Research Institute places the students on research teams that include UCSB graduate students and faculty mem bers. In addition, they participate in workshops on writing and research, mathematics and microcomputers. Students receive a $1,500 stipend, travel assistance, housing and academic credit. Deadline for applying is March 17. For more information call UCSB ' s graduate division office at (805) 961-2277 . GROUP RECEIVES GRANT The National Hispanic University announced Feb . 1 it received a $250,000 grant from the Campbell Soup Fund. The money will be used to strengthen academic programs and operations of the eight year-old institution , the only four-year national Hispanic university on the U.S. mainland. NHU is based in Oakland, Calif. Calendar PTA LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE Washington D.C . Feb . 27-March 2 MIGRANT HEAD START National Migrant Head Start Directors As sociation To Our Readers: To ensure information r egarding your organization's upcoming event N ill be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear . There is no charge. -:>lease include date, location, contact name and phone number . Address items to : Calen d ar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report , 1420 N St. NW, Washington D .C. 20005 . THIS WEEK MARKETING CONFERENCE New York Feb.27, 28 The Marketing Institute will hold a conference on new opportunities in the Hispanic market featuring speeches by top marketing and ad vertising executives. Conference Administrator 1-800-345-8016 PTA leaders and U.S. legislators will hold a conference to discuss children and teen is sues, including dropouts, child care, AIDS, child nutrition, homeless children and public education. John M irallegro (202) 484-1 000 jVIVAELMAR/ACHI! Fresno, Calif. March 5 Radio Bilingue presents the seventh annual Mariachi Festival. It will feature music , enter tainment, Mexican food, dance and art . Kathy O'Rourke (209) 486-5174 COMING SOON HISPANIC WOMEN'S FORUM Hispanic Women's Task Force of New Jersey Princeton, N.J . March 7, 8 Wanda Garcia (609) 757-6349 Feb.27, 1989 Mesa, Ariz. March 19-22 Isaac Salcido (602) 231-6967 SPOTLIGHT IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE POLICY:The Center for Migrant Studies will hold a two-day conference on the consequen ces of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, legal immigration reform and the basis for U.S . refugee policy. The conference will feature international and national experts from a range of agencies, government, legal practice, the social sciences, law schools and volunteer organizations . Registration for the conference, to be held April 6 , 7 in Washington, D.C., costs $140. For more infor mation call Lydio Tomasi at (718) 351-8800 . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED PRESIDENT UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE Nominations and expressions of interest are invited for the posi tion of President of the University of Delaware. The President is chief executive officer of the University and reports to the Board of Trustees which operates under a perpetual charter originally granted in 1883. The appointment of the new President will be come effective as soon as possible and not later than July 1, 1990. A state-assisted, land-grant and sea-grant institution, the Univer sity of Delaware has characteristics of both a public and private corporation. The University is located in Newark, Delaware, mid way between Baltimore and Philadelphia. It has a faculty of 855 and an enrollment of approximately 19,000 undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education students. With an endow ment ranked 33rd in the nation , the University of Delaware ' s an nual budget is in excess of $200 million. The University is organized into 10 colleges: Agricultural Sciences ; Arts and Scien ces; Business and Economics; Education ; Engineering; Human Resources; Marine Studies; Nursing; Physical Education, Ath letics and Recreation; and Urban Affairs and Public Policy. The University is committed to teaching, research, and public service . The University of Delaware is seeking an individual with a distin guished record of accomplishment in the field of higher education, or another professional field. The President must be able to com municate the needs and ach i evements of the University to a variety of groups and enlarge and administer the financial resour ces of the institution . He or she must also possess the qualities of integrity, stamina, and intellectual depth necessary to lead a complex University that seeks continued improvement in the quality and effectiveness of its academic programs . Nominations and expressions of interest should be submitted to: Mr. John E . Burris Presidential Nominating Committee of the Board of Trustees University of Delaware P.O. Box 5598 Newark, DE 19714-5598 Nominations and expressions of interest will continue to be received until the position is filled. Since the Board will begin the screening of candidates on March 27, such submissions should be made and received prior to that date. The University of Delaware is an equal opportunity and affirm ative action employer which actively seeks and encourages nominations of, and expressions of interest from, minority and female candidates . DIRECTOR, DIVISION OF EQUAL OPPORTUNITY NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES The National Institutes of Health is accepting nominations and ap plications for the position of Director, Division of Equal Opportunity. The Director is responsible for planning, directing, coordinating , and evaluating a comprehensive equal opportunity program encompassing equal employment and specia l emphasis programs, affirmative action, civil rights and contracts compl i ance . This is a Civil Service position at the GM-15 grade level, with a salary range of $57,158 to $74,303 per annum . Applicants must have sub stantive experience performing work of an analytical , interpretative, and judgmental nature which demonstrates knowledge of equal employment opportunity principles, practices, laws, and regulations . For questions concerning this position please contact Patricia Mid dleton at (301) 496-6521 . Application packets may be obtained by call ing the above number. Completed packets must be submitted to: Ms . Patricia Middleton National Institutes of Health Office of the Director , Personnel Building 31, Room 1 C-23 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda , Maryland 20892 APPLICATIONS MUST BE POSTMARKED NO LATER THAN MARCH 31, 1989. All qualified candidates will receive consideration without regard to race, religion, color , sex, age , national origin , lawful political affiliation, marital status , union membersh i p , or nondisqualifying physi cal or men tal handicap . U.S . Citizenship required . NIH IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER BROWN UNIVERSITY . The program in American Civil i zation and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America invite nominations