Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, March 20, 1989

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, March 20, 1989
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
Arthur Brown, president of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture, honors U.S. Rep. E. "Kika" de la Garza, of Texas, for his service to the agriculture industry...Florida Gov. Bob Martinez signs the state’s first death warrant ordering the execution of a woman, Andrea Hicks Jackson...California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Jesus Rodriguez, of Chula Vista, as a judge on the San Diego County Superior Court...Orange County, Calif., Bishop Norman McFarland names Father Jaime Soto to oversee the county's 300,000 to 400,000 Latinos who are Roman Catholics...Colorado Congresswoman Pat Schroeder presents to former Colorado state Sen.
Polly Baca and five other Colorado women awards on behalf of the America-lsrael Friendship League for their contributions to better understanding between Israel and the United States...Greenlee (Ariz.) County Superior Court Judge Allen Minker orders out of office Nogales Mayor Mary Macias, ruling that she was not a resident of the city when she was elected in January. Macias was Nogales’ first female mayor...Donna Ashlock, the 18-year-old heart transplant patient who became an instant celebrity when she received the heart of her 15-year-old friend Felipe Garza three years ago, dies in her Patterson, Calif., home awaiting a second transplant. Garza, who had a crush on Ashlock, willed his heart to the girl a few days before he died eerily of a burst blood vessel in his brain...

Bilingual Ed. Experts Rip Grant Plan
Courts Lifts Purge Law; Rep. Seeks Intervention
A federal judge in the U.S. District Court in Brooklyn issued a preliminary injunction March 8that prevents the purge of300,000 registered voters in New York City, mostly Hispanic and black.
The purge, which equaled 12% of the city’s 2.5 million registered residents, was expected to hurt the black and Hispanic community in the May 3 school board elections, the Sept. 12 mayoral primary and the Nov. 7 general election. The procedure strikes from the voting rolls infrequent voters whom the state cannot locate at their listed addresses.
The injunction will be in place until a trial begins on the constitutionality of the state law. That is not expected until after the school elections.
The suit challenging the law was filed by the United Parents Association and black school board candidate Agnes Green, who argued that the voting regulation violates the federal Voting Rights Act and the Constitution.
Opponents say the purge will weaken the expected importance of the two groups in the upcoming elections and that it will counteract the annual registration drives of black and Hispanic residents. The challenged law requires that New Yorkers vote at least once every four years.
Luis Caban, the New Jersey-based associate director of the Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project, criticized the state’s reliance on four-year-old addresses. “Our community is a rental community; they often move from one building to another.”
The plaintiffs are likely to be successful, said Daniel DeFrancisco, executive director of the New York City Board of Elections.
— Luis Rest repo
Unemployed Drop to 6.8%
The Hispanic unemployment rate dropped 1.6 percentage points last month, to 6.8% — the lowest Hispanic rate since the Labor Department began collecting such statistics in 1973 — according to figures released March 9 by the department's Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The U.S. Department of Education, citing the needs of students who do not speak the "usual” foreign languages, proposed a plan March 7 that would halt bilingual education grants to many school districts that serve Spanish-speaking students.
Under the proposal, districts that have previously received funds for programs geared toward students speaking a particular language would be ineligible to receive further federal aid for programs in that language.
“The plan effectively knocks out Spanish," Jim Lyons, legislative counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education, told Weekly Report.
"The department is basically saying, 'The only way you’ll get any money is if you choose a new language,"' said Denise de la Rosa of the National Council of La Raza. “It disregards the needs of the students."
In the past, the department claimed that it tried to serve those in greatest need, said Lyons, noting that in some districts Spanish is the native language of more than 90% of the limited-English-speaking students. "The focus on language instead of kids has confused everything. The department’s priority
Police Chief Unveils
Responding to offensive remarks that his police commissioner made about Hispanics during the last three months, New York Mayor Ed Koch said March 10 that Commissioner Benjamin Ward will take several steps to improve police relations in precincts with large Hispanic populations.
Those steps included adding more Spanishspeaking 911 operators, lengthening the hours of operation for bilingual receptionists at 21 station houses and appointing Hispanic community-affairs officers in seven additional precincts. Currently, there are 14 such officers.
The corrective measures, contained in a 10-page report by Ward, were a result of a meeting last month between Koch and a coalition of Hispanic leaders. The leaders charged they could no longer deal with Ward in good faith.
would cut off Title VII aid to the kids who really need it."
In a letter from Macario Saldate, president of NABE, to Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos, the Los Angeles Unified School District is used as ah example of the effect the proposal would have. In 1986-87, 37% of all LAUSD elementary school students—more than 117,000—were classified as limited-English-proficient; 98% of those students speak one of eight languages which have been served under prior Title VII grants; 92% speak Spanish.
continued on page 2
Address Your Comments To...
Interested persons are invited to submit comments regarding this bilingual education proposal. All comments submitted will be available for public inspection during and after the comment period.
Comments must be received on or before April 7, and should be sent to OBEMLA, U.S. Department of Education, Room 5086, Switzer Bldg., 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20202.
Corrective Steps
In December, at a meeting with Hispanic leaders to discuss the city’s efforts to crack down on illegal drugs, Ward cautioned, "Tell your relatives to be careful where they buy drugs. We don’t want to confiscate their cars." Later, at a forum with many of the same leaders in late January, where Ward was attempting to explain his department’s failure to appoint more Hispanics to top positions, he said, "In South Africa they say, ‘Don't give Zulu white bread. Give them black bread, because if you give them white bread, tomorrow they will want butter; too.’”
Koch called the comments stupid but commended Ward on his overall performance.
Ward turned down the coalition's request for a pay differential for bilingual officers, saying that being a professional "includes the use of all one’s talents." **


California Acts to Maintain Classes for Newly Legalized
Legislation aimed at continuing educational programs for newly legalized immigrants in California was unanimously approved March 8 by the state Senate education committee. The bill is presently being considered by the appropriations committee.
The programs will be suspended in April unless the legislature approves the bill, which would allow the state Department of Education to borrow $50 million from its future budgets to continue the classes this year. President Bush’s new budget calls for a $348 million cut in California’s $1.8 billion alien aid grant.
The problem posed for the majority of California’s nearly 2 million immigrants who have been granted temporary residency is that they must complete at least 40 hours of classes in civics and English as a Second Language before gaining permanent residency. The immigrants become eligible for permanent residency 18 months after they received their temporary residency. They must then apply within one year or face deportation.
The bill was introduced by state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles), who said he did so to ensure that English-as-Second-Language classes "get the priority" they need. Beverly
Curtis of Torres’ office said that although Gov. George Deukmejian had not yet expressed a commitment to sign the bill, they hoped it would get through the Legislature. "It certainly has gotten off to a good start,” she said.
State Superintendent of Public Instruction Bill Honig endorsed the bill March 7. He said that 350,000 students are currently enrolled in the classes, which are offered by adult schools, community colleges and neighborhood organizations. Of the 3 million people who received temporary residency under the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act, 54% did so in California
— Danilo Alfaro
Ed. Dept. Proposal 'Disregards’ Pupils
continued from page 1
Under the department’s proposal, LAUSD would be barred from applying for grants to serve 98% of its limited-English-proficient students. Other major school districts, such as San Francisco, Miami, Houston, Washington, D.C., New York and Chicago, would be similarly affected.
In the March 15 issue of Education Week, reporter Julie Miller broke the story about an apparent contradiction in department policy with regard to the $110 million grant program. The article quoted a source within the department as saying that the department intended to fund 75 new transitional bilingual education programs and 76 alternative programs. However, applications for transitional programs received by the department far outnumbered ones for alternative programs—274 to 159.
According to the source, if 150 awards were made strictly according to the ranked scores, twice as many would go to transitional as to alternative applications.
Bilingual education advocates complain that the department is biased toward alternative instructional programs, which use an English-only approach. Transitional programs use the students’ native languages.
