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Hispanic link weekly report, March 6, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 6, 1989
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Making the News This Week
President Bush renominates Ferdinand Fernandez, a federal judge in Los Angeles, to a seat on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Fernandez, who if confirmed would be the first Latino member of the nation's largest federal appeals court, was originally nominated by former President Ronald Reagan...Mark Rodriguez, president of KOJO-FM in Dallas, offers Reagan $200,000 to host a weekly 35- to 45- minute talk show for ayear...U.S. Rep. William Lehman, of Florida, invites Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos to visit Miami to witness the impact recently arrived Nicaraguan children have had on the Dade County school system...Rudy Beserra, associate director of the White
House Office of Public Liaison during the latter part of the Reagan administration, joins the Atlanta headquarters of Coca-Cola as its liaison to the Hispanic community...The Seattle Seahawks, a professional football team, name Tom Flores, former coach of the Los Angeles Raiders, president and general manager of the team...The Michigan State Republican Committee elects Laura Reyes Kopack, vice president and general counsel of Syndeco, a subsidiary of Detroit Edison Electric Co., as one of its six vice chairs...The FBI launches an investigation to determine whether six Los Angeles police officers violated the civil rights of Jesse Lirez and his family during a raid at their home. Larez's nose was broken during the raid, and his daughter, Diane, was yanked to the floor by her hair...
Vol. 7 No. 10

March 6,1989
Govs. Fault Language, Culture Gap
The nation’s schools — beginning as early as the first grade — must teach students to become familiar with other cultures and proficient in at least one language other than English if the United States hopes to regain some of its lost dominance in global economic and intellectual arenas, concluded a report released Feb. 25 in Washington, D.C., by the National Governors' Association.
Prepared by a three-member panel led by New Jersey Gov. Thomas Kean, the report said, "For more than a century, Americans enjoyed unchallenged superiority in virtually
Miamians Disagree on Riot
Eighty-three percent of Miami’s Latinos blamed last month's Overtown and Liberty City rioting on a few troublemakers, virtually discounting social and economic causes, according to a poll released Feb. 21 by WL7V-Channel 23.
In contrast, 50% of black respondents blamed troublemakers, while 48% cited economic and social factors as the cause. Anglos were more sympathetic to the economic frustration of blacks. Half of them blamed frustrations, while 40% blamed troublemakers.
Osvaldo Soto, chairman of the Spanish-American League Against Discrimination, said both were causes. “A group of troublemakers took advantage of a very sad incident in which a Hispanic policeman shot a black. But also, the blacks feel very disappointed and frustrated because Hispanics have been less discriminated against and because of the (economic and political) goals the Cuban Americans have reached." Other poll responses:
— Miami has generally ignored the needs of Overtown and Liberty City:
Latino Black Anglo Agree 34% 89% 60%
Disagree 55 11 34
— The city has generally ignored the needs of its Cuban American neighborhoods:
Agree 21% 14% 10%
Disagree 71 83 84
— Mario Santana
everything we turned our hands to. We could afford the luxury of ignoring the seers and experts who urged us to learn the tongues and ways of other lands, but those days have gone the way of leaded gas and the nickel phone call."
Marta Jim6nez, an associate counsel at the Washington office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, agreed with the pluralistic philosophy of the report. She said it proved wrong the "less-is-more“ mentality pervading organizations that seek legislation making English the United States’ official language.
”We need to recognize that we cannot exist as a nation unto ourselves anymore," said Jimenez.
continued on page 2
Senator Introduces Bill to Halt Congress Bias
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) is trying to establish a fair employment office extending 1964 Civil Rights Act protections offered U.S. workers against discrimination to employees of the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate. It will deal with complaints on hiring and on-the-job discrimination.
He introduced the bill Jan. 30. According to Lome Cranea, a legislative assistant in McCain's office, it is now in the Government Affairs Committee. No hearings are scheduled yet.
No parallel bill has been introduced in the House, although it passed a similar bill Oct. 4 that offered anti-discrimination protections to its employees and new hires.
Baseball’s Giamatti Hears Hiring Ideas
A. Bartlett Giamatti, commissioner-elect of Major League Baseball, met Feb. 23 with members of the congressional black and Hispanic caucuses in Washington, D.C., and agreed to study affirmative action proposals put forth by the legislators.
Stu Nagurka, a spokesman for Congressional Hispanic Caucus member Bill Richardson (D-N.M.), said the meeting "went very well" and that caucus members were impressed with Giamatti'^ "obvious concern with bringing more minorities into front office and managerial positions." Giamatti acknowledged that he only has the power of persuasion over teams.
At the meeting with Giamatti were Reps. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), Edward Roybal (D-Calif.), Albert Bustamante (D-Texas), and Richardson of the Hispanic caucus. Also present were Reps. Edolphus Towns (D-N.Y.), Alan Wheat (D-Mo.), John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Charles Rangel (D-N.Y.) of the Congressional Black Caucus.
Janet Hill of Alexander and Associates, a Washington, D.C., consulting firm hired by Giamatti and the league presidents to help develop baseball’s affirmative action programs, said that of 26 major league and approximately 130 minor league teams, one
major league manager and 14 minor league managers are Hispanic. In both the major and minor leagues combined, only 22 coaches are Hispanic.
Hill added that 10% of baseball’s front office employees are minorities. While she declined to say what proportion of that figure was Hispanic, she said that the majority are blacks.
Robert Heuer, a Chicagoan who has extensively researched and written about Latinos in the major leagues, said that the proposed minority hiring reforms were primarily geared toward blacks. "Baseball has little interest in the Hispanic side of the story. Thinking of it as a black-white issue is just an easy way of dealing with the very complex problem of race relations."
Some of the proposals that Giamatti agreed to study further include setting up a bank of names of minorities or minority groups in major league cities interested in buying a team, implementing a program similar to those used in the National Basketball Association and the National Football League to train minority coaches, and increasing the number of minority college students who intern in the teams’ front offices.
— Danilo Alfaro


Hispanics Lack Representation on N.Y.C. School Boards
Of the 11 New York City school districts where Hispanics make up 40% or more of the enrollment, six have two or fewer Latinos on theifefllne-member, locally elected school boards, according to figures for the 1987-68 school year published in the Feb. 16 issue of The New York Times.
Two other districts — one where Hispanics account for 83% ofthe student population and another where they are 53% — have had their boards suspended by the City Board of Education for mismanagement and replaced by trustees.
One reason given for the underrepresentation is the low participation of the communities in the board elections. In the last election, 7.5% of those eligible voted. The elections are held every three years. The next ones will be May 2.
Another factor is that many parents are not aware, particularly those that are recent arrivals from the Caribbean, that they are eligible to vote in school board elections. All
parents can vote, even if they are not U.S. citizens.
Overall, Hispanics hold 38 ofthe 288 seats, or 13%, that make up the city’s 32 decentralized school boards. Blacks account for 23% of the members; 49% of the seats are occupied by whites.
Hispanics make up 34% of the city’s public school students, blacks 39%.
The city’s school boards were decentralized in 1970 to give a greater voice to district residents.
— Mario Santana
NEW YORK SCHOOL BOARDS, DISTRICT ENROLLMENT — 1987-88 (districts with 40% or more Hispanic enrollment)
Student Population Board Makeup
Dist. Latino Black White Latino Black White Vacant
1 71.5% 16.4% 3.3% 1 0 7 1
4 59.8 35.4 4.3 6 2 1
7 67.3 31.9 0.4 5 3 0 1
8 55.4 30.7 12.5 2 2 5
10 60.0 24.4 9.6 1 0 6 2
12 67.2 30.6 0.8 7 2 0
14 70.2 20.4 7.1 2 0 5 2
15 58.2 16.9 21.0 1 0 8
19 44.1 48.3 4.6 1 4 3 1
24 42.6 7.2 32.3 0 0 9
32 69.4 27.6 1.5 6 1 1 1
Source: New York City Board of Education, The New York Times
Governors Seek International Literacy
continued from page 1
The report, titled "America in Transition: The International Frontier (Report of the Task Force on International Education)," says people are forward-looking, Jimenez said, adding, "U.S. English is a restrictionist movement that looks to the past.”
Sharon McCloe, director of government operations for U.S. English, said the report did not contradict the group’s beliefs. "We endorse the teaching of foreign languages," she claimed. She commented that U.S. English "feels schools are not doing enough to teach English to our students. And before we move on (and teach other languages and cultures), we first have to teach people in our own language."
In his foreword to the report, Governor Kean left no doubt about when to start. "I have no illusions about the difficulty involved" in making
16-Montfi-Old Calvin Dies
Sixteen-month-old Calvin Oliveira, of Deerfield, Fla., whose plight received national attention, died of massive system failure Feb. 22 at the University of Wisconsin Children’s Hospital in Madison.
His death came 53 days after “Baby Calvin," son of Carlos and Adriana Oliveira, received a liver and small intestine transplant. The nine-hour operation, performed on New Year’s Eve, was the first of its kind in medical history. But soon afterward, the child developed a lung ailment and his condition worsened progressively.
Last year the Oliveiras set out to raise $400,000 for the transplant. With Florida Gov. Bob Martinez’s help and media attention, they managed to raise a large chunk of the money._______________________
international education a priority. "But neither do I doubt the consequences if we do not. America can’t afford to wait a generation," he wrote.
The report stated that the "vast majority” of people in the United States cannot speak a language other than English and are uninformed about basic geography. It offered these examples:
• Twenty-five percent of Dallas students did not know Mexico was the country bordering the United States to the south;
• One in seven adults could not locate the United States on a world map; and
• In 1987 only 20% of high school graduates studied a foreign language for more than two years.
"An increased emphasis on international education in schools and colleges will help everyone understand and interact with their neighbors, classmates and co-workers," advised the report.
Stanley Diamond, chairman of U.S. English, said while the group does seek a "language of common discourse," he saw no disagreement with the report. "We would encourage universities and colleges to require a foreign language requirement for admission."
Jimenez agreed that English is important but said "we must recognize the value and importance of other languages and cultures. We need to recognize that minority children are our work force of the future."
Among the report’s recommendations were that teachers learn more about international issues and that business and government join with the school system to support international education.
— FeixPetez
Law Schools Put Stop to FBI Recruiter Visits
Two major law schools have barred FBI recruiters from their campuses in part as a result of a September 1988 federal court ruling that the bureau discriminated against its Hispanic agents.
The deans of the University of Michigan and Ohio State University law schools said that their policies prohibit employers who have been found to discriminate from recruiting on their facilities.
U.S. District Court Judge Lucius Bunton in Midland, Texas, ruled last year that the FBI failed to promote its Hispanic agents and systematically relegated them to the least rewarding and most dangerous assignments. Testimony to determine damages has been given for the past two weeks. Counsel for the plaintiffs is seeking $9.2 million.
