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Hispanic link weekly report, March 13, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 13, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La.) tells Puerto Rican political leaders that he will introduce this month a bill calling for a plebiscite on the status of the island...Sen. Connie Mack (R-Fla.) calls on the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to free anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch, 61. Bosch, who returned to the United States last year after 11 years imprisonment in Venezuela, has been in custody for violating his parole... Raymond Ehrlich, chief justice of the Florida Supreme Court, honors Miami attorney Rafael Penalver for his pro bono work on behalf of Mariel detainees... Jos§ Garcia De Lara, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, testifies before the U.S. Senate
Judiciary Committee against the nomination of former Education Secretary William Bennett as "drug czar," citing Bennett’s poor record in dealing with Hispanics...San Francisco Police Commission President Louis Giraudo announces meetings on the case of United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta, who was seriously injured by police last year at a protest, will be closed to the public...Juan Mercado, a teacher in an adult center in Wharton, Texas, and Alejandro Torres, a staff sergeant with the U.S. Army in New York, are among the nine people selected from across the nation for the 1989 Outstanding Adult Learner awards...Samuel and Cristina Torres win a $14 million lottery drawing in Illinois and form a family partnership to split the winnings with their relatives...

Cross-Cultural Adoption Numbers, Debates On the Rise
The number of Latino children who are eligible for adoption or are in foster care in the United States is increasing, while the number of adoptable non-Hispanic white infants is dwindling, causing Anglo couples to consider adoption of Latino infants more and more. Latin America is providing such couples with a growing number of babies.
This combination of trends has created a new series of predicaments for social policy makers, as well as for Hispanic community advocates and the children themselves.
As with blacks and Native Americans, the question is being raised whether these children should be entrusted to adults who are
not sensitive to their culture or are unprepared to deal with prejudice, particularly against those boys and girls who are dark-skinned.
But perhaps the biggest problem of all is collecting facts and statistics to help officials and other concerned parties determine what, if anything, they should do.
"The problem we have with the Hispanic adoption issue is a terrible lack of data," admits Jeff Rosenberg, director of adoption services for the National Committee for Adoptions. "A lot of people don’t want the data because it’s so politically hot. Even when we get decent data, it’s pretty much black and white."
Hispanic Leaders Support John Tower
The leaders of 18 Hispanic organizations met at the White House March 6 with President Bush and his chief of staff John Sununu, to express their support for the beleaguered John Tower’s confirmation as secretary of defense.
"Tower has always been supportive of the Hispanic community," said Hector Barreto, chairman emeritus of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Barreto mentioned Tower’s pledge to Hispanics in 1984 to threaten to filibuster the Simpson-Mazzoli immigration bill. Among those attending the meeting were Barreto, Mario Diaz, chairman of the American G.l. Forum, Cathi Villalpando, chairman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, Jackie Tillman, executive director of the Cuban American National Foundation, Pedro Viera, president of National SER-Jobs for Progress, and Rey Maduro, a member of the board of directors of the National Puerto Rican Coalition.
The leaders said they initiated the hourlong meeting, at which they discussed strategies to salvage the former Texas senator’s nomination. They said they would urge members of their respective organizations to call and send telegrams to their senators.
"It’ll be an uphill battle," conceded Diaz, "but it’s not over 'til it’s over."
Asked whether supporting Tower is important to the Hispanic community, Barreto said, "The
president is the president of all Americans in the United States, and we must support him." At press time, the Senate was expected to reject the Tower nomination.
— Danilo Alfaro
Collection of cross-cultural adoption figures varies widely from state to state — even from county to county — as do definitions of what constitutes an adoptable child.
According to American Public Welfare Association figures, in 1985 there were at least 36,000 children available for adoption. An estimated half of them were minority.
Toshi Tatara, director of research for APWA, works with sometimes incomplete data submitted by about 38 states through the Voluntary Cooperative Information System. He estimates there were 280,000 foster children in the United States in 1986.
Latino children make up 11% of the nation’s youngsters. If they are represented proportionately, there would be about 4,000 waiting for adoption. Tatara says another 30,000 are in foster care.
In the past, Latino children without parents to care for them were taken in by other family members, but this practice may be less com-continued on page 2
46% of Latino Voters Turn Out in 1988
Hispanic voter turnout dropped slightly in the November 1988 general election compared to the 1984 election, going from 48% to 46%, according to figures in a report released March 8 by the U.S. Census Bureau.
groups like the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials for their efforts to help naturalize Latinos who are not citizens, but he said more needs to be done.
— FekPetez
The decrease in voter participation occurred among all voters. Observers attributed the downturn to the lack of interest generated by the George Bush-Michael VOTING AND REGISTRATION NOVEMBER 1988 (numbers in thousands)
Dukakis race. Total Registered Voted
Bob Brischetto, director of the Southwest Latinos 8,078 57% 46%
Voter Research Institute, criticized the Cen- Male 3,851 56 46
sus Bureau for inaccurately pegging the Female 4,227 58 46
Latino voter turnout at an artificially low level. Blacks 18,969 67 53
He said that because 37% of the Latino Male 8,381 64 51
voting-age population is ineligible to vote, it Female 9,580 77 62
is incorrect to factor them into the Hispanic Whites 145,999 71 62
voting rate. The Census did not exclude this Male 69,692 70 61
population when it reported widely that only Female 76,308 72 63
29% of voting-age Hispanics cast their bal- All 168,495 70 61
lots. — Latinos can be of any race.
"The picture the Census Bureau paints is misleading," said Brischetto. He lauded
Source: The U.S. Census Bureau’s * Voting and Registration in the November 1988 Election*


Rift Increases Over Bonuses for LA. Bilingual Teachers
An initiative to rescind bonuses for the Los Angeles Unified School District’s 4,000 bilingual teachers has resulted in a bitter and divisive controversy. A vote on the initiative will be held by April 9.
The effort is spearheaded by Learning English Advocates Drive, a group of teachers seeking to reform the bilingual education system in the district.
The campaign has become increasingly venomous, with barbs being swapped publi-cally by each side. Initially, union leadership had been quiet on the issue, but Wayne Johnson, president of the 22,000-member United Teachers-Los Angeles announced March 2 that he would oppose the effort.
"It has become very political, very emotional and very nasty,” said Johnson.
Sally Peterson, president and founder of Learning English Advocates, said the group supports bilingual education. "We have been branded as anti- Hispanic, but we are not anti anything," she said. "We love all our kids. We just want to help all kids reach their greatest potential."
Michael Genzuk, director of legislative affairs for the California Association for Bilingual Education, says that Peterson's group is opposed to minority empowerment. "They have an agenda of covert racism," he said. "They are trying to eliminate bilingual education." Genzuk also charged that Learning English Advocates was funded by U.S. English, a charge Peterson denied. She said that although U.S. English had provided “support and advice," the group was funded by its 20,000 members.
Supporters of the referendum feel that it is unfair for some teachers to receive annual bonuses of up to $5,000 while others do not. Opponents say that the bonuses are essential if the district is to attract and keep qualified bilingual teachers. Los Angeles has an estimated 160,000 limited-English-proficient students, most of whom are Latino.
Peterson, a kindergarten teacher in Sun Valley, said that under the current system of bilingual education, almost $20 million is spent annually on Spanish-language maintenance rather than English development. "Some Hispanic leaders, for some vested reason, have left the academic arena and entered one of business and industry," she accused.
— Danilo Alfaro
Lack of Data Fuels Cross-Cultural Adoption Controversy
continued from page 1
mon today as the Hispanic family unit gives way under the weight of urban living. In 1986, the out-of-wedlock childbearing rate was 22.8% for Latinas, nearly double that of Anglo women.
In 1987, 10,097 children were adopted from overseas, with a growing number — 20% — coming from Latin America.
Ernesto Loperena, director of the New York Council on Adoptable Children, which has placed 1,300 children since its inception in 1972, says, "In many places, Hispanics are not being identified as such. We find them adopted by white families if they are light-skinned and black families if they’re dark-skinned."
States such as Massachusetts and Pennsylvania keep no adoption records at all on Hispanic children.
Collecting statistics is complicated by a boom in privately arranged adoptions. This may account for as many as half of all adoptions today.
Additionally, poorly kept local records affect the accuracy of state records. Another adoption expert reports that there are times when the name on a birth certificate is clearly Latino, but records kept by the county may indicate there have been no adoptions of Hispanic children.
Colorado provides a typical example of poor record-keeping. In 1986, 13 counties in the state placed 63 Hispanic children, but the state has no record of the background of the adoptive parents.
Congress has mandated that a standardization of this data take place before 1991. "We set up a technical advisory committee and debated about data elements each state should provide. We spent many hours on race categories; it’s a large headache," says Victor Flango, who heads the Adoption Information Improvement Project of the National Center for State Courts. The organization has a federal grant to study the problem and submit recommendations to Congress.
Of the more than 60,000 children in California foster care programs, 21% are Hispanic, but there are no figures indicating the ethnicity of foster parents, according to Linda McMahon, director of the California Department of Social Services.
In fiscal year 1987-88, there were 528 adoptions in Los Angeles. California law says foster parents have first preference in the adoption of a child who has lived with them. This contributes to cross-cultural adoptions, according
Poll: Chicago Latinos Back Daley 3-1
Nearly three-quarters of Hispanics in Chicago cast their votes for mayoral candidate Richard Daley in that city's Feb. 28 Democratic primary, according to an exit poll by the Midwest/Nor-theast Voter Registration Education Project. Of the 1,244 Hispanic voters interviewed, 878 said they voted for Daley, Illinois state's attorney and winner of the primary, and 366 voted for incumbent Eugene Sawyer.
The poll showed that support for Daley did not vary by Hispanic subgroup. It found Hispanic support for the two candidates for to be:
Puerto Ricans Daley 420 Sawyer 159
Mexicans 276 124
Cubans 62 24
Central Ams. 33 18
South Ams. 42 14
Other 45 27
Puerto Ricans accounted for 44% of the voters interviewed, Mexican Americans 32% and Cubans 7%. Hispanics make up roughly 9% of Chicago’s registered voters.