Competitions are held to determine which programs merit the grants. Panels of experts review the applications and score them based on a code of federal regulations.
The department source said that in the latest such competition, which took place in August 1988, applications for transitional bilingual education programs that outscored alternative ones were passed up for the funds.
Alicia Coro, acting director of the department's Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, told Weekly Report that new immigrant students were arriving in school districts whose existing bilingual programs were designed for other languages. "We have received numerous requests from school district officials to provide services for students not speaking the usual languages," she said.
Coro told Education Week that the department is making grants “based on quality, not instructional approach." She conceded that her office could legally pass over high-scoring applications in favor of lower-scoring ones. She said that about $80 million would likely be spent on new and continuing transitional grants. The department could spend up to $27 million on alternative programs. Education Week's source claimed that Coro had agreed to use some of the funds likely to be left over after the slated 151 grants are negotiated to fund more transitional projects "so that this wouldn’t look too embarrassing."
The March 7 notice proposes a new competition that would make available an additional $2 million. It would give "absolute preference" to applicants seeking to provide services in new languages.
Critics say that the action would frustrate the legitimate expectations of districts whose applications scored very high but currently are not scheduled to receive grants.
The proposal is open to public comment until April 7. After that, Secretary of Education Laura Cavazos will determine whether to go forward with the new proposal.
"If he examines the matter personally and critically, he’ll have to abandon it," said Lyons.
— Danilo Alfaro
INS Ditch Flap Flares; Rep. Seeks Intervention
Criticisms and countercriticisms surrounding the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service’s proposed ditch along the U.S.-Mexico border near San Diego continue to grow. The latest installment comes from a Southern California congressman who has requested a congressional hearing and written the U.S. State Department seeking its intervention.
U.S. Rep. Jim Bates (R-San Diego) wrote a letter to Rep. George Crockett (D-Mich.), head of the Western Hemisphere Affairs Subcommittee, urging that hearings be held "as soon as possible."
The INS has commissioned an environmental impact study that is expected to be finished by late April. It hopes to have the four-mile-long, 15-foot-wide, five-foot-deep ditch built by summer. The agency has stood fast by the proposal, saying that it will deter drug and undocumented immigrant smugglers and provide drainage.
A staff member of Crockett’s subcommittee, Francine Marshall, said the hearing will be held in late April "if it happens" at all.
In his letter to Secretary of State James Baker, Bates asked that the secretary’s department step into the fray "in the interest of positive U.S.-Mexican relations." The department had not responded as of March 14.
Panel Nixes Charges in Huerta Beating
San Francisco’s Police Commission decided March 8 not to order disciplinary action for the alleged beating of United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta.
The commission supported by a 4-1 vote Chief Frank Jordan's decision not to file charges against officers in connection with the Sept. 14, 1988, incident in which Huerta and two other women claim to have been clubbed by police officers. Jordan said that no unnecessary force was used and that there were no grounds to punish the officers.
Huerta suporters charged that Jordan pressured the commission into agreeing with him when he said he would disobey any order
recommending disciplinary measures be taken.
Huerta filed a $15 million lawsuit against the city and the county Nov. 18, charging police brutality without provocation during a demonstration outside a hotel where then-Vice President Bush was the guest of honor at a political fund-raiser. In her complaint Huerta claimed that police officer Francis Achim injured her. She said that the officer had previous incidents of unreasonable use of force. She was hospitalized for six days with a ruptured spleen and two fractured ribs.
— Luis Restrepo
2
March 20,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Zita Arocha
An Immigrant’s Gamble
Several months ago I told my father I was considering quitting my job as a reporter at The Washington Post to work at home as a free-lance writer.
"What?" he asked incredulously. "Have you prayed about this? Have you thought about this seriously?"
Understandably, my news had elicited a similar response from some of my good friends. But coming from my father, whom I look up to and admire greatly, the response rekindled misgivings about my decision. Suddenly, my well-thought-out reasons to develop in-depth stories from home on immigration and spend more time with my 4-year-old daughter seemed questionable.
You must be crazy to give up a good job at a prestigious newspaper to pursue such a risky venture, I remember thinking. Later, I realized that my reaction really was a reflection of my parents’ lifelong anxiety overtrading a sure bet for an uncertain opportunity.
They had adopted this attitude as a way to survive in this country. The notion of leaving the job for something that might or might not turn out to be better was very threatening. My job at the Post reflected the height of achievement.
Interestingly, their fear of risk-taking contradicts their courageous decision to forsake their rural village in Cuba and immigrate here.
DAD LABORED FROM SUNUP TO SUNDOWN Armando, my dad, was the son of an impoverished farmer and one of 13 children. He had been able to attend only the first and second grades of a one-room schoolhouse. An older sister taught him to read and do basic addition and subtraction.
As a teen-ager, he had worked in the cane fields, laboring under the sweltering Caribbean heat from sunup to sundown. Before he left the island, he was earning $1 a day hauling fruits and vegetables from one end of the island to the other, often working 48 hours straight.
My mother, Olga, was the daughter of the sole policeman in Guira de Melena, the small town where she was born. As a young woman, she had studied to become a seamstress and worked at home helping to roll cigars for her father's fledgling tobacco business. Despite their poverty, when she married my father she stayed home to raise her daughters.
Faced with a bleak future, they jumped at the chance to come to this country when my great aunt Carmen, who had settled in Tampa, Fla., in the 1920s, offered to help them emigrate in 1958.
Dad's first job in this country was as a roofer, slapping sticky black tar on pitched roofs. He learned English at night at the local high school. Mom went to work in a nearby garment factory.
PARENTS’ COURAGE INSPIRED DAUGHTER Later, my father became a licensed plumber. They bought a home and raised three daughters, two of whom graduated from college.
I can honestly say it was their unwavering courage that gave me the impetus to push hard for what I wanted out of life. That immigrant desire to succeed at all costs took me to college, where I earned a master’s degree in English and Comparative Literature. It helped me land a job at the afternoon paper in Tampa even though I had no formal training as a journalist. In 1978, it drew me to Miami, away from my family, to take a job on the Spanish-language edition of The Miami Herald.
Despite what I have achieved in 13 years of daily journalism, I know I will always share my parents’ anxiety about taking a risk. A part of me will always remain that tiny, scared 5-year-old girl, clutching a doll in one arm and my mother’s hand in the other, who descended from an airplane into a windy December Miami night in 1958.
Yet, thoughts of that night bring back the hope and excitement of facing a new life. As I launch my new career, I feel both emotions: fear of the unknown and the excitement of a new world of opportunities. (Zita Arocha resides in Bethesda, Md.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la
DON’T SNEEZE ON ME: In case you missed it in the miles of copy printed about the Senate fight over John Tower’s nomination as Secretary of Defense, there was a precious utterance by our own Manuel Lujdn.
In discussing the importance of the august body's decision, Georgia’s Sam Nunn admonished his fellow solons, "Everyone ought to recognize we're not talking about the Secretary of Interior. We're talking about someone who is next to the President, at the very top of the nuclear chain of command.”
A few days later, speaking at a function celebrating the 140th anniversary of his department, Interior Secretary Lujan admitted that Nunn’s comment cut him to the quick. "Let me tell you," he told an appreciative audience, "we have more land than Donald Trump. We’re nothing to be sneezed at."
CULTURAL CLARIFICATION: In a March 4 editorial scolding the FBI for its bias against Hispanic agents, The Miami Herald also straightened the record on another matter.
"Within FBI ranks, Miami is one of the cities on the Taco Circuit,”' it noted. "The term is mildly offensive, but more for misperceptions about Miami’s Hispanic population than for its overall pejorative nature.
“Tacos in Miami? Outside of specialized franchises, a connoisseur of true Mexican tacos would be hard-pressed to find one in Miami. But encountering perfectly seasoned black beans or arroz con polio is easy..."
WHO’S CHEAP? The Oakland Tribune held a contest to find the town's biggest miser. Most who entered complained that it cost them a 25-cent stamp to do so. One contestant claimed she refroze used ice cubes. Another reused his dental floss.