Student groups at the University of Michigan, which put its policy into effect last December, circulated a petition last fall protesting FBI recruitment in the wake of charges that it discriminated against its minority agents. "The ban was an appropriate act on the part of the administration in its effort to implement a policy that it had on record," said Victor Torres, member of the university’s Hispanic Law Students' Association.
Reaction to the ban within the student community was mixed. Some minority student groups saw the move as perpetuating the FBI’s current hiring practices.
"I don’t think it will make a big impact," said Gregg Carr, president of Ohio State’s Black Law Students’ Association. "You don’t cut off your nose to spite your face. (The ban) may be denying the opportunity for people with new and progressive ideas to get into the FBI.”
— Danilo Alfaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2
March 6,1989


Miguel Perez
Deciding Who Decides
NATIONAL PRO-VOTE GROUP ORGANIZES "I understand that there may be some legal questions that may prevent those who were born here from participating," said George Perez, of Chicago, "but it shouldn’t be up to us to determine that. How do we tell our children, our young people, who for years we have been teaching to be proud of being Puerto Rican, that now they can’t vote because they are not really Puerto Rican? I don’t know about you, but I can’t do that."
The group vowed to organize chapters all over the U.S. mainland and to gather a half-million signatures asking Congress to allow them to vote. "I say to you that it is unconstitutional, illegal and inhuman that you who are here but feel like you are there emotionally and intellectually are deprived of that sacred right," said attorney Jaime Hernandez Sanchez, a former senator in Puerto Rico. "And I say sacred because to decide the destiny of a people is a sacred right.”
The group is considering many options, from its own bill to a lawsuit to prevent Congress from excluding mainland Puerto Ricans. "Then it would be up to the courts to decide and I believe the Constitution is on our side," said Hernandez Sanchez, warning that there are partisan groups in Puerto Rico-"that will try to exclude you."
PARTISANSHIP ENTERS DEBATE In Puerto Rico, how mainland Puerto Ricans would vote may determine whether some political parties would approve of mainland participation. A national survey of Puerto Rican activists and professionals conducted by the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy last year found that 44% support independence, while 14% favored commonwealth and 13% wanted statehood. Significantly, however, 24% said that this was a decision that should be left up to the islanders.
But Bronx Councilman Jos6 Rivera, born in Puerto Rico, has introduced a resolution asking the City Council to urge the government of Puerto Rico to allow Puerto Ricans to vote from here. Although the association’s national coordinator, Monserrate Flores, kept insisting that to be effective, the group must remain non-partisan, not all could resist the temptation. "Will the independentistas continue to insist on another plebiscite after they lose this one?" one man asked. "If we want statehood, we shouldn’t be wasting time with technicalities," another man said. "Of course we all want a plebiscite," said another; "who wants Puerto Rico to continue being a colony?"
After the first debate, when it’s finally determined who will have a say in Puerto Rico’s future, it will be time for the real debate. For now, it suffices to say, "Viva la independencia" — to vote, of course.
(Miguel PSrez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
TRAVELERS’ WARNING: As you read this item, keep in mind that la migra swears on Bibles that it does not single out Latino types as probable illegal immigrants.
On Feb. 27, INS officers pulled 79 suspected undocumented aliens off an Eastern Airlines plane en route from Los Angeles to New York during a stopover in Atlanta. (After the raid, INS reported that 39 of the suspects were from Mexico, 21 from Guatemala, 13 from the Dominican Republic, four from El Salvador, and one each from Honduras and Ecuador.)
A wire service quoted INS spokesman Tom Thomas’ explanation for the raid:
‘There’s a commuter who regularly flies from Los Angeles to Atlanta who called our office...and said, ’Hey, it seems there’s an awful lot of Hispanic people who fly this flight. You might want to check it out!”
It brings back nasty memories of the '40s and ’50s when cops would arrest Latino teen-agers for loitering if the kids had the audacity to gather in groups of more than two or three on a street corner.
If you’re planning on attending the National Hispanic Media Conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico, next month or the Image or MANA or NABE conventions in May, remember: La migra is watching. Travel alone or with a blue-eyed blond.
A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND INSULTS: Texas Air Chairman Frank Lorenzo, who gets nice write-ups in Latino magazines but sometimes isn't treated with such deference in the establishment press, was the subject of an unflattering portrait in the Feb. 27 Fortune magazine. That is, assuming such descrip-tives as union-buster, showboater and loose cannon may be categorized as unflattering.
Managers of Eastern Airlines (now a part of Texas Air) took quick action when they discovered the publication in their reading racks. They sent out a directive to the fleet of 200 planes:
"It is imperative that the current issue of Fortune magazine be removed immediately from all Eastern aircraft. Dispose of all copies locally. Have a member of management audit all aircraft to ensure compliance. “
So what did Lorenzo do when he found out? He ordered his mousy mid-management minions to put ’em all back in the racks.
It was a rather flattering picture of him on the cover.
A VERY IMPERFECT CRIME: On Feb. 17 H6ctor Marin-Hem6ndez, awaiting trial for marijuana possession, escaped from Metropolitan Correctional Center in Southwest Dade County, Fla., by hiding for 24 hours in the prison’s Dumpster.
He failed to consider that the trash gets squeezed tight by a hydraulic trash compactor.
After the surprised garbage men unloaded him, along with potato peels and other mushy stuff at the county dump, they rushed him to the hospital. Marfn-Hernandez, 27, suffered head injuries and a crushed pelvis. At last report, he was cleaner, wiser, and in good condition.
— KayBarbaro
Quoting...
FREDERICK ERICKSON, sociolinguist at the University of Pennsylvania, commenting in the Feb. 20 issue of Newsweek on the campaign for an amendment to make English the official language of the United States:
“It’s a real cover for bigotry. It's easier to say we’re afraid of English being overwhelmed than to say we don’t want any more spies around here."
For many years they waited for a real chance to decide their political future, but now that Puerto Ricans may finally influence their destiny, now that it looks like they will have a plebiscite to determine the future status of their island, the most pressing question has become not who wins, but who gets to play the game.
All over Nueva York, Puerto Ricans are debating the question of who will vote in the plebiscite with even more passion than how they will vote if they get the opportunity. Many believe that those on the mainland, especially those born on the island, should be able to vote on whether Puerto Rico should become a state, an independent nation or retain its commonwealth .. status.
Ever since Puerto Rico’s three political parties g agreed to have a plebiscite and President Bush £ called for a referendum during his speech to j Congress Feb. 9, Puerto Ricans on the main-1 land have been organizing a united front to | demand to be included in the election process.
Those efforts were formalized in the Bronx Feb.
19 with the formation of a national association, a group that decided, after some discussion, that it would fight for ALL Puerto Ricans — even those born here of Puerto Rican parents — to be included in the voting.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
March 6,1989
3


Robert Heuer
Black Hispanics Integrated Baseball
Now that baseball has as its two league presidents a black man named White and a white man named Brown, it’s time to fit Hispanics into the racial equation, because it was Cubans who "integrated" our national pastime.
This obscure fact cannot minimize the pioneering role of Jackie Robinson, who arrived on the scene in 1947 and despite all the racial hardships, earned a spot in the Hall of Fame. If anything, the Cuban saga shows the idiocy of racial distinctions.
Spanish Caribbean peoples tolerate interracial marriage more than North Americans, which is one reason why Cuba’s genetic melting pot confounded baseball purists.
In 1911, the Cincinnati Reds wired a Havana sportswriter to ask if two Cuban prospects were "authentic Caucasians." Rafael Almeida and Armando Marsans passed this test and headed north. To assure skeptical readers, a Cincinnati sportswriter wrote: "Permit me to introduce two of the purest bars of Castilian soap ever to wash upon our shores."
Although U.S. blacks wouldn’t get a chance for another 36 years, a dozen Cubans reached the majors by 1920.
RACIAL BARRIER AN AMERICAN ABSURDITY Adolfo Luque, a brilliant and volatile pitcher, nearly caused a race riot in 1923 when he charged the opposition’s bench and began swinging at Casey Stengel. The papers reported that another benchwarmer had "challenged the purity of his Castilian strain." Luque, said to have a "purplish Latin American complexion," was probably called a "nigger." A Cuban passport surely helped Roberto Estalella join the Washington Senators in 1935. With aflat, broad nose and kinky hair, he was not the purest bar of Castile soap to float down the Potomac. "Estalella had the retarded Negroid features of a Bantu tribesman," a teammate recalled. Another baseball man said he was a "freckle-faced, red-headed jig.” Cubans had been around for 20 years. So nobody stopped the Senators from putting this one at third base. Estalella, who told me the racial barrier was "an absurd American thing," denied having any kind of black heritage.
Cubans say otherwise. Minnie Minoso, the first so-called "Latin Negro” to follow Robinson into the majors, calls Estalella "unmulato," a generic term for all non-whites. Rudy Fernandez, a Negro League player from Cuba, called him “un jabao," meaning a person with a small amount of color in his ancestry. "Foreigners didn't get the chance to see all the members of ond’s family," said Fernandez, Who like other dark-complected Cubans kept his countryman’s secret.
COLOR PRIMARILY ECONOMICS ISSUE In the '40s, the black press attacked Washington owner Clark Griffith for signing many foreigners but refusing to sign “men of color” in his own back yard. "The old fox,” as he was called, brushed off the critics by saying that the signing of a black would ruin the Negro Leagues.
"It was said that some of our Cubans had black blood, which made them black according to the standards of the world,” recalled Calvin Griffith, who moved the franchise to Minnesota after his uncle’s death. "But Bobby Estalella was not Negroid. He had very thin lips and was more yellow than anything else."
This affably gruff man didn’t pretend to be a genetics expert. No matter. Bobby Estalella proved that the color bar was primarily an issue of economics. Blacks were allowed in the major leagues largely because World War II decimated the pool of available white talent.
"I’ve told lots of reporters that Jackie Robinson wasn’t the first black player," said 78-year-old Howie Haak, the scout who loaded Pittsburgh Pirate lineups with Latins for three decades. "There was Bobby Estalella and Tommy de la Cruz who pitched for the Reds. He was blacker than my shoes. But nobody ever picked up on the story.”
(Robert Heuer, of Chicago, is an authority on Latin Americans in organized baseball.)
4
Jim Sagel
Artist Revives Carts of Death
"One of these days it’s going to be fashionable to be Hispanic," says Luis Tapia That day may already have come; few have done more to assure its arrival than this prolific artist and sarrtero of Santa Fe, N.M.
Tapia is one of 30 contemporary Hispanic painters and sculptors featured in perhaps the most prestigious and important Hispanic art show to date, the "Hispanic Art in the United States" exhibit.
The ambitious exhibit, curated at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, is currently traveling to several cities, including Washington, D.C., Miami and Los Angeles. Tapia created two major pieces for it — a 4 1/2-foot carreta de muerte, or death cart, and an 8x12-foot reredo, altar screen.