— Mario Santana
to Barbara Medina Ahmed, Los Angeles County deputy Children’s Services administrator.
The county has been working on finding more Hispanic foster and adoptive homes. Officials say they need to double the 3,822 licensed foster homes, only 676 of which are Latino. Each month 450 of the 1,200 children taken into protective custody are Latino.
"The concern would be that the adoptive family is sensitive to the child's background. Our concern is also the community and how the family will help the child handle prejudice," says Ahmed.
Placement of Hispanic children with parents of a different ethnicity "is a placement of last resort" in New York City, according to Loperena. Currently there are 24,000 children in foster care there — 60% black, 25% Hispanic. Of all children in the city’s foster care system, 3,822 have been made available for adoption.
Keeping track of the number of mixed-culture adoptions becomes more important as the number of minority children entering the foster care system grows. The number of children becoming wards of New York City grew 26% last year. Ninety percent of them were Hispanic and black.
One factor in the city’s growing pool of children is the 76,500 reported cases of child abuse and neglect in 1987 — a 72% increase since 1976. In 1986 and 1987, 4,084 drug-addicted babies were born in the city.
Although much research has been conducted on trans-racial adoption, few studies have looked at the results of adoptions of Latino children by Anglo parents. Richard Barth, a University of California at Berkeley researcher, says there is no solid evidence on the effect of such adoptions on the children. But, he adds, "To resign kids to foster care because they don’t have a family available that matches is cruel."
— Sophia Nieves
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2
March 13,1989


Sophia Nieves
Cross-Cultural Adoptions —
Increasing cross-cultural adoptions of Latin American children by Anglo parents have heightened the debate over whether these parents are equipped to teach their brown-skinned children about Indo-Hispanic culture and prepare them for the world outside their Anglo-Saxon homes. Experts and parents choose sides, sometimes clinging obstinately to their views.
Ernesto Loperena, who runs a New York City-based adoption agency, says love and good intentions are not enough. "We live in a racist society,” he maintains. "The parents don’t have the background to provide these children with the defense mechanisms to venture forth in this society.”
Of 10,097 children adopted from overseas in 1987, an estimated 20% were from Latin America. Mexico, Guatemala, Colombia and Honduras provided most of them. The numbers are growing.
Sixty percent of these children are placed through licensed agencies working with foreign counterparts. The remainder are obtained through private attorneys or unlicensed persons or groups.
ARE PARENTAL EFFORTS ENOUGH?
Carolyn Jones, a soft-spoken 19-year-old who carries herself with a dignity beyond her years, came to the United States from Costa Rica as a 10-year-old along with two siblings, one younger, one older.
Her first adoption into an Anglo home was a disaster. Jones rebelled against attempts to keep her from speaking Spanish to her sister and brother. A second adoption was successful, but it separated her from her natural family. Her siblings were not comfortable in either world and as teen-agers became estranged from their adoptive family.
When Jones speaks of her recommendations to parents who adopt children of a different ethnic background, her mild manner slips away, replaced by a tone that betrays a trace of bitterness.
"You need to remember where he or she is from," she says. "My first family never listened. You have to have freedom to learn about the culture."
Injurious or Inconsequential?
Juanita McKenna, a Broward County, Fla., resident with nine adopted kids, including one toddler from South America, disagrees that cultural clash is inevitable. "I have children of different ethnic backgrounds," says McKenna. "I never think of talking to the others about their English heritage."
Cheryl Adkins, whose forebears are from Eastern Europe, and her attorney husband Ed are trying a different tack. They live near Annapolis, Md., which has no Hispanic community, but she dismisses the view that their culture will displace the culture of their children. Holly, 7, and Susan, 6, were adopted from Chile as infants.
"That’s the old melting pot theory. We feel an obligation to pay attention to their heritage," she argues. Susan and Holly have visited Chile and a second trip with both sets of biological grandparents is being planned.
"My husband and I are taking Spanish right now. One daughter began Spanish classes last year. We will be a bilingual family," she vows.
Will the efforts of parents such as the Adkinses be enough once the children pass into their teens? Opinions run the gamut.
CHILDREN UNDERGO STRESS Jean Erichsen, president of Los Ninos International, an adoption agency in Austin, Texas, has 15-year-old twin daughters adopted from Colombia. The family moved to Austin from Minnesota, where Tatiana and Rosana were "exotic and singled out for preferential treatment." In Texas the girls adopted much of the Mexican culture of their peers to the point where they pretended to be Mexican American.
Usual growing pains coupled with cultural identity problems made junior high school a stressful time for Jean and her husband, Heino, and the girls. "They’ve been raised in an Anglo-Saxon home by Anglo-Saxon parents, but they look different,” says Mrs. Erichsen. "For several years they were embarrassed to bring people home."
The stance of the National Committee for Adoption is that racially and culturally matched families are the most desirable. But Jeff Rosenberg, the group's director for adoption services, dismisses theories that hold cross-cultural adoptions to be harmful.
"That’s bunk,” says Rosenberg. "There's been no research that shows it doesn’t work. It shows the kids grow up just fine."
(Sophia Nieves until recently was a reporter with Weekly Report.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
GO NORTH (OR ANYWHERE BUT HERE): What’s the "whitest" border city in the USA? The nomination of the Los Angeles Times is San Diego.
In a Feb. 27 article on racial tensions there, the Times notes that 9% of San Diego’s 1.1 million population is black, and its Latino percentage is approaching dpuble that. The black percentage is much smaller than that found in any U.S. city of comparable size, it observes.
San Diego has long had a reputation as a community where people of color would be encouraged, subtly if not overtly, to keep on truckin’ north.
Its eight-member city council, seven-member port commission, and the five-member county board of supervisors have no Hispanic members. At present, there is one black member on the council and one on the county board.
CULTURE LESSON: In its Feb. 13 "Special Report on Marketing to Hispanics," Advertising Age carried a lengthy piece describing a creative ad campaign Johnson Wax used to introduce “Future" floor polish to Spanish-speaking Latinas in Miami and New York.
The 30-second spot shows a Latina "standing on her clean but dull kitchen floor,” the mag explains. The Latina’s spirits pick up dramatically as she douses her floor with "Future,” and the ad asks: “We know your floors are clean, but do they shine?"
In the final shot, describes account manager Peter McClure, the approving husband leaps in the air and cries," jResalta/" — Outstanding!
Then Peter explains to us, "We tried to tap into gender roles and reflect-Hispanic ethics where approval of spouse is important."
Pedro, please stay out of my kitchen. In fact, please stay out of my house.
JUDGE NOT...: During the 1987 robbery trial otcubano Fernando Hernandez, Dade Circuit Judge Milton Friedman chastised a prospective Latina juror whose English was imperfect: ”l went to the trouble of going to school to learn Spanish, but the Spanish won't go and learn English."
Defendant Hernandez had asked for an interpreter; during the trial the judge related how he "took care of” another Hispanic who he said falsely claimed he couldn’t speak English.
Then, when a juror questioned whether Friedman might be prejudiced, the judge responded: "I don’t want you to get the wrong impression. Last night I had a Spanish dinner."
The jury found Hernandez guilty and Friedman sentenced him to seven years in prison.
Last month, reported The Miami Herald, an appeal court accused Friedman of "anti-Hispanic comments" and decided that Hernandez is entitled to a new trial.
— KayBarbaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
March 13,1989
3


RaulYzaguirre
Blacks and Latinos Must Talk
Miami’s recent riots are only the tip of the iceberg in a growing interminority hostility that threatens to pit blacks against Hispanics. The United States’ two largest ethnic minorities have much in common — a concern for civil rights guarantees and an expanding economy, better education and housing. But these common interests are being eclipsed by regrettable episodes in Miami.
Blacks and Hispanics have clashed in other cities. Yet Miami’s situation is advanced in one respect. There, Hispanics have forged the city’s dominant power structure in the span of a single generation. Today, Nicaraguan and other Central American refugees are pouring into the area, hoping to join this largely Cuban American success story.
Blacks see this influx as detrimental to their interests. They see these new immigrants following the historical patterns of the Irish, Italian and Polish, who faced discrimination early on, overcame it and entered the white mainstream, leaving blacks at the bottom of the social structure. Blacks in Miami see themselves being leapfrogged by yet another wave of white immigration.
Hispanics, more oriented to culture than race, see U.S. blacks as Anglos or English-speaking Protestants with values similar to other North Americans. Hispanics consider themselves a multiracial culture, blending African, European and American Indian bloodlines. While Hispanic history includes oppression, Hispanics are less likely to recognize the racial segregationist undertones of North America’s otherwise modern society.
RACIAL HATRED ERASES PROGRESS
Put bluntly, blacks look at Hispanics and see honkies, Hispanics look at blacks and see gringos.
Back in the 1970s, I co-chaired, along with the late Carl Holman of the National Urban Coalition, the National Commission of the Concerns of Hispanics and Blacks. It was a frustrating experience because I often felt the two groups were competing on a misery index. Whose per capita income is lowest? Whose children drop out of school in greater numbers? Whose illiteracy rate is highest? Frankly, this is not the sort of competition I want to win.
Despite a glossy surface, the 1980s have been dangerous times. Growing gaps between rich and poor, blacks and whites, Hispanics and Anglos threaten the fabric of our life. Racial hatred festering between Hispanics and blacks can only serve to hold the two groups down and erase progress made in previous eras.
BLACK HISPANICS CAN BE CRUCIAL
As fellow minorities, we must resist infighting and the tendencies of the mainstream media to exacerbate the Miami riots into a purely black-versus-Hispanic rivalry. Segregated schools and public facilities were 'facts of life in the South long before Hispanic immigrants arrived.
Leadership on the part of the black and Hispanic communities is needed more than ever. Perhaps it’s time to resurrect the Commission on the Concerns of Hispanics and Blacks. Only this time, let’s focus on our mutual interests, not our differences.