The winner, Luis Torres, proudly proclaimed that he peels apart two-ply toilet paper to produce two one-ply rolls.
LISTS: She seems like such a nice person, but Barbara Bush has gone and done it. She's joined our "lists" list.
To gain the distinction, the First Lady announced the creation this month of the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy — and then revealed the names of its eight-member steering committee. Tsk, tsk. Not a single brown one.
WICKED DITCH OF THE WEST (CONT.): Hispanic Link contributing columnist Raoul Lowery Contreras continues his campaign against INS' proposed $2 million smuggler-deterrent ditch in Otay Mesa, below San Diego.
If the environmental impact study now being conducted fails to acknowledge that the trench could threaten endangered plant species, he plans to submit proof that a scrubby little plant called "Mesa mint" could be in peril.
— KayBarbaro
Quoting...
F. A CHAVEZ, Oklahoma City data processing specialist, describing in a Hispanic Link News Service column this week his half-century battle to succeed, capped by his only son’s acceptance this fall by Harvard University:
“In a way, I feel sorry for my son. After all, how will this poor, Harvard-educated, young Hispanic American ever find enough obstacles to make him a better man than /?”
ALAN NELSON, Immigration & Naturalization Service director, reacting in a March 14 New York Times interview to a damaging audit of INS made public by the Justice Department:
"It's a little hard to understand. If the President or the Attorney General wanted me out, ifs very easy. They don’t need to go through these oblique approaches."
March 20,1989
3


COLLECTING
BILINGUAL ED. FUNDING BIAS: The March 15 issue of Education Week contains an article, "Bias is Charged in Awarding of Bilingual Grants,” in which bilingual education advocates maintain the U.S. Department of Education is biased in the awarding of grants. For a copy send $3 to Education Week, Back Issues, 4301 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 250, Washington, D.C. 20008 (202) 364-4114.
SOCIAL SECURITY EMPLOYMENT AND SERVICE: "Social Security Administration: Employment of and Service to Hispanics" is a report by the U.S. General Accounting Office on Hispanic employment in the Social Security Administration and the positions they occupy. While most SSA material is published in Spanish, the agency does not compile data on the services it provides according to ethnic or racial group. To receive afree copy (specify GAO/HRD-89-35, Jan. 31), contact GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241.
LATINAS AND EDUCATION: "The Broken Web: The Educational Experience of Hispanic American Women" is a 262-page book containing several papers on the inadequacies of the public school system and the shortcomings of policy makers in addressing the educational problems of Latinas. For a paperbound copy, send $23.95 to Floricanto Press, 16161 Ventura Blvd., Suite 830, Encino, Calif. 91436-2504. (Hardbound editions are $32.)
LIVING ARRANGEMENTS: "Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1988" is an 86-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that gives data according to race and ethnicity. For a copy contact the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 782-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
LANGUAGE STUDY: "International Studies for Undergraduates, 1987: Operations and Opinions" is a 45-page report by the American Council on Education which finds that while most U.S. colleges and universities do not require students to study a foreign language to get in, many require them to do so to graduate. Copies of the report are $8 from the Division of Policy Analysis and Research, ACE, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 939-9365.
ADVISING NON-PROFITS: The Southern California Center for Non-Profit Management is offering free copies of its booklet "Get Ready — Get Set: A Guide to Launching a Non-Profit Organization." The publication also offers advice on how to maintain the organization. To obtain a copy, contact Leslie Forbes, Contributions Administrator, Southern California Gas, 810 S. Flower St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90017 (213)689-2345.
CONNECTING
N.Y.C. SCHOLARSHIP COMPETITION BEGINS
Hispanic college-bound high school students in the New York metropolitan area have until April 12 to apply for one of at least 20 $1,000 scholarships, Aspira of New York and the Amoco Corp. announced March 1.
More than 35 Amoco dealers in the area have agreed to contribute 2$ from every gallon of gasoline they sell during the Memorial Day weekend, May 26-29, to the Amoco Dealers Hispanic Scholarship Fund. The Amoco Foundation and Oil Co. will also contribute.
Scholarship winner selection will be based on grades, financial need, extracurricular activities, career goals and motivation.
Applications are available at high school counselor offices or by calling Aspira at (212) 292-2690.
RADIO STATION PROMOTES EDUCATION
San Jose, Calif., radio station KLOK-AM will conduct a promotional campaign from now until September aimed at Hispanics who have a desire to finish or start a higher education. As part of the campaign, the Spanish-language, 24-hour station will award 12 full-tuition scholarships toward undergraduate degrees at the National Hispanic University.
The campaign, called BECAS, will be carried out through programming and school visits. It will reach Hispanic students in San Jose, San Francisco and the greater Bay Area For more information and applications, call Silvia Calderon, NHU’s director of student services, at (415) 451-0511.
DESIGNERS GALA REMINDERS
April 30 is the deadline for several student competitions being sponsored by Hispanic Designers Inc. The competitions seek to provide opportunities in different areas of the fashion industry to people of Hispanic descent.
The competitions are in photography, stage and set design, and fashion design. The organization is also offering several six- to eight-week internships at its Washington, D.C., headquarters. In addition, it offers scholarships. Deadline for them is Sept. 30.
HDI recently published its first newsletter, the spring 1989 edition. It includes articles on HDI activities, profiles and news of opportunities offered through the non-profit group. To receive afree copy, write HDI, 1000 16th St. NW, Suite 504, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 452-0092.
Cajendar______________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regarding your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
UNITED NATIONS AWARDS DINNER
San Francisco March 21 The United Nations Association will hold its sixth annual dinner commemorating the U.N.-declared "International Day for the Elimination of Racism." Eleanor Roosevelt Humanitarian
Awards will be presented to three individuals who have worked to eliminate racism and promote international cooperation. Among the recipients will be Luis Valdez, director of the films Zoot Suit and La Bamba Stephanie Rapp (415) 982-6677
LAMA PROCUREMENT SEMINAR Washington, D.C. March 21, 22 The Latin American Manufacturers Association will be sponsoring a seminar on the new 8(a) reform law and on recent developments in the minority procurement policies of the Department of Defense. Prominent contract specialists will be present to provide guidance and suggestions on how to increase federal procurement opportunities.
Eva De Luna (202) 546-3803
PUERTO RICO SLAVERY
Chicago March 22-April 8
The Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center will sponsor
several events celebrating the abolition of
slavery in Puerto Rico, including an African-
March 20,1989
Caribbean music performance and an art exhibit.
Olga Medina (312) 235-3988
LA FAMILIA
San Diego March 24
The Chicano Federation of San Diego County Inc. will honor the recipients of its Willie Velasquez Community Service Awards at its 19th annual dinner. The keynote speaker will be Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza.
Linda Castro (619) 236-1228
LEADERSHIP PROGRAM
Silver Spring, Md. March 25 The topic of Proyecto Amor’s monthly session aimed at developing leadership skills in at-risk youth is "Your Government: Whom Does It Serve?" This month’s speaker will be Jorge Lambrinos from Congressman Edward Roybal’s office.
Tomasa Gonzales- Ordonez (301) 745-2521
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
JOB FAIR AT THE NAHJ CONFERENCE
Focus of the Job Fair
The upcoming National Hispanic Media Conference in San Juan will feature a job fair all day Friday, April 21. There will be opportunities in print and broadcast journalism, the business side of the media, and other media fields.
Other minority job fairs around the country every year are designed primarily for students and recent graduates. But at our national conference, the recruiters attend with the express purpose of finding experienced media professionals. Students and recent grads can be interviewed as well, but the focus of the job fair is on experienced applicants.
Companies Likely to Attend
Dozens of media companies sent recruiters to our national conference last year in Dallas. At least four dozen are expected in San Juan. Likely recruiters can be discerned from some of the companies who participated last year in Dallas: Gannett, Associated Press, Newsday, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, Time magazine, PBS Broadcasting, and Fox Television. (Conference attendees should note that the only recruiting sanctioned by the conference organizer is that done at the job fair.)