The intricately painted reredo features four bultos, or carvings in the round, as well as a crucifix beneath the painted figure of a white dove symbolizing the Holy Spirit. The museum has agreed to donate the piece to a New Mexican church at the close ofthe traveling exhibit this year. For the 37-year-old artist, acceptance by the churches of his native New Mexico is more gratifying than the current, long-awaited acceptance by galleries, museums and that amorphous and powerful entity, the "art world."
He is perhaps most proud of his restoration of art treasures in several northern New Mexico churches and his creation of new religious art in the tradition of the 18th and 19th century Hispanic santeros.
FORMULA NEVER REPEATED
Tapia is a co-founder of probably the most important association of Hispanic artists to date, La Cofradia. The organization, which flourished during the renaissance of Hispanic art in northern New Mexico the last half of the ’70s, was responsible for many exhibits that helped launch the careers of some of today’s best-known Hispanic artists.
Self-taught, as are many Hispanic santeros who began resurrecting the art of their ancestors in the early years of the last decade, Tapia was one of the first to bring back polychromatic, painted santos.
Among Tapia's carvings are the penitent carretas de muerte, with horrific, skeletal figures of death riding in the rickety carts of doom. Though Tapia has carved some 15 to 20 of the anthropomorphic death figures, he never repeats a formula. Each muerte has its own personality. The "Lady of Death” Tapia is currently working on has human and dog teeth, abalone shell eyes, and scraggly hair made from azalea, or sheepskin.
Among the most striking features on this howling hag are her almost stylish rosewood fingers and toenails.
The way Tapia sees it, however, the recognition the national exhibit portends is not a result of hype, explaining that the quality of Hispanic art has gone up so incredibly that it can no longer be ignored.
ORIGINALITY ABOUNDS
Though the artwork of U.S. Hispanics is as varied as the artists themselves—from Cuba-born abstract expressionist painters to such traditional santeros as Felix Lopez, of Espanola, N.M., who is featured in the exhibit — there is a common spirit of expressiveness.
"I saw the similarity in the boldness, the colors, the strokes,” Tapia says, describing the exhibit. But most of all, he saw originality.
"Finally, we’re being accepted artistically," he says. "Before, the only Hispanic artists were dead. And those of us who were alive were put in a bottle and expected never to change."
One ofthe main young santeros Tapia gives advice to is his own son, Sergio, who has literally been carving since he was a baby. Working alongside his father in the studio, the 16-year-old is receiving the personal encouragement and inspiration his father never had.
Whether the national recognition afforded Tapia and Hispanic art in general is long-lasting or short-lived, the artistic tradition will continue.
"I am the tradition," Tapia says. "What I do to continue my heritage is to renew it, like a growing plant."
(Jim Sagel, of Espanola, N.M., is author of several books.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
March 6,1989


COLLECTING
SOCIAL WELFARE: "Toward a More Perfect Union: Basic Skills, Poor Families, and Our Economic Future" is a 99-page publication by the Ford Foundation that gives a comprehensive picture of poverty and what has been and might be done about it. Copies are free and may be obtained from Ford Foundation, Office of Reports, 320 E. 43rd St., New York, N.Y. 10017 (212) 573-5000.
AIDS REPORT: The Michigan Department of Public Health and the state’s Office on Spanish Speaking Affairs has compiled "A Report to the Spanish Speaking People of Michigan on AIDS," a 37-page, Spanish-language publication. It is available free by writing to the Michigan Department of Public Health, Special Office on AIDS Prevention, Randy Pope, Director, 3500 N. Logan, P.O. Box 30035, Lansing, Mich. 48909.
INTERNATIONALIZING THE U.S.: "America in Transition: The International Frontier (Report of the Task Force on International Education)" is a 24-page report by the National Governors’ Association proposing -stronger interculturaLedueation in the United States. For a copy of the report, send $10.95 to National Governors' Association Publications Office, 444 N. Capitol St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 624-5300.
MARKETING TO HISPANICS: The Feb. 13 issue of Advertising Age has a 14-page special report on Hispanic market advertising. The report includes information on the top 10 Hispanic market advertisers in 1988 and Hispanic-oriented marketing strategies by major corporations such as Toyota, GTE, Fisher-Price and many others. Copies are $2 each. Write to Advertising Age Circulation Department, 965 E. Jefferson, Detroit, Mich. 48207 1-800-992-9970.
BILINGUAL ALPHABET BOOK: "T is for Terrific'" is a 32-page book by a 12-year-old that teaches the alphabet using bilingual instruction. The book is to be published May 1 by Open Hands Publishing Inc. The cost is $8.95 for cloth cover and $3.95 for paperback. For a copy or catalog of other bilingual publications from Open Hands Publishing, write P.O. Box 22048, Seattle, Wash. 98122 (206) 323-3868.
HISPANIC-OWNED BANKS: The March issue of Hispanic Business magazine contains a three-page article that contains a listing, according to deposits, of the top 27 Hispanic-owned banks in the Federal Reserve System. Copies are $5. Write Circulation Director Don Wortman, 360 Hope Ave., Santa Barbara, Calif. 93105 (805) 682-5843.
CONNECTING
PROGRAM DOCUMENTS BROOKLYN LATINOS
New York’s Brooklyn Historical Society hopes to open by early next year an exhibit, using oral histories, photographs, documents and artifacts, tracing the roots of the borough's Hispanic residents.
The Society will trace the histories of Hispanics in New York’s largest borough, which has approximately 12 Hispanic communities. Represented among those communities are Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Mexicans, Salvadorans, Nicaraguans and Ecuadoreans. Hispanics represent 18%, or 500,000, of Brooklyn's population.
To fund the program, the Society is using a $20,000 grant it received from the New York State Council on the Arts. It expects a $50,000 grant from the Ford Foundation.
EEOC STRENGTHENS OPERATIONS
Clarence Thomas, chairman of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, announced Feb. 23 that the agency now has a computerized database system that will enhance its ability to determine patterns of discrimination.
In the past the EEOC could not pinpoint employers who were charged repeatedly with discrimination but routinely settled the cases before they were litigated. Now the agency can analyze trends across the nation instantaneously.
The EEOC has an active inventory of approximately 100,000 cases. By giving its investigators access to updated information, the agency will have stronger cases, making EEOC a more aggressive and effective agency, Thomas said.
MISCELLANY
Miami’s Latin Builders Association announced Feb. 22 it will join with three technical schools in the area to offer 100 scholarships to low-income students who want to study air conditioning, plumbing or electricity. The group’s director, Jorge Abril, said he hopes half of the $4,500 scholarships will go to black students...
Washington, D.C.’s Council of Hispanic Community and Agencies announced last month the launching of a comprehensive AIDS prevention and education program, Unidos contra el SIDA. The program is being funded by a $25,000 grant from the Meyer Foundation and a $15,000 grant from the Glen Eagle Foundation...
Los Angeles' Entertainment Industries Council, in association with the National Institute on Drug Abuse, kicks off an anti-drug song-writing contest conducted through Spanish-language radio stations and newspapers. For information call (213) 274-8483...
Cafendar_______________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regarding your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC WOMEN’S FORUM Princeton, N.J. March 7, 8 The Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey is holding its second annual forum addressing an array of topics, including the impact of AIDS on the Hispanic community,
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
issues of political empowerment, the impact of welfare reform on Latinas and many others. Wanda Garcia (609) 757-6349
TESOL CONVENTION San Antonio March 7-11 Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages’ 23rd annual convention will feature several presentations focusing on bilingual education. Speakers will include San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, I. King Jordan, president of Gallaudet University, and William Kirby, commissioner of education in Texas.
Juana Hopkins (202) 872-1271
SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET New York March 8
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists is holding a banquet to raise money for scholarships for Hispanic college students studying journalism. The keynote speaker will be Tom Brokaw, anchorman of NBC Nightly
News.
Ana Marie Argilagos (202) 783- 6228
TEXAS HISPANIC-JEWISH RELATIONS Dallas March 8
Bambi Cardenas Ramirez, a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and vice president of institution advancement at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, will speak at a forum on the state of Jewish-Hispanic relations in Texas. The event is sponsored by the American Jewish Congress. Janis Jacobson Peiser (214) 368-2731
CHILDREN’S CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. March 8-10 The Children’s Defense Fund’s 1989 conference, titled "Leadership for Children in a New Era," will include a workshop on the development of Latino teens and another that will cover children’s issues of concern for both urban and rural families.
David Singer (703) 548-2802
March 6,1989
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The University of
DEAN
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Toledo
VICE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS
The College of Arts & Sciences enrolls 8,667 students in 19 departments, offers seven doctoral programs and houses the university Honors Program. Three of its departments have received Program Excellence Awards from the Ohio Board of Regents, an honor accorded to only 66 departments in the state system of more than 60 public universities and colleges. Four departments have received Ohio Board of Regents Academic Challenge grants that supplement ordinary funding in exceptional departments for six years. A new building for the Department of Physics and Astronomy opened in 1987. A new building for the Art Department is being planned.
DEAN
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The College of Business Administration has 5 departments enrolling more than 3,700 students. It houses an International Business Center, a Small Business Institute, a Center for Labor-Management Cooperation (state- funded), and the Toledo Economic Information System (funded by the city). Besides the B.B.A. and M.B.A., the college offers a Master of Taxation, M.S. in Accounting, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Manufacturing Management. Two departments have received Academic Challenge grants from the Ohio Board of Regents to supplement ordinary funding in exceptional departments for six years. Stranahan Hall, the home of the College, is three years old.
The University of Toledo is the fourth largest public university in Ohio with a total enrollment of 22,806 in eight colleges with 21 doctoral programs, including the J.D. and Pharm.D. It is a member of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges.
Candidates should have an earned Ph.D. in one of the disciplines in the college, substantial teaching and research experience, and significant administrative experience. They should be prepared to lead the College to continued growth in the quality of instruction and the volume of research. Salary is negotiable. Positions are available July 1, 1989. Nominations and applications should be sent to:
Dr. William N. Free Vice President for Academic Affairs The University of Toledo Toledo, OH 43606.
The University of Toledo
The University of Toledo invites applications and nominations for the position of Vice President for University Relations.
Founded in 1872, The University of Toledo has been a member of the University system of the State of Ohio since 1967. It is also a member of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges. The University of Toledo enrolls 22,800 undergraduate and graduate students and employs approximately 1,200 full-time and part-time faculty members. The University consists of seven degree-granting colleges (Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Education, Engineering, Law, Pharmacy, and University College), a Graduate School which grants doctorates in 21 disciplines, a Community and Technical College (located at the Scott Park Campus), and a Division of Continuing Education. Its 210-acre main campus is located in a pleasant residential area on the western edge of the city of Toledo. It also has a modem educational facility that is part of the recently completed SeaGate Centre in downtown Toledo.