Black Hispanics can play a crucial role in this process. An estimated 1.5 million Americans, often from Caribbean backgrounds, are the products of both Hispanic and black cultures. In the past, their dual ethnic heritages too often were overlooked in the rush to pigeonhole human beings into narrow demographic categories. Today, their leadership is needed to give blacks and Hispanics a focal point in our efforts to understand the roots of the Miami riots.
The riots may be the first evidence of long-lingering tensions between blacks and Hispanics, but politically and economically speaking, both groups are in the same boat.
(Raul Yzaguirre is president of the National Council of La Raza.)
4 March
FeixPerez
The Duke of Civil Rights
Recently, while mindlessly switching channels on my TV to find a program that would help me fall asleep, I stumbled across David Duke, the handsome 38-year-old elected last month to the Louisiana state legislature.
Mr. Duke, the topic that night on Nightline, and his victory in Metairie, a suburb of New Orleans, were the subjects of international media attention. The faint possibility that a former Ku r . TqHMMMj Klux Klan imperial wizard and neo-Nazi could be elected to office nearly twenty-five years W after PSSsaQ® of the Civil Rights Act drew the
M attention of many.
Bib TW I followed with great interest Mr. Duke’s ut-terances and the developments in his race. Very few people, thought Mr. Duke had a *■*' * I chance to wi n.
As I sat listening to Mr. Duke that evening, my jjf initial reaction was anger, but it soon turned to fright.
I was upset that Mr. Duke now had a national forum from which to preach his outdated and dangerous philosophy, that he was made to appear the misunderstood underdog by the overagressive Morton Dean, Ted Koppel’s replacement that evening.
I was frightened Mr. Duke would legitimize and bring out into the open the mentality of people who had up to now kept under wraps beliefs similar to his.
DUKE — A DEMOCRATIC GODSEND Despite all this, I found myself developing a certain awe for the telegenic Louisianan. His ability to deflect questions, his composure under what for all intents and purposes was a journalistic ambush and his gift at dressing his racism in eloquent and logical-sounding language was commendable.
During the show’s first commercial, my phone rang. It was my friend Charles. He wanted to make sure I was watching Mr. Duke. We hurriedly compared observations, not wanting to miss a second of the program.
I called Charles after the show and told him I couldn’t believe how personable and persuasive Mr. Duke was. I was caught completely off guard by his polished, Madison Avenue approach. Mr. Duke, I said, would do more to persuade people straddling the fence over affirmative action than any Supreme Court decision. On and on I went, expressing utter disbelief at what I had just witnessed.
Charles erupted in laughter.
David Duke will do more to draw people to the Democratic Party than a "hundred Jesse Jacksons," he said. A staunch Democrat, Charles thought it the height of hypocrisy that GOP leaders, especially Ronald Reagan, were feverishly trying to distance themselves from Mr. Duke when it was the agenda they followed for the past nine years that gave rise to him. It was they, argued Charles, who made affirmative action a dirty word.
BUSH FANNED RACIAL FEARS Just look at the campaign Bush ran, he pointed out. Bush, after all, saw nothing wrong with using black convict Willie Horton to broadside Michael Dukakis and in the process fan fears about race and crime.
Mr. Duke, said my friend, was simply being straightforward and voicing some thoughts that many conservative Republicans had harbored for years.
There was much truth to what Charles said. I agreed that the Republican Party had brought racial politics into vogue, that Reagan had set back the clock on civil rights 20 years. Charles was also right in feeling that Mr. Duke was a boon for the Democratic Party.
But when all the political games are over and done, it will not be the Henry Cisneroses or Jesse Jacksons who will feel the sting and humiliation of the racist actions of the Dukes of this world. It is you and I who will pay the price.
(Felix Perez serves as editor of Hispanic Link Weekly Report.)
13,1989 Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
The following are some agencies, organizations and publications that can be consulted for further information regarding cross-cultural adoption.
Adoption Counseling Organization and Resource Network (ACORN), 9650 Santiago Road, Suite 102, Columbia, Md. 21045 (301) 997- 5772
Adoption Information Improvement Project, National Center for State Courts, 300 Newport Ave., Williamsburg, Va. 23187 (804) 253-2000
ADOPTION FACTS: "The 1989 Adoption Factbook," to be issued by the National Committee for Adoption, will be available this spring. The cost is $25 plus $5 for postage and handling. To receive a copy, write NCA, 193017th St. NW, Washington D.C. 20009 (202) 328-1200.
American Adoption Agency, 1228 M St. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 638-1543
Biracial Adoptive and Natural Children (BRANCH), P.O. Box 50051, Lighthouse Point, Fla. 33074 (305) 781-6798 Families Adopting Children Everywhere (FACE), P.O. Box 28058, Northwood Station, Baltimore, Md. 21239 (301) 239-4252 Hispanic Advocacy and Resource Center (HARC), 2488 Grand Concourse, Suite 413, Bronx, N.Y. 10458 (212) 733-1200/1202
Los Ninos International, 1110 William Cannon, Suite 404, Austin, Texas 78745 (512) 443-2833
New York Council on Adoptable Children, 666 Broadway, Suite 820, New York, N.Y. 10012 (212) 475-0222
SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN: "The CAP Book" is a two-volume, nationwide listing of adoptable special-needs children updated biweekly. The children, whose photos are included, are among the most difficult to place because of age, mental and physical handicaps, or siblings with whom they must be placed. Availability for cross-cultural placement is dependent on individual state policies. The book is available by sending $55 to Children Awaiting Adoptive Parents (CAP), 700 Exchange St., Rochester, N.Y. 14608 (716) 232-5110.
VOTING AND REGISTRATION: "Voting and Registration in the Election of November 1988 (Advance Report)'1 is a 10-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that gives ethnic and racial statistics on voting patterns from November 1988 elections. To receive a copy (specify Series P-20, No. 435), write Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 782-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
CONNECTING
FORD SUPPORTS PLAYWRIGHTS ArtePublico Press of the University of Houston has begun accepting plays for consideration for its Hispanic Playwright Series publications, it was announced Feb. 15. The publication will be funded by a two-year, $133,426 grant from the Ford Foundation.
During the two-year period, Arte Publico will publish twelve collections of plays by Hispanics, including a collection by Luis Valdez, director of the movies Zoot Suit and La Bamba, a Cuban American theater anthology and a Mexican American drama anthology.
The submissions being sought will be for four of the 12 collections. Anyone interested in submitting their work should do so as soon as possible. Send them, along with a self-addressed, stamped envelope, to Nicolas KaneWos, Arte Publico Press, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-2090 (713) 749-4768.
STUDENT CENTERS OPEN
In an effort to increase the rates at which Hispanic students graduate from high school, enroll in and graduate from college, three San An-tonio-area centers,offering tutoring to children in kindergarten through the eighth grade, opened their doors March 6.
Serving students in the Harlandale, San Antonio and Edgewater school districts, the students are offered tutoring in all subjects, particularly math and reading. All tutoring is done by volunteers.
The students are identified and referred to the centers by their teachers. They receive at least one hour of tutoring per week.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Jose Quintero, recognized as one of the eminent theater directors in the United States, is appointed to the first Wortham Chair of the Performing Arts at the University of Houston Drama Department. Quintero has had 50 productions on and off Broadway and has won two Tony Awards...
University of California at Santa Barbara Chancellor Barbara Uehling announces the appointment of Ernest Lopez as assistant vice chancellor for public affairs. L6pez had been serving as director of public affairs at the office of the president of the University of California at Berkeley...
The National Conference of Puerto Rican Women opened its first office March 1. The office, located at 5 Thomas Circle, National City Christian Church, Washington, D.C. 20005, will be headed by Edna Laverdi, formerly with the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, until an executive director is named. The telephone is (202) 393-1604...
Calendar____________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regarding your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
THE HISPANIC ELDERLY North Bergen, N.J. March 16 The New Jersey chapter of the National Hispanic Council on Aging and the Hispanic Women’s Resource Center of Catholic Community Services are sponsoring a conference Hispanic Link Weekly Report
titled 'The Hispanic Elderly: Issues and Expectations in the New Decade." The conference will focus on current legislative proposals, social policies and budgetary implications relevant to the elderly population. Mercedes Gil (201) 866-3208
YOUTH PROFESSIONALS CONFERENCE New Orleans March 19-22 The National Youth Professionals’ Institute is holding its 15th annual conference. "Strategies for Working With At-Risk Youth" is the theme of this year’s event. Workshops will be held on dropout prevention, motivation, management techniques and professional survival skills, as well as discussions of critical youth problems such as unemployment and teen pregnancy.
Delores Parker 1-800-424-9105
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
Mesa, Ariz. March 19-22
The National Migrant Head Start Directors As-
March 13,1989
sociation is sponsoring its 18th annual convention. Exhibitors will display materials, publications or other products and information relevant to the areas of handicapped, health, nutrition, management, training, administration, education, social services and parental involvement pertaining to early childhood education. Assorted workshops and seminars will also be held.
Issac Salcido (602) 231-0967
COMING SOON
PROCUREMENT SEMINAR
Latin American Manufacturers Association Washington, D.C. March 21, 22 Eva De Luna (202) 546-3803
EDUCATION CONFERENCE
National School Boards Association Anaheim, Calif. April 1-4 Phil Smith (703) 838-6722
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I iAi |1 UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - WHITEWATER
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DIRECTOR OF UNIVERSITY SERVICES
UNIVERSTIY OF WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER
The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater is seeking a Director of University Services. The position manages the University Services Department, which consists of campus procurement, stores, central receiving, property management, mailroom, duplicating and transportation. Specific duties include:
— Direct a full-time staff of 12 people plus student labor.
— Manage annual revenue-producing budgets of $1,200,000 and general purpose supply/expense budgets of $200,000.
— Establish and administer department operating policies and procedures.
— Assure that all operations comply with appropriate federal, state and campus policies, regulations and guidelines.