and applications for a Howard Foundation post doctoral fellowship in Latino Studies for 1989-90 . The stipend for the academic year is $28,000. The fellow would be expected to teach one course each semester in a particular area of Latino history or culture and to work closely with the Center to develop an interdisciplinary plan for Latino Studies at Brown University. Applicants should have some teaching experience and training in inter disciplinary methods . Ph.D. required . Closing date for applications is April 1, 1989 . Please send letter of ap plication, curriculum vitae, and three letters of recommendation to Mari Jo Buhle, Chair, American Civilization, Brown University, Providence , Rhode Island 02912. NATIONAL CATHOLIC CONFERENCE The National Catholic Conference for Interra cial Justice is inviting resume submissions for the following positions : DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target ana tional pool of Latino executive professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: H i spanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week . •Field director and coordinator for intercultural collaboration; •Programs director and affirmative action coordinator; •Administrative assistant/office manager; •Secretary. Send resume (no phone calls), including salary requirements to : NCCIJ, 1200 Varnun St. NE, Washington, D . C . 20017 . Equal Opportunity Employer His panic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word) . Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Feb.27, 1989 Ordered by ______________ _ Organization. _______________ _ Street . _________________ _ City, State & Zip ____________ _ Area Code & Phone _____________ _

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Arts & Entertainment MUSIC NORTH AND SOUTH: Two extreme points in the Americas -Los Angeles and Vifla del Mar, Chile-held major music events last week . Los Angeles was home to the 31st annual Grammy Awards cere mony that yielded six Latino winners, half of them in non-Hispanic categories . Mexican guitarist Carlos Santana won a Grammy in the "best in strumental rock" category for his album Blues for Salvador . Two Spaniards won in classical categories-pianist Alicia de Larrocha for "best classical instrumental" recording, Albeniz, and tenor Placido Domingo as one of the principal soloists in Wagner: Lohengrin , which was named "best opera recording." Gloria Estefan and Miami Sound Machine, nominated in the "best pop vocal group or duo" category for the Spanish-language version of the single Anything For You was edged out by Manhattan Transfer and its album Brasil . As expected , Linda Ronstadt captured the Grammy in the "best Mexican American" category for her first-ever Spanish-language album, Canciones de mi padre . Ronstadt was the nominee in that category to perform at the ceremony, which was telecast by CBS Feb . 22 . .. Quick! Let's build a 14-foot ditch! .. Ruben Blades won the Gram my in the "best tropical latin" category for the album Antecedente. Roberto Carlos could not travel to Los Angeles to pick up the award, because he was scheduled to close the XXX Festival de Ia Canci6n de Vina del Mar at that Chilean beach resort . It was the fourth Gram my for Ronstadt and the second for Blades . Singers and composers from around the globe including Cuban American singer Gloria Alfonsowere represented at Latin America's major song competition . Roberto Carlos was among guest performers that included British singer Shirley Bassett and U.S. rock group REO Speedwagon . Brazilian singer Roberto Carlos was a surprise winner in the "best Iatino pop category" for his album Roberto Carlos . Jose Jose, who had been nominated five times before and won once, was favored for Soy asi. Media Report By Evelyn Hernandez , president of the Na tional Association of Hispanic Journalists When the Pulitzer Prize jurors gather at Columbia University in New York City next month to award journalism's most prestigious prize, five talented Latino journalists will be among the judges . It was a long time coming . HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher : Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues) : Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word . D i splay ads are $45 per column inch . If placed by Tuesday, will run in Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 Just a year ago , there were no Hispanics among the 66 jurors . Not one . The Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D . C ., noticed the omission and, together with the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and Jerry Apodaca, at that time publisher of "Hispanic" magazine, sent letters of protest to the Pulitzer Prize Board . The board took the hint and appointed five Hispanics to this year's jury : Manuel Galvan of the Chicago Tribune, Norma Sosa of the Corpus Christi Caller Times, Ernie Sotomayor of the Dallas Morning News, Frank del Olmo of The Los Angeles Times, and David Medina, then of The Miami News, which ceased publishing in December . "There was a sense that there had been a change, a development in journalism that we hadn't kept up with , " Robert Christopher, ad ministrator of the prize, said recently. "There were many more Hispanic Americans than there were 20 years ago." Christopher said he was unsure if other Hispanics have served as jurors before . Cer tainly there have never been as many as five, he said . But we still have a problem. In the news busi ness, except in very few instances, Hispanics continue to be excluded from high-level decision-making positions . The Pulitzers are no exception . Feb . 27, 1989 Antonio Mejias-Rentas The 66 jurors make recommendations to the 16 member Pulitzer board, the group that makes the final decision about who wins . The board can overrule the jurors ' recommenda tions and select its own winners. There are no Hispanics on that board . There isn't much turnover on the board, either. There is an empty slot now . A member will step down after this year's judging. The board will select a replacement soon . The National Association of Hispanic Jour nalists has sent another letter to the Pulitzer board , strongly recommending that a Hispanic be named to the position . I urged other jour nalism associations to do the same, and quickly. As Hispanic journalists, we must remain ever vigilant that equality be guaran teed at all levels . No doubt Hispanics will bring journalistic ex cellence and a new perspective to the judging . But it's newsroom managers who can help more Hispanic journalists excel and be nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. They can do so by providing professional guidance and support . And more of these managers should be Hispanic. Norma Sosa, managing editor of the Corpus Christi Caller-Times, made the simple point: "Hispanics excel when they are given the op portunity to develop, the same as other jour nalists." (Hernandez is a reporter with Newsday in New York.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report