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Hispanic link weekly report, March 27, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, March 27, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
The New York Times names Marta Casals Istomin, artistic director of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., as one of the leading candidates to be chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts...The Orange County (Calif.) Commission on Human Rights includes six Latinos among the 18 county residents it recognizes for their humanitarian work. They are Jaime G6mez, 34, manager of a homeless family shelter, Lenore Durazo, 53, founder of a program that distributes foods and provides job referrals, Ignacio Salgado, 23, day-laborer advocate, Jonathan Ruiz, 17, a high school student who helped form a group to bring together different ethnic groups, Father Jaime Soto, 33, immigrant rights promoter, and FrancesMufioz, 58, municipal
court judge who aided more than 400 immigrants file legalization applications...The U.S. Justice Department looks into allegations of criminal civil rights violations at the Hudson County Jail in New Jersey after the March 11 beating death of inmate Arnaldo Ortega. A deputy warden and two guards were arrested...As part of a widespread investigation of corruption and mismanagement in the city school system, the Bronx district attorney's office indicts Miguel Dfaz, chairman of Community School Board 12, on charges of soliciting a bribe from a subordinate...A Dade County (Fla.) Circuit Court jury decides that South Miami Hospital must pay 21-year-old Blanca Naranjo $10 million. Naranjo, a former honors student, who entered the hospital in 1986 for a broken leg, incurred severe brain damage there and became a quad-raplegic...
voi7^,3CHfpAmcTlNKWEEKLY REPORtHb)m»"»”i«»»
Report Says Job Service Falls Short
Experts Dispute Senate Refugee-Policy Report
A report by the Senate subcommittee on immigration and refugee affairs, finding that the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service’s new policy of detention and deportation “appears appropriate," is being disputed by representatives of the refugee community.
A two-day study mission was dispatched to the Rio Grande Valley in South Texas Feb. 23 by Sens. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.) to review the new policy.
The report, released March 9, found that the INS’ policy is "appropriate and has proven effective in deterring frivolous asylum applications."
E.J. Flynn, an attorney for Proyecto Libertad, a Brownsville, Texas, group that provides legal representation for undocumented immigrants, challenged the report’s findings. "The INS’ policy is not successful in deterring people from entering the country, it merely deters people from turning themselves in to INS," he said.
The report declared that most asylum applications “appeared frivolous," a charge that brought heavy criticism. Ninfa Krueger, director of the Border Association for Refugees from Central America, said, "In a country like ours where even criminals are considered innocent until proven guilty, it is tragic that INS officials
continued on page 2
Hispanics are so underserved by the federal Job Training Partnership Act that some 15,000 Latinos who should benefit from the program annually do not, concludes a report released March 16 by the National Council of La Raza. The report points out that there should be more Hispanic JTPA enrollees because Latinos historically have low job skills and high dropout (45%) and functional illiteracy (56% for individuals age 25 and over) rates. The importance to the nation of better serving Hispanics through such programs lies in the fact that because of their sheer numbers, Hispanics are expected to constitute up to 10% of the U.S. labor force in 1995 compared with 7% right now.
The report, "Falling Through the Cracks: Hispanic Underrepresentation in the Job Training Partnership Act,” finds that those Hispanics who are enrolled in JTPA are in the program for shorter periods of time than other groups. This, it says, suggests the program is not targeting Latinos who have more serious educational deficiencies and those whose first language is Spanish.
Raul Yzaguirre, president of NCLR, says, "For thousands of Hispanics, the cracks in the JTPA program resemble gaping holes.” Hispanic subgroups that the report says are especially overlooked are dropouts and un-
employed males. In 1986 the participation and eligibility rates for the following Hispanic populations were:
Eligible Participate
Adult Dropouts 24% 14%
Youth Dropouts 21 14
Unemployed Men 15 11
continued on page 2
NPRC Clarifies Position
The president of the Washington, D.C.-based National Puerto Rican Coalition issued a statement March 21 saying the presence of one of the members of its board of directors at a meeting with President Bush to express support for the now-dead nomination of John Tower as secretary of defense was not to be construed as an action representing the organization's stance.
NPRC President Louis NCifiez wrote, "...we wish to clarify that Mr. (Rey) Maduro attended such meeting on his own behalf," and that NPRC took no position on Tower’s nomination. Maduro, who attended the meeting along with 17 other Hispanic leaders March 16, was identified by the White House as an NPRC board member. The four leaders who fielded reporters' questions said the meeting’s participants represented their listed organizations.
Stands by Watsonville Election Ruling
U.S. Supreme Court
The U.S. Supreme Court March 20 let stand an appellate court decision that Watsonville, Calif., must adopt single-district elections to select its council members because at-large elections dilute the Hispanic vote.
Watsonville, a farming community 90 miles southeast of San Francisco, currently has one Hispanic on its six-member council even though Hispanics comprise nearly half of the city’s population. Between 1971 and 1985, eight Latinos ran for council seats. All lost.
The Supreme Court decision concluded a case handled by Joaquin Avila for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. It was the first such action brought in California_______________
MALDEF lost the initial court decision in January 1987. It appealed. On July 27,1988, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals supported MALDEF. The city then took the case to the Supreme Court.
A day after the court’s action, the council voted to postpone its at-large elections set for May and agreed to come up with a redistricting plan that will involve public input.
Avila and MALDEF, after conferring with the suit’s plaintiffs, will also prepare a plan for the court’s consideration.
"If we and the city can agree on the plan, then district elections could be conducted in three or four months," Avila said.
According to Avila, former MALDEF president, while the Supreme Court decision will influence cases brought in any U.S. city or county elected by the at-large electoral system, it will have a particularly strong impact on the electoral process in California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho, Nevada, Arizona and Hawaii, states within the 9th court district.
In California, an overwhelming majority of cities hold at-large elections for their councils. MALDEF may file similar lawsuits in Santa Clara and other jurisdictions in Los Angeles and Kern counties, Avila said.
— Mario Santana


Island, Mainland Puerto Ricans Try to Avert Confrontation
Leaders of the mainland Puerto Rican community and the governor of Puerto Rico, Rafael Herndndez Colon, are trying to avert a potential confrontation over a plan by the governor, revealed March 15, to create a cabinet-level department to deal with issues of the U.S. Puerto Rican community.
The new department expects to open by July with a budget of $6 million. Its headquarters will be in New York and it will have offices in Cleveland, Philadelphia and Chicago.
The leadership of several mainland Puerto Rican organizations has expressed the concern that this initiative should complement rather than compete with existing activities and organizations.
"We believe that a process of substantial consultation is necessary. The problems of
the Puerto Ricans who live in the U.S. appear different when you look at them from the island," said Ram6n Daubon, vice president of the National Puerto Rican Coalition.
Louis Nunez, NPRC’s president, said that perhaps the most significant difference between the two Puerto Rican communities that should be taken into consideration is that the island residents are not a minority and mainland Puerto Ricans, on the other hand, are both a minority and one ethnic group among many.
"We may be brothers, but we are brothers whose life experiences have been so different," said Nunez. “Ifwearetoworktogether, the significant differences that characterize the current situation of both communities must be recognized.”
According to Nydia Velasquez, appointed by Hernandez Colon as the director of the new department, the agency is going to deal with four major areas: voter registration and political education, promotion of the Puerto Rican culture, human resources and a technical assistance program for small businesses.
Velasquez, currently director of Puerto Rico’s New York-based Department of Migration, said that a “permanent and constant dialogue ©cists between the U.S. Puerto Rican leadership and the government of the island."
But U.S. Puerto Rican leaders want more communication. "All we have,” Daubon said, "is general possibilities. We are waiting for something more concrete."
— Mario Santana
Refugee Advocates Challenge Findings
continued from page 1
have already made up their minds about the outcome of these cases. To me, that makes due process a joke."
The State Department often provides a form letter or a sticker attached to the application to inform applicants of its intention to deny asylum. According to the report, the applicants have no way of knowing the specific basis for the department’s decision, and therefore no meaningful opportunity to rebut or challenge it. Additionally, some refugees with potentially strong cases for asylum were unwilling to file claims for fear of being jailed and deported, it said. Even so, the report called the procedure for screening out frivolous claims "credible."
The study mission also found that "conditions of detention and shelter are acceptable and improving" despite increasing tensions and deteriorating conditions in the facilities.
During an incident at Port Isabel Processing Center March 17, some 1,500 inmates tried to tear a chain link fence out of the ground, protesting lack of food, showers and medical attention, said Linda Yafiez, a Brownsville attorney who provides legal assistance to the detainees. She confirmed that inmates are sometimes unable to bathe or change their clothes for weeks at a time. "Is that accept-
able? Would it be acceptable if these people were Irish instead of from south of the border?”
Flynn called conditions "appalling.” He said that each week hundreds of new refugees were being packed into already overcrowded areas, in temperatures that reach into the 90’s. "Even people with strong claims are saying they can’t take it anymore. They are becoming resigned to deportation," he said.
Krueger cited a shortage of legal assistance as well as the fact that many inmates cannot be reached by relatives and friends who could give moral support and serve as witnesses.
Yanez said that during deportation hearings, interpreters are not present unless the applicant is being spoken to directly by the judge, the government attorney or his or her own attorney. "How is the person going to know what is being said?" She added that many of the detainees did not have attorneys at the hearings.
The report, while generally a positive assessment, concluded by recommending a high-level review of the administration’s overall asylum and refugee policy. It said that certain adjustments are required to assure greater opportunities for "nonfrivolous" applicants.
"I’m hoping Hispanic organizations around the country take a good look at this," Yanez said.
— Danilo Alfaro
La Raza Recommends JTPA Revamp
continued from page 1
La Raza’s report finds that in addition to Hispanics being underrepresented, more will not find jobs after completing the program than whites — 25% and 20%, respectively. Also, Hispanics will on average start their jobs at slightly lower wages.