— Consult with the campus, UW-System and Department of Administration regarding services provided by the department.
— Direct department computer automation.
Minimum requirements are a B.A. in Business Administration, seven to ten years work experience and at least two years of supervisory experience. Exposure to purchasing, contract management or stores operations in a university setting is highly desirable.
Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience. Send a letter of application, current resume and unofficial transcripts to Thomas R. Lauer, Executive Director of General Services, 500 N. Fremont Street, Whitewater, Wisconsin 53190.
Affirmative Action Plan; therefore, women, minorities, Vietnam-era veterans and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.
HARTNELL COLLEGE FALL 1989 OPENINGS
MATRICULATION COUNSELOR, INSTRUCTORS: TWO ENGLISH (one permanent and a one-year sabbatical replacement). ACCOUNTING, OFFICE OCCUPATIONS, MATHEMATICS, ESL Salary DOE $24,930-$46,298. FFD 4/14/89.
HARTNELL COMMUNITY COLLEGE PERSONNEL, 156 Homestead Ave., Salinas, Calif. 93901, (408) 755-6706. FAX number (408) 755-6751.
EOE/AA
TENURE TRACK POSITIONS IN MARKETING
The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater is accepting applications for tenure track positions in marketing for Fall 1989. A doctorate or ABD from an AACSB school is required for assistant, associate, or full professor positions. MBA from an AACSB school will be considered for teach-- ing staff positions.
Submit letter of application, transcripts, three current references and complete vitae to: Chairman, Department of Marketing, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, Wl 53190.
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER
RESIDENCE HALL DIRECTORS
RESPONSIBILITIES: The Hall Director is responsible for the total administration of 240-650 students in 1-2 residence halls, including training and supervising paraprofessional staff, coordinating the student conduct process, facilitating programming, working with student government, and overall management. Hall Directors also have the opportunity for collateral assignments in a Student Affairs area after their first year of employment.
QUALIFICATIONS: The requirement for this position is a Bachelor's degree; however, a Master’s Degree in Student Personnel or related area and Residence Hall experience is strongly preferred.
REMUNERATION: The Hall Director has a twelve-month appointment with a furnished apartment, utilities, meal plan, and benefits. The salary is $17,248.
APPLICATIONS: Interested candidates should submit a letter of application, resume, all transcripts, and two letters of recommendation to:
Scott Griesbach
Associate Director of Residence Life 101 Salisbury Hall University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Whitewater, Wl 53190
We will be interviewing at NASPA and the Oshkosh Placement Exchange. Applications will be accepted until positions are filled.
UW-Whitewater is an equal opportunity employer with an affirmative action plan. Women, members of minority groups, and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.
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March 13,1989
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
ARLINGTON COUNTY, VIRGINIA
PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT
FIREFIGHTER TRAINEE
No. 5212-9A-FIR Salary: $22,798
Trainee level position leading into the Firefighter position after completion of Trainee Program. Learns and performs firefighting and prevention in a combination of classroom and on-the-job training. Operates apparatus and equipment at emergency scenes. Employee works a 24-hour shift reporting at 7:00 a.m. and is on call in the fire station during that shift.
Requires high school diploma, GED or equivalent; 18 years old by 6/10/89; good physical condition.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 pm on APRIL 6,1989. To request application material please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD (703) 284- 5521 (hearing impaired only).
Arlington County Personnel Department
2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, VA 22201
EOE/MFH
GENERAL MANAGER
Pacifica Radio is accepting applications for the General Manager position at WBAI-FM in New York City. Starting salary is $30k/year plus benefits. WBAI broadcasts with 50,000 watts and seeks to serve a multi-ethnic community not served by other broadcast media. Extensive experience is required in management of community radio or progressive organizations. Skills sought include fiscal planning, personnel management, fundraising expertise, and administrative leadership. Familiarity with the political and cultural communities in New York is desired.
Applicants should send a resume and letter of interest to David Salniker, Executive Director, Pacifica Foundation, 2207 Shat-tuck Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 94704.
DEADLINE: April 15.
GENERAL MANAGER BAY AREA RAPID TRANSIT
GENERAL MANAGER, SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA RAPID TRANSIT DISTRICT (Oakland, CA) Salary open D.O.Q. Position reports to nine-member elected Board of Directors and responsible for managing a 71.5-mile rail transit system serving 2.5 million people, supervising a workforce of 2,433 employees and overseeing an operating budget of $178 million. Desire individual with several years of senior level management experience in a comparably sized and complex organization. Transportation-related experience desirable but not a requirement.
Emphasis will be on demonstrated leadership abilities to manage a large organization, oversee a major capital program and relate well to an elected public board. Send resumes in confidence to:
KORN/FERRY INTERNATIONAL, Attn: Jim B. Clarke,
1800 Century Park East,
9th Floor,
Los Angeles, Calif. 90067. AAJEEO
FULL TIME INSTRUCTORS SOLANO COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Openings in Business, Fire Technology, Mathematics, Ship Building, Nursing, English, Physical Education/Basketball Coach.
For full details contact: Personnel Office, Solano Community College (707) 864-7128.
Solano Community College is located in the San Francisco Bay area,
INSTRUCTOR
FIRE TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTOR, Rio Hondo College, Whittier, Calif. Full time, tenure track. For information and application, call Jean at (213) 692-0921 ext. 309. EOE
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PACIFICA RADIO WITH VISION
RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST
National Hispanic organization seeks Resource Development Specialist to carry out funding source research, write proposals, maintain accurate proposal and funding records, and carry out other assigned duties. Interested applicants must have a BA or experience in related field, strong writing, communication and organizational ^skills, and ability to work well under pressure and as part of a team.
Send resume and writing sample by March 14, 1989 to: Cristina Lopez, Resource Development Coordinator, National Council of La Raza, 810 First St., NE, Third Floor, Washington, D.C. 20002-4205.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Ordered by__
Organization_
Street
City, State & Zip_
Area Code & Phone
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
March 13,1989
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Arts & Entertainment
ACTORS PROTEST SPANISH WAIVER: A group of Latino actors who are members of the Screen Actors Guild are protesting the union’s decision to grant a salary minimum waiver to the producers of a new Spanish-language series.
The SAG granted the waiver to Genesis International, producer of the daytime syndicated series The Judge and its new Spanish-language clone, El juez. Under waiver provisions, the producers were allowed to employ SAG members at $250 per day — lower than the SAG minimum of $398. Genesis has completed filming 26 episodes of El juez — with Rene Enriquez in the title role — that were ordered by the Univision network and are intended to air this spring.
In negotiations with the SAG, Genesis claimed that it could not afford to pay the minimum to Hispanic actors because of the low fees being paid to them by Univision. The SAG said it allowed the waiver because of the ongoing threat of “runaway" productions and the low
employability of Hispanic actors. The waiver agreement was reached after negotiations that included several Hispanic SAG members.
A dissenting group, however, is questioning the negotiation procedure and is requesting to address the union at its board meeting, slated for March 13.
GOYA SINGS: In anticipation of a probable Broadway run, an album including various songs from the musical Goya, A Life In Song was released earlier this month.
The recording, on the CBS Masterworks label, features Placido Domingo singing the lead role of Francisco de Goya, the 18th century Spanish master. The LP also includes a song recorded by Gloria Es-tefan—who sings the female lead role, Duquesa de Alba, in a Spanish-language version of the album to be released by Discos CBS. Dionne Warwick sings the Duquesa de Alba role in English, a duet titled Till I Loved You. The duet has bas been recorded in Portuguese, with Brazilian pop star Simone, and in Japanese, with singer Seiko Matsuda.
Casting for the Broadway production has not been announced yet. It is unlikely that Domingo will sing the role on the stage.
— Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
AIDS EDUCATION CAMPAIGN: The U S. Department of Health and Human Services, along with the Public Health Service and the Centers for Disease Control, has prepared a diverse series of Spanish-language public service announcements as part of their national campaign, America Responds to AIDS. The campaign is designed to educate the public about the Human Immunodeficiency Virus and AIDS. The PSAs are available to TV, radio and print media.
The CDC has prepared a 25-page brochure containing the copy of the TV and radio ads as well as illustrations of the various print executions that are available. A free copy of the booklet may be obtained by writing the National AIDS Information Clearinghouse, P.O. Box 6003, Rockville, Md., 20850, or by calling 1-800-458-5231.
HISPANIC MARKETING SURVEY RESULTS: Hispanics are now the "hot" con-
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
sumer group, taking the place that blacks once occupied in the minds of corporate America, according to a survey released Feb. 23.
The survey of 107 advertising executives from top U.S. consumer products and services companies revealed that 35% consider Hispanics to be the most important racial or ethnic market segment, followed by blacks (32%) and Asians (5%). In addition, 40% of advertisers said they market specifically to Hispanics, while only a quarter do so to blacks. Vitt Media International, a New York media planning and buying company, conducted the survey last year.
Respondents cited brand loyalty, Hispanic media’s efficiency in providing an exclusive audience, and the increase in population and disposable income as the reasons Hispanics edged out blacks.
The full results of the survey are published in the winter 1989 Vitt Monitor. For a free copy, write to John Power at Vitt Media International, 1114 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10036.
TRAINING PROGRAMS: Greater Media Inc. has announced its 1989 Minority Internship in Media Careers program. The company will award a one-year salaried employment contract, along with a $5,000 stipend, to one intern beginning in July.
Eligiblity is limited to college graduates of non-Caucasian or Hispanic descent. Application deadline is April 30. For more information contact Emily Szestakowski at (201) 247-6161....
The Minority Broadcast Career Training Program is open to recent college graduates of Hispanic, black, Asian, Native American or Alaskan descent, especially graduates of communications or journalism schools.
Participants will intern in selected radio or TV stations for 12 months, after which the broadcast station will have the opportunity to make an offer of regular employment to the trainee. Application deadline is May 1. College seniors should contact the National Association of Broadcasters at (202) 429-5498 for more information.