PERSONNEL DIRECTORS
On April 17, we will publish our 1989 "Media Edition."
This special issue will reach our subscribers (now at 1,200 advocates and professionals across 38 states, Puerto Rico and Canada) AND a projected 1,000 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 19-22 National Hispanic Media Conference in Puerto Rico.
In addition to our regular "Marketplace" section, Weekly Report will carry a full page of "Opportunities in the Media" for the edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section.
Deadline for copy to reach us Is Friday, April 7.
Interviews by appointment only.
Register early to guarantee your interviews.
Interview Schedule: Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Some companies will be available on Saturday morning to interview applicants on a walk-in basis only.
Interview Scheduling and Fees
The job fair is open to conference registrants only! The conference runs from April 19-22. Registration, which includes all events, is $100.00 by April 1, late registration $150.00, students $50.00. The fee for participating in the job fair is included in the conference registration fee.
This job fair is conducted by the NAHJ Job Exchange, a computerized employment referral service of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. In charge of scheduling is Jocelyn Cordova, manager of NAHJ’s Job Exchange.
To sign up for interviews, submit the following to NAHJ:
1. Ten (10) copies of a current resume. Provide work & home phone numbers.
2. A cover letter that briefly explains your (a) target job; (b) long-term career goals; (c) salary requirements; and (d) any other information you feel will help us schedule the kind of interviews you are most interested in.
3. Do not send us work samples. But be sure to bring plenty of copies of your work to the job fair.
Pre-Registration Deadline: March 31st.
Resumes received after March 31st will be scheduled on a space-available basis only. So please register early\
MAIL THESE MATERIALS & YOUR CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM TO: National Conference Job Fair, NAHJ Office, Suite 634, 529 14th Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20045.
For more information, phone Jocelyn Cdrdova at (202) 783-6228.
PROFESSOR/DIRECTOR
POSITION: Professor and Director of the Program in English as a Second Language.
DESCRIPTION: Lehman College of CUNY is seeking a senior faculty member to direct its program in ESL. The appointee will also do research, curriculum development, teaching in the field, and will work directly with students whose native language is most likely Spanish.
QUALIFICATIONS: An earned doctorate in Linguistics, or in a language, or in a language-related discipline, appropriate to the field of English as a Second Language.
Significant scholarly accomplishment appropriate for appointment as a Full Professor.
SALARY RANGE: $46,310-$66,310 depending upon qualifications and experience.
Applicants should send resumes and letters describing their: experience and qualifications to:
Professor Luis Losada, Chair
The Search Committed for a Director of ESL
Office of the Provost, Lehman College, Bedford Park Blvd., West Bronx, New York 10468
FULL TIME INSTRUCTORS SOLANO COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Openings in Business, Fire Technology, Mathematics, Ship Building, Nursing, English, Physical Education/Basketball Coach.
For full details contact: Personnel Office, Solano Community College (707) 864-7128.
Solano Community College is located in the San Francisco Bay area.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Unk Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Unk, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Ordered by__________
Organization________
Street______________
City, State & Zip__
Area Code & Phone
M
A
R
K
E
T
P
L
A
C
E
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
March 20,1989


Arts & Entertainment
MIAMI VETO: Members of Miami's Puerto Rican community boycotted the final events of that city’s Carnaval de la Calle Ocho — which concluded March 12—to protest the cancellation of a scheduled performance by singer Andy Montanez.
The Puerto Rican salsero was barred from the Carnaval, along with Brazil’s Denise DeKalafe and Spain's De Raymond, because of alleged pro-Fidel Castro statements ahd/or performances in Cuba during the 70s.
Montanez joins a list of several international performers — Puerto Rico's Danny Rivera, Panama's Rubdn Blades and Venezuela’s Oscar DeLedn, among them — who are "blacklisted" by Miami's radio and television stations.
Dominican Singer Wilfrido Vargas was nearly barred from a March 11 concert, which was telecast by the Telemundo network, but the veto was removed when Calle Ocho organizers could not ascertain if Vargas had indeed performed in Cuba.
Controversy over the veto threatened the withdrawal of city funds from the event and prompted at least one sponsor, The Miami Herald, to remove its support.
In spite of the controversy and the boycott, the Carnaval attracted thousands of spectators and revelers to event sites along Eighth Street SW, the core of the city's Latino population.
ACE THE AWARDS: New York’s Asociacidn de Cronistas de Espectaculos—a grouping of that city's Spanish-language entertainment journalists — handed out its ACE awards March 11. There was hardly an element of surprise.
Winners were announced in over 60 film, television, radio, theater, recording and night club categories. ACE recipients included actress Miriam Colon, director of New York’s Puerto Rican Traveling Theater, and the Oscar-nominated Spanish director Pedro Almodovar. The Telemundo network received an "extraordinary" ACE for achievement in TV.
Special, non-competitive ACEs were also handed to actors Raul Juiid, Elizabeth Pena, Edward James Olmos and Esaf Morales, and filmmakers Nestor Almendros and Jorge Ulla
— Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
ANPA LAUNCHES JOB HOTLINE:The American Newspaper Publishers Association will launch a national toll-free telephone job bank April 1 aimed at attracting Hispanics, blacks, other minorities and women to the newspaper industry.
The service can be accessed 24 hours a day from anywhere in the United States by dialing 1 -800-JOB-ANPA. The job bank will list reporting and editing openings as well as other positions in the industry. Each listing will include a job description, required qualifications, application procedures and deadlines. The listings will be updated every two weeks.
The hotline, a project of the ANPA Minority Opportunity Committee, will be available to everybody, although it will be promoted primarily in publications geared toward minorities, according to John Blodger, ANPA vice president/human resources.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Edrtor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana.
Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza, Maria I. San Jase
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch, if placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Newspapers using the service may list up to 50 jobs each year. They will be charged a fee based on their circulation. For more information contact Blodger at (703) 648-1000.
WETA INVITES PROPOSALS: Independent minority producers in the Greater Washington, D.C., area are invited to participate in WETA-TV’s Independent Minority Producers Laboratory. Proposals for programs suitable for broadcast on the station are being accepted until May 12.
The station is seeking creative minority producers who can demonstrate a fresh vision or voice in their work.
Interested persons should send a description of their proposed project along with a resume of professional qualifications and achievements, and samples of previous work in video or film to Independent Minority Producers Laboratory, WETA Channel 26, P.O. Box 2626, Washington, D.C. 20013. For further information contact Joyce Campbell at (703) 998-2758.
KUDOS AND MOVES: When The Miami News folded earlier this year, two out of 11 Latino journalists employed there had not committed to new jobs by the final day of publication. The two have now rejoined the ranks of the employed: David Medina, former assistant city editor, joins WXTV Channel 41 in New York as executive news editor, and Cheryl Brownstein-Santiago, former opinion page editor, joins the Los Angeles Times as a news and copy editor. She will also contribute to the Times’ monthly bilingual news section Nuestro Tiempo, which was launched in February...
Manuel Perez-Rivas of Newsday was among the winners of the Education Writers Association’s 1988 National Awards for Education Reporting. Perez-Rivas was a first-place winner in the breaking news category for a newspaper of more than 75,000 circulation.
Also honored this month was David G6mez of The Albuquerque Tribune, who was one of the winners of the 1989 George Polk Awards for Journalism in the local reporting category.
— Danilo Alfaro
DICHO
El camaron que se duerme se lo Neva la corriente
(The shrimp who sleeps gets carried away by the current.)
Keep pushing ahead or you’ll fall behind.