Some of the recommendations the report makes to improve the servicing of Hispanics by the 6-year-old, $3.8 billion program are: o Redefine the target groups;
o Involve communty-based organizations in the design and delivery of services; o Set aside more funds for those service providers that target hard-to-serve populations; and
o Require that English-language instruction be included in the program’s services.
"The issue goes beyond equity," says Yzaguirre. "As a matter of public policy, JTPA should serve those who can benefit most from training." — FetixPetez
Bill Targets Money to Higher Ed. Institutions
Congressman Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) announced March 22 the introduction of a bill to provide $70 million in federal assistance to colleges and universities with student enrollments of 1,400 or more that are at least 25% Hispanic.
The legislation would create a network of institutions that have demonstrated a commitment to educating Hispanic students. The federal government would then provide funding to the network on a competitive basis.
The funds would be used to provide financial assistance, academic tutoring and counseling for Hispanic students as well as programs to recruit and retain them.
Bustamante said that the task would be made easier by the fact that Hispanic college and university students are concentrated at a relatively small number of institutions. He added that less than 80 schools account for more than 50% of the total Hispanic enrollment. Currently, 78 schools meet the enrollment requirements of the bill.
— Danilo Alfaro
Latina Mayor Marks First
Gilda Oliveros became the nation’s first Cuba-born female mayor March 14 when she captured 53% of the vote in a runoff election in Hialeah Gardens, Fla., a city of 5,000.
I n winning a two-year term to the $20,000-a-year post, Oliveros defeated the comeback effort of former Mayor Daniel Riccio. Initially, there were four contenders in the race, including incumbent Greg Read.
Oliveros, 39, was elected to the City Council two years ago. Her mayoral victory was helped by the fact that nearly 50% of the registered voters there are Latino.
2
March 27,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Dick Meister
Dolores Needs a Kind Act
So George Bush wants "a kinder, gentler nation," does he? Then let our new president step forward to support the frail, 58-year-old grandmother who is still seeking redress for the severe beating baton-wielding policemen inflicted on her outside one of his campaign dinners.
Dolores Huerta, all 5 feet 2, 110 pounds of her, was among some 1,800 people who turned out for that fund-raiser at a San Francisco hotel last September. They included 700 of the Republican faithful who came to dine on mousse of sole with lobster sauce, rack of lamb and other $1,000-a-plate treats, 1,000 demonstrators who came to protest Bush’s position on any number of issues, and 100 helmeted police.
Huerta is first vice president of the United Farm Workers union and, as such, a leading advocate and practitioner of non-violence. She was passing out literature that denounced Bush for ridiculing her union's nationwide grape boycott when the police squad abruptly waded into the crowd of protesters in front of the hotel.
The police prodded with their three-foot-long clubs, they poked, they jabbed, they pushed very hard, trying to move the crowd across the street. The demonstrators couldn’t move off the sidewalk fast enough.
Huerta was hit high in the back, then struck near her kidneys with a blow that took her breath away. She crumpled to the sidewalk in pain. Flailing batons had broken two of Huerta’s ribs and ruptured her spleen — it had to be removed during her six-day stay in a local hospital.
SPYING ON GROUPS SUGGESTED Videotapes shown later to San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos and others disclosed that Huerta had been clobbered even though she was obeying police orders. The chief suspect is a six-foot tall, 200-pound officer, Francis Achim.
As for Huerta, said Agnos, "We could see she was very cooperative. We could even read her lips saying, ‘I’m moving!”1 The city’s Office of Citizen Complaints concluded that Achim had used excessive and unnecessary force, but it does not have prosecutorial powers.
The district attorney definitely could have done something. But he decided to refer the matter to the grand jury instead of conducting his own investigation, and the grand jury decided to do no more than recommend changes in police procedures.
To the great and certainly justified anger of Huerta and her supporters in some three dozen labor, civil rights, political and gay rights groups, the grand jury suggested that similar incidents could be averted if the police would spy on groups that might be planning demonstrations. Thus officers would be prepared to move in swiftly and without major incident to arrest protesters and their leaders.
NO MOVE TO RIGHT THE WRONG But even Police Chief Frank Jordan balked at the recommendation. He acknowledged, in fact, that the need is to improve the police department’s crowd-control procedures and presented the city's police commission a plan that supposedly will do that. Yet the chief insisted that the officers were "using proper techniques" when they battered Huerta and that there was no reason to discipline anyone.
Both the police commission and Mayor Agnos have refused to challenge the police chief’s judgment.
The UFW has filed a $15 million claim against the city on behalf of Huerta—reasoning, as union attorney Diana Lyons says, that "without an indictment and with no serious action being taken to discipline the officer who nearly killed Dolores, a lawsuit is the only way we can tell them they were wrong.” That probably won’t do it, either. But suppose George Bush spoke up, President George Bush? That would be a truly kind and gentle act.
(Dick Meister, a San Francisco writer, is co-author of ’A Long Time Coming: The Struggle to Unionize America’s Farm Workers.")
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
THIS LAND OF LIBERTY: Empowerment. It’s such a pretty word. What happens when it’s denied you is illustrated by recent events in laid-back California.
As usual, the victims were Latinos who labor in the fields to feed us.
It took attorney Joaquin Avila and his former colleagues at the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund a couple of years to gain the hope of empowerment for the Mexican American community in the redneck city of Watsonville.
When, on March 20, the U.S. Supreme Court let stand an appeals court decision to eliminate an overtly racist at-large voting system in that agribusiness "company town," a matter of justice that should have been resolved in days finally moved to the remedy phase.
Unless Watsonville’s political bosses decide to drag the case out further, it won’t be long before Latinos, who represent half of the population there, can elect a few officials who will actually care about their lot.
What can happen when you don’t have power was illustrated too vividly this month 90 miles to the north — in San Francisco. The aftermath of the vicious, unprovoked beating by police of United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta saw a morally corrupt system circle its wagons again.
Legendary San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen commented on the shameful police commission cover-up: "I think it’s wonderful that the S.F. police have been exonerated in the case of Dolores Huerta. Now we have to find out how she managed to break those ribs and rupture her spleen all by herself."
Some of the city’s liberal politicians proclaimed March 8 as “Dolores Huerta Day" as a symbol of support. Jos6 Medina, the lone Latino on the five-member Police Commission and the lone vote to pursue an investigation of the cops who beat her, told Weekly Report reporter Luis Restrepo:
"You beat a person one day and then you honor her the next day.”
Medina noted that "not a single newspaper carried the content of my dissent. A citizen's complaint was filed, investigated, and sustained, but no action will take place.”
The most popular T-shirt we noted on a visit to California recently bore the slogan: "Shit Happens."
I guess they think that's quite all right.
A PRICE ON OUR HEADS: According to the March 21 "Labor Letter" column in The Wall Street Journal, blacks and Hispanics are coming back into vogue with big business. It bases its report on interviews with a couple headhunter firms, which sense a new attitude in the Bush administration:
"Recruiter Sanford Rose says his firm has 20 searches specifically targeting minorities. ‘We probably didn’t get that for the entire Reagan years,’ he says. Some companies, he says, offer an extra 5% of the first year’s salary — in addition to the usual 30% fee — if the headhunter can find qualified minorities to fill a post. Donald Clark, another recruiter, says minorities are being sought in 25% of his searches, up from 10% during the Reagan years..."
— KayBarbaro
Quoting...
ANDREW YOUNG, mayor of Atlanta addressing a public school teachers' group on the value of the diversity of cultures and races present in urban school systems:
7 ask my middle class friends who want to enroll their children in private schools, ‘Why are you paying to get your children culturally deprived?’"
March 27.1989


COLLECTING
JOB TRAINING PROGRAM: "Falling Through the Cracks: Hispanic Underrepresentation in the Job Training Partnership Act," a 24-page report by the National Council of La Raza, concludes that JTPA underserves Hispanics. For a copy send $5 to NCLR, 810 First St. NE, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 289-1380.
N.Y.C. PUERTO RICAN POLITICS: The reasons why Mayor Ed Koch has received strong support from Puerto Ricans in past mayoral elections, the pivotal role Puerto Ricans are expected to play in the upcoming mayoral race and the growing strength of the Republican Party among Puerto Ricans are some of the issues covered in the 17-page report "Puerto Ricans and the 1989 Mayoral Election in New York City." For a copy send $1 along with a self-addressed envelope with 450 postage to Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, 286 Fifth Ave., Suite 805, New York, N.Y. 10001-4512 (212) 564-1075.
CENSUS UNDERCOUNT: The winter 1989 edition of California Tomorrow magazine is devoted to the upcoming census, its importance and how millions of people, particularly inner-city residents, are regularly undercounted. For a copy of the 35-page magazine, send $5 to California Tomorrow, Fort Mason Center, Building B, San Francisco, Calif. 94123 (415) 441-7631.
CIVIL RIGHTS PUBLICATION: In its winter 1988 edition of New Perspectives, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has a tribute to its late chairman, Clarence Pendleton, and a special feature on the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s Proposition 48, a rule on the eligibility of freshman athletes. For a free copy, contact USCCR, Publications, 1121 Vermont Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20425 (202) 376-8312.
INCOME FIGURES: "Money Income of Households, Families, and Persons in the United States: 1987," a 213-page publication by the Census Bureau, contains income figures by racial and ethnic group. For a copy send $11 to Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
NEW YORK PUERTO RICAN AGENDA: "A Call to Action III" is an agenda drafted by the Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors on steps to achieve integration of New York’s Latinos into the social, political and economic mainstream. Copies of the 82-page report are free. Contact APRED, 140 W. 22nd St., Suite 301, New York, N.Y. 10011 (212) 242-5501.