— Danilo Alfaro
Cathi Villalpando, chairwoman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, Mario Diaz, middle, president of the American Gl Forum, and Hector Barreto, chairman emeritus of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, speak to reporters outside of the White House about their support of defense secretary nominee John Tower.
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Making The News This Week Judiciary Committee against the nomination of former Education Secretary William Bennett as "drug czar," citing Bennett's poor record in dealing with Hispanics ... San Francisco Police Commission President Louis Giraudo announces meetings on the case of United Fa r m Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta , who was seriously injured by police last year at a protest, will be closed to the public ... Mer cado, a teacher in an adult center in Wharton, Texas, and AleJandro Torres, a staff sergeant with the U . S . Army in New York, are among the nine people selected from across the nation for the 1989 Outstand ing Adult Learner awards ... Samuel and Cristina Torres win a $14 mil lion lottery drawing in Illinois and form a family partnership to split the winnings with the i r relatives ... Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La . ) tells Puerto Rican political leaders that he will introduce this month a bill calling for a plebiscite on the status of the island ... Sen . Connie Mack (R-Fia.) calls on the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to free anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch, 61 . Bosch , who returned to the United States last year after 11 years imprisonment in Venezuela, has been in custody for violating his parole ... Raymond Ehrlich, chief justice of the Florida Supreme Court , honors Miami attorney Rafael Perialver for his pro bono work on behalf of Mariel detainees ... Jose Garcia De Lara, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, testifies before the U .S. Senate Vol. 7 No.11 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REP arch 13,1989 Cross-Cultural Adoption Numbers, Debates On the Rise The number of Latino children who are not sensitive to their culture or are unprepared Collection of cross-cultural adopt1on f1gures eligible for adoption or are in foster care in the to deal with prejudice , particularly against varies widely from state to state.-:even from United States is increasing, while the number those boys and girls who are dark-skinned . county to county as do d.efm1t1ons of what of adoptable non-Hispanic white infants is constitutes an adoptable c hild . dwindling, causing Anglo couples to consider But perhaps the biggest problem of all is colAccord ing to American Publ ic Welfare Asadoption of Latino infants more and more . lect i ng facts and statistics to help officials and sociation figures , in 1985 there were at least Latin America is providing such couples with a other concerned parties determine what, if 36 , 000 children available for adoption . An esgrowing number of babies . anything , they should do . timated half of them were minority . This combination of trends has created a new " The problem we have with the Hispanic Toshi Tatara , dire c tor of research for APWA, series of predicaments for social pol i cy adoption issue is a terrible lack of data," admits works with sometimes incomplete data sub makers, as well as for Hispanic community adJeff Rosenberg, director of adoption services m i tted b y about 38 states through the Volun vocates and the children themselves. for the National Committee for Adoptions . "A tary Cooperative Information System . He As with blacks and Native Americans the lot of people don ' t want the data because it's estimates ther e were 280 , 000 foster children question is being raised whether these so politically hot. Even when we get de c ent in the United States in 1986. children should be entrusted to adults who are data, it' s pretty much black and white." Latino chi ldren make up 11% of the nation 's Hispanic Leaders Support John Tower The leaders of 18 Hispanic organizat i ons met at the White House March 6 with President Bush and his chief of staff John Sununu, to ex press their support for the beleaguered John Tower ' s confirmation as secretary of defense . president is the president of all Americans in the United States, and we must support him." At press time , the Senate was expected to reject the Tower nomination . Danilo Alfaro youngsters. If they are represented propor tionately , there would be about 4,000 waiting for adopt i on . Tatara says another 30 , 000 are in foster care . In the past, Latino children without parents to care for them were taken in by other family members , but this pract ic e may be less com-continued o n page 2 "Tower has always been supportive of the Hispanic community," said Hector Barreto , chairman emeritus of the U .S. Hispanic Cham ber of Commerce. Barreto mentioned Tower ' s pledge to Hispanics in 1984 to threaten to filibuster the Simpson-Mazzoli immigration bill. 46% of Latino Voters Turn Out in 1988 Among those attending the meeting were Barreto , Mario Dfaz, chairman of the American G . I. Forum, Cat hi Villalpando, chairman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, Jackie Tillman , executive director of the Cuban American National Foundation , Pedro Viera , president of National SER-Jobs for Progress, and Rey Maduro, a member of the board of directors of the National Puerto Rican Coalition . The leaders said they initiated the hourlong meeting, at which they discussed strategies to salvage the former Texas senator's nomina tion. They said they would urge members of their respective organizations to call and send telegrams to their senators. "It'll be an uphill battle," conceded Dfaz , "but it's not over ' til it's over." Asked whether supporting Tower is important to the Hispanic community , Barreto said , "The Hispanic voter turnout dropped slightly in the November 1988 general election com pared to the 1984 election, going from 48% to 46 % , according to figures in a report released March 8 by the U . S . Census Bureau. The decrease in voter participation oc curred among all voters. Observers a t tributed the downturn to the lack of interest generated by the George Bush-Michael Dukakis race. Bob Brischetto, director of the Southwest Voter Research Institute, criticized the Cen sus Bureau for inaccurately pegging the Latino voter turnout at an artificially low level. He said that because 37% of the Latino voting age population is ineligible to vote , it is incorrect to factor them into the Hispanic voting rate. The Census did not exclude this population when it reported widely that only 29% of voting-age Hispanics cast their bal lots. "The picture the Census Bureau paints is misleading , " said Brischetto . He lauded groups like the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials for their ef forts to help naturalize Latinos who are not citizens , but he sa i d more needs to be done. Fab
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Rift Increases Over Bonuses for L.A. Bilingual Teachers An initiative to rescind bonuses for the Los Angeles Unified School District ' s 4 , 000 b i lin gual teachers has resulted in a bitter and divisive controversy. A vote on the initiative will be held by April 9. The effort is spearheaded by Learning English Advocates Drive, a group of teachers seeking to reform the bilingual education sys tem in the district. The campaign has become increasingly venomous, with barbs being swapped publi cally by each side . Initially, union leadership had been quiet on the issue, but Wayne Johnson, president of the 22,000 member United Teachers-Los Angeles announced March 2 that he would oppose the effort. "It has become very political, very emotional and very nasty," said Johnson . Sally Peterson , president and founder of Learning English Advocates, said the group supports bilingual education. "We have been branded as antiHispanic, but we are not anti anything," she said . "We love all our kids. We just want to help all kids reach their greatest potential." Michael Genzuk, director of legislative af fairs for the California Association for Bilin gual Education, says that Peterson's group is opposed to minority empowerment. " They have an agenda of covert racism, " he said . "They are trying to eliminate bilingual educa tion." Genzuk also charged that Learning English Advocates was funded by U.S. English , a charge Peterson denied . She said that although U . S . English had provided "sup port and advice," the group was funded by its 20,000 members . Supporters of the referendum feel that it is unfair for some teachers to receive annual bonuses of up to $5,000 while others do not. Opponents say that the bonuses are essen tial ifthe district is to attract and keep qualified bilingual teachers. Los Angeles has an es timated 160,000 limited-English-proficient students, most of whom are Latino. Peterson , a kindergarten teacher in Sun Valley, said that under the current system of bilin gual education, almost $20 million is spent annually on Spanish-language maintenance rather than English development. "Some Hispanic leaders, for some vested reason, have left the academic arena and entered one of business and industry," she accused . Danilo Alfaro Lack of Data Fuels Cross-Cultural Adoption Controversy continued from page 1 mon today as the Hispanic family unit gives way Colorado provides a typical example of poor to Barbara Medina Ahmed , Los Angeles Coununder the weight of urban living . In 1986, the record-keeping . In 1986, 13 counties in the ty deputy Children ' s Serv i ces administrator. out-of-wedlock childbearing rate was 22 . 8 % for state placed 63 Hispanic children , but the state The county has been working on finding more Latinas, nearly double that of Anglo women . has no record of the background of the adopHispanic foster and adoptive homes . Officials In 1987, 10,097 children were adopted from tive parents . say they need to double the 3,822 li censed overseas, with a growing number20 % -Congress has mandated that a standfoster homes, only 676 of which are Latino. coming from Latin America. ardization of this data take place before 1991. Each month 450 of the 1 ,200 children taken into Ernesto Loperena , director of the New York "We set up a technical advisory committee and protective custody are Latino . Council on Adoptable Children, which has debated about data elements each state "The concern would be that the adoptive fami placed 1 ,300 children since its inception in should prov i de . We spent many hours on race ly is sensitive to the child ' s background. Our 1972, says, "In many places, Hispanics are not categories; it's a large headache," says Victor concern is also the community and how the being identified as such. We find them adopted Flango, who heads the Adoption Information family will help the child handle prejudice," says by white families if they are light-skinned and Improvement Project of the National Center for Ahmed . black families if they 're dark-skinned. " State Courts . The organization has a federal Placement of Hispanic children with parents States such as Massachusetts and Pennsylgrant to study the problem and submit recom of a different ethnicity "is a placement of last vania keep no adoption records at all on mendations to Congress . resort" in New York City, according to Hispanic children . Of the more than 60 000 children in CaliforLoperena . Currently there are 24 , 000 children nia foster care 21% are Hispanic , in foster care there 60 % black, 25 % Collecting statistics is complicated by a boom but there are no figures indicating the ethnicity Hispanic . Of all children in the city's foster care in privately arranged adoptions . This may account for as many as half of all adoptions today . of foster parents, according to Linda Mesystem, 3,822 have been made available for Mahon , director of the California Department adoption . Additionally , poorly