6
March 20.1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week Polly Baca and five other Colorado women awards on behalf of the America-Israel Friendship League for their contributions to better un derstanding between Israel and the United States ... Greenlee (Ariz . ) County Superior Court Judge Allen Minker orders out of office Nogales Mayor Mary Macias, ruling that she was not a resident of the city when she was elected in January . Macfas was Nogales' first female mayor ... Donna Ashlock, the 18-year-old heart transplant patient who became an instant celebrity when she received the heart of her 15-year old friend Felipe Garza three years ago, dies in her Patterson, Calif., home awaiting a second transplant. Garza, who had a crush on Ashlock, willed his heart to the girl a few days before he died eerily of a burst blood vessel in his brain ... Arthur Brown, president of the National Association of State Depart ments of Agriculture, honors U . S . Rep. E. "Kika" de Ia Garza, ofTexas, for his service to the agriculture industry ... Florida Gov. Bob Martinez signs the state's first death warrant ordering the execution of a woman, Andrea Hicks Jackson ... California Gov. George Deukmejian ap points JesUs Rodriguez, of Chula Vista, as a judge on the San Diego County Superior Court ... Orange County, Calif . , Bishop Norman Mc Farland names Father Jaime Soto to oversee the county's 300,000 to 400,000 Latinos who are Roman Catholics ... Colorado Con gresswoman Pat Schroeder presents to former Colorado state Sen. Courts Lifts Purge Law; Rep. Seeks Intervention A federal judge in the U.S. District Court in Brooklyn issued a preliminary injunction March 8 that prevents the purge of 300,000 registered voters in New York City, mostly Hispanic and black . The purge, which equaled 12% of the city's 2.5 million registered residents, was expected to hurt the black and Hispanic community in the May 3 school board elections, the Sept. 12 mayoral primary and the Nov. 7 general elec tion. The procedure strikes from the voting rolls infrequent voters whom the state cannot locate at their listed addresses . The injunction will be in place until a trial begins on the constitutionality of the state law. That is not expected until after the school elec tions. The suit challenging the law was filed by the United Parents Association and black school board candidate Agnes Green, who argued that the voting regulation violates the federal Voting Rights Act and the Constitution. Opponents say the purge will weaken the ex pected importance of the two groups in the up coming elections and that it will counteract the annual registration drives of black and Hispanic residents. The challenged law re quires that New Yorkers vote at least once every four years. Luis Caban, the New Jersey-based associate director of the Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project, criticized the state's reliance on four-year-old addresses. "Our community is a rental community; they often move from one building to another." The plaintiffs are likely to be successful, said Daniel Defrancisco, executive director of the New York City Board of Elections. Luis Restrepo Unemployed Drop to 6.SOk The Hispanic unemployment rate dropped 1 . 6 percentage points last month, to 6.8% -the lowest Hispanic rate since the Labor Department began collecting such statistics in 1973 according to figures released March 9 by the department's Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bilingual Ed. Experts Rip Grant Plan The U.S. Department of Education, citing the would cut off Title VII aid to the kids who real needs of students who do not speak the ly need it." "usual" foreign languages, propcised a plan In a letter from Macario Sal date, president of March 7 that would halt bilingual education NABE, to Secretary of Education Lauro grants to many school districts that serve Cavazos, the Los Angeles Unified School Dis Spanish-speaking students . trict is used as an example of the effect the Under the proposal, districts that have preproposal would have . In 1986-87, 37% of all viously received funds for programs geared LAUSD elementary school students-more toward students speaking a particular lanthan 117,000--were classified as limited guage would be ineligible to receive further English-proficient; 98% of those students federal aid for programs in that language . speak one of eight languages which have been "The plan effectively knocks out Spanish," served under prior Title VII grants; 92% speak Jim Lyons, legislative counsel for the NationSpanish. al Association for Bilingual Education, told continued on page 2 Weekly Report. "The department is basically saying, 'The only way you 'll get any money is if you choose a new language,"' said Denise de Ia Rosa of the National Council of La Raza . "It disregards the needs of the students . " In the past, the department claimed that it tried to serve those in greatest need, said Lyons, noting that in some districts Spanish is the native language of more than 90% of the limited-English-speaking students . "The focus on language instead of kids has con fused everything. The department's priority Address Your Comments To ... Interested persons are invited to submit comments regarding this bilingual education proposal. All comments sub mitted will be available for public inspec tion during and after the comment period . Comments must be received on or before April 7, and should be sent to OBEMLA, U.S . Department of Educa tion, Room 5086, Switzer Bldg. , 400 Maryland Ave. SW , Washington , D .C. 20202 . Police Chief Unveils Corrective Steps Responding to offensive remarks that his police commissioner made about Hispanics during the last three months, New York Mayor Ed Koch said March 10 that Commissioner Benjamin Ward will take several steps to im prove police relations in precincts with large Hispanic populations. Those steps included adding more Spanish speaking 91 1 operators, lengthen ing the hours of operation for bilingual receptionists at 21 station houses and appointing Hispanic com munity-affairs officers in seven additional precincts. Currently, there are 14 such officers. The corrective measures, contained in a 1 0page report by Ward, were a result of a meet ing last month between Koch and a coalition of Hispanic leaders . The leaders charged they could no longer deal with Ward in good faith . In December, at a meeting with Hispanic leaders to discuss the city's efforts to crack down on illegal drugs, Ward cautioned, "Tell your relatives to be careful where they buy drugs. We don't want to confiscate their cars." Later, at a forum with many of the same leaders in late January , where Ward was at tempting to explain his department's failure to appoint more Hispanics to top positions, he said, "In South Africa they say, 'Don't give ZuiL white bread. Give them black bread, because if you give them white bread, tomorrow they will want butter, too ."' Koch called the comments stupid but com mended Ward on his overall performance. Ward turned down the coalition's request for a pay differential for bilingual officers, saying that being a professional "includes the use of all one's talents . " '

PAGE 2

California Acts to Maintain Classes for Newly Legalized Legislation aimed at continuing educational programs for newly legalized immigrants in California was unanimously approved March 8 by the state Senate education committee . The bill is presently being considered by the appropriations committee . The programs will be suspended in April un less the legislature approves the bill, which would allow the state Department of . Educa tion to borrow $50 million from its future budgets to continue the classes this year. President Bush's new budget calls for a $348 million cut in California's $1.8 billion alien aid grant. The problem posed for the majority of California's nearly 2 million immigrants who have been granted temporary residency is that they must complete at least 40 hours of classes in civics and English as a Second Language before gaining permanent residency. The immigrants become eligible for per manent residency 18 months after they received their temporary residency. They must then apply within one year or face deportation. The bill was introduced by state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles), who said he did so to ensure that English-as-Second-Language classes "get the priority" they need. Beverly Ed. Dept. Proposal 'Disregards' Pupils continued from page 1 Under the department's proposal, LAUSD would be barred from applying for grants to serve 98% of its limited-English-proficient stu dents. Other major school districts, such as San Francisco, Miami, Houston, Washington, D.C . , New York and Chicago, would be similarly affected. In the March 15 issue of Education Week , reporter Julie Miller broke the story about an apparent contradiction in department policy with regard to the $11 0 million grant program. The article quoted a source within the department as saying that the department intended to fund 75 new transitional bilingual education programs and 76 alternative programs. However, applications for transitional programs received by the department far out numbered ones for alternative programs-274 to 159 . According to the source, if 150 awards were made strictly according to the ranked scores, twice as many would go to transitional as to al ternative applications. Bilingual education advocates complain that the department is biased toward alternative in structional programs, which use an English only approach. Transitional programs use the students' native languages. Cora told Education Week that the depart ment is making grants "based on quality, not instructional approach." She conceded that her office could legally pass over high-scoring applications in favor of lower-scoring ones . She said that about $80 million would likely be spent on new and