CONNECTING
RESEARCH CENTER SETS AGENDA
Some 60 scholars from across the country met March 14-17 to set a research agenda for a new Hispanic research institute at Michigan State University in Lansing.
Headed by Richard Navarro, an associate professor of teacher education, the as-yet unnamed institute will conduct research on Hispanics in the Midwest, assist in educational outreach, offer more ! courses on Hispanics and serve as an information clearinghouse. Some possible research topics include the impact of Michigan’s changing economy on the Hispanic labor force, the social and political status of Latinas in the Midwest, and migrant farm worker resettlement.
For more information contact Navarro at Hispanic Research In- l stitute, 301 Erickson Hall, MSU, East Lansing, Mich. 48824 (517) 353-6418.
PROJECT RECEIVES $25,000
The Puente Project, a Berkeley, Calif.-based organization begun in 1982 to increase the transfer rate of California Latinos from community colleges to four-year institutions, received a $25,000 grant from the Pacific Telesis Foundation last month.
Co-sponsored by the University of California and California Com- I munity Colleges, the Puente will use the money to fund three conferences, help develop a marketing strategy, produce additional copies of an informational video and add five new Southern California community colleges to its network.
Puente is a one-year program that teams English teachers, Mexican American counselors and mentors from the professional Latino community with Mexican American students at 20 community colleges.
INS AND OUTS
U.S. Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.), chairman of the Republican Research Committee, announces he is seeking resumes from j Hispanic leaders to fill posts in the Bush administration. Anyone interested can write Duncan at 133 Cannon Building, Washington, D.C. 20515...
The Mexican American Women’s National Association starts a chapter, MANA del Norte, in the Northern New Mexico area. It has members from Espanola, Santa Fe, San Juan, El Rito and Los Alamos. Anyone interested in more information can contact Carmen Rodriguez at P.O. Box 9236, Santa Fe, N.M. 87504 (505) 667-0907.
Calendar_______________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regarding your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Unk's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
CHICANO WEEK
Laramie, Wyo. March 28-April 1 The University of Wyoming's MEChA, a Chicano student organization, will host its third annual Semana Chicane. Events include a showing of the film Stand and Deliver, a panel discussion and a
folkloric dance troupe.
Dolores Saucedo Cardona (307) 766-6189
HISPANIC LITERACY San Diego March 28-April 1 SER-Jobs for Progress National Inc. is holding its 23rd annual conference. During the event, which carries the theme "Literacy, Youth and Work Force 2000," SER will discuss its approach to education, training and job placement. The conference will include a job fair, several workshops and prominent guest speakers.
Joe Campos (214) 631-3999
SCHOOL BOARDS CONVENTION Anaheim, Calif. April 1 -4
The National School Boards Association’s 49th annual convention will explore ways for public schools to provide needed services to all students, including those deemed at risk. A luncheon sponsored by the National Caucus of Hispanic School Board Members will also be featured.
Phil Smith (703) 838-6722
COMING SOON
HISPANIC IDENTITY The Tomas Rivera Center Riverside, Calif. April 7 Dick Lloyd (714) 787-5185
SPOTLIGHT
NATIONAL MEDIA CONFERENCE: The seventh annual National Hispanic Media Conference and Expo will be held April 19-22 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The conference will feature more than two dozen panels and workshops, screenings of films and videos produced and/or directed by Hispanics, a display of the works of Hispanic photojournalists from across the U.S. mainland and Puerto Rico, and a job fair where representatives from an array of media companies will recruit students, recent graduates and experienced professionals. For more information contact Jocelyn Cordova at (202) 783-6228.
4
March 27,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
■ m m jM fti M RIO HONDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT if) 3600 Workman Mill Road • Whittier, CA 90608 • Phone (213) 692-0921 NACME
- an m
SUPERINTENDENT/PRESIDENT RIO HONDO
COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT WHITTIER, CALIFORNIA
The Board of Trustees of the Rio Hondo Community College District and the Rio Hondo Superintendent/Presidential Search Committees invite application and nominations for the position of Superinten-dent/President.
Educational and Professional Preparation
A master's degree from an accredited institution is required; doctoral degree is desired. Candidate must hold or be eligible for a California Community College Chief Administrative Officer credential.
A minimum of three years of recently demonstrated successful senior administrative level experience in an eductional institution.
Three years of successful teaching/faculty experience. Community College experience is desired.
Knowledge of the California Community College system is highly
Hocirshlp
APPLICATION PROCEDURES Application must include:
• A personal letter of intent.
• A completed Rio Hondo College form.
• A resume addressing the qualifications of the position, which details education, training, and experience.
• A one-page statement of educational philosophy and management style.
• Transcripts of college coursework.
• Three current professional letters of recommendation or placement file.
All applications and related materials will be treated as confidential. The applicant is responsible for ensuring that the application and all material are received by the consultant on or before the stated deadline. Failure to submit all required materials will result in the elimination of the applicant's candidacy.
Applications are to be obtained by contacting Rio Hondo Community College District Personnel Services 3600 Workman Mill Road Whittier, Calif. 90608 (213) 908-3405
All completed applications, required materials, nominations, and inquiries are to be addressed to;
MBF AND ASSOCIATES P.O. Box 321
10820 E. Beverly Boulevard Whittier Calif. 90601
APPLICATION AND REQUIRED MATERIALS MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN 5:00 P.M., APRIL 28, 1989.
Rio Hondo is an Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
VICE PRESIDENT
NACME, a national non-profit organization dedicated to increasing the number of underrepresented minorities in engineering, seeks a skilled, high-energy manager for the position of Vice President. With a constituency among the Fortune 500 companies, technology-intensive universities and the science and engineering establishment, NACME initiates and implements services to precollege and college programs across the country.
The vice president we seek will manage the organization’s scholarship program, seed funding and technical assistance programs and the research effort through which we derive effective program strategy. He or she will also manage the professional and support staff who are responsible for:
• stimulating interest in science, mathematics and engineering among minority youth from prekindergarten through high school; and
• initiating, improving and supporting NACME programs at the college level.
The vice president advises the president in the areas of policy, personnel, operations, fundraising and strategic planning, and manages NACME’s operations in the absence of the president.
NACME’s vice presidency is a high visibility position which requires demonstrated success in management, an advanced degree, strong interpersonal and leadership skills, exceptional oral and written communication skills, familiarity with technical career development for minorities and personal commitment to the minority engineering effort. At least one degree in a technical field and five years management experience are desirable.
Excellent salary and benefits. Send letter with resume to:
Search Committee, NACME, 3 West 35th St., New York, N.Y. 10001-2281.
NACME is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
ASSISTANT VICE CHANCELLOR
ASSISTANT VICE CHANCELLOR FOR ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES. Supervises coordinators of programs to serve needs of all university students and of academic support programs for minority and disadvantaged students. Coordinates special minority student financial programs. Reports to Vice Chancellor.
For application, submit letter of application, vita, all transcripts, 3 letters of recommendation. To apply or to seek further information, write:
Dr. Rudolph M. Najar, Associate Dean College of Letters and Sciences University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Whitewater,Wl 53190
U. of Wisconsin-Whitewater is an AA/EEO employer.
March 27,1989
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
LEHMAN
i
LEHMAN COLLEGE • THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK Bedford Park Boulevard West • Bronx, N.Y. 10468
DIRECTOR OF THE PROGRAM IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
Lehman College seeks to appoint a senior faculty member to direct its program in English as a Second Language. The director will also do research, develop curriculum, and teach.
Qualifications sought include: A doctorate in linguistics, a language, or appropriate language-related discipline; scholarly accomplishments appropriate for appointment as a full professor; familiarity with research on language acquisition and teaching; college-level experience in teaching English as a Second Language; administrative experience; the ability to work with students whose native language is most likely Spanish.
Full professor salary range: $46,310-$66,310, based on qualifications and experience.
Send resume and letters to: Professor Luis Losada, Chair, ESL Director Search Committee, Lehman College, c/o Office of the Provost, Bronx, New York 10468.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER.
The Library of Congress is seeking an experienced legal specialist in Hispanic law to fill the position of Assistant Chief in the Library's Hispanic Law Division. Applicants must have graduated from a law school in one of the Hispanic nations (including Portuguese-speaking countries) and possess substantive specialized experience in Hispanic legal research or in the practice of Hispanic law which demonstrates professional recognition in the field. Bar admission or license to practice law in an appropriate jurisdiction and reading facility in Spanish or Portuguese is also required.
Foreign Law Specialist Hispanic Law GS-14 $48,592-$63,172 The Library of Congress Washington, D.C.
Interested candidates are invited to submit, by April 21, 1989, a Standard Form 171, Application for Federal Employment to: The Library of Congress, Employment Office, Dept. E, 101 Independence Avenue, S.E., Washington, D.C. 20540, Vacancy Announcement 90056. Application forms and copies of the vacancy announcement may be obtained by calling (202) 707-5620. Equal Opportunity Employer.
ASSISTANT ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE -PUBLIC RELATIONS
We are seeking an ambitious Public Relations professional, or journalist interested in Public Relations, to join our St. Louis office. Work will include Hispanic and general market Public Relations.
Qualifications: .
• Strong writing ability.
• Good understanding of the media.
• Fluency in spoken and written Spanish.
• 1-4 years experience in PR or journalism.
• Eager to learn and grow in the PR profession with a proven leader in the industry.
Please send cover letter, resume, and samples of your work to:
Joe Trevino Fleishman - Hillard, Inc.
200 North Broadway St. Louis, Mo., 63102 Equal Opportunity Employer
FREE-LANCE WRITERS WANTED
One of the nation’s largest billingual magazines has a few openings for freelance writers. If you would like to have your work published in a national publication, call 1-800-826-0869; ask for Steve Solomon.