kept local records affect of Social Services . Keeping track of the number of mix ed-c u lture the accuracy of state records . Another adoption .In fiscal year 1987 _88, there were 528 adopadoptions impo . rtant as the expert reports that there are times when the tions in Los Angeles . California law says foster number of m1nor1ty children entenng foster name on a birth certificate is clearly Latino, but parents have first preference in the adoption of care system grows . The number of children be records kept by the county may indicate there a child who has lived with them . This concoming wards of New York City grew 26 % last have been no adoptions of Hispanic children . tributes to cross-cultural adoptions , according year . Ninety percent of them were Hispanic and black. Poll: Chicago Latinos Back Daley 3-1 One factor in the city's growing pool of children is the 76,500 reported cases of child abuse and neglect in 1987-a 72% increase since 1976 . In 1986 and 1987, 4,084 drug-addicted babies were born in the city. Nearly three-quarters of Hispanics in Chicago cast their votes for mayoral candidate Richard Daley in that city ' s Feb. 28 Democratic primary, according to an exit poll by the Midwest/Nor theast Voter Registration Education Project. Of the 1 ,244 Hispanic voters interviewed, 878 said they voted for Daley, Illinois state ' s attor ney and winner of the primary, and 366 voted for incumbent Eugene Sawyer . The poll showed that support for Daley did not vary by Hispanic subgroup. It found Hispanic support for the two candidates for to be : 2 Puerto Ricans Mexicans Cubans Central Ams. South Ams. Other Daley 420 276 62 33 42 45 Sawyer 159 124 24 18 14 27 Although much research has been conducted on trans-racial adoption, few studies have looked at the results of adoptions of Latino children by Anglo parents. Richard Barth, a Univer::;ity of California at Berkeley researcher, says there is no solid evidence on the effect of for of such adoptions on the children . But, he adds , voters mterv1ewed, .Mex1?an Amencans 32Yo "To resign kids to foster care because they and Cubans 7% . H1span1cs make up roughly don ' t have a family available that matches is 9% of Chicago's registered voters . cruel." Mario Santana Sophia Nieves March 13, 1989 Hispanic Link W ee kly R eport

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Sophia Nieves Cross-Cultural AdoptionsInjurious or Inconsequential? Increasing cross-cultural adoptions of Latin American children by Juanita McKenna , a Broward County, Fla . , resident with nine adopted Anglo parents have heightened the debate over whether these parents kids, including one toddler from South America, d i sagrees that cultural are equipped to teach their brown-skinned children about Indoclash is inevitable. "I have children of different ethnic backgrounds," Hispanic culture and prepare them for the world outside their Anglosays McKenna. "I never think of talking to the others about their English Saxon homes . Experts and parents choose sides, sometimes clinging heritage . " obstinately to their views . Cheryl Adkins, whose forebears are from Eastern Europe, and her atErnesto Loperena , who runs a New York City-based adoption agentorney husband Ed are trying a different tack . They live near Annapolis, cy, says love and good intentions are not enough . "We live in a racist Md. , which has no Hispanic community , but she dismisses the view society," he maintains . "The parents don ' t have the background to that their culture will displace the culture of their children. Holly, 7 , and provide these children with the defense mechanisms to venture forth in Susan, 6 , were adopted from Chile as infants. this society." " That's the old melting pot theory. We feel an obligation to pay attenOf 10,097 children adopted from overseas in lion to their heritage," she argues . Susan and Holly have visited Chile 1987, an estimated 20 % were from Latin and a second trip with both sets of biological grandparents is being America . Mexico , Guatemala , Colombia and planned. Honduras provided most of them. The numbers "My husband and I are taking Spanish right now. One daughter began are growing . Spanish classes last year . We will be a bilingual family," she vows. Sixty percent of these children are placed Will the efforts of parents such as the Adkinses be enough once the through licensed agencies work :ng with foreign chi ldren pass into their teens? Opinions run the gamut. counterparts . The remainder are obtained through pri vate attorneys or unlicensed per sons or groups . ARE PARENTAL EFFORTS ENOUGH? Carolyn Jones, a soft-spoken 19-year-old who carries herself with a dignity beyond her years, came to the United States from Costa Rica as a 1 0 year-old along with two siblings , one JOunger, one older . Her first adoption into an Anglo home was a disaster. Jones rebelled against attempts to keep her from speaking Spanish to her s i ster and brother. A second adoption was successful , but it separated her from her natural family . Her siblings were not comfortable in either world and as teen-agers became estranged from their adoptive family . When Jones speaks of her recommendations to parents who adopt children of a different ethnic background, her mild manner slips away, replaced by a tone that betrays a trace of bitterness . " You need to remember where he or she is from , " she says . "My first family never listened. You have to have freedom to learn about the cul ture . " Sin pelos en Ia lengua GO NORTH (OR ANYWHERE BUT HERE): What's the " whitest " border city in the USA? The nomination of the Los Angeles Times is San Diego. In a Feb . 27 article on racial tensions there , the Times notes that 9% of San Diego's 1 . 1 million population is black , and its Latino per centage is approaching d9uble that. The black percentage is much smaller than that found in any U .S. city of comparable size , it obser ves . San Diego has long had a reputation as a community where people of color would be encouraged , subtly if not overtly , to keep on truckin ' north. Its eight-member city council , seven-member port commission, and the five-member county board of supervisors have no Hispanic members . At present, there is one black member on the council and one on the county board . CULTURE LESSON: In its Feb. 13 " Special Report on Marketing to Hispanics , " Advertising Age carried a lengthy piece describing a creative ad campaign Johnson Wax used to introduce "Future" floor polish to Spanish speaking Latinas in Miami and New York . The 30-second spot shows a Latina "standing on her clean but dull kitchen floor," the mag explains . The Latina's spirits pick up dramat i cally as she douses her floor with "Future," and the ad asks : "We know your floors are clean, but do they shine?" CHILDREN UNDERGO STRESS Jean Erichsen , president of Los Ninos Internat i onal , an adoption agency in Austin, Texas, has 15-year-old twin daughters adopted from Colombia . The family moved to Austin from Minnesota, where Tatiana and Rosana were " e x otic and singled out for preferential treatment . " In Texas the g i rls adopted much of the Me x ican culture of their peers to the point where they pretended to be Me x ican American. Usual growing pains coupled with cultural identity problems m a d e junior high school a stressful time for Jean and her husband , Heino , and the girls . "They ' ve been raised in an Anglo-Saxon home by Anglo Saxon parents , but they look d i fferent, " says Mrs. Erichsen . " For several years they were embarrassed to bring people home . " The stance of the National Committee for Adoption is that racially and culturally matched families are the most desirable. But Jeff Rosen berg , the group ' s director for adoption services, dismisses theories that hold cross-cultural adoptions to be harmful. "That ' s bunk," says Rosenberg. "There ' s been no research that shows it doesn ' t work . It shows the kids grow up just fine . " (Sophia Nieves until rec ently was a reporter with Weekly Report.) In the final shot, describes account manager Peter Me lure, the approving husband leaps in the air and cries, "iResalta!"-Outstand ing! Then Peter e x plains to us, " We tried to tap into gender roles and reflect Hispanic ethics where approval of spouse is important." Pedro , please stay out of my kitchen. In fact, please stay out of my house . JUDGE NOT ... : During the 1987 robbery trial of cubano Fernando Hernandez, Dade Circuit Judge Milton Friedman chastised a prospective Latina juror whose English was imperfect: "I went to the trouble of going to school to learn Spanish , but the Spanish won ' t go and learn English." Defendant Hernandez had asked for an interpreter; during the trial the judge related how he "took care of" another Hispanic who he said falsely claimed he couldn ' t speak English. Then, when a juror questioned whether Friedman might be prejudiced , the judge responded : "I don't want you to get the wrong impression . Last night I had a Spanish dinner . " The jury found Hernandez guilty and Friedman sentenced him to seven years in prison. Last month, reported The Miami Herald , an appeal court accused Friedman of "anti-Hispanic comments" and decided that Hernandez is entitled to a new trial. Kay B arbaro His p a ni c Link Weekly Rep o rt Mar c h 13 , 1989 3

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Raul Yzaguirre Blacks and Latinos Must Talk Miami's recent riots are only the tip of the iceberg in a growing inter minority hostility that threatens to pit blacks against Hispanics . The United States' two largest ethnic minorities have much in common-a concern for civil rights guarantees and an expanding economy, better education and housing. But these common interests are being eclipsed by regrettable episodes in Miami. Blacks and Hispanics have clashed in other cities. Yet Miami's situation is advanced in one respect. There, Hispanics have forged the city's dominant power structure in the span of a single generation. Today, Nicaraguan and other Central American refugees are pouring into the area, hoping to join this largely Cuban American success story. Blacks see this influx as detrimental to their in terests . They see these new immigrants follow ing the historical patterns ofthe Irish, Italian and Polish, who faced discrimination early on, over came it and entered the white mainstream, leaving blacks at the bottom of the social structure. Blacks in Miami see themselves being leapfrogged by yet another wave of white immigration . Hispanics, more oriented to culture than race , see U.S. blacks as Anglos or English-speaking Protestants with values similar to other North Americans. Hispanics consider themselves a multiracial culture, blending African, European and American Indian bloodlines. While Hispanic history includes oppression, Hispanics are less likely to recog nize the racial segregationist undertones of North America's otherwise modern society. RACIAL HATRED ERASES PROGRESS Put bluntly, blacks look at Hispanics and see honkies, Hispanics look at blacks and see gringos . Back in the 1970s, I co-chaired, along with the late Carl Holman of the National Urban Coalition, the National Commission of the Concerns of Hispanics and Blacks. It was a frustrating experience because I often felt the two groups were competing on a misery index. Whose per capita income is lowest? Whose children drop out of school in greater num bers? Whose illiteracy rate is highest? Frankly, this is not the sort of competition I want to win. Despite a glossy surface, the 1980s have been dangerous times. Growing gaps between rich and poor, blacks and whites, Hispanics and Anglos threaten the fabric of our life. Racial hatred festering between Hispanics and blacks can only serve to hold the two groups down and erase progress made in previous eras. BLACK HISPANICS CAN BE CRUCIAL As fellow minorities, we must resist infighting and the tendencies of the mainstream media to exacerbate the Miami riots into a purely black versus-Hispanic rivalry . Segregated schools and