The Vice President for University Relations will report directly to President Frank E. Horton. The Vice President for University Relations is responsible for such critical matters as development, community, media and government relations, publications and alumni affairs. The Vice President also serves as liaison to the University’s foundation, deals with all matters related to private giving, and serves as the President’s senior adviser on development and University relations policies.
Candidates for the position are expected to possess an advanced degree and university experience in an appropriate area. The successful candidate must have outstanding communication skills, written and oral, and must possess tact, discretion and sensitivity to the complex interactions which exist between the University community and external constituencies of the University. The candidate must possess organizational skills and competence in working with both internal and external constituencies. Salary and fringe benefits are competitive.
The position will remain open until filled. The Search Committee will begin its review of applications on April 8, 1989. In order to ensure full consideration, nominations and applications should be received before that date.
Interested persons should submit a letter indicating an interest in the position, a complete resume and the names, addresses and telephone numbers of at least five references.
Applications and nominations should be sent to:
Arlington County Personnel Office Employment Opportunities 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, VA 22201
Employment Information 703-358-3500
Job Line 703-538-3363
TDD (hearing impaired only) 703-284-5521
Equal Opportunity Employer
Dr. Harold Allen, Vice President for Graduate Studies, Research and Economic Development The University of Toledo 2801 West Bancroft St. Toledo, OH 43606
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March 6,1989
The University of Toledo is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER RESIDENCE HALL DIRECTORS
RESPONSIBILITIES: The Hall Director is responsible for the total administration of 240-650 students in 1 -2 residence halls, including training and supervising paraprofessional staff, coordinating the student conduct process, facilitating programming, working with student government, and overall management. Hall Directors also have the opportunity for collateral assignments in a Student Affairs area after their first year of employment.
QUALIFICATIONS: The requirement for this position is a Bachelor’s degree; however, a Master’s Degree in Student Personnel or related area and Residence Hall experience is strongly preferred.
REMUNERATION: The Hall Director has a twelve-month appointment with a furnished apartment, utilities, meal plan, and benefits. The salary is $17,248.
APPLICATIONS: Interested candidates should submit a letter of application, resume, all transcripts, and two letters of recommendation to:
Scott Qriesbach
Associate Director of Residence Life 101 Salisbury Hall University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Whitewater, Wl 53190
We will be interviewing at NASPA and the Oshkosh Placement Exchange. Applications will be accepted until positions are filled.
UW-Whitewater is an equal opportunity employer with an affirmative action plan. Women, members of minority groups, and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply._
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Executive Director/Agency Manager for Nonprofit organization. Salary range $40,000 to $44,340. Supervising City economic development planning, loan program supervision, redevelopment, commercial area revitalization and other projects, managing contracts with consultants, writing grant proposals, administering grants for economic development projects, providing staff support to community organizations and coordinating the financing of projects.
Qualifications: Graduate degree in economics, public administration and/or a combination of 3-5 years experience in city planning, busi-ness/finance management or economic develop-ment/administration. Bilingual English/Spanish preferred.
Send resume ASAP to: Robert Sanchez, Search Committee Chair, Mission Economic Development Assoc., 987 Valencia Street, San Francisco, CA94110, (415) 282-3334.
ATTORNEY/LOBBYIST $42,000 + DOE
Small non-profit legal advocacy organization seeks dynamic Executive Director. Qualifications include: Law degree, substantial experience lobbying on Capitol Hill, commitment to administering and strengthening a national farmworker advocacy organization. Fundraising experience highly desirable.
Resumes with references to: Search Committee, Farmworker Justice Fund, P.O. Box 53285, Washington, D.C. 20009.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
HARTNELL COLLEGE FALL 1989 OPENINGS
MATRICULATION COUNSELOR, INSTRUCTORS: TWO ENGLISH (one permanent and a one-year sabbatical replacement). ACCOUNTING, OFFICE I OCCUPATIONS, MATHEMATICS, ESL. Salary DOE $24,930-$46,298. FFD' 4/14/89.
HARTNELL COMMUNITY COLLEGE PERSONNEL, 156 Homestead Ave., Salinas, Calif. 93901, (408) 755-6706. FAX| number (408) 755-6751.
EOE/AA
RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST
National Hispanic organization seeks Ftesource Development Specialist to carry out funding source research, write proposals, maintain accurate proposal and funding records, and carry out other assigned duties. Interested applicants must have a BA or experience in related field, strong writing, communication and organizational skills, and ability to work well under pressure and as part of a team.
Send resume and writing sample by March 14, 1989 to: Cristina Lopez, Resource Development Coordinator, National Council of La Raza, 810 First St., NE, Third Floor, Washington, D.C. 20002-4205.
GENERAL MANAGER
GENERAL MANAGER, SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA RAPID TRANSIT DISTRICT! (Oakland, CA) Salary open D.O.Q. Position reports to nine-member elected Board of Directors and responsible for managing a 71.5-mile rail transit system serving 2.5 million people, supervising a workforce of 2,433 employees and overseeing an operating budget of $178 million. Desire individual with several years of senior level management experience in a comparably sized and complex organization. Transportation-related experience desirable but not a requirement.
Emphasis will be on demonstrated leadership abilities to manage a large organization, oversee a major capital program and relate well to an elected public board. Send resumes in confidence to: KORN/FERRY INTERNATIONAL, Attn: Jim B. Clarke, 1800 Century Park East, 9th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90067.
AA/EEO
INSTRUCTOR
FIRE TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTOR, Rio Hondo College, Whittier, Calif. Full time, tenure track. For information and application, call Jean at (213) 692-0921 ext. 309. EOE
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Fteport. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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March 6,1989


Arts & Entertainment
ONE MORE FOR SANTANA: Shortly after winning his first Grammy Award, Carlos Santana was named Musician of the Year at the (San Francisco) Bay Area Music Awards. Santana performed at the BAM Awards ceremony, held at San Francisco’s Civic Center Auditorium Feb. 25. Winners were determined by fans’ mail-in ballots.
On Feb. 22 the Mexican guitarist won a Grammy in the "best rock instrumental” category for his album Blues For Salvador.
In other awards news, this week New York’s Asociacionde Cronistas de Espectaculos hands out its own ACE Awards.
Awards in more than 60 categories will be announced at a ceremony March 11 at New York’s Waldorf Astoria Hotel. Special, non-competitive ACEs will be awarded to Ruben Blades, Edward James Olmos, Elizabeth Pena, Esai Morales and Raul Julia
FONDA ACQUIRES ‘MUJERES’: Actress Jane Fonda has acquired the rights for her Fonda Films production company to do an English-
language version of the Spanish film Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown.
Fonda will star in the movie as Pepa, the character played in the original film by Carmen Maura An actress being mentioned as possible co-star in the film is Shirley MacLaine.
The original Mujeres al horde de un ataque de nervlos, written and directed by Pedro Almodovar, is nominated for a foreign language Oscar this year.
TWO TO TANGO: The creators of Tango Apasionado, the 1987 off-Broadway hit based on the works of Argentine writer Jose Luis Borges, have reunited to develop a piece titled Tango/Orfeo.
The play, which sets the myth of Orpheus in Argentina in the 1870s, is being directed and choreographed by that country’s Graciela Daniele. She co-wrote the book with James Lewis; lyrics are by William Finn and music by Astor Piazzolla.
Tango/Orfeo will premiere in May in Philadelphia, make a stop at the Spoleto Festival USA, then move to California’s La Jolla Playhouse in July.
— Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
VILLANUEVA QUITS KMEX-TV: Daniel Villanueva, president and general manager of KMEX-TV in Los Angeles, announced March 1 his retirement, to be effective June 1. He will continue for two more years in an advisory capacity with Univislon Holdings Inc., parent company of KMEX. He hopes to pursue other personal interests as well, he said.
Villanueva is the second head of a major Los Angeles Spanish-language television station to resign in as many months. Frank Cruz, vice president and general manager of KVEA, resigned Feb. 2.
"Villanueva has been a strong voice in the Southern California Hispanic community," said Armando Dur6n, head of the National Hispanic Media Coalition in Los Angeles.
An announcement will be made sometime this week regarding Villanueva’s replacement. He says he will be consulted and hopes to have an influence on the decision.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Ftestrepo, Mario Santana.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
UNIVISION ANNOUNCES NEW PUBLICATION: Univision Publications announced Feb. 21 that its new magazine, Ahora, a general interest Spanish-language quarterly with a controlled circulation of 500,000, will debut in August.
The 100-page premiere issue will focus on Hispanic personalities, trends in lifestyle and issues of special relevance to U.S. Hispanics. Special sections will feature columns on the law, insurance and medical services.
"Our research indicates there is a great opportunity for a quality print vehicle that speaks to readers in Spanish," said Roger Toll, publisher and editor-in-chief.
Free one-year subscriptions are available on request by writing to Univision’s offices at 330 Madison Ave., 26th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10017.
If after the first year response has been favorable, Ahora may convert to paid circulation, although it would be a "very low fee," said Toll, former editor-in-chief of The Mexico City News. The circulation base is scheduled to
increase to 580,000 for the winter 1989 issue,
630.000 for the spring 1990 issue, and
700.000 for the summer 1990 issue. Circulation is guaranteed by Business Publications Audit of Circulation.
PEPSI TARGETS LATINO YOUTH: During the Grammy Awards Feb. 22, CBS made network history when it ran the first Spanish-language commercial on prime time television without the use of subtitles or dubbing. The commercial, an ad for Pepsi, was filmed in Chile and stars 20-year-old Puerto Rican singer Chayanne.
Pepsi hopes the 30-second commercial, which cost an estimated $600,000, will pull in young Latinos as well as others of the 50 million viewers who watched the Grammys.
Tod MacKenzie, a spokesman for Pepsi, said, “We have always used music to communicate, and we have always looked at the Grammys as an opportunity for innovative ads."