MINORITY AFFAIRS FACULTY POSITION
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
The Center for Urban Community Development, Division of Outreach and Continuing Education, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee seeks a full-time faculty member, annual position.
Duties include designing and developing educational programs and applied research to address the needs of Milwaukee's minority urban population in areas such as jobs, economic development, community development, education, welfare and human services, housing, and health care. Activities include teaching on and off campus, applied research, and service to the community.
Qualifications: Earned doctorate, three years experience working with minority issues.
Salary: Dependent on qualifications
Application Deadline: May 1,1989
Send cover letter, vita, and three letters of reference to:
Minority Affairs Faculty Position
Division of Outreach and Continuing Education
University of Wisconsin Milwaukee PO Box 413
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 ** aa/eoe**
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
6
March 27,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
Office of the President
Metropolitan State College
1006 11th Street • Denver, Colorado 80204
METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE DENVER, COLORADO ANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING FULLTIME PROBATIONARY FACULTY POSITIONS EFFECTIVE AUGUST 1989. MATERIAL LISTED MUST BE SUBMITTED FOR EACH POSITION TO THE CHAIR LISTED BY APRIL 24,1989:
SCHOOL OF LETTERS ARTS AND SCIENCES
CHEMISTRY
QUALIFICATIONS: Required Doctoral degree completed by August, 1989. Demonstrated considerable knowledge in the areas of Forensic Science. APPLICANTS MUST SUBMIT: Letter of application stating compliance with the background requirements listed. Current resum6. Official transcripts from all colleges/universities attended will be required of the finalists. Three (3) recent letters of reference from individuals who are in a position to evaluate applicant’s expertise as it relates to the job requirements will be required of the finalists.
MATERIALS ARE TO BE MAILED TO: Jack Cummins, Department of Chemistry, Box 52.
HISTORY
QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. in History. Teaching experience in Western Civilization. Ability to teach Ancient and/or Medieval History and one or more of the following areas will also be considered: European Intellectual, European Women’s, European Social History, Teaching Methods in History.
APPLICANTS MUST SUBMIT: Letter of application relating the applicant’s expertise to the requirements listed. A current resum §. Evidence of successful teaching. A sample of writing. Representive dissertation chapters, manuscripts submitted for publication, or publications may be presented as evidence of writing. At least three recent letters of recommendation from persons who are in a position to comment upon the applicant’s expertise in the job requirements. A transcript indicating Ph.D. completion. (Official transcripts required prior to appointment.)
MATERIALS ARE TO BE MAILED TO: Dr. Stephen J. Leonard, Chair, History Department.
Please contact the Chair listed for a position announcement or for further information, Metropolitan State College, 1006 11th St., Denver, Colo. 80204.
Metropolitan State College is an equal opportunity employer. Applications from minorities and women are particularly invited. Metropolitan State College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, sex, age, or handicap in admissions or access to, or treatment or employment in, its educational programs or activities. Inquiries concerning Title VI and IX may be referred to Dr. Percy Morehouse, Jr., Director of Equal Oppor-tunity/Assistant to the President, 100611th St., Box 63, Denver, Cob. 80204, (303) 556-2999. Inquiries concerning Section 504 may be referred to AHEC, P.O. 4615-P, Denver, Colo. 80204. Or inquirbs may be referred to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 1961 Stout St., Denver, Colo. 80294.
ARLINGTON COUNTY, VIRGI PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT
#1 COURTHOUSE PLAZA SUITE SI I
2100 CLARENDON BOULEVARD ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 22201
Explore Employment Opportunities with Arlington County Government Seminar
Arlington County Government Department of Personnel is sponsoring three (3) evening seminars to provide jobseekers with helpful information in the search for employment opportunities with Arlington County.
Workshop presenter Marvin A. Cortez, Outreach Specialist with the Personnel Department, will cover the following topics:
• Identifying the appropriate job match
• Determining relevant skills and abilities for specific positions
• Learning to compete effectively
The Personnel Department will offer individual assistance in English and Spanish after the seminar.
Interested persons must call (703) 358-3501 to register for one of the following dates:
WHEN: Tuesday, April 11,1989 Thursday, May 18, 1989 Thursday, June 29, 1989 All sessions will be held from 7:00 pm- 9:00 pm WHERE: Arlington County Courthouse 2100 Clarendon Boulevard County Board Room - 3rd Floor Room 307 Arlington, Virginia (Across from the Courthouse Metro stop on the Orange Line)
No job Interviews or job offers will be made at this workshop
Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer
Counseling/Clinical Psychologist
Position requirements: License eligible in the State of Ohio; skills in individual and group counseling; assessment supervision and training of graduate students; consultation and outreach. Demonstrated expertise with Asian, Black or Hispanic Student populations desired. Available September 1, 1989. Applications will be reviewed starting April 10. Contact Dr. Denise Y. Hatter, Counseling and Consultation Service, The Ohio State University, 1739 N. High Street, Columbus, OH 43210, (614) 292-5766, for further information.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
March 27,1989


Arts & Entertainment
OSCAR FOR OLMOS? The entertainment award season winds down this week with the 61 st annual Academy Awards presentation — and a Latino actor has an outside chance for an Oscar in a major category.
Edward James Olmos is one of five nominees in the "best actor" category. He was nominated for his portrayal of teacher Jaime Escalante in the film Stand and Deliver. Two of the nominees, Dustin Hoffman and Gene Hackman — both prior winners — are favored.
No Latino had been nominated in this category since 1964, when Anthony Quinn was up for the Oscar in Zorba the Greek. The only Hispanic to capture a "best actor" award is Jose Ferrer, who won in 1950 for Cyrano de Bergerac.
Spanish director Pedro Almodovar is nominated in the "best foreign film11 category for Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown.
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences hands out its Oscars March 29 at Los Angeles’ Shrine Auditorium. The ceremony will be broadcast by ABC (check local listings for times).
In other award news, San Antonio was once again the stage, March 18, for the Tejano Music Awards. Winners were announced in 12 categories at the ceremony held at the Convention Center Arena
Four acts were double winners. David M£rez won "song of the year" for Ffate and "album of the year, orquesta" for Sold Out. David Lee Garcfa y bs Musicales won "single of the year" for Me quieras tu, te quiero yo and "album of the year, conjurrto" for Tour '88.
Joe Lopez won "male vocalist" and "best vocal duo,” the latter with Jimmy Gonzdlez, his colleague in the group Mazz. Selena Quintanilla— the sole woman among the winners — won "female vocalist" and "female entertainer."
Other award winners were Ramiro Herrera, “male entertainer"; Luis Silva, "songwriter of the year"; Los Dudes, "most promising group"; and Paulino Bernal in the new "Tejano gospel music artist" category.
ONE LINERS: Mario Ernesto Sdnchez, producing artistic director of Miami’s Teatro Avante, was voted "best actor" in the AACT/Fest competition held recently at Daytona Beach... Spain’s New Anthology of Zarzuela continues an engagement this week, through April 2, at New York’s City Center...
— Antonb Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
1990 CENSUS PROGRAM: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund launched its nationwide census education outreach program March 23 with press conferences in 12 major cities around the country. The program is designed to reduce the number of Hispanics not counted in the 1990 census.
Its national media campaign will consist of network public service announcements on the Univision network and local public service announcements. Coordinators of community education campaigns will work with churches, organizations, schools and other entities in the Hispanic community. The production of a ques-tion-and-answer brochure, a training booklet for community leaders, posters, an informational video and other promotional items is planned.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 2344)280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lixP6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana.
Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza, Marfa I. San Jose
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
In the 1980 census, the first time Hispanics were counted as a separate group, it is estimated that 5% to 10% of the Hispanic population was not counted.
MEETING LEGALIZATION REQUIREMENTS: "Staying Legal," a 16-page special section appearing in the Los Angeles Times and the Spanish-language daily La Opinion March 13, deals with the second phase of the nation’s legalization program for immigrants. The guide is in English and Spanish and was jointly produced by the Times and La Opinion. it details the requirements for gaining permanent residency, the appeals process and other key aspects of the immigration law. For a free copy, contact the Times at (213) 237-5784.
THE MORNING AFTER: Some 250 guests attended the National Association of Hispanic Journalists’first annual scholarship banquet March 8 in New York City. Edna Negron, head of NAHJ's education committee, estimated that at least $20,000 had been raised for the NAHJ scholarship fund.
SECOND EDITION: A new program at Marquette University in Milwaukee is designed for minorities ready to make second-career choices. Individuals with jobs and college degrees who want to move into print or broadcast journalism will take part in a 12-week intensive reporting-writing-editing skills workshop. The workshop is followed by a four-month internship and, after an interview, a fulltime position in a print or broadcast outlet. The program provides full tuition, workshop-related expenses and a small stipend. Deadline to request applications is April 2. Contact Sharon Murphy at (414) 224-7132 for more information.
ETCETERA: Arturo Villar, publisher of Vista magazine, has joined the journalism advisory board of the Los Angeles-based Foundation for American Communications...
Former Hispanic Link News Service reporter Julio Laboy was awarded a 10-week reporting internship with Newsday to begin June 12.