public facilities were " facts of life in the South long Hispanic immigrants arrived . Leadership on the part of the black and Hispanic communities is needed more than ever. Perhaps it's time to resurrect the Commission on the Concerns of Hispanics and Blacks . Only this time, let's focus on our mutual interests, not our differences . FelxPerez The Duke of Civil Rights Recently, while mindlessly switching channels on my TV to find a program that would help me fall asleep, I stumbled across David Duke , the handsome 38-year-old elected last month to the Louisiana state legislature. Mr. Duke, the topic that night on Nightline, and his victory in Metairie, a suburb of New Orleans, were the subjects of international media at tention. The faint possibility that a former Ku Klux Klan imperial wizard and neo-Nazi could be elected to office nearly twenty-five years after passage of the Civil Rights Act drew the attention of many . I followed with great interest Mr. Duke ' s ut terances and the developments in his race. Very few people, thought Mr. Duke had a chance to win. As I sat listening to Mr. Duke that evening, my initial reaction was anger, but it soon turned to fright. I was upset that Mr. Duke now had a national forum from which to preach his outdated and dangerous philosophy, that he was made to appear the misunderstood underdog by the overagressive Morton Dean, Ted Koppel's replacement that evening. I was frightened Mr. Duke would legitimize and bring out into the open the mentality of people who had up to now kept under wraps beliefs similar to his. DUKE-A DEMOCRATIC GODSEND Despite all this, I found myself developing a certain awe for the telegenic Louisianan . His ability to deflect questions, his composure under what for all intents and purposes was a journalistic ambush and his gift at dressing his racism in eloquent and logical-sounding language was commendable . During the show's first commercial, my phone rang. It was my friend Charles . He wanted to make sure I was watching Mr. Duke. We hur riedly compared observations, not wanting to miss a second of the program . I called Charles after the show and told him I couldn't believe how per sonable and persuasive Mr. Duke was. I was caught completely off guard by his polished, Madison Avenue approach. Mr. Duke , I said, would do more to persuade people straddling the fence over affirmative action than any Supreme Court decision. On and on I went, expressing utter disbelief at what I had just witnessed. Charles erupted in laughter. David Duke will do more to draw people to the Democratic Party than a "hundred Jesse Jacksons," he said . A staunch Democrat, Charles thought it the height of hypocrisy that GOP leaders , especially Ronald Reagan, were feverishly trying to distance themselves from Mr . Duke when it was the agenda they followed for the past nine years that gave rise to him . It was they, argued Charles, who made affirmative action a dirty word . BUSH FANNED RACIAL FEARS Just look at the campaign Bush ran, he pointed out. Bush, after all, saw nothing wrong with using black convict Willie Horton to broadside Michael Dukakis and in the process fan fears about race and crime . Mr . Duke, said my friend, was simply being straightforward and voic ing some thoughts that many conservative Republicans had harbored for years. There was much truth to what Charles said. I agreed that the Republican Party had brought racial politics into vogue, that Reagan had set back the clock on civil rights 20 years. Charles was also right in feeling that Mr. Duke was a boon for the Democratic Party. Black Hispanics can play a crucial role in this process. An estimated 1.5 million Americans, often from Caribbean backgrounds, are the products of both Hispanic and black cultures . In the past, their dual eth nic heritages too often were overlooked in the rush to pigeonhole human beings into narrow demographic categories . Today, their leadership is needed to give blacks and Hispanics a focal point in our efforts to un derstand the roots of the Miami riots . But when all the political games are over and done, it will not be the The riots may be the first evidence of long-lingering tensions between Henry Cisneroses or Jesse Jacksons who will feel the sting and hum ilia blacks and Hispanics, but politically and economically speaking, both lion of the racist actions of the Dukes of this world . It is you and I who groups are in the same boat. will pay the price . (Raul Yzaguirre is president of the National Council of La Raza.) (Felix Perez serves as editor of Hispanic Link Weekly Report.) 4 March 13, 1989 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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COLLECTING The following are some agencies, organizations and publications that can be consulted for further information regarding cross-cultural adop tion. Adoption Counseling Organization and Resource Network (ACORN) , 9650 Santiago Road, Suite 102, Columbia, Md. 21045 (301) 9975772 Adoption Information Improvement Project, National Center for State Courts, 300 Newport Ave. , Williamsburg, Va. 23187 (804) 2532000 ADOPTION FACTS: "The 1989 Adoption Fact book," to be issued by the National Committee for Adoption, will be available this spring . The cost is $25 plus $5 for postage and handling. To receive a copy, write NCA, 1930 17th St. NW, Washington D . C . 20009 (202) 328 1200. American Adoption Agency, 1228 M St. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 638-1543 Biracial Adoptive and Natural Children (BRANCH), P.O. Box 50051, Lighthouse Point, Fla. 33074 (305) 7816798 Families Adopting Children Everywhere (FACE), P . O . Box 28058 , Northwood Station , Baltimore, Md. 21239 (301) 239 4252 Hispanic Advocacy and Resource Center (HARC), 2488 Grand Concourse, Suite 413, Bronx, N . Y . 10458 (212) 733-1200/1202 Los Ninos International, 1110 William Cannon, Suite 404, Austin, Texas 78745 (512) 443-2833 New York Council on Adoptable Children, 666 Broadway, Suite 820, New York, N.Y. 10012 (212) 475-0222 SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN: "The CAP Book" is a two-volume , n ationwide listing of adoptable special-needs children updated biweekly . The children, whose photos are included , are among the most difficult to place because of age, mental and physical handicaps, or sib lings with whom they must be placed . Availability for cross-cultural placement is dependent on individual state policies . The book is avail able by sending $55 to Children Awaiting Adoptive Parents (CAP), 700 Exchange St., Rochester, N . Y . 14608 (716) 232-511 0 . VOTING AND REGISTRATION: "Voting and Registration in the Elec tion of November 1988 (Advance Report)" is a 1 0-page report by the U . S . Census Bureau that gives ethnic and racial statistics on voting pat terns from November 1988 elections. To receive a copy (specify Series P-20, No . 435) , write Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D .C. 20402 (202) 782-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) CONNECTING FORD SUPPORTS PLAYWRIGHTS ArtePublico Press of the University of Houston has begun accepting plays for consideration for its Hispanic Playwright Series publications , it was announced Feb . 15. The publication will be funded by a two year, $133,426 grant from the Ford Foundation . During the two year period, Arte Publico will publish twelve collections of plays by Hispanics, including a collection by Luis Valdez, director of the movies Zoot Suit and La Samba , a Cuban American theater an thology and a Mexican American drama anthology. The submissions being sought will be for four of the 12 collections. Anyone interested in submitting their work should do so as soon as possible . Send them, along with a self-addressed, stamped envelope , to Nicolas Kanellos , ArtePub/ico Press, University of Houston, Houston , Texas 77204-2090 (713) 749 4768 . STUDENT CENTERS OPEN In an effort to increase the rates at which Hispanic students graduate from high school, enroll in and graduate from college, three San An tonio-area centers , offering tutoring to children in kindergarten through the eighth grade , opened the i r doors March 6 . Serving students in the Harlandale, San Antonio and Edgewater school districts , the students are offered tutoring in all subjects , par ticularly math and reading. All tutoring is done by volunteers . The students are identified and referred to the centers by their teachers. They receive at least one hour of tutoring per week . OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Jose Quintero, recognized as one of the eminent theater directors in the United States, is appointed to the first Wortham Chair of the Per forming Arts at the University of Houston Drama Department. Qu i ntero has had 50 productions on and off Broadway and has won two Tony Awards ... University of California at Santa Barbara Chancellor Barbara Uehling announces the appointment of Ernest Lopez as assistant vice chancel lor for public affairs. Lopez had been serving as director of public af fairs at the office of the president of the University of California at Berkeley . . . The National Conference of Puerto Rican Women opened its first office March 1 . The office, located at 5 Thomas Circle, National City Christian Church, Washington, D.C . 20005, will be headed by Edna Laverdi, formerly with the U.S . Commission on Civil Rights, until an executive director is named . The telephone is (202) 393-1604 ... Calendar TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regarding your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link ' s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear . There is no charge . Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005 . titled "The Hispanic Elderly: Issues and Ex pectations in the New Decade." The con ference will focus on current legislative proposals, social policies and budgetary im plications relevant to the elderly population . Mercedes Gil (201) 866-3208 sociation is sponsoring its 18th annual con vention . Exhibitors will display materials , pub lications or other products and information relevant to the areas of handicapped, health, nutrition , management, training, administra tion , education, social services and parental involvement pertaining to early childhood education . Assorted workshops and seminars will also be held . THIS WEEK THE HISPANIC ELDERLY North Bergen , N . J . March 16 The New Jersey chapter of the National Hispanic Council on Aging and the Hispanic Women 's Resource Center of Catholic Com munity Services are sponsoring a conference Hispanic Link Weekly Report YOUTH PROFESSIONALS CONFERENCE New Orleans March 19-22 The National Youth Professionals ' Institute is holding its 15th annual conference. "Strategies for Working With At-Risk Youth " is the theme of this year's event. Workshops will be held on dropout prevention, motivation, management techniques and professional survival skills, as well as discussions of criti cal youth problems such as unemployment and teen pregnancy . Delores Parker 1-800-424-9105 CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Mesa, Ariz . March 19-22 The National Migrant Head Start Directors As March 13, 1989 Issac Salcido (602) 231-0967 COMING SOON PROCUREMENT SEMINAR Latin American Manufacturers Association Washington , D .C. March 21, 22 Eva De Luna (202) 546-3803 EDUCATION CONFERENCE National School Boards Association Anaheim, Calif . April 1 4 Phil Smith (703) 838-6722 5