— Danilo Alfaro
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March 6,1989
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Making the News This Week President Bush renominates Ferdinand Fernandez, a federal judge in Los Angeles, to a seat on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals . Fernandez, who if confirmed would be the first Latino member of the nation's largest federal appeals court, was originally nominated by former President Ronald Reagan ... Mark Rodriguez, president of KOJO-FM in Dallas, offers Reagan $200 , 000 to host a weekly 35to 45minute talk show for a year ... U . S . Rep. William Lehman, of Florida, invites Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos to visit Miami to witness the impact recently arrived Nicaraguan children have had on the Dade County school system ... Rudy Beserra, associate director of the White House Office of Public Liaison during the latter part of the ad ministration , joins the Atlanta headquarters of Coca Cola as ItS to the Hispanic community ... The Seattle Seahawks, a professional football team , name Tom Flores, former coach of the Los Raiders, president and general manager of the team ... The State Republican Committee elects Laura Reyes Kopack, v•.ce dent and general counsel of Syndeco, a subsidiary of Detroit Electric Co. , as one of i ts six vice chairs .. .The an.•nves tigation to determine whether six Los Angeles . pollee . officers . violated the civil rights of Jesse Lilrez and his family dur!ng a ra1d at home. Larez' s nose was broken during the raid, and h1s daughter , D1ane, was yanked to the floor by her ha i r ... Voi.7No.101 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT (IMarchS,l08S Govs. Fault Language, Culture Gap The nation's schools-beginning as early as everything we hands to . We could the first grade must teach students to be-afford the luxury of 1gnonng the seers and excome fa m iliar with other cultu Fes-aFu:ol proficient parts who urged us to learn the tongues and in at least one language other than English if ways of other lands, but those have gone the United States hopes to regain some of its the way of leaded gas and the mckel phone lost dominance in global economic and Intelcall." iectual arenas, concluded a report released Marta Jimenez , an associate counsel at the Feb . 25 in Washington , D . C., by the National Washington office of the Mexican American Governors' Assoc i ation. Legal Defense and Educational Fund, agreed Prepared by a three member panel led by with the pluralistic philosophy of the report. She New Jersey Gov . Thomas Kean , the report said it proved wrong the "less-is-more" said, "For more than a century, Americans entality pervading organizations that seek le.ws joyed unchallenged superiority in virtually iation making English the United States' off1c1al language. Mlamians Disagree on Riot "We need to recognize that we cannot exist as a nation unto ourselves anymore , " said JmElnez. Senator Introduces Bill to Halt Congress Bias Sen . John McCain (R-Ariz . ) is trying to establish a fair employment office extending 1964 Civil Rights Act protections offered U . S . workers against discrimination to employees of the U.S . House of Representa tives and Senate . It will deal with complaints on hiring and on-the-job discrim i nation. He introduced the bill Jan . 30. According to Lorne C r anea , a legislative assistant in McCain's office , it is now in the Government Affairs Committee. No hearings are scheduled yet. No parallel bill has been i ntroduced in the House, although it passed a similar bill Oct. 4 that offered anti-discr i mination protections to its employees and new hires . Eighty-three percent of Miami's Latinos blamed last month's Overtown and Liberty City rioting on a few troublemakers, virtually discounting social and economic causes, ac cording to a poll released Feb . 21 by WL 1VChannel23. con t inued on page2 L-----------------1 In contrast, 50% of black respondents blamed troublemakers, while 48% cited economic and social factors as the cause . Anglos were more sympathetic to the economic frustration of blacks . Half of them blamed frustrations, while 40% blamed troublemakers. Osvaldo Soto, chairman of the Spanish American League Against Discrimination, said both were causes . "A group of troublemakers took advantage of a very sad incident in which a Hispanic policeman shot a black. But also, the blacks feel very disappointed and frustrated because Hispanics have been less discriminated against and because of the (economic and po l itical) goals the Cuban Americans have reached." Other poll respon ses : -Miami has generally ignored the needs of Overtown and Liberty City : Latino Black Anglo Agree 34% 89% 60% Disagree 55 11 34 The city has generally ignored the needs of its Cuban American neighborhoods : Agree 21% 14% 10% Disagree 71 83 84 Mario Santana Baseball's Giamatti Hears Hiring Ideas A Bartlett G i amatti, commissioner-elect of Major League Baseball, met Feb. 23 with members of the congressional black and Hispanic caucuses in Washington , D.C., and agreed to study affirmative action proposals put forth by the legislators . Stu Nagurka , a spokesman for Congres sional Hispanic Caucus member Bill Richardson (D-N . M.), said the meeting " went very well" and that caucus members were impressed with "obvious concern with bringing more m i norities into front office and managerial positions . " Giamatti acknowledged that he only has the power of persuasion over teams . At the meeting with Giamatti were Reps . Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) , Edward Roybal (DCalif.), Albert Bustamante (D-Texas), and Richardson of the Hispanic caucus . Also present were Reps . Edolphus Towns (DN . Y .), Alan Wheat (D-Mo .), John Lewis (DGa.) and Charles Rangel (D-N.Y.) of the Congressional Black Caucus . Janet Hill of Alexander and Associates, a Washington, D . C., consulting firm hired by Giamatti and the league presidents to help develop baseball' s affirmative action programs, said that of 26 major league and approximately 130 minor league teams, one major l eague manager and 14 minor league managers are Hispanic . In both the major and minor leagues combined , only 22 coaches are Hispanic. Hill added that 10% of baseball's front of fice employees are minorities . While she declined to say what p r oportion of that figure was Hispanic, she said that the majority are blacks . Robert Heuer , a Chicagoan who has exten sively researched and written about Latinos in the major leagues, said that the proposed minority hiring reforms were primarily geared toward blacks . "Baseball has little interest in the Hispanic side of the story. Think ing of it as a black-white issue is just an easy way of dealing with the very complex problem of race relations." Some of the proposals that Giamatti agreed to study further include setting up a bank of names of minorities or m i nority groups in major league cit i es interested in buying a team , implement ing a program similar to those used in the National Basket ball Association and the Nat i onal Football League to train minority coaches , and in creasing the number of minority college stu dents who intern in the teams ' front offices. Danilo Alfaro

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Hispanics Lack Representation on N.Y.C. School Boards Of the 11 New York City school districts where Hispanics make up 40% or more of the enrollment, s i x have two or fewer Latinos on their nine member, locally elected school boards, according to figures for the 1987-88 school year published in the Feb . 16 issue of The New York Times. Two other districts one where Hispanics account for 83% of the student population and another where they are 53% have had . their boards suspended by the City Board of Education for mismanagement and replaced by trustees . One reason given for the underrepresenta tion is the low participation of the com munities in the board elections . In the last election , 7 .5% of those eligible voted. The elections are held every three years. The next ones will be May 2. Another factor is that many parents are not aware, particularly those that are recent ar rivals from the Caribbean, that they are eligible to vote in school board elections. All parents can vote, even if they are not U.S. Hispanics make up 34% of the city's public citizens. school students, blacks 39%. Overall , Hispanics hold 38 of the 288 seats, or 13%, that make up the city's 32 decentral ized school boards . Blacks account for 23% of the members; 49% of the seats are oc The city's school boards were decentralized in 1970 to give a greater voice to district resi dents . Mario Santana cupied by whites. Dist. 1 4 7 8 10 12 14 15 19 24 32 NEW YORK SCHOOL BOARDS, DISTRICT ENROLLMENT -1987-88 (districts with 40% or more Hispanic enrollment) Student Population Board Makeup Latino Black White Latino Black White Vacant 71.5% 16.4% 3 .3% 1 0 7 1 59.8 35.4 4 . 3 6 2 1 67.3 31. 9 0.4 5 3 0 55.4 30 . 7 12.5 2 2 5 60. 0 24.4 9 . 6 1 0 6 2 67.2 30 . 6 0.8 7 2 0 70.2 20.4 7.1 2 0 5 2 58.2 16.9 21.0 1 0 8 44.1 48.3 4.6 1 4 3 42.6 7.2 32 . 3 0 0 9 69.4 27.6 1.5 6 1 1 Source: New York City Board of Education, The New York Times Governors Seek International Literacy Law Schools Put Stop to FBI Recruiter Visits continued from page 1 The report, titled "America in Transition: The International Frontier (Report of the Task Force on International Education)," says people are forward looking, Jimenez said, ad ding , "U. S . English is a restrictionist movement that looks to the past." Sharon McCioe, director of government operations for U . S . English, said the report did not contradict the group's beliefs. "We endorse the teaching of foreign languages," she claimed . She commented that U.S. English "feels schools are not doing enough to teach English to our stu dents . And before we move on (and teach other languages and cultures), we first have to teach people in our own lan guage . " In his foreword to the report, Governor Kean left no doubt about when to start. "I have no il lusions about the difficulty involved" in making 16-Month-Oid Calvin Dies Sixteen-month-old Calvin Oliveira, of Deerfield, Fla . , whose plight received na tional attention, died of massive system failure Feb. 22 at the University of Wiscon sin Children's Hospital in Madison. His death came 53 days after "Baby Cal vin," son of Carlos and Adriana Oliveira, received a liver and small intestine transplant. The nine-hour operation, per formed on New Year's Eve, was the first of its kind in medical history. But soon after ward, the child developed a lung ailment and his condition worsened progressively. Last year the Oliveiras set out to raise $400,000 for the transplant. With Florida Gov. Bob Martinez's help and media atten tion, they managed to raise a large chunk of the money . 2 international education a priority. "But neither do I doubt the consequences if we do not. America can't afford to wait a generation," he wrote. The report stated that the "vast majority" of people in the United States cannot speak alan guage other than English and are uninformed about basic geography. It offered these examples: • Twenty-five percent of Dallas students did not know Mexico was the country bordering the United States to the south; • One in seven adults could not locate the United States on a world map; and eln 1987 only 20% of high school graduates studied a foreign language for more than two years. "An increased emphasis on international education in schools and colleges will help everyone understand and interact with their neighbors, classmates and co-workers," ad vised the report. Stanley Diamond, chairman of U .S. English, said while the group does seek a "language of common discourse," he saw no disagreement with the report. "We would encourage univer sities and colleges to require a foreign lan guage requirement for admission." Jimenez agreed that English is important but said "we must recognize the value and impor tance of other languages and cultures. We need to recognize that minority children are our work force of the future." Among the report's recommendations were that teachers learn more about international is sues and that business and government join with the school system to support international education. March 6, 1989 Two major law schools have barred FBI recruiters from their campuses in part as a result of a September 1988 federal court ruling that the bureau discriminated against its Hispanic agents. The deans of the University of Michigan and Ohio State University law schools said that their policies prohibit employers who have been found to discriminate from recruiting on their facilities . U .S. District Court Judge Lucius Bunton in Midland, Texas, ruled last year that the FBI failed to promote its Hispanic agents and sys tematically relegated them to the least reward ing and most dangerous assignments. Testimony to determine damages has been given for the past two weeks. Counsel.for the plaintiffs is seeking $9.2 million. Student groups at the University of Michigan, which put its policy into effect last December, circulated a petition last fall protesting FBI recruitment in the wake of charges that it dis criminated against its minority agents. "The ban was an appropriate act on the part of the administration in its effort to implement a policy that it had on record," said Victor Torres, mem ber of the university's Hispanic Law Students' Association. Reaction to the ban within the student com munity was mixed. Some minority student groups saw the move as perpetuating the FBI's current hiring practices. "I don't think it will make a big impact," said Gregg Carr, president of Ohio State's Black Law Students' Association. "You don't cut off your nose to spite your face . (The ban) may be denying the opportunity for people with new and progressive ideas to get into the FBI." Danilo Alfaro Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Miguel Perez Deciding Who Decides For many years they waited for a real chance to decide their political future, but now that Puerto Ricans may finally influence their destiny, now that it looks like they will have a plebiscite to determine the future status of their island, the most pressing question has become not who wins, but who gets to play the game . All over Nueva York, Puerto Ricans are debating the question of who will vote in the plebiscite with even more passion than how they will vote , if they get the opportunity. Many believe that those on the mainland, especially those born on the island, should be able to vote on whether Puerto Rico should become a state, an inde pendent nation or retain its commonwealth status. Ever since Puerto Rico's three political parties agreed to have a plebiscite and President Bush called for a referendum during his speech to Congress Feb. 9, Puerto Ricans on the main land have been organizing a united front to demand to be included in the election process. Those efforts were formalized in the Bronx Feb . 