— Danilo Alfaro


Full Text

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Making The News This Week court judge who aided more than 400 immigrants file legalization ap plications ... The U . S . Justice Department looks of criminal civil rights violations at the Hudson County Ja111n New Jersey after the March 11 beating death of inmate Arnaldo Ortega . A deputy warden and two guards were arrested ... As part of a widespread inves tigation of corruption and mismanagement in the city s?hool system, the Bronx district attorney's office indicts Miguel Diaz, chairman of Com munity School Board 12, on charges of soliciting a bribe from a subor dinate ... A Dade County (Fla.) Circuit Court jury decides that South Miami Hospital must pay 21-year-old Blanca Naranj? million . Naranjo, a former honors student, who entered the hospital 1n 1986 for a broken leg, incurred severe brain damage there and became a quad raplegic ... The New York Times names Marta Casals lstomin, artistic director of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., as one of the leading candidates to be chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts ... The Orange County (Calif.) Commission on Human Rights includes six Latinos among the 18 county residents it recognizes for their humanitarian work. They are JaimeG6mez, 34, manager of a homeless family shelter, Lenore Durazo, 53, founder of a program that distributes foods and provides job referrals, Ignacio Salgado, 23, day laborer advocate, Jonathan Ruiz, 17, a high school student who helped form a group to bring together different ethnic groups, Father Jaime Soto, 33, immigrant rights promoter, and FrancesMuiioz, 58, municipal voo.7No1all HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 27, 1989 Experts Dispute Senate Refugee-Policy Report A report by the Senate subcommittee on immigration and refugee affairs, finding that the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service's new policy of detention and deportation "ap pears appropriate," is being disputed by repre sentatives of the refugee community. A two-day study mission was dispatched to the Rio Grande Valley in South Texas Feb. 23 by Sens. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Alan Simpson (R-Wyo . ) to review the new policy . The report, released March 9, found that the INS' policy is "appropriate and has proven effective in deterring frivolous asylum applica tions." E.J. Flynn, an attorney for Proyecto Libertad, a Brownsville , Texas, group that provides legal representation for undocumented immigrants, challenged the report's findings . "The INS' policy is not successful in deterring people from entering the country, it merely deters people from turning themselves in to INS," he said . The report declared that most asylum applica tions "appeared frivolous," a charge that brought heavy criticism . Ninfa Krueger , direc tor oft he Border Association for Refugees from Central America, said, "In a country like ours where even criminals are considered innocent until proven guilty, it is tragic that INS officials continued on page 2 Report Says Job Service Falls Hispanics are so underserved by the federal males . In 1986 the Job Training Partnership Act that some 15,000 rates for the followmg H1spamc Latinos who should benefit from the program populations were : annually do not, concludes a report released March 16 by the National Council of La Raza . The report points out that there should be more Hispanic JTPA enrollees because Latinos historically have low job skills and high dropout (45%) and functional illiteracy (56% Adult Dropouts Youth Dropouts Unemployed Men Eligible 24% 21 15 Participate 14% 14 11 continued on page 2 for individuals age 25 and over) rates . The im-NPRC Clarifies Position portance to the nation of better serving Hispanics through such programs lies in the fact that because of their sheer numbers, Hispanics are expected to constitute up to 10% of the U .S. labor force in 1995 compared with 7% right now. The report, "Falling Through the Cracks : Hispanic Underrepresentation in the Job Training Partnership Act," finds that those Hispanics who are enrolled in JTPA are in the program for shorter periods of time than other groups . This, it says, suggests the program is not targeting Latinos who have more serious educational deficiencies and those whose first language is Spanish . Raul Yzaguirre, president of NCLR, says, "For thousands of Hispanics, the cracks in the JTPA program resemble gaping holes . " Hispanic subgroups that the report says are especially overlooked are dropouts and unThe president ofthe Washington, D . C .based National Puerto Rican Coalition issued a state ment March 21 saying the presence of one of the members of its board of directors at a meeting with President Bush to express support for the now-dead nomination of John Tower as secretary of defense was not to be construed as an action representing the organization's stance. NPRC President Louis Nunez wrote, " ... we wish to clarify that Mr. (Rey) Madura attended such meeting on his own behalf," and that NPRC took no position on Tower's nomination . Madura, who attended the meeting along with 17 other Hispanic leaders March 16, was iden tified by the White House as an NPRC board member . The four leaders who fielded reporters' questions said the meeting's participants represented their listed organizations . U.S. Supreme Court Stands by Watsonville Election Ruling The U.S . Supreme Court March 20 let stand MALDEF lost the initial court decision in According to Avila, former MALDEF presi-an appellate court decision that Watsonville, January 1987 . It appealed . On July 27, 1988 , dent, while the Supreme Court decision will Calif., must adopt single-district elections to the 9th U .S. Circuit Court of Appeals supinfluence cases brought in any U.S. city or select its council members because at-large ported MALDEF. The city then took the case county elected by the at-large electoral syselections dilute the Hispanic vote . to the Supreme Court . tem, it will have a particularly strong impact Watsonville, a farming community 90 miles A day after the court's action, the council on the electoral process in California, southeast of San Francisco, currently has voted to postpone its at-large elections set for Oregon , Washington, Alaska, Montana, one Hispanic on its six-member council even May and agreed to come up with a redistrictIdaho, Nevada, Arizona and Hawaii, states though Hispanics comprise nearly half of the ing plan that will involve public input. within the 9th court district. city's population . Between 1971 and 1985, Avila and MALDEF, after conferring with the 1 c l ' f ht La f ' I t Alii t n a 1 erma, an overwhelming majority of e1g tmos ran or counc1 sea s. os su1't' s pla1'nt1'ffs, will also prepare a plan for the h ld 1 C d 1 d d c1t1es o atarge elections for their councils. The Supreme curt eclslon cone u e a court's consl'deratl 'on. MALDE ' A 'I f h F may file similar lawsuits in Santa case handled by Joaqum VI a or t e "If we and the city can agree on the plan, Cl d th d' L A I Mexican American Legal Defense and ara an o er JUriS 1ct1ons 1n os nge es Educational Fund . It was the first such action then district elections could be conducted in and Kern counties, Avila said . three or four months," Avila said. -Mario Santana brought in California

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Island, Mainland Puerto Ricans Try to Avert Confrontation Leaders of the mainland Puerto Rican com munity and the governor of Puerto Rico, Rafael Hernandez Colon, a r e trying to avert a potential confrontation over a plan by the governor, revealed March 15, to create a cabinet-level department to deal with issues of the U.S. Puerto Rican community. The new department expects to open by July with a budget of $6 million . Its head quarters will be in New York and it will have offices in Cleveland, Philadelphia and Chicago. The leadership of several mainland Puerto Rican organizations has expressed the con cern that this initiative should complement rather than compete with existing activities and organizations. "We believe that a process of substantial consultation is necessary. The problems of the Puerto Ricans who live in the U.S. appear different when you look at them from the is land," said Ramon Daub6n, vice president of the National Puerto Rican Coalition. Louis Nunez, NPRC's president, said that per haps the most significant difference between the two Puerto Rican communities that should be taken into consideration is that the island residents are not a minority and main land Puerto Ricans, on the other hand, are both a minority and one ethnic group among many . "We may be brothers, but we are brothers whose life experiences have been so dif ferent," said Nunez . "If we are to work together, the significant differences that characterize the current situation of both communities must be recognized." Refugee Advocates Challenge Findings continued from page 1 have already made up their minds about the outcome of these cases. To me, that makes due process a joke." The State Department often provides a form letter or a sticker attached to the application to inform applicants of its intention to deny asylum. According to the report, the ap plicants have no way of knowing the specific basis for the department's decision, and therefore no meaningful opportunity to rebut or challenge it. Additionally, some refugees with potentially strong cases for asylum were unwilling to file claims for fear of being jailed and deported, it said. Even so, the report called the procedure for screening out frivolous claims "credible." The study mission also found that "condi tions of detention and shelter are acceptable and improving" despite increasing tensions and deteriorating conditions in the facilities. During an incident at Port Isabel Processing Center March 17, some 1,500 inmates tried to tear a chain link fence out of the ground, protesting lack of food, showers and medical attention, said Linda Yanez, a Brownsville attor ney who provides legal assistance to the detainees . She confirmed that inmates are sometimes unable to bathe or change their clothes for weeks at a time. "Is that acceptable? Would it be acceptable if these people were Irish instead of from south of the border?" Flynn called conditions "appalling." He said that each week hundreds of new refugees were being packed into already overcrowded areas, in temperatures that reach into the 90's. "Even people with strong claims are saying they can't take it anymore. They are becoming resigned to deportation," he said. Krueger cited a shortage of legal assistance as well as the fact that many inmates cannot be reached by relatives and friends who could give moral support and serve as witnesses. Yanez said that during deportation hearings, in terpreters are not present unless the applicant is being spoken to directly by the judge, the government attorney or his or her own attorney. "How is the person going to know what is being said?" She added that many of the detainees did not have attorneys at the hearings. The report, while generally a positive assess ment, concluded by recommending a high level review of the administration's overall asylum and refugee policy . It said that certain adjustments are required to assure greater op portunities for "nonfrivolous" applicants. "I'm hoping Hispanic organizations around the country take a good look at this," Yanez said. Danilo Alfaro La Raza Recommends JTPA Revamp continued from page 1 La Raza's report finds that in addition to Hispanics being underrepresented, more will not find jobs after completing the program than whites 25% and 20%, respectively. Also, Hispanics will on average start their jobs at slightly lower wages. Some of the recommendations the report makes to improve the servicing of Hispanics by the 6-year-old, $3.8 billion program are: o Redefine the target groups; 2 o Involve communty-based organizations in the design and delivery of services; o Set aside more funds for those service providers that target hard-to-serve popula tions; and o Require that English-language instruction be included in the program's services. "The issue goes beyond equity," says Yzaguirre. "As a matter of public policy, JTPA should serve those who can benefit most from training." FeiixF'erez March 27. 