continuing transitional grants. The department could spend up to $27 million on alternative programs . Education Week's source claimed that Cora had agreed to use some of the funds likely to be left over after the slated 151 grants are negotiated to fund more transitional projects "so that this wouldn't look too embarrassing." The March 7 notice proposes a new competi tion that would make available an additional $2 million . It would give "absolute preference" to applicants seeking to provide services in new languages. Critics say that the action would frustrate the legitimate expectations of districts whose ap plications scored very high but currently are not scheduled to receive grants . The proposal is open to public comment until April 7. After that, Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos will determine whether to go forward with the . new proposal. "If he examines the matter personally and critically, he'll have to abandon it," said Lyons . Danilo Alfaro Curtis of Torres' office said that although Gov. George Deukmejian had not yet expressed a commitment to sign the bill, they hoped it would get through the Legislature. "It certain ly has gotten off to a good start," she said. State Superintendent of Public Instruction Bill Honig endorsed the bill March 7. He said that 350,000 students are currently enrolled in the classes, which are offered by adult schools, community colleges and neighbor hood organizations. Of the 3 million people who received temporary residency under the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act, 54% did so in California. Danilo Alfaro INS Ditch Flap Flares; Rep. Seeks lnteiVention Criticisms and countercriticisms surrounding the U . S . Immigration and Naturalization Service's proposed ditch along the U.S. Mexico border near San Diego continue to grow. The latest installment comes from a Southern California congressman who has requested a congressional hearing and written the U.S . State Department seeking its inter vention . U . S . Rep. Jim Bates (R-San Diego) wrote a letter to Rep. George Crockett (D-Mich .), head of the Western Hemisphere Affairs Subcom mittee, urging that hearings be held "as soon as possible." The INS has commissioned an environmen tal impact study that is expected to be finished by late April. It hopes to have the four-milelong, 15-foot-wide, five-foot-deep ditch built by summer . The agency has stood fast by the proposal, saying that it will deter drug and undocumented immigrant smugglers and provide drainage . A staff member of Crockett's subcommittee, Francine Marshall, said the hearing will be held in late April "if it happens" at all. In his letter to Secretary of State James Baker, Bates asked that the secretary's department step into the fray "in the interest of positive U . S.-Mexican relations." The depart ment had not responded as of March 14. Competitions are held to determine which programs merit the grants . Panels of experts review the applications and score them based on a code of federal regulations . Panel Nixes Charges in Huerta Beating The department source said that in the latest such competition, which took place in August 1988, applications for transitional bilingual education programs that outscored alterna tive ones were passed up for the funds. Alicia Cora, acting director of the department's Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, told Weekly Report that new immigrant students were ar riving in school districts whose existing bilin gual programs were designed for other languages. "We have received numerous re quests from school district officials to provide services for students not speaking the usual languages," she said . 2 San Francisco's Police Commission decided March 8 not to order disciplinary ac tion for the alleged beating of United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta. The commission supported by a 4-1 vote Chief Frank Jordan's decision not to file charges against officers in connection with the Sept. 14, 1988, incident in which Huer ta and two other women claim to have been clubbed by police officers. Jordan said that no unnecessary force was used and that there were no grounds to punish the officers. Huerta suporters charged that Jordan pres sured the commission into agreeing with him when he said he would disobey any order March 20, 1989 recommending disciplinary measures be taken. Huerta filed a $15 million lawsuit against the city and the county Nov. 18, charging police brutality without provocation during a demonstration outside a hotel where then Vice President Bush was the guest of honor at a political fund-raiser . In her complaint Huerta claimed that police officer Francis Achim injured her. She said that the officer had previous incidents of unreasonable use of force. She was hospitalized for six days with a ruptured spleen and two fractured ribs. Luis Restrepo Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Zita Arocha An Immigrant's Gamble Several months ago I told my father I was considering quitting my job as a reporter at The Washington Post to work at home as a free-lance writer. "What?" he asked incredulously. "Have you prayed about this? Have you thought about this seriously?" Understandably, my news had elicited a similar response from some of my good friends. But coming from my father, whom I look up to and admire greatly, the response rekindled misgivings about my decision . Suddenly, my well-thought-out reasons to develop in-depth stories from home on immigration and spend more time with my 4-year-old daughter seemed questionable. You must be crazy to give up a good job at a prestigious newspaper to pursue such a risky venture, I remember thinking . Later, I realized that my reaction really was a reflection of my parents' lifelong anxiety over trading a sure bet for an uncertain opportunity. They had adopted this attitude as a way to sur vive in this country . The notion of leaving the job for something that might or might not turn out to be better was very threatening. My job at the Post reflected the height of achievement. Interestingly, their fear of risk taking contradicts their courageous decision to forsake their rural village in Cuba and immigrate here. DAD LABORED FROM SUNUP TO SUNDOWN Armando, my dad, was the son of an impoverished farmer and one of 13 children. He had been able to attend only the first and second grades of a one-room schoolhouse. An older sister taught him to read and do basic addition and subtraction . As a teen-ager , he had worked in the cane fields , laboring under the sweltering Caribbean heat from sunup to sundown . Before he left the island, he was earning $1 a day hauling fruits and vegetables from one end of the island to the other, often working 48 hours straight. My mother, Olga, was the daughter of the sole policeman in Guira de Melena, the small town where she was born . As a young woman, she had studied to become a seamstress and worked at home helping to roll cigars for her father's fledgling tobacco business. Despite their poverty, when she married my father she stayed home to raise her daughters. Faced with a bleak future, they jumped at the chance to come to this country when my great aunt Carmen, who had settled in Tampa, Fla., i n the 1920s, offered to help them emigrate in 1958. Dad's first job in this country was as a roofer, slapping sticky black tar on pitched roofs. He learned English at night at the local high school. Mom went to work in a nearby garment factory . PARENTS' COURAGE INSPIRED DAUGHTER Later , my father became a licensed plumber . They bought a home and raised three daughters, two of whom graduated from college. I can honestly say it was their unwavering courage that gave me the impetus to push hard for what I wanted out of life . That immigrant desir.e to succeed at all costs took me to college, where I earned a master ' s degree in English and Comparative Literature . It helped me land a job at the afternoon paper in Tampa even though I had no formal training as a journalist. In 1978, it drew me to Miami , away from my family, to take a job on the Spanish-language edition of The Miami Herald . Despite what I have achieved in 13 years of daily journalism, I know I will always share my parents' anxiety about taking a risk. A part of me will always remain that tiny, scared 5-year-old girl, clutching a doll in one arm and my mother's hand in the other, who descended from an airplane into a windy December Miami night in 1958. Yet , thoughts of that night bring back the hope and excitement of facing a new life. As I launch my new career, I feel both emotions : fear of the unknown and the excitement of a new world of opportunities . (Zita Arocha resides in Bethesda, Md.