19 with the formation of a national association, a group that decided, after some discussion, that it would fight for ALL Puerto Ricans even those born here of Puerto Rican parents to be included in the voting . NATIONAL PRO-VOTE GROUP ORGANIZES "I understand that there may be some legal questions that may prevent those who were born here f r om participating," said George Perez, of Chicago , "but it shouldn't be up to us to determine that. How do we tell our children, our young people, who for years we have been teaching to be proud of being Puerto Rican, that now they can't vote because they are not really Puerto Rican? I don't know about you, but I can't do that." The group vowed to organize chapters all over the U.S. mainland and to gather a half-million signatures asking Congress to allow them to vote. "I say to you that it is unconstitutional, illegal and inhuman that you who are here but feel like you are there emotionally and intellec twally are deprived of that sacred right," said attorney Jaime Hernandez Sanchez, a former senator in Puerto Rico . "And I say sacred because to decide the destiny of a people is a sacred right." The group is considering many options, from its own bill to a lawsuit to prevent Congress from excluding mainland Puerto Ricans. "Then it would be up to the courts to decide and I believe the Constitution is on our side," said Hernandez Sanchez, warning that there are partisan groups in Puerto Rico . "that will try to exclude you . " PARTISANSHIP ENTERS DEBATE In Puerto Rico, how mainland Puerto Ricans would vote may deter mine whether some political parties wou l d approve of mainland par ticipation . A national survey of Puerto Rican activists and professionals conducted by the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy last year found that 44% support independence, while 14% favored commonwealth and 13% wanted statehood. Significantly , however, 24% said that this was a decision that should be left up to the islanders . But Bronx Councilman Jose Rivera, born in Puerto Rico, has introduced a resolution asking the City Council to urge the government of Puerto Rico to allow Puerto Ricans to vote from here. Although the association's national coordinator, Monserrate Flores, kept insisting that to be effective, the group must remain non-partisan , not all could resist the temptation. "Will the independentistas continue to insist on another plebiscite after they lose this one?" one man asked. "If we want statehood, we shouldn't be wasting time with technicalities , " another man said . "Of course we all want a plebiscite , " said another ; "who wants Puerto Rico to continue being a colony?" After the first debate, when it's finally determined who will have a say in Puerto Rico's future, it will be time for the real debate. For now , it suf fices to say, "Viva Ia independencia" -to vote, of course . (Miguel Perez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua TRAVELERS' WARNING: As you read this item, keep in mind that /a migra swears on Bibles that it does not single out Latino types as probable illegal immigrants . On Feb . 27, INS officers pulled 79 suspected undocumented aliens off an Eastern Airlines plane en route from Los Angeles to New York during a stopover in Atlanta. (After the raid, INS reported that 39 of the suspects were from Mexico, 21 from Guatemala, 13 from the Dominican Republic, four from El Sal vador, and one each from Honduras and Ecuador . ) A wire service quoted INS spokesman Tom Thomas' explana tion for the raid : "There's a commuter who regularly f lies from Los Angeles to Atlanta who called our office ... and said, 'Hey, it seems there's an awful lot of Hispanic people who fly thi s fligh t . You might want to check it out!'" It brings back nasty memories of the ' 40s and '50s when cops would arrest Latino teen-agers for loitering if the kids had the audacity to gather in groups of more than two or three on a street corner. If you ' re planning on attending the National Hispanic Media Con ference in San Juan, Puerto Rico, next month or t he Image or MANA or NABE conventions in May , remember: La migra is watching . Travel alone or with a blue-eyed blond . A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND INSULTS : Texas Air Chairman Frank Lorenzo, who gets nice write-ups in Latino magazines but sometimes isn't treated with such deference in the establishment press, was the subject of an unflattering portrait in the Feb . 27 Fortune magazine. That is, assuming such descrip.. lives as union-buster, showboater and loose cannon may be categorized as unflattering . Managers of Eastern Airlines (now a part ofTexas Air) took quick action when they discovered the publication in their reading racks. They sent out a directive to the fleet of 200 planes : "It is imperative that the current issue of Fortune maga z ine be removed immediately from all Eastern aircraft . Dispose of all copies locally . Have a member of management audit all aircraft to ensure compliance. " So what did Lorenzo do when he found out? He ordered his mousy mid management minions to put 'em all back in the racks. It was a rather flattering picture of him on the cover. A VERY IMPERFECT CRIME : On Feb. 17 He ctor Mari n Hem{mdez, awaiting trial for marijuana possession , escaped from Metropolitan Correctional Center in Southwest Dade County, Fla., by hiding for 24 hours in the prison's Dumpster . He failed to consider that the trash gets squeezed tight by a hydraulic trash compactor. After the surprised garbage men unloaded him, along with potato peels and other mushy stuff at the county dump, they rushed him to the hospital. Marin-Hernandez , 27, suffered head injuries and a crushed pelvis . At last report, he was cleaner, wiser, and in good condition. Kay Barbaro Quoting ... FREDERICK ERICKSON, sociolinguist at the University of Pennsyl vania, commenting in the Feb. 20 issue of Newsweek on the campaign for an amendment to make English the official language of the United States: "It's a real cover for bigotry. It's easier to say we're afraid of Engli s h being overwhelmed than to say we don ' t want any more spi e s around here." Hispanic Link Weekly Report March 6, 1989 3

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Robert Heuer Black Hispanics Integrated Baseball Now that baseball has as its two league presidents a black man named Wh.ite and a. white man Brown , it's time to fit Hispanics into the rac1al equat1on, because 1t was Cubans who "integrated" our national pastime. This obscure fact cannot minimize the pioneering role of Jackie Robin son, who arrived on the scene in 1947 and despite all the racial hardships, earned a spot in the Hall of Fame . If anything, the Cuban saga shows the idiocy of racial distinctions . 1 Spanish Caribbean peoples tolerate interracial marriage more than North Americans, which is one reason why Cuba's genetic melting pot confounded r---...,..-----. baseball purists . In 1911 , the Cincinnati Reds wired a Havana sportswriter to ask if two Cuban prospects were "authentic Caucasians." Rafael Almeida and Armando Marsans passed this test and headed north. To assure skeptical readers, a Cincinnati sportswriter wrote: "Permit me to introduce two of the purest bars of Castilian soap ever to wash upon our shores." Although U . S . blacks wouldn't get a chance for L-another 36 years, a dozen Cubans reached the majors by 1920 . RACIAL BARRIER AN AMERICAN ABSURDITY Jim Sagel Artist Revives Carts of Death " One of these days it's going to be fashionable to be Hispanic," says Luis Tapia. That day may already have come; few have done more to assure its arrival than this prolific artist and santero of Santa Fe, N .M. Tapia is one of 30 contemporary Hispanic painters and sculptors fea tured in perhaps the most prestigious and important Hispanic art show to date, the "Hispanic Art in the United States" exhibit. The ambitious exhibit, curated at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, is currently traveling to several cities, including Washington, D . C . , Miami and Los Angeles . Tapia created two major pieces for it-a 4 1/2-foot carreta de muerte, or death cart , and an 8x12-foot reredo, altar screen . The intricately painted reredo features four bultos, or carvings in the round, as well as a crucifix beneath the painted figure of a white dove symbolizing the Holy Spirit. The museum has agreed to donate the piece to a New church at the close of. the trav.el . hi bit this ' year. For tt1 e 37 -year artist, accep tance by the churches of his native New Mexico is more gratifying than the current, long awaited acceptance by galleries, museums and that amorphous and powerful entity, the "art world." He is perhaps most proud of his restoration of art treasures in several northern New Mexico churches and his creation of new religious art in the tradition of the 18th and 19th century Hispanic santeros . Adolfo Luque, a brilliant and volatile pitcher , nearly caused a race riot in 1923 when he charged the opposition's bench and began swinging at Casey Stengel. The papers reported that another benchwa r mer had FORMULA NEVER REPEATED "challenged the purity of his Castilian strain." Luque, said to have a Tapia is a co-founder of probably the most important association of "purplish Latin American complexion , " was probably called a "nigger." Hispanic artists to date, La Cofradia . The organization, which A Cuban passport surely helped Roberto Estalella join the Washington flourished during the renaissance of Hispanic art in northern New Senators in 1935 . With a flat, broad nose and kinky hair , he was not the Mexico the last half of the '70s , was responsible for many exhibits that purest bar of Castile soap to float down the Potomac. "Estalella had the helped launch the careers of some of today's best-known H i spanic ar retarded Negroid features of a Bantu tribesman," a teammate recalled . tists . Another baseball man said he was a "freckle-faced, red-headed jig . " Self-taught, as are many Hispanic santeros who began resurrecting Cubans had been around for 20 years . So nobody stopped the the art of their ancestors in the early years of the last decade, Tapia Senators from putting this one at third base . Estalella , who told me the was one of the first to bring back polychromatic, painted santos . racial barrier was "an absurd American thing, " denied having any kind Among Tapia ' s carvings are the penitent carretas de muerte, with horof black heritage. rific, skeletal figures of death riding in the rickety carts of doom . Though Cubans say otherwise . Minnie Minoso, the first so-called "Latin Negro" Tapia has carved some 15 to 20 of the anthropomorphic death figures , to follow Robinson into the majors, calls Estalella "un mulato," a generic he never repeats a formula . Each muerte has its own personality. The term for all non-whites. Rudy Fernandez, a Negro League player from "Lady of Death" Tapia is currently working on has human and dog teeth, Cuba, called him "un jabao," meaning a person with a small amount of abalone shell eyes, and scraggly hair made from a za/ea, or sheepskin . color in his ancestry. "Foreigners didn't get the chance to see all the . Among the most striking on this howling hag are her almost fnembers of Ohe's family," Sciid F8rn8ndez, Who likeother stylish ana toe"'naiiS.,.-... _ _ :.: ........ -. plected Cubans kept his countryman's secret. The way Tapia sees it, however, the recognition the national exhibit portends is not a result of hype, explaining that the quality of Hispanic art has gone up so incredibly that it can no longer be ignored . COLOR PRIMARILY ECONOMICS ISSUE In the '40s, the black press attacked Washington owner Clark Griffith for signing many foreigners but refusing to sign "men of color " in his own back yard . "The old fox," as he was called, brushed off the critics by saying that the signing of a black would ruin the Negro Leagues. "It was said that some of our Cubans had black blood, which made them black according to the standards of the world," recalled Calvin Griffith, who moved the franchise to Minnesota after his uncle's death . "But Bobby Estalella was not Negroid . He had very thin lips and was more yellow than anything else. " This affably gruff man didn't pretend to be a . genetics expert . No mat ter. Bobby Estalella proved that the color bar was primarily an issue of economics. Blacks were allowed in the major leagues largely because World War II decimated the pool of available white talent. "I've told lots of reporters that Jackie Robinson wasn't the first black player," said 78-year-old Howie Haak, the scout who loaded Pittsburgh Pirate lineups with Latins for three decades. "There was Bobby Estalel la and Tommy de Ia Cruz who pitched for the Reds . He was blacker than my shoes . But nobody ever picked up on the story." (Robert Heuer, of Chicago, is an authority on Latin Americans in or ORIGINALITY ABOUNDS Though the artwork of U.S . Hispanics is as varied as the artists them selvesfrom Cuba-born abstract expressionist painters to such tradi tional santeros as Felix Lopez, of Espanola , N . M., who is featured in the exhibit there is a common spirit of expressiveness . "I saw the similarity in the boldness, the colors, the strokes," Tapia says, describing the exhibit. But most of all, he saw originality . "Finally, we're being accepted artistically," he says . "Before, the only Hispanic artists were dead. And those of us who were alive were put in a bottle and expected never to change." One of the main young santeros Tapia gives advice to is his own son, Sergio, who has literally been carving since he was a baby . Working alongside his father in the studio, the 16-year-old is receiving the per sonal encouragement and inspiration his father never had . Whether the national recognition afforded Tapia and Hispanic art in general is long-lasting or short-lived, the artistic tradition will continue . "I am the tradition," Tapia says. "What I do to continue my heritage is to renew it, like a growing plant." (Jim Sage/, of Espanola, N.M., is author of several books . ) ganized baseball . ) 4 March 6 , 1989 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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COLLECTING SOCIAL WELFARE: "Toward a More Perfect Union : Basic Skills, Poor Families, and Our Economic Future" is a 99-page publication by the Ford Foundation that gives a comprehensive picture of poverty and what has been and might be done about it. Copies are free and may be obtained from Ford Foundation, Office of Reports, 320 E. 43rd St., New York, N.Y . 10017 (212) 573-5000. AIDS REPORT: The Michigan Department of Public Health and the state's Office on Spanish Speaking Affairs has compiled "A Report to the Spanish Speaking People of Michigan on AIDS," a 37-page, Spanish-language publication. It is available free by writing to the Michigan Department of Public Health, Special Office on AIDS Preven tion, Randy Pope, Director, 3500 N. Logan, P.O . Box 30035, Lansing, Mich. 48909. INTERNATIONALIZING THE U.S.: "America in Transition: The Inter national Frontier (Report of the Task Force on International Education)" is a 24-page report by the National Governors' Association proposing ,,st r onger in the United States. For a copy of the report, send $10.95 to National Governors' Assoc i ation Publications Of fice, 444 N . Capitol St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20001 (202) 624-5300. MARKETING TO HISPANICS : The Feb . 13 issue of Advertising Age has a 14-page special report on Hispanic market advertising . The report includes information on the top 10 Hispanic market advertisers in 1988 and Hispanic-oriented marketing strategies by major corporations such as Toyota, GTE, Fisher-Price and many others. Copies are $2 each . Write to Advertising Age Circulation Department, 965 E. Jefferson, Detroit, Mich. 48207 1-800-992-9970. BILINGUAL ALPHABET BOOK: '"T' is for 'Terrific"' is a 32-page book by a 12-year-old that teaches the alphabet using bilingual instruction. The book is to be published May 1 by Open Hands Publishing Inc. The cost is $8.95 for cloth cover and $3.95 for paperback. For a copy or catalog of other bilingual publications from Open Hands Publishing, write P.O . Box 22048, Seattle, Wash. 98122 (206) 323-3868. HISPANIC-OWNED BANKS: The March issue of Hispanic Business magazine contains a three-page article that contains a listing, accord ing to deposits, of the top 27 Hispanic-owned banks in the Federal Reserve System. Copies are $5. Write Circulation Director Don Wortman, 360 Hope Ave., Santa Barbara, Calif . 93105 (805) 682-5843 . CONNECTING PROGRAM DOCUMENTS BROOKLYN LATINOS New York's Brooklyn Historical Society hopes to open by early next year an exhibit, using oral histories, photographs, documents and ar tifacts, tracing the roots of the borough's Hispanic residents . The Society will trace the histories of Hispanics in New York's largest borough, which has approximately 12 Hispanic communities . Represented among those communit i es are Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Mexicans, Salvadorans , Nicaraguans and Ecuadoreans. Hispanics represent 18%, or 500,000, of Brooklyn ' s population. To fund the program, the Society is using a $20,000 grant it received from the New York State Council on the Arts. It expects a $50,000 grant from the Ford Foundation. EEOC STRENGTHENS OPERATIONS Clarence Thomas, chairman of the U . S . Equal Employment Oppor tunity Commission , announced Feb . 23 that the agency now has a computerized database system that will enhance its ability to deter mine patterns of discrimination. In the past the EEOC could not pinpoint employers who were charged repeatedly with discrimination but routinely settled the cases before they were litigated . Now the agency can analyze trends across the nation instantaneously. The EEOC has an active inventory of approximately 100,000 cases. By giv ing its investigators access to updated information, the agency will have stronger cases, making EEOC a more aggressive and ef fective agency, Thomas said . MISCELLANY Miami's Latin Builders Association announced Feb . 22 it will join with three technical schools in the area to offer 100 scholarships to low-in come students who want to study air conditioning, plumbing or electricity. The group's director, Jorge Abril, said he hopes half of the $4,500 scholarships will go to black students ... Washington, D . C . 's Council of Hispanic Community and Agencies announced last month the launching of a comprehensive AIDS prevention and education program, Unidos contra e/ S/DA. The program is being funded by a $25,000 grant from the Meyer Founda tion and a $15,000 grant from the Glen Eagle Foundation ... Los Angeles' Entertainment Industries Council, in association with the National Institute on Drug Abuse, kicks off an anti-drug song-writ ing contest conducted through Spanish-language radio stations and newspapers. For information call (213) 274-8483 ... Calendar issues of political empowerment, the impact of welfare reform on Latinas and many others . Wanda Garda (609) 757 6349 News. Ana Marie Argilagos (202) 783 6228 TEXAS HISPANIC-JEWISH RELATIONS Dallas March 8 TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regarding your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge . Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. THIS WEEK HISPANIC WOMEN'S FORUM Princeton, N.J . March 7, 8 The Hispanic Women's Task Force of New Jersey is holding its second annual forum ad dressing an array of topics, including the im pact of AIDS on the Hispanic community, Hispanic Unk Weekly Report TESOL CONVENTION San Antonio March 7-11 Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages' 23rd annual convention will fea ture several presentations focusing on bilin gual education . Speakers will include San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, I. King Jor dan, president of Gallaudet University, and William Kirby, commissioner of education in Texas. Juana Hopkins (202) 872-1271 SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET New York March 8 The National Association of Hispanic Jour nalists is holding a banquet to raise money for scholarships for Hispanic college students studying journalism . The keynote speaker will be Tom Brokaw, anchorman of NBC Nightly March 6 , 1989 Bambi Cardenas Ramirez, a member of the U.S . Commission on Civil Rights and vice president of institution advancement at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, will speak at a forum ori the state of Jewish Hispanic relations in Texas . The event is sponsored by the American Jewish Congress . Janis Jacobson Peiser (214) 368-2731 CHILDREN'S CONFERENCE Washington , D . C. March 8-1 0 The Children's Defense Fund's 1989 con ference, titled "Leadership for Children in a New Era , " will include a workshop on the development of Latino teens and another that will cover children ' s issues of concern for both urban and rural families . David Singer (703) 548-2802 5

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6 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED The University of Toledo DEAN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES The College of Arts & Scienoes enrolls 8 , 667 students in 19 departments, offers seven doctoral programs and houses the university Honors Program. Three of its departments have reoeived Program Exoellenoe Awards from the Ohio Board of Regents, an honor accorded to only 66 departments in the state system of more than 60 public universities and colleges . Four departments have received Ohio Board of Regents Academic Challenge grants that supplement ordinary funding in exception al departments for six years . A new building for the Department of Physics and Astronomy opened in 1987. A new building for the Art Department is being planned . DEAN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION The College of Business Administration has 5 departments en rolling more than 3,700 students . It houses an International Busi ness Center, a Small Business Institute , a Center for Labor-Management Cooperation (statefunded), and the Toledo Economic Information System (funded by the city) . Besides the B . B.A. and M . B.A., the college offers a Master of Taxation, M .S. in Accounting, and M .S. and Ph.D. in Manufacturing Manage ment. Two departments have received Academic Challenge grants from the Ohio Board of Regents to supplement ordinary funding in exceptional departments for six years. Stranahan Hall, the home of the College , is three years old . The University of Toledo is the fourth largest public university in Ohio with a total enrollment of 22,806 in eight colleges with 21 doctoral programs, including the J.D . and Pharm . D . It is a mem ber of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges. Candidates should have an earned Ph. D. in one of the dis ciplines in the college, substantial teaching and research ex perienoe, and significant administrative experienoe . They should be prepared to lead the College to continued growth in the quality of instruction and the volume of research. Salary is negotiable. Positions are available July 1 , 1989 . Nominations and applica tions should be sent to : Dr. William N . Free Vice President for Academic Affairs The University of Toledo Toledo , OH 43606 . Arlington County l&l Personnel Office Employment Opportunities 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, VA 22201 Employment Information Job Line TOO (hearing impaired only) . 