1989 According to Nydia Velasquez, appointed by Hernandez Colon as the director of the new department, the agency is going to deal with four major areas: voter registration and politi cal education, promotion of !he Puerto Rican culture, human resources and a technical as sistance program for small businesses. Velasquez, currently director of Puerto Rico's New York-based Department of Migration, said that a "permanent and constant dialogue exists between the U .S. Puerto Rican leader ship and the government of the island." But U.S. Puerto Rican leaders want more communication. "All we have," Daubon said, "is general possibilities. We are waiting for something more concrete." Mario Santana Bill Targets Money to Higher Ed. Institutions Congressman Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) announced March 22 the introduction of a bill to provide $70 million in federal assistance to colleges and universities with student enroll ments of 1 ,400 or more that are at least 25% Hispanic. The legislation would create a network of institutions that have demonstrated a commit ment to educating Hispanic students. The federal government would then provide funding to the network on a competitive basis . The funds would be used to provide financial assistance, academic tutoring and counseling for Hispanic students as well as programs to recruit and retain them . Bustamante said that the task would be made easier by the fact that Hispanic college and university students are concentrated at a rela tively small number of institutions . He added that less than 80 schools account for more than 50% of the total Hispanic enrollment. Current ly, 78 schools meet the enrollment require ments of the bill. Danilo Alfaro Latina Mayor Marks First Gilda Oliveros became the nation's first Cuba-born female mayor March 14 when she captured 53% of the vote in a runoff election in Hialeah Gardens, Fla., a city of 5,000. In winning a two-year term to the $20,000a-year post, Oliveros defeated the come back effort of former Mayor Daniel Riccio. Initially, there were four contenders in the race, including incumpent Greg Read. Oliveros, 39, was elected to the City Council two years ago . Her mayoral victory was helped by the fact that nearly 50% of the registered voters there are Latino. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Dick Meister Dolores Needs a Kind Act So George Bush wants "a kinder, gentler nation," does he? Then let our new president step forward to support the frail, 58-year old grandmother who is still seeking redress for the severe beating baton wielding policemen inflicted on her outside one of his campaign din ners . Dolores Huerta, all 5 feet 2, 11 0 pounds of her, was among some 1,800 people who turned out for that fund-raiser at a San Francisco hotel last September . They included 700 of the Republican faithful who came to dine on mousse of sole with lobster sauce, rack of lamb and other $1 ,000-a-plate t r eats, 1,000 demonstrators who came to p r otest B u s h' s position on any number of issues, and 100 helmeted police. Huerta is first vice president of the United Farm Workers union and, as such, a leading ad vocate and practitioner of non-violence . She was passing out literature that denounced Bush for ridiculing her union's nationwide grape boycott when the police squad abruptly waded i nto the crowd of protesters in front of the hotel. The police prodded with their three-foot-long clubs , they poked, they jabbed, they pushed very hard, trying to move the crowd across the street. The demonstrators couldn ' t move off the sidewalk fast enough . Huerta was hit high in the back, then struck near her kidneys with a blow that took her breath away . She crumpled to the sidewalk in pain . Flailing batons had broken two of Huerta ' s ribs and ruptured her sp l een i t had to be rem . oved during her six-day stay in a local hospital. SPYING ON GROUPS SUGGESTED Vi deotapes shown later to San Francisco Mayor Art Agnos and others disclosed that Huerta had been clobbered even though she was obey ing pol i ce orders . The chief suspect is a six-foot tall, 200-pound officer , Franc i s Achim . As f or Huerta, said Agnes, "We could see she was very cooperative . We could even read her l i ps saying, ' I'm moving!"' The city ' s Office of Citizen Complaints concluded that Achim had used excessive and unnecessary force , but it does not have prosecutorial powers . The district attorney definitely could have done something . But he decided to refer the matter to the grand jury instead of conducting his own investigation , and the grand jury decided to do no more than recommend changes in police procedures . To the great and certainly justified anger of Huerta and her supporters in some three dozen labor, civil rights , political and gay rights groups, the grand jury suggested that similar inc i dents cou l d be averted if the police would spy on groups that might be planning demonstrations . Thus officers would be prepared to move in swiftly and without major incident to arrest protesters and their leaders. NO MOVE TO RIGHT THE WRONG But even Police Chief Frank Jordan balked at the recommendation . He acknowledged , in fact, that the need is to improve the police department's crowd-control procedures and presented the city ' s police commission a plan that supposedly will do that. Yet the chief insisted that t he officers were "using proper techniques" when they battered Huerta and that there was no reason to disc i pline anyone . Both the police commission and Mayor Agnes have refused to chal lenge the police chief ' s judgment. The UFW has filed a $15 million claim against the city on behalf of Huerta-reasoning, as union attorney Diana Lyons says , that "without an indictment and with no serious action being taken to discipline the officer who nearly killed Dolores, a lawsuit is the only way we can tell them they were wrong." That probably won't do it, either. But suppose George Bush spoke up, President George Bush? That would be a truly kind and gentle act. (Dick Meister, a San Francisco writer, is co-author of "A Long Time Coming : The Struggle to Unionize America's Farm Sin pelos en Ia lengua THIS LAND OF LIBERTY : Empowerment. It's such a pretty word. What happens when it ' s denied you is illustrated by recent events in laid-back California . As usual, the victims were Latinos who labor in the fields to feed us. It took attorney Joaquin Avila and his former colleagues at the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund a of year s to gain the hope of for Mex1can American community in the redneck c1ty of Watsonville . When on March 20, the U . S . Supreme Court let stand an ap peals decision to eliminate an overtly racist at-large system in that agribusiness "company town , " a matter of JUStice that should have been resolved in days finally moved to the remedy phase. Unless Watsonville ' s polit i cal bosses decide to drag the case out further, it won ' t be long before Latinos , who represent half of the population there, can elect a few officials who will actually care about their lot. What can happen when you don ' t have power was illustrated too vividly this month 90 miles to the north in San Francisco . The aftermath of the vicious, unprovoked beat i ng by police of United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta saw a morally corrupt system circle its wagons again . Legendary San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen com mented on the shameful pol i ce commission cover-up: "I think it's wonderful that the S.F. police have been exonerated in the case of Dolores Huerta. Now we have to find out how she managed to break those ribs and rupture her spleen all by herself." Some of the city ' s liberal politicians proclaimed March 8 as "Dolo r es Huerta Day" as a symbol of support . Jose Medina, the lone Latino on the five-member Police Commission and the lone vote to pursue an investigation of the cops who beat her, told Weekly Report reporter Luis Restrepo : "You beat a person one day and then you honor her the next day . " Medina noted that "not a single newspaper carried the content of my dissent. A citizen ' s complaint was filed , in v estigated, and sustained, but no action will take place." The most popular T shirt we noted on a visit to California recent ly bore the slogan : " Shit Happens . " I guess they think that's quite all right. A PRICE ON OUR HEADS : According to the March 21 "Labor Letter" column in The Wall Street Journal, blacks and Hispanics are coming back into vogue with big business . It bases its report on interviews with a couple headhunter firms, which sense a new attitude in the Bush administrat i on: "Recruiter Sanford Rose says his firm has 20 searches specif i cally targeting minorities. 'We probably didn ' t get that for the en tire Reagan years,' he says. Some companies, he says, offer an extra 5% of the first year's salaryin addition to the usual 30 % fee-if the headhunter can find qualified minorities to fill a post. Donald Clark, another recruiter, says minorities are being sought in 25% of his searches, up from 10% during the Reagan years ... " KayBiu'baro Quoting ... ANDREW YOUNG, mayor of Atlanta addressing a public school teachers' group on the value of the diversity of cultures and races present in urban school systems : "I ask my middle class friends who want to enroll their children in private schools , ' Why are you paying to get your children culturally deprived? ' " Hispanic UnkWeeldy Report March 27 , 1989 3

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COLLECTING JOB TRAINING PROGRAM: "Falling Through the Cracks: Hispanic Underrepresentation in the Job Training Partnership Act," a 24-page report by the National Council of La Raza, concludes that JTPA under serves Hispanics . For a copy send $5 to NCLR, 81 0 First St. NE, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 289-1380 . N.Y.C. PUERTO RICAN POLITICS: The reasons why Mayor Ed Koch has received strong support from Puerto Ricans in past mayoral elec tions, the pivotal role Puerto Ricans are expected to play in the upcom ing mayoral race and the growing strength of the Republican Party among Puerto Ricans are some of the issues covered in the 17 -page report "Puerto Ricans and the 1989 Mayoral Election in New York City." For a copy send $1 along with a self-addressed envelope with 45 postage to Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, 286 Fifth Ave., Suite 805, New York, N.Y. 10001-4512 (212) 564-1075. CENSUS UNDERCOUNT: The winter 1989 edition of California Tomorrow magazine is devoted to the upcoming census, its importance and how millions of people, particularly inner-city residents, are regularly undercounted . For a copy of the 35-page magazine, send $5 to California Tomorrow, Fort Mason Center, Building B, San Francisco, Calif. 94123 (415) 441-7631. CIVIL RIGHTS PUBLICATION: In its winter 1988 edition of New Perspectives, the U .S. Commission on Civil Rights has a tribute to its late chairman, Clarence Pendleton, and a special feature on the Na tional Collegiate Athletic Association's Proposition 48, a rule on the eligibility of freshman athletes. For a free copy, contact USCCR, Publications, 1121 Vermont Ave. NW, Washington, D . C . 20425 (202) 376-8312. INCOME FIGURES: "Money Income of Households, Families, and Persons in the United States: 1987," a 213-page publication by the Census Bureau, contains income figures by racial and ethnic group. For a copy send $11 to Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Govern ment Printing Office, Washington, D.C . 