} Sin pelos en Ia lengua DON'T SNEEZE ON ME: In case you missed it in the miles of copy printed about the Senate fight over John Tower's nomina tion as Secretary of Defense, there was a precious utterance by our own Manuel Lujan In discussing the importance of the august body's decision , Georgia ' s Sam Nunn admonished his fellow solons, "Everyone ought to recognize we're not talking about the Secretary of Inter ior. We're talking about someone who is next to the President , at the very top of the nuclear chain of command . " A few days later, speaking at a function celebrating the 140th anniversary of his department, Interior Secretary Lujan admitted that Nunn's comment cut him to the quick. "Let me tell you," he told an appreciative audience, "we have more land than Donald Trump. We're nothing to be sneezed at." CULTURAL CLARIFICATION : In a March 4 editorial scolding the FBI for its bias against Hispanic agents, The Miami Herald also straightened the record on another matter. "Within FBI ranks, Miami is one of the cities on the 'Taco Cir cuit,"' it noted. "The term is mildly offensive, but more for misper ceptions about Miami ' s Hispanic population than for its overall pejorative nature . "Tacos in Miami? Outside of specialized franchises, a connois seur of true Mexican tacos would be hard-pressed to find one in Miami . But encountering perfectly seasoned black beans or arroz con polio is easy ... " WHO'S CHEAP? The Oakland Tribune held a contest to find the town's biggest miser . Most who entered complained that it cost them a 25-cent stamp to do so. One contestant claimed she refroze used ice cubes . . Another reused his dental floss . The winner , Luis Torres, proudly proclaimed that he peels apart two-ply toilet paper to produce two one-ply rolls . USTS: She seems like such a nice person, but Barbara Bush has gone and done it. She's joined our "lists" list. To gain the distinction, the First Lady announced the creation this month of the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacyand then revealed the names of its eight-member steering com mittee. Tsk, tsk. Not a single brown one. WICKED DITCH OF THE WEST (CONT . ) : Hispanic Link con tributing columnist Raoul Lowery Contreras continues his cam paign against INS' proposed $2 million smuggler-deterrent ditch in Otay Mesa, below San Diego . If the environmental impact study now being conducted fails to acknowledge that the trench could threaten endangered plant species, he plans to submit proof that a scrubby little plant called "Mesa mint" could be in peril. Kay Barbaro Quoting ... F. A. CHAVEZ, Oklahoma City data processing specialist, describing in a Hispanic Link News Service column this week his half-century bat tle to succeed, capped by his only son's acceptance this fall by Har vard University : "In a way, I feel sorry for my son. After all, how will this poor, Harvard educated, young Hispanic American ever find enough obstacles to make him a better man than I?" ALAN NELSON, Immigration & Naturalization Service director , react ing in a March 14 New York Times interview to a damaging audit of INS made public by the Justice Department: "It's a little hard to understand. If the President or the Attorney General wanted me out, it's very easy. They don' t need to go through these ob lique approaches." Hispanic Link Weekly Report March 20, 1989 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING BILINGUAL ED. FUNDING BIAS: The March 15 issue of Education Week contains an article, "Bias is Charged in Awarding of Bilingual Grants," in which bilingual education advocates maintain the U.S. Department of Education is biased in the awarding of grants. For a copy send $3 to Education Week, Back Issues, 4301 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 250, Washington, D. C. 20008 (202) 364-4114. SOCIAL SECURITY EMPLOYMENT AND SERVICE: "Social Security Administration: Employment of and Service to Hispanics" is a report by the U .S. General Accounting Office on Hispanic employ ment in Social Security Administration and the positions they oc cupy. While most SSA material is published in Spanish, the agency does not compile data on the services it provides according to ethnic or racial group. To receive a free copy (specify GAO/HRD-89-35, Jan . 31), contact GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Md. 20877 (202) 275-6241. LATINAS AND EDUCATION: "The Broken Web: The Educational Experience of Hispanic American Women" is a 262-page book con taining several papers on the inadequacies of the . public school sys tem and the shortcomings of policy makers in addressing the educational problems of Latinas . For a paperbound copy, send $23.95 to Floricanto Press, 16161 Ventura Blvd., Suite 830, Encino, Calif. 91436-2504. (Hardbound editions are $32.) LIVING ARRANGEMENTS: "Marital Status and Living Arrange ments: March 1988" is an 86-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that gives data according to race and ethnicity. For a copy contact the of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 782-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) LANGUAGE STUDY: "International Studies for Undergraduates, 1987: Operations and Opinions" is a 45-page report by the American Council on Education which finds that while most U.S. colleges and universities do not require students to study a foreign language to get in, many require them to do so to graduate. Copies of the report are $8 from the Division of Policy Analysis and Research, ACE, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D. C. 20036 (202) 939-9365. ADVISING NON-PROFITS: The Southern California Center for Non Profit Management is offering free copies of its booklet "Get ReadyGet Set: A Guide to Launching a Non-Profit Organization." The publication also offers advice on how to maintain the organization . To obtain a copy, contact Leslie Forbes, Contributions Administrator, Southern California Gas, 810 S. Flower St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90017 (213) 6892345. CONNECTING N.Y.C. SCHOLARSHIP COMPETITION BEGINS Hispanic college-bound high school students in the New York metropolitan area have until April 12 to apply for one of at least 20 $1 ,000 scholarships, Aspira of New York and the Amoco Corp . an nounced March 1. More than 35 Amoco dealers in the area have agreed to contribute 2 from every gallon of gasoline they sell during the Memorial Day weekend, May 26-29, to the Amoco Dealers Hispanic Scholarship Fund. The Amoco Foundation and Oil Co. will also contribute. Scholarship winner selection will be based on grades, financial need, extracurricular activities, career goals and motivation. Applications are available at high school counselor offices or by call ing Aspira at (212) 292-2690. RADIO STATION PROMOTES EDUCATION San Jose, Calif., radio station KLOK-AM will conduct a promotion al campaign from now until September aimed at Hispanics who have a-desire to finish or start a higher education. As part of the campaign, the Spanish-language, 24-hour station will award 12 full-tuition scholarships toward undergraduate degrees at the National Hispanic University . The campaign, called BECAS, will be carried out through program ming and school visits. It will reach Hispanic students in San Jose, San Francisco and the greater Bay Area. For more information and applications, call Silvia Calderon, NHU's director of student services, at (415) 451-0511 . DESIGNERS GALA REMINDERS April 30 is the deadline for several student competitions being spon sored by Hispanic Designers Inc . The competitions seek to provide opportunitiesin different areas of the fashion industry to people of Hispanic descent. The competitions are in photography, stage and set design, and fashion design. The organization is also offering several sixto eight week internships at its Washington, D.C., headquarters . In addition, it offers scholarships. Deadline for them is Sept. 30. HDI recently published its first newsletter, the spring 1989 edition . It includes articles on HDI activities, profiles and news of opportunities offered through the non-profit group . To receive a free copy, write HDI, 1000 16th St. NW, Suite 504, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 4520092. Calendar TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regarding your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number . Address items to: Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Awards will be presented to three individuals who have worked to eliminate racism and promote international cooperation. Among the recipients will be Luis Valdez, director of the films Zoot Suit and La Bamba. Caribbean music performance and an art ex hibit. Olga Medina (312) 235-3988 LA FAMILIA THIS WEEK UNITED NATIONS AWARDS DINNER San Francisco March 21 The United Nations Association will hold its sixth annual dinner commemorating the U.N. declared "International Day for the Elimination of Racism." Eleanor Roosevelt Humanitarian 4 Stephanie Rapp (415) 982-6677 LAMA PROCUREMENT SEMINAR Washington, D . C . March 21, 22 The Latin American Manufacturers Associa tion will be sponsoring a seminar on the new 8(a) reform law and on recent developments in the minority procurement policies of the Department of Defense. Prominent contract specialists will be present to provide guidance and suggestions on how to increase federal procurement opportunities. Eva De Luna (202) 546-3803 PUERTO RICO SLAVERY Chicago March 22-April 8 The Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center will sponsor several events celebrating the abolition of slavery in Puerto Rico, including an African-March 20, 1989 San Diego March 24 The Chicano Federation of San Diego Coun ty Inc. will honor the recipients of its Willie Velasquez Community Service Awards at its 19th annual dinner. The keynote speaker will be Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza. Linda Castro (619) 236-1228 LEADERSHIP PROGRAM Silver Spring, Md. March 25 The topic of Proyecto Amor's monthly sess iun aimed at developing leadership skills in at-risk youth is "Your Government: Whom Does It Serve?" This month's speaker will be Jorge Lambrinos from Congressman Edward Roybal's office. Tomasa GonzalesOrdonez (301) 745-2521 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIED JOB FAIR AT THE NAHJ CONFERENCE Focus of the Job Fair The upcoming National Hispanic Media Conference in San Juan will feature a job fair all day Friday, April 21. There will be opportunities in print and broadcast journalism, the business side of the media, and other media fields . Other minority job fairs around the country every year are designed primarily for students and recent graduates . But at our national conference, the recruiters at tend with the express purpose of finding experienced media professionals . Stu dents and recent grads can be interviewed as well, but the focus of the job fair is on experienced applicants . Companies Likely to Attend Dozens of media companies sent recruiters to our national conference last year in Dallas . At least four dozen are expected in San Juan . Ukely recruiters can be discerned from some of the companies who participated last year in Dallas : Gan nett, Associated Press, Newsday, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, Time magazine, PBS Broadcasting, and Fox Television. (Conference attendees should note that the only recruiting sanctioned by the conference organizer is that done at the job fair . ) Interviews by appointment only. Register early to guarantee your interviews. Interview Schedule : Friday 9 a.m . -5 p .m. Some companies will be available on Saturday morning to interview applicants on a walk-in basis only . Interview Scheduling and Fees The job fair is open to conference registrants only! The conference runs from April 19-22. Registration, which includes all events, is $1 00 . 