703-358-3500 703-538-3363 703-284-5521 Equal Opportunity Employer March 6, 1989 VICE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS The University of Toledo The University of Toledo invites applications and nominations for the position of Vice President for University Relations. Founded in 1872, The University of Toledo has been a member of the University system of the State of Ohio sinoe 1967. It is also a member of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges. The University of Toledo enrolls 22,800 un dergraduate and graduate students and employs approximately 1 , 200 full-time and part-time faculty members. The University con sists of seven ' degree-granting colleges (Arts and Scienoes, Busi ness Administration , Education, Engineering, Law , Pharmacy , and University College), a Graduate School which grants doc torates in 21 disciplines, a Community and Technical College (lo cated at the Scott Park Campus), and a Division of Continuing Education . Its 21 0-acre main campus is located in a pleasant residential area on the western edge of the city of Toledo. It also has a modern educational facility that is part of the reoently com pleted SeaGate Centre in downtown Toledo . The Vice President for University Relations will report directly to President Frank E. Horton. The Vioe President for University Rela tions is responsible for such critical matters as development, com munity, media and government relations, publications and alumni affairs. The Vice President also serves as liaison to the University ' s foundation, deals with all matters related to private giving, and serves as the President's senior adviser on develop ment and University relations policies. Candidates for the position are expected to possess an ad vanoed degree and university experience in an appropriate area. The successful candidate must have outstanding communication skills, written and oral, and must possess tact, discretion and sen s i tivity to the complex interactions which exist between the Univer sity community and external constituencies of the University. The candidate must possess organizational skills and competence in working with both internal and external constituencies . Salary and fringe benefits are competitive. The position will remain open until filled. The Search Committee will begin its review of applications on April 8, 1989 . In order to ensure full consideration, nominations and applications should be reoeived before that date . Interested persons should submit a letter indicating an interest in the position, a complete resume and the names, addresses and telephone numbers of at least five references . Applications and nominations should be sent to: Dr. Harold Allen, Vice President for Graduate Studies, Research and Economic Development The University of Toledo 2801 West Bancroft St. Toledo, OH 43606 The University of Toledo is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Ac tion Employer. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED HARTNELL COLLEGE FALL 1989 OPENINGS UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER RESIDENCE HALL DIRECTORS MATRICULATION COUNSELOR, IN STRUCTORS : TWO ENGLISH (one per manent and a one-year sabbatical replacement). ACCOUNTING, OFFICE OCCUPATIONS , MATHEMATICS, ESL. Salary DOE $24,930-$46,298. FFD 4/14/89 . RESPONSIBILITIES : The Hall Director is responsible for the total adm i nistrat i on of 240 650 stu dents in 1 2 residence halls, including training and supervising paraprofessional staff, coordinat ing the student conduct process , facilitating programming, working with student government, and overall management. Hall Directors also have the opportunity for collateral assignments in a Stu dent Affairs area after their first year of employment. HARTNELL COMMUNITY COLLEGE PERSONNEL, 156 Homestead Ave. , Salinas, Calif. 93901, (408) 755-6706 . FAX number (408) 755 -6751. QUALIFICATIONS: The requirement for this position is a Bachelor ' s degree ; however , a Master ' s Degree in Student Personnel or related area and Residence Hall experience is strongly preferred . REMUNERATION : The Hall Director has a twelve month appointment w ith a furnished apart ment, utilities, meal plan, and benefits . The salary is $17,248. EOE/AA APPLICATIONS : Interested candidates should submit a letter of application , resume, all transcripts, and two letters of recommendation to : GENERAL M ANAGER Scott Griesbach Associate Director of Res i dence Life GENERAL MANAGER, SAN FRANCISCO 101 Salisbury Hall BAY AREA RAPID TRANSIT DISTRICT University of Wisconsin-Whitewater (Oakland, CA) Salary open D.O . Q . Position Whitewater, WI 53190 reports to nine-member elected Board of Directors and responsible for managing a We will be interviewing at NASPA and the Oshkosh Placement Exchange . Applications will be 71. 5-mile rail transit system serving 2 . 5 milaccepted until positions are filled . lion people, supervising a workforce of 2,433 employees and overseeing an operating UW-Whitewater is an equal opportunity employer with an affirmative action plan. Women , membudget of $178 million . Desire individual .__..;;be.;;....;rs_o;..f..;;m;..';..n .. or .. ,;,.a_nd.....:...pe_r_s_o_ns_w_it_h_d_isa_b_il,_.tie_s_ar_e_e_n_c_o_ur_a..::g_ed_to__.ap'-'p-ly"-.-------_. with several years of senior level manage ment experience in a comparably sized and organization . Transportation reECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Executive Director/Agency Manager for Non profit organization . Salary range $40 , 000 to $44,340 . Supervising City economic develop ment planning, loan program supervision, redevelopment, commercial area revitalization and other projects , managing contracts with con sultants , writing grant proposals, administer ing grants for economic development projects, providing staff support to community organiza tions and coordinating the financing of projects . Qualifications : Graduate degree in economics , public administration and/or a combination of 3-5 years experience in city planning, busi ness/finance management or economic develop ment/administration . Bilingual English/Spanish preferred . Send resume ASAP to: Robert sanchez , Search Committee Chair, Mission Economic Develop-NATIONAL COUNCIL O F lated experience desirable but not a require,,,, LA RAZJI will be on demonstrated leadership abilities to man a ge a large organization, RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT oversee a major capital program and relate well to an elected public board . Send SPECIALIST resumes in confidence to : KORN/FERRY IN TERNATIONAL , Attn : Jim B. Clarke, 1800 National H i spanic organization seeks Resource Development Specialist to carry out funding source research, write proposals, main t ain accurate proposal and fundin g records , and carry out other assigned duties. Interested applicants must have a BA or experience in related field, strong writing, communication and organizational skills, and ability to work well under pressure and as part of a team . Send resume and writing sample by March 14, 1989 to : Cristina Lopez , Resource Development Coordinator , National Council of La Raza, 810 First St., NE , Third Floor, Washington, D . C . 20002-4205 . Century Park East, 9th Floor , Los Angeles, Calif . 90067 . ANEEO INSTRUCTOR FIRE TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTOR, Rio Hondo College , Whittier , Calif . Full time, tenure track . For information and applica tion, call Jean at (213) 692-0921 ext. 309. EOE ment Assoc . , 987 Valencia Street , San Francis.__ _________________ _... co, CA 9411 0, (415) 282-3334 . ATTORNEY/LOBBYIST $42,000 + DOE Small non-profit legal advocacy organization seeks dynamic Executive Director . Qualifications include: Law degree, substantial experience lob bying on Capitol Hill , commitment to administering and strengthening a national farmworker ad vocacy organization . Fundraising experience highly desirable. DEA'R PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target anational pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report . To place an ad in Marketplace , please call or send your copy to : Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D.C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 . Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p . m . (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES : 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words ; telephone number , 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. Ordered by ______________ _ Organization ______________ _ Street. _________________ _ City, State & Zip ____________ _ DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES : Area Code & Phone _____ . ______ _ Resumes with references to : Search Committee, (ads with borders, varied type Farmworker Justice Fund, P . O . Box 53285, sizes) $45 per column inch. Washington, D.C . 20009 . --------------------------------Hispanic link Weekly Report March 6 , 1989 7

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Arts & Entertainment language version of the Spanish film Women on the Verge of a Ner vous Breakdown. Fonda w ill star in the movie as Pepa, the character played in the orig i nal film by Carmen Maura. An actress being mentioned as possib l e co-star in the film is Sh i rley MacLaine . ONE MORE FOR SANTANA: Shortly after winn ing his first Grammy Award , Carlos Santana was named Mus i cian of the Year at the (San Francisco) Bay Area Music Awards . Santana performed at the BAM Awards ceremony , held at San Francisco ' s Civic Center Auditorium Feb . 25 . Winners were determined by fans ' mail-in ballots. The orig inal Mujeres at borde de un ataque de nervios , written and directed by Pedro Almodovar, is nominated for a foreign language Oscar this year . On Feb. 22 the Mexican guitarist won a Grammy in the "best rock in strumental" category for his album Blues For Salvador . TWO TO TANGO: The creators of Tango Apasionado, the 1987 off Broadway hit based on the works of Argentine writer Jose Luis Borges, have reunited to develop a piece titled Tango/Orfeo . In other awards news, this week New York ' s Asociaci6nde Cronistas deEspectacu/os hands out its own ACE Awards . The play, which sets the myth of Orpheus i n Argentina in the 1870s, is being directed and choreographed by that country's Gracie Ia Daniele . She co-wrote the book with James Lew i s ; lyrics are by William Finn and music by Astor Piazzolla . Awards in more than 60 categories will be announced at a ceremony March 11 at New York ' s Waldorf Astoria Hotel. Specia l , non competi tive ACE's will be awarded to Ruben Blades , Edward James Olmos , Elizabeth Pena, Esaf Morales and Raul Julia FONDA ACQUIRES 'MUJERES': Actress Jane Fonda has acquired the rights for her Fonda Films production company to do an English Tango/Orfeo will premiere in May in Philadelphia , make a stop at the Spoleto Festival USA, then move to California ' s La Jolla Playhouse in July . Media Report VILLANUEVA QUITS KMEX-TV: Daniel Vil lanueva, president and general manager of KMEX-TV in Los Angeles, announced March 1 his retirement, to be effective June 1 . He will cont i nue for two more years in an advisory capacity with Univislon Holdings Inc., parent company of KMEX. He hopes to pur sue o t her personal interests as well, he said. Villanueva i s the second head of a major Los Angeles Span i sh-language television station to res ign in as many months. Frank Cruz , vice president and general manager of KVEA, resigned Feb . 2 . "Villanueva has been a strong voice in the Southern Cal i fornia Hispanic community," sa i d Armando Duron, head of the National Hispanic Media Coalition in Los Angeles. An announcement will be made sometime this week regard i ng Villanueva's replace ment. He says he w ill be consulted and hopes to have an inf l uence on the decision . HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N' St r eet NW Washington , D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher : Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas , Danilo Alfaro, Lui s Restrepo, Mario Santana. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form w i thout advance per mission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word . Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday , will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 8 UNIVISION ANNOUNCES NEW PUBLICATION: Univision Publications an nounced Feb . 21 that its new magazine , Ahara, a general interest Spanish-language quarterly with a controlled circulation of 500 , 000 , will debut in August. The 1 00-page premiere issue will focus on Hispanic personalities , trends in lifestyle and issues of special relevance to U . S . Hispanics. Special sections will feature columns on the law , insurance and medical services . "Our research indicates there is a great op portunity for a quality print vehicle that speaks to readers in Spanish , " said Roger Toll , publisher and editor -inchief . Free one-year subscriptions are available on request by writ ing to Univis ion' s offices at 330 Mad i son Ave ., 26th Floor, New York , N . Y . 10017 . If after the first year response has been favorable, Ahora may convert to paid circula tion, although it would be a "very low fee," said Toll, former editor in-chief of The Mexico City News . The circulat ion base is scheduled to Antonio Mejias-Rentas increase to 580,000 for the winter 1989 issue, 630 , 000 for the spring 1990 issue , and 700,000 for the summer 1990 issue. Circula t ion is guaranteed by Business Publications Aud i t of Circulation . PEPSI TARGETS LATINO YOUTH : During the Grammy Awards Feb . 22, CBS made net work history when it ran the first Span i sh-lan guage commercial on prime time television without the use of subtitles or dubbing . The commercial, an ad for Pepsi , was filmed in Chile and stars 20-year old Puerto Rican singer Chayanne . Peps i hopes the 30 second . commercial, which cost an estimated $600,000 , will pull in young Latinos as well as others of the 50 mil lion viewers who watched the Grammys . Tod MacKenzie , a spokesman for Pepsi , said , " We have always used music to com municate , and we have always looked at the Grammys as an opportunity for innovative ads." Danilo Alfaro .. Congressman, a man who says he's an old friend of yours is here with a housing idea ... March 6 , 1989 H i spanic Link Weekly Report