20402 (202) 783-3238. NEW YORK PUERTO RICAN AGENDA: "A Call to Action Ill" is an agenda drafted by the Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors on steps to achieve integration of New York's Latinos into the social, political and economic mainstream . Copies of the 82-page report are free. Contact APRED, 140 W. 22nd St., Suite 301, New York, N.Y. 10011 (212) 242-5501. folkloric dance troupe. CONNECTING RESEARCH CENTER SETS AGENDA Some 60 scholars from across the country met March 14-17 to set a research agenda for a new Hispanic research institute at Michigan State University in Lansing . Headed by Richard Navarro, an associate professor of teacher education, the as-yet unnamed institute will conduct research on Hispanics in the Midwest, assist in educational outreach, offer more courses on Hispanics and serve as an information clearinghouse. Some possible research topics include the impact of Michigan's changing economy on the Hispanic labor force, the social and politi cal status of Latinas in the Midwest, and migrant farm worker reset tlement. For more information contact Navarro at Hispanic Research In stitute, 301 Erickson Hall, MSU, East Lansing, Mich . 48824 (517) 3536418 . PROJECT RECEIVES $25,000 The Puente Project, a Berkeley, Calif.-based organization begun in 1982 to increase the transfer rate of California Latinos from com munity colleges to four-year institutions , received a $25,000 grant from the Pacific Telesis Foundation last month . Co-sponsored by the University of California and California Com munity Colleges, the Puente will use the money to fund three con ferences, help develop a marketing strategy, produce additional copies of an informational video and add five new Southern Califor nia community colleges to its network. Puente is a one-year program that teams English teachers, Mexican American counselors and mentors from the professional Latino com munity with Mexican American students at 20 community colleges. INS AND OUTS U.S. Rep . Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.). chairman of the Republican Research Committee, announces he is seeking resumes from Hispanic leaders to fill posts in the Bush administration . Anyone in terested can write Duncan at 133 Cannon Building, Washington, D . C . 20515 ... The Mexican American Women's National Association starts a chapter, MANA del Norte, in the Northern New Mexico area. It has members from Espanola, Santa Fe, SanJuan, El Ritoand Los Alamos. Anyone interested in more information can contact Carmen Rodriguez at P.O. Box 9236, Santa Fe, N . M . 87504 (505) 667-0907. Calendar Dolores Saucedo Cardona (307) 766-6189 COMING SOON TO OUR READERS: To ensure information regard ing your organization ' s upcoming event will be in cluded in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to ap pear. There is no charge . Please include date, loca tion, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor , Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 . THIS WEEK CHICANO WEEK Laramie, Wyo. March 28-April 1 The University of Wyoming's MEChA, a Chicano student organization, will host its third annual Semans Chicana. Events include a showing of the film Stand and Deliver, a panel discussion and a 4 HISPANIC LITERACY San Diego March 28April 1 SEA-Jobs for Progress National Inc . is holding its 23rd annual conference . During the event, which carries the theme 'Literacy, Youth and Work Force 2000,' SEA will discuss its approach to education, training and job placement. The conference will in clude a job fair, several workshops and prominent guest speakers . Joe Campos (214) 631-3999 SCHOOL BOARDS CONVENTION Anaheim, Calif . April 1-4 The National School Boards Association's 49th an nual convention will explore ways for public schools to provide needed services to all students, includ ing those deemed at risk. A luncheon sponsored by the National Caucus of Hispanic School Board Members will also be featured. Phil Smith (703) 838-6722 March 27, 1989 HISPANIC IDENTITY The Tomas Rivera Center Riverside, Calif. April 7 Dick Lloyd (714) 787-5185 SPOTLIGHT NATIONAL MEDIA CONFERENCE: The seventh annual National Hispanic Media Conference and Expo will be held April 19-22 in San Juan, Puerto Rico . The conference will feature more than two dozen panels and workshops, screenings of films and videos produced and/or directed by Hispanics, a display of the works of Hispanic photojournalists from across the U .S. mainland and Puerto Rico, and a job fair where representatives from an array of media companies will recruit students, recent graduates and experienced professionals . For more information contact Jocelyn Cordova at (202) 783-6228 . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED " RIO HONDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT 3600 Workman Mill Road • Whittie r, CA 90608 • Ph o n e (213 ) 692.{)921 SUPERINTENDENT/PRESIDENT RIO HONDO coMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT WHITTIER, CALIFORNIA The Board of Trustees of the Rio Hondo Community College District and the Rio Hondo Superintendent/Presidential Search Committees in vite application and nominations for the position of Superinten dent/President. Educational and Professional Preparation A master's degree from an accredited institution is required; doc toral degree is desired . Candidate must hold or be eligible for a California Community College Chief Administrative Officer credential. A minimum of three years of recently demonstrated successful senior administrative level experience in an eductional institution. Three years of successful teaching/faculty experience . Community College experience is desired. Knowledge of the California Community College system is highly desirable . APPLICATION PROCEDURES Application must include : • A personal letter of intent. • A completed Rio Hondo College form . • A resume addressing the qualifications of the position, which details education, training, and experience . • A one-page statement of educational philosophy and management style . • Transcripts of college coursework. • Three current professional letters of recommendation or placement file. All applications and related materials will be treated as confidential. The applicant is responsible for ensuring that the application and all material are received by the consultant on or before the stated dead line . Failure to submit all required materials will result in the elimination of the applicant's candidacy . Applications are to be obtained by contacting Rio Hondo Community College District Personnel Services 3600 Workman Mill Road Whittier, Calif. 90608 (213) 908-3405 All completed applications, required materials , nominations, and inquiries are to be addressed to: MBF AND ASSOCIATES P.O. Box 321 1 0820 E. Beverly Boulevard Whittier Calif. 90601 APPLICATION AND REQUIRED MATERIALS MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN 5 :00P. M . , APRIL 28, 1989. Rio Hondo is an Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer . NACM= VICE PRESIDENT NACME , a national non-profit organization dedicated to increasing the number of underrepresented minorities in engineering, seeks a skilled, high-energy manager for the position of Vice President. With a constituency among the Fortune 500 companies, technology-intensive universities and the science and engineering establishment, NACME initiates and implements services to precollege and col lege programs across the country . The vice president we seek will manage the organization's scholarship program, seed funding and technical assistance programs and the research effort through which we derive effective program strategy . He or she will also manage the professional and support staff who are responsible for : • stimulating interest in science, mathematics and engineering among minority youth from prekindergarten through high school; and • initiating, improving and supporting NACME programs at the college level. The vice president advises the president in the areas of policy, personnel , operations, fundraising and strategic planning , and manages NACME' s operations in the ab sence of the president. NACME ' s vice presidency is a high visibility position which requires demonstrated success in management , an advanced degree , strong interpersonal and leadership skills, exceptional oral and written communication skills, familiarity with technical career development for minorities and personal commitment to the minority engineering ef fort . At least one degree in a technical field and five years management experience are desirable . Excellent salary and benefits. Send letter with resume to: Search Committee, NACME, 3 West 35th St., New York, N . Y . 1 0001-2281. NACME is an Equal Opportunity Employer . ASSISTANT VICE CHANCELLOR ASSISTANT VICE CHANCELLOR FOR ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES. Supervises coordinators of programs to serve needs of all university students and of academic support programs for minority and disadvantaged students. Coordinates special minority student financial programs . Reports to Vice Chancellor. For application, submit letter of application, vita, all transcripts, 3 letters of recommendation . To apply or to seek further information, write: Dr . Rudolph M. Najar, Associate Dean College of Letters and Sciences University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Whitewater,WI 53190 U . of Wisconsin-Whitewater is an AA/EEO employer. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report March 27, 1989

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6 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED LEI-L\IAN LEHMAN COLLEGE • THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK Bedford Park Boulevard West • Bronx, N.Y . 10468 DIRECTOR OF THE PROGRAM IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE Lehman College seeks to appoint a senior faculty member to direct its program in English as a Second Language. The director will also do research, develop cur riculum, and teach . Qualifications sought include: A doctorate in linguistics, a language, or ap propriate language-related discipline; scholarly accomplishments appropriate for appointment as a full professor; familiarity with research on language acquisiti on and teaching; college-level experience in teaching English as a Second Lan guage; administrative experience; the ability to work with students whose native language is most likely Spanish. Full professor salary range: $46,31 0-$66,31 0, based on qualifications and ex perience. Send resume and letters to: Professor Luis Losada, Chair, ESL Director Search Committee, Lehman College, c/o Office of the Provost, Bronx, New York 10468. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. Foreign Law Specialist Hispanic Law GS-14 $48,592-$63,172 The Library of Congress Washington, D.C. The Library of Congress is seeking an experienced legal specialist in Hispanic law to fill the position of Assistant Chief in the Library's Hispanic Law Division . Applicants must have graduated from a law school in one of the Hispanic nations (including Portuguese-speaking coun tries) and possess substantive specialized experience in Hispanic legal research or in the practice of Hispanic law which demonstrates professional recognition in the field. Bar admission or license to practice law in an appropriate jurisdiction and reading facility in Spanish or Por tuguese is also required. Interested candidates are invited to submit, by April 21, 1989, a Standard Form 171, Application for Federal Employment to: The Library of Con gress, Employment Office, Dept. E, 101 Independence Avenue, S.E., Washington, D .C. 20540, Vacancy Announcement 90056 . Application forms and copies of the vacancy an nouncement may be obtained by call ing (202) 707-5620. Equal Opportuni ty Employer . ASSISTANT ACCOUNT EXECUTIVEPUBLIC RELATIONS We are seeking an ambitious Public Relations professional, or journalist interested in Public Relations, to join our St. Louis office. Work will include Hispanic and general market Public Relations. Qualifications: • Strong writing ability. • Good understanding of the media . • Fluency in spoken and written Spanish . • 1-4 years experience in PR or journalism. • Eager to learn and grow in the PR profession with a proven leader in the industry . • Please send cover letter, resume, and samples of your work to: Joe Trevino Fleishman Hillard, Inc . 