00 by April 1, late registration $150 . 00, students $50.00. The fee for participating in the job fair is included in the conference registration fee . This job fair is conducted by the NAHJ Job Exchange, a computerized employ ment referral service ofthe National Association of Hispanic Journalists . In charge of scheduling is Jocelyn Cordova, manager of NAHJ ' s Job Exchange. To sign up for interviews, submit the following to NAHJ: 1 . Ten (1 0) copies of a current resume . Provide work & home phone numbers . 2 . A cover letter that briefly explains your (a) target job; (b) long-term career goals; (c) salary requirements; and (d) any other information you feel will help us schedule the kind of interviews you are most interested in. 3 . Do not send us work samples. But be sure to bring plenty of copies of your work to the job fair. Pre-Registration Deadline: March 31st. Resumes received after March 31st will be scheduled on a space-available basis only. So please register early! MAIL THESE MATERIALS & YOUR CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM TO: National Conference Job Fair, NAHJ Office, Suite 634, 529 14th Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20045. For more information, phone Jocelyn Cordova at (202) 783-6228 . PERSONNEL DIRECTORS On April 17, we will publish our 1989 "Media Edition. " This special issue will reach our sub scribers (now at 1 ,200 advocates and profeSsionals across 38 states, Puerto Rico and Canada) AND a projected 1,000 journalists and media profes sionals who will be attending the April 19-22 National Hispanic Media Con ference in Puerto Rico. In addition to our regular "Marketplace" section, Weekly Report will carry a full page of "Opportunities in the Media" for the edition . If you have a position or service to offer this ex panded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section. Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, Apri/7. PROFESSOR/DIRECTOR POSITION: Professor and Director of the Program in English as a Second Lan guage . DESCRIPTION : Lehman College of CUNY is seeking a senior faculty member to direct its program in ESL. The appointee will also do research, curriculum development, teaching in the field, and will work directly with students whose native language is most likely Spanish. QUALIFICATIONS : An earned doc torate in Linguistics, or in a language, or in a language-related disc j pline, appropriate to the field of English as a Second Lan guage . Significant scholarly accomplishment ap propriate for appointment as a Full Profes sor. SALARY RANGE: $46,310-$66 , 310 depending upon qualifications and experience. Applicants should sen<;! resumes and let ters describing their' experience and qualifications to: Professor Luis Losada ; Chair The Search Committee for a Director of ESL , Office of the Provost, Lehman College, Bedford Park Blvd., West Bronx , New York 10468 FULL TIME INSTRUCTORS SOLANO COMMUNITY COLLEGE Openings in Business, Fire Technology, Mathematics, Ship Building, Nursing, English, Physical Education/Basketball Coach. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target ana tional pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Unk Weekly Report . To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to : Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 . Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m . (E1) Tues day will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. For full details contact: Personnel Of fice, Solano Community College (707) 864-7128 . Solano Community College is located in the San Francisco Bay area. Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES : 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number , 1 word) . Multiple use rates on re quest. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES : Ordered by _____________ _ Organization _____________ _ Street. ________________ _ City, State & Zip ____________ _ (ads with borders, varied type sizes) Area Code & Phone $45 per column inch. -------------March 20. 1989

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment Controversy over the veto threatened the withdrawal of city funds from the event and prompted at least one sponsor, The Miami Herald, to remove its support . MIAMI VETO: Members of Miami's Puerto Rican community boycotted the final events of that city's Carnaval de Ia Calle Ocho -which concluded March 12-to protest the cancellation of a scheduled performance by singer Andy Montanez . In spite of the controversy and the boycott, the Carnaval attracted thousands of spectators and revelers to event sites along Eighth Street SW, the core of the city's Latino population . ACE THE AWARDS: New York's Asociaci6n de Cronistas de Espectaculos-a grouping of that city's Spanish-language entertain ment journalists handed out its ACE awards March 11. There was hardly an element of surprise . The Puerto Rican salsero was barred from the Carnaval, along with Brazil's Denise DeKalafe and Spain's De Raymond , because of alleged pro-Fidel Castro statements ahd/or performances in Cuba during the '70s. Montanez joins a list of several international performers Puerto Rico's Danny Rivera, Panama's Ruben Blades and Venezuela's Oscar Deleon, among them who are "blacklisted" by Miami's radio and television stations. Winners were announced in over 60 film, television, radio, theater, recording and night club categories . ACE recipients included actress Miriam Colon, director of New York's Puerto Rican Traveling Theater, and the Oscar-nominated Spanish director Pedro Almodovar. The Telemundo network received an "extraordinary" ACE for achievement in TV. Dominican Singer Wilfrido Vargas was nearly barred from a March 11 concert, which was telecast by the Telemundo network, but the veto was removed when Calle Ocho organizers could not ascertain if Var gas had indeed performed in Cuba . Special, non-competitive ACEs were also handed to actors Raul Julia, Elizabeth Pena, Edward James Olmos and Esaf Morales, and filmmakers Nestor Almendros and Jorge Ulla. Media Report ANPA LAUNCHES JOB HOTLINE:The American Newspaper Publishers Association will launch a national toll-free telephone job bank April 1 aimed at attracting Hispanics, blacks, other minorities and women to the newspaper industry . The service can be accessed 24 hours a day from anywhere in the United States by dialing 1-800-JOB-ANPA. The job bank will list report ing and editing openings as well as other posi tions in the industry . Each listing will include a job description, required qualifications, ap plication procedures and deadlines. The list ings will be updated every two weeks . The hotline, a project of the ANPA Minority Opportunity Committee, will be available to everybody, although it will be promoted primarily in publications geared toward minorities, according to John Blodger, ANPA vice president/human resources. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio MejfasRentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza, Marfa I. San ..ooe No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week . 6 Newspapers using the service may list up to 50 jobs each year. They will be charged a fee based on their circulation . For more informa tion contact Blodger at (703) 648-1 000. WETA INVITES PROPOSALS: Independent minority producers in the Greater Washington, D . C ., area are invited to participate in WET A TV's Independent Minority Producers Laboratory . Proposals for programs suitable for broadcast on the station are being ac cepted until May 12. The station is seeking creative minority producers who can demonstrate a fresh vision or voice in their work . Interested persons should send a description of their proposed project along with a resume of professional qualifications and achievements, and samples of previous work in video or film to Independent Minority Producers Laboratory, WETA Channel 26, P.O. Box 2626, Washington, D.C . 20013 . For further in formation contact Joyce Campbell at (703) 998-2758 . El camar6n que se duerme se lo lleva Ia corriente (The shrimp who sleeps gets carried away by the current.) March 20, 1989 Antonio Mejfas-Rentas KUDOS AND MOVES: When The Miami News folded earlier this year, two out of 11 Latino journalists employed there had not committed to new jobs by the final day of pub lication . The two have now rejoined the ranks of the employed: David Medina, former assis tant city editor, joins WXTV Channel41 in New York as executive news editor , and Cheryl Brownstein-Santiago, former opinion page editor, joins the Los Angeles Times as a news and copy editor. She will also contribute to the Times' monthly bilingual news section Nuestro Tiempo , which was launched in February ... Manuel Perez-Rivas of Newsday was among the winners of the Education Writers Association's 1988 National Awards for Education Reporting . Perez-Rivas was a first place winner in the breaking news category for a newspaper of more than 75,000 circulation . Also honored this month was David Gomez of The Albuquerque Tribune, who was one of the winners of the 1989 George Polk Awards for Journalism in the local reporting category . Danilo Alfaro Hispanic Lin k Weekly Report