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN -WHITEWATER DIRECTOR OF UNIVERSITY SERVICES UNIVERSTIY OF WISCONSIN WHITEWATER The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater is seeking a . Director of University Services. The position manages the University Services Department, which consists of campus procurement, stores, central receiving, property manage ment, mailroom, duplicating and transportation. Specific duties include: Direct a full-time staff of 12 people plus student labor. Manage annual revenue-producing budgets of $1,200,000 and general purpose supply/expense budgets of $200, 000 . Establish and administer department operating policies and procedures. Assure that all operations comply with appropriate federal, state and campus policies, regulations and guidelines. Consult with the campus, UW-System and Depart ment of Administration regarding services provided by the department. Direct department computer automation . Minimum requirements are a B.A. in Business Administra tion, seven to ten work experience and at least two years of supervisory . experience . Exposure to purchasing, contract management or stores operations in a university setting is highly desirable . Salary is com' petitive and commensurate with experience. Send a letter of application, current resume and unofficial transcripts to Thomas R. Lauer, Executive Director of General Services, 500 N. Fremont Street, Whitewater, Wis consin !?3190. Affirmative Action Plan; therefore, women, minorities, Vietnam-era veterans and persons with disabilities are en cowaged to apply. HARTNELL COLLEGE FALL 1989 OPENINGS MATRICULATION COUNSELOR, INSTRUCTORS: TWO ENGLISH (one permanent and a one-year sabbatical replacement). ACCOUNTING, OFFICE OCCUPATIONS, MATHEMATICS, ESL. Salary DOE $24,930-$46,298. FFD 4/14/89. HARTNELL COMMUNITY COLLEGE PERSONNEL, 156 Homestead Ave ., Salinas, Calif. 93901, (408) 755-6706. FAX number (408) 755-6751 . EOE/AA March 13, 1989 TENURE TRACK POSITIONS IN MARKETING The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater is accepting ap plications for tenure track positions in marketing for Fall 1989. A doctorate or ABO from an AACSB school is required for assistant, associate, or full professor positions . MBA from an AACSB school will be considered for teach > ing staff positions. Submit letter of application, transcripts, three current references and complete vitae to : Chairman, Department of Marketing, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI 53190 . UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN WHITEWATER RESIDENCE HALL DIRECTORS RESPONSIBILITIES : The Hall Director is responsible for the total administration of 240-650 students in 1-2 residence halls , including training and supervising paraprofessional staff, coordinating the student conduct process, facilitating programming , working with student government, and overall management. Hall Directors also have the opportunity for collateral assignments in a Stu dent Affairs area after their first year of employment. QUALIFICATIONS: The requirement for this position is a Bacheldr's degree; however, a Master's Degree io Stu dent Personnel or related area and Residence Hall ex perience is strongly preferred. REMUNERATION: The Hall Director has a twelve-month appointment with a furnished apartment, utilities, meal plan, and benefits . The salary is $17,248. APPLICATIONS: Interested candidates should submit a letter of application , resume, all transcripts, and two letters of recommendation to : Scott Griesbach Associate Director of Residence Life 101 Salisbury Hall University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Whitewater, WI 53190 We will be interviewing at NASPA and the Oshkosh Placement Exchange . Applications will be accepted until positions are filled. UW-Whitewater is an equal opportunity employer with an affirmative action plan . Women, members of minority groups, and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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I I ! I I I I I l { r I l CORPORATE CLASSIFIED ARLINGTON COUNTY, VIRGINIA PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT FIREFIGHTER TRAINEE Ann. No. 5212-9A-FIR Salary: $22,798 Trainee level position leading into the Firefighter position after completion of Trainee Program . Learns and performs firefighting and prevention in a combina tion of classroom and on-the-job training. Operates apparatus and equipment at emergency scenes. Employee works a 24-hour shift reporting at 7:00 a.m. and is on call in the fire station during that shift . Requires high school diploma, GED or equivalent; 18 years old by 6/1 0/89; good physical condition. All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted . Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00pm on APRIL 6, 1989. To request application material please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only). Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, VA 22201 GENERAL MANAGER BAY AREA RAPID TRANSIT EOE/MFH FULL TIME INSTRUCTORS SOLANO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Openings in Business, Fire Technology, Mathematics, Ship Building, Nursing, English, Physical Education/Basketball Coach . For full details contact: Personnel Office, Solano Community College (707) 8647128. Solano Community College is located in the San Francisco Bay area. INSTRUCTOR FIRE TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTOR, Rio Hondo College, Whittier, Calif . Full time, tenure track . For information and applica tion, call Jean at (213) 692-0921 ext . 309 . EOE GENERAL MANAGER Pacifica Radio is accepting applications for the General Manager position at WBAI-FM in New York City. Starting salary is $30k/year plus benefits. WBAI broadcasts with 50,000 watts and seeks to serve a multi-ethnic community not served by other broadcast media. Exten sive experience is required in manage ment of community radio or progressive organizations . Skills sought include fiscal planning, personnel management, fundraising expertise, and administrative leadership. Familiarity with the political and cultural communities in New York is desired. Applicants should send a resume and . let ter of interest to David Salniker, Executive Director, Pacifica Foundation, 2207 Shat tuck Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 94704. DEADLINE: April 15 . \\): PACIFICA RADIO WITH VISION RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST National Hispanic organization seeks Resource Development Specialist to carry out funding source research, write proposals , maintain accurate proposal and funding records, and carry out other assigned duties . Interested ap plicants must have a BA or ex perience in related field, strong writing, communication and or ganizational skills,
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Arts & Entertainment employability of Hispanic actors . The waiver agreement was reached after negotiations that included several Hispanic SAG members . A dissenting group, however , is questioning the negotiation procedure and is requesting to address the union at its board meet ing, slated for March 13. ACTORS PROTEST SPANISH WAIVER: A group of Latino actors who are members of the Screen Actors Guild are protesting the union's decision to grant a salary minimum waiver to the producers of a new Spanish-language series . GOYA SINGS: In anticipation of a probable Broadway run, an album including various songs from the musical Goya , A Life In Song was released earlier this month . The SAG granted the waiver to Genesis International, producer of the daytime syndicated series The Judge and i ts new Spanish-lan guage clone, El juez . Under waiver provisions, the producers were al lowed to employ SAG members at $250 per day lower than the SAG minimum of $398 . Genesis has completed filming 26 episodes of El juez-with Rene Enriquez in the title role-that were ordered by the Univision network and are intended to air this spring . The recording, on the CBS Masterworks label, features Placido Domingo singing the lead role of Francisco de Goya, the 18th century Spanish master . The LP also includes a song recorded Glona .Estefan-who sings the female lead role , Duquesa de Alba, 1n a Spanish language version of the album to be rel eased by CBS : Dion.ne Warwick sings the Duquesa de Alba role in English , a duet t1tled Till/ Loved You. The duet has bas been recorded in Portuguese, with Brazilian pop star Simone, and in Japanese, with singer Seiko Matsuda. In negotiations with the SAG, Genesis claimed that it could not afford to pay the minimum to Hispanic actors because of the low fees being paid to them by Univision . The SAG said it allowed the waiver because of the ongoing threat of "runaway" productions and the low Casting for the Broadway production has not been announced yet. It is unlikely that Domingo will sing the role on the stage. Antonio Mejfas-Rentas Media Report AIDS EDUCATION CAMPAIGN: The U . S . Department of Health and Human Services, along with the Public Health Service and the Centers for Disease Control, has prepared a diverse series of Spanish language public ser vice announcements as part of their national campaign, America Responds to AIDS . The campaign is designed to educate the public about the Human Immunodeficiency Virus and AIDS . The PSAs are available to TV, radio and print media. The CDC has prepared a 25-page brochure containing the copy of the TV and radio ads as well as illustrations of the various print execu tions that are available . A free copy ofthe book let may be obtained by writing the National AIDS Information Clearinghouse, P . O . Box 6003 , Rockville, Md. , 20850, or by calling 1 800-458-5231 . HISPANIC MARKETING SURVEY RESULTS: Hispanics are now the "hot" conHISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N ' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting : Antonio Mej i as-Rentas , Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana . No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 c:ents per word . Display ads are $45 per column 1nch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Reports mailed Fri day of same week . Multiple use rates on request. 8 sumer group, taking the place that blacks once occupied in the minds of corporate America, according to a survey released Feb . 23. The survey of 1 07 advertising executives from top U . S . consumer products and services companies revealed that 35% consider Hispanics to be the most important racial or ethnic market segment , followed by blacks (32%) and Asians (5%). In addition, 40% of ad vertisers said they market specifically to Hispanics, while only a quarter do so to blacks . Vitt Media International, a New York media planning and buying company , conducted the survey last year . Respondents cited brand loyalty, Hispanic media ' s efficiency in providing an exclusive audience, and the increase in population and disposable income as the reasons Hispan ics edged out blacks . The full results of the survey are published in the winter 1989 Vitt Monitor . For a free copy , write to John Power at Vitt Media Internation al, 1114 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10036. TRAINING PROGRAMS: Greater Media Inc. has announced its 1989 Minority In ternship in Media Careers program . The company will award a one-year salaried employment contract, along with a $5,000 stipend , to one intern beg i nning in July. Eligiblity is limited to college graduates of non-Caucasian or Hispanic descent. Applica tion deadline is April 30. For more information contact Emily Szestakowski at (201) 2476161.. .. The Minority Broadcast Career Training Program is open to recent college graduates of Hispanic , black , Asian, Native American or Alaskan descent, especially gradi,Jates of communications or journalism schools . Part i cipants will intern in selected radio or TV stations for 12 months , after which the broad cast station will have the opportunity to make an offer of regular employment to the trainee . Application deadline is May 1 . College seniors should contact the National Association of Broadcasters at (202) 429-5498 for more in formation. Danilo Alfaro photos by Danil o Alfaro Cathi Villalpando, chairwoman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, Mario Dfaz , middle president of the American Gl Forum, and Hector Barreto, chairman emeritus of the u . S . Hlspanic Chamber of Commerce, speak to reporters outside of the White House about their support of defense secretary nominee John Tower. March 13 , 1989 Hispani c Link Weekly R e port