200 North Broadway St. Louis, Mo., 63102 Equal Opportunity Employer March 27, 1989 FREE-LANCE WRITERS WANTED One of the nation ' s largest billingual magazines has a few openings for free lance writers . If you would like to have your work published in a national publi cation, call 1-800-826-0869; ask for Steve Solomon. MINORITY AFFAIRS FACUL TV POSITION University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee The Center for Urban Community Development, Division of Outreach and Continuing Education, University of Wis consin, Milwaukee seeks a full-time faculty member, annual position . Duties include designing and develop ing educational programs and applied research to address the needs of Milwaukee's m i nority urban population in areas such as jobs, economic development, community development, education, welfare and human services, housing, and health care. Activities in clude teaching on and off campus, applied research, and service to the community . Qualifications: Earned doctorate, three years experience working with minority issues. Salary: Dependent on qualifications Application Deadline: May 1, 1989 Send cover letter, vita, and three letters of reference to: Minority Affairs Faculty Position Division of Outreach and Continuing Education University of Wisconsin Milwaukee PO Box 413 Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 *" aqleoe*" DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20005 (202) 2340280 . Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p . m . (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED Office of the President Metropolitan State College 1006 11th Street • Denver, Colorado 80204 METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE DENVER COLORADO ANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING TIME PROBATIONARY FACULTY POSITIONS EFFEC TIVE AUGUST 1989. MATERIAL LISTED MUST BE SUBMITTED FOR EACH POSITION TO THE CHAIR LISTED BY APRIL 24, 1989: SCHOOL OF LETTERS ARTS AND SCIENCES CHEMISTRY QUALIFICATIONS: Required Doctoral degree completed by August, 1989. Demonstrated considerable knowledge in the areas of Forensic Science. APPLICANTS MUST SUBMIT: Letter of application stating compliance with the back ground requirements listed . Current resume. Official transcripts from all colleges/universities attended will be re quired of the finalists . Three (3) recent letters of reference from individuals who are in a position to evaluate applicant's expertise as it relates to the job requirements will be required of the finalists. MATERIALS ARE TO BE MAILED TO : Jack Cummins, Department of Chemistry, Box 52 . HISTORY QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. in History. Teaching experience in Western Civilization. Ability to teach Ancient and/or Medieval History and one or more of the following areas will also be considered : European Intellectual, European Women's, European Social History, Teaching Methods in History . APPLICANTS MUST SUBMIT : Letter of application relat ing the applicant ' s expertise to the requirements listed . A current resume. Evidence of successful teaching . A sample of writing . Representive dissertation chapters , manuscripts submitted for publication, or publications may be presented as evidence of writing. At least three recent letters of recommendation from persons who are in a position to com ment upon the applicant's expertise in the job requirements. A tra nscript indicating Ph. D . completion. (Official transcripts required prior to appointment.) MATERIALS ARE TO BE MAILED TO : Dr. Stephen J. Leonard, Chair, History Department. Please contact the Chair listed for a position an nouncement or for further information, Metropolitan State College, 1006 11th St., Denver, Colo. 80204 . Metropolitan State College is an equal opportunity employer. Applications from minorities and women are par ticularly invited. Metropolitan State College does not dis criminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin , sex, age , or handicap in admissions or access to, or treat ment or employment in, its educational programs or ac tivities. Inquiries concerning Title VI and IX may be referred to Dr. Percy Morehouse , Jr., Director of Equal Oppor tunity/Assistant to the President, 1006 11th St., Box 63, Den ver, Colo. 80204, (303) 556-2999 . Inquiries concerning Section 504 may be referred to AHEC, P . O . 4615 -P, Den ver, Colo . 80204 . Or inquiries may be referred to the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education , 1961 Stout St., Denver, Colo. 80294 . Hispanic Unk Weekly Report ARLINGTON COUNTY, •.. PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT mrr-1 I I COURTHOUSE PLAZA. SUIT:511 2100 CLARENDON 80ULEVAR0 ' • ... ALINGTON, VIRGINIA. 22201 Explore Employment Opportunities with Arlington County Government Seminar Arlington County Government Department of Personr,1el is sponsoring three (3) evening seminars to provide job seekers with helpful information in the search for employ ment opportunities with Arlington County . Workshop presenter Marvin A. Cortez, Outreach Specialist with the Personnel Department, will cover the following topics : • Identifying the appropriate job match • Determining relevant skills and abilities for specific positions • Learning to compete effectively The Personnel Department will offer individual assis tance in English and Spanish after the seminar . Interested persons must call (703) 358 -3501 to register for one of the following dates : WHEN: Tuesday , April 11, 1989 Thursday, May 18, 1989 Thursday , June 29 , 1989 All sessions will be held from 7:00 pm9:00 pm WHERE : Arlington County Courthouse 21 00 Clarendon Boulevard County Board Room 3rd Floor Room 307 Arlington, Virginia (Across from the Courthouse Metro stop on the Orange Line) No job Interviews or job offers will be made at this workshop Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer Counseling/Clinical Psychologist Position requirements : License eligible in the State of Ohio skills in and group counseling; assessment and tra1n1ng of graduate students; consultation and outreach . Demonstrated expertise with Asian, Black or Hispanic Student populations desired. Available September 1 , 1989 . Applications will be reviewed starting April 10 . Contact Dr . Denise Y. Hatter, Counseling and Consultation Service, The Ohio State University 1739 N . High Street , Columbus, OH 4321 0, (614) 292-5766, further information. An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer March 27, 1989 7

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Arts & Entertainment In other award news, San Antonio was once again the stage, March 18, for the Tejano Music Awards. Winners were announced in 12 categories at the ceremony held at the Convention Center Arena. OSCAR FOR OLMOS? The entertainment award season winds down this week with the 61 st annual Academy Awards presentation-and a Latino actor has an outside chance for an Oscar in a major category. Four acts were double winners. David Marez won "song of the year" for Ffate and "album of the year, orquesta" for Sold Out . David Lee Garcia y los Musicales won "single of the year" for Me quieras tu, te quiero yo and "album of the year, conjunto" for Tour '88. Edward James Olmos is one of five nominees in the "best actor" category. He was nominated for his portrayal of teacher Jaime Es calante in the film Stand and Deliver. Two of the nominees Dustin Hoffman and Gene Hackman-both prior winners-are Joe Lopez won "male vocalist" and "best vocal duo," the latter with Jimmy Gonzalez, his colleague in the group Mazz. Selena Quintanilla the sole woman among the winners won "female vocalist" and "female entertainer." No had been nominated in this category since 1964, when An thony QUinn was up for the Oscar inZorba the Greek. The only Hispanic to capture a "best actor" award is Jose Ferrer, who won in 1950 for Cyrano de Bergerac. Other award winners were Ramiro Herrera, "male entertainer"; Luis Silva, "songwriter of the year"; Los Dudes, "most promising group" ; and Paulino Bernal in the new "Tejano gospel music artist" category. Spanish director Pedro Almodovar is nominated in the "best foreign film" category for Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. ONE LINERS: Mario Ernesto Sanchez , producing artistic director of Miami's Teatro Avante, was voted "best actor" in the AACT/Fest com petit ion held recently at Daytona Beach ... Spain's New Anthology of Zarzuela continues an engagement this week, through April 2, at New York's City Center ... The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences hands out its Oscars March 29 at Los Angeles' Shrine Auditorium . The ceremony will be broadcast by ABC (check local listings for times) . Media Report 1990 CENSUS PROGRAM: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund launched its nationwide census educa tion outreach program March 23 with press conferences in 12 major cities around the country. The program is designed to reduce the number of Hispanics not counted in the 1990 census. Its national media campaign will consist of network public service announcements on the Univision network and local public service an nouncements . Coordinators of community education campaigns will work with churches, organizations, schools and other entities in the Hispanic community . The production of a ques tion-and-answer brochure, a training booklet for community leaders, posters, an informa tional video and other promotional items is planned. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc . 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 0280 or 234-0737 Publisher : Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Ecfrtor: Felix Pllrez Reporting : Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana. Sales : Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza, Marfa I. San ..ooe No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 In the 1980 census , the first time Hispanics were counted as a separate group, it is es timated that 5% to 10% of the Hispanic popula tion was not counted . MEETING LEGALIZATION REQUIRE MENTS: "Staying Legal," a 16-page special section appearing in the Los Angeles Times and the Spanish-language daily La Opinion March 13, deals with the second phase of the nation ' s legalization program for immigrants. The guide is in English and Spanish and was jointly produced by the Times and La Opinion. It details the requirements for gaining per manent residency, the appeals process and other key aspects of the immigration law . For a free copy, contact the Times at (213) 2375784 . THE MORNING AFTER: Some 250 guests attended the National Association of Hispanic Journalists' first annual scholarship banquet March 8 in New York City. Edna Negron, head of NAHJ's education committee, estimated that at least $20,000 had been raised for the NAHJ scholarship fund. Antonio Mejias-Rentas SECOND EDITION: A new program at Mar quette University in Milwaukee is designed for minorities ready to make second-career choices. Individuals with jobs and college degrees who want to move into print or broad cast journalism will take part in a 12 week intensive reporting-writing-editing skills workshop. The workshop is followed by a four month internship and, after an interview, a full time position in a print or broadcast outlet. The program provides full tuition, workshop-related expenses and a small stipend. Deadline to request applications is April 2. Contact Sharon Murphy at (414} 224-7132 for more informa tion . ETCETERA: Arturo Villar, publisher of Vista magazine, has joined the journalism advisory board of the Los Angeles-based Foundation for American Communications ... Former Hispanic Link News Service reporter Julio Laboy was awarded a 1 0-week reporting internship with Newsday to begin June 12 . Danilo Alfaro CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch . If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. "This job's starting to get to me, Verne. •