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Hispanic link weekly report, April 3, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, April 3, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos joins Interior Secretary Manuel Luj£n on a tour of Indian schools managed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs in California, New Mexico and Arizona. The trip was the first of its kind by two Cabinet members...U.S. Transportation Secretary Samuel Skinner appoints Alicia Casanova of Miami to head the department’s Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization...Freedom magazine, a California-based publication, honors Colorado state Sen. Bob Martinez of Adams County with its human rights advocate award. Martfnez was the sponsor of successful legislation passed last year that provides penalties for mental health profes-
sionals who sexually abuse their patients.. .The Los Angeles City Council approves the nomination of Dennis Luna, a corporate and real estate attorney, to the board of commissioners of the Community Redevelopment Agency...U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service agents arrest in Washington, D.C., Salvadoran America Sosa, leader of Comadres — Committee of the Mothers for the Disappeared. Charged with "entering without inspection," Sosa now faces deportation proceedings...The Marine Corps releases the names of 18 of the 19 Marines killed March 20 in a helicopter crash in South Korea. Four were Latino: Cpi. John Alfonso, 24, Aztec, N.M.; Pfc. Saul Castro, 18, Lamont, Calif.; Lance Cpi. Andrew Hernandez, 19, Arnold, Md.; and Staff Sgt. Jorge Verdugo, 27, Nogales, Ariz...

Leaders Say National Service Proposal Inequitable
The dream of a college education for many disadvantaged students would be postponed, and perhaps permanently denied, say Hispanic leaders, under recently introduced legislation that would require many students to perform national service to receive federal financial aid.
By diverting low-income and even middle-in-come students into civilian and military service to earn "vouchers" that would later pay for college tuition, Hispanics say the Citizenship and National Service bill would have the effect of sidetracking some of the promising, poor youths who now obtain direct grants and federally subsidized loans, or who participate in work-study programs.
‘Genetics’ Cut Off Tests
Tests drafted by a professor who in earlier research concluded that "inherited genetic material" probably causes the poor performance of some Hispanic students were banned March 21 by Bronx school district No. 11.
The tests, written by Lloyd Dunn, University of Hawaii faculty affiliate, are used worldwide and available in every New York City school district to measure language and spelling skills and screen pupils for special education classes.
A1987 research paper by Dunn sparked the ban. In it, he wrote: "While many people are willing to blame the low scores of Puerto Ricans and Mexican- Americans on their poor conditions, few are prepared to face the probability that inherited genetic material is a contributing factor."
In the 87-page document, Dunn concluded, "...Hispanic pupils and their parents have also failed the schools and society because they have not been motivated and dedicated enough to make the system work for them."
According to a spokesman for the city’s Board of Education, the research paper is being reviewed. He noted, however, that the decision to ban tests is one made by individual districts.
"It interrupts the educational cycle," says Eduardo Pena, chairman of the League of United Latin American Citizens’ Foundation, which sponsors education programs, and a Washington, D.C.-based attorney. "It would create too many situations that tend to siphon off students from continuing their education."
But backers of the bill respond to the criticisms.
“We all owe something to our country, and this bill offers a way for young people to give something back to their country," says Cindy Cain, press secretary for one of the co-sponsors of the legislation, Rep. Bill McCurdy (D-Okla.).
Under the proposal, a quasi-public agency would administer the national service plan, which would be phased in over a five-year period.
On the military side, participants would earn vouchers worth $12,000 for eight years of military reserve based on the current reserve
The National Council of La Raza has endorsed legislation introduced March 22 by Rep. Howard Berman (D-Calif.) that would borrow more than $150 million from funds intended for newly legalized immigrants and use the money to help resettle Soviet Jews.
The funds would be taken from State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants and repaid in 1991.
Another bill, recently introduced by Sens. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Robert Kasten (R-Wis.), proposed the transfer of SLIAG funds without repayment.
SLIAG funds are provided to states on a formula basis to offset public health, public assistance and education costs associated with legalization under the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act. Among those costs are the English and civics classes that many immigrants need to be eligible for permanent residency. These requirements must be fulfilled 30 months after filing.
The 1991 repayment date in the Berman bill would come too late for the funds to be used
requirements of regular weekend duty and a longer duty period each year. A $24,000 voucher would be given to individuals who sign up for two years of active military duty and six years of reserve status.
Those who opt for the civilian route would be paid $100 a week and receive a $10,000 voucher for one year of civilian duty and a $20,000 one for two years. Federal health benefits are also offered. Participants would be placed in jobs with social service agencies, nursing homes, schools or other community work. If students need more financial aid to cover college costs, they could then apply for other federal aid, including subsidized loans.
Pena says this aspect of the plan offers its own set of drawbacks, pointing out that the legislation provides no money to assist community service organizations with training or supervising these workers—expected to number in the hundreds of thousands.
for education of applicants seeking permanent residency.
Mario Moreno, director of the Washington, D.C., office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said that although his group took no position on the Berman bill, it had serious reservations. One concern was that the repayment provision might be dropped. But, he added, "We don’t have the muscle to fight with the Jewish community. If push comes to shove, Hispanics will take a back seat.”
Cecilia Munoz, senior immigration policy analyst for the NCLR, called the Berman bill a compromise. It issued a report finding that even before any diminished funding, "the capacity of the current ESL/civics delivery system will be severely tested." Munoz said that the problem was less a financial one and more one of implementation. "We would not be endorsing this bill if we thought it would endanger even one applicant," she said.
The bill is currently under consideration by the House Judiciary and Appropriations committees. — Danilo Alfaro
continued on page 2
Groups Differ on Legalization Fund Use


fi
N.Y.C. Latinos Disagree on Benefits of City Govt. Overhaul
Latinos in New York City disagree whether a March 22 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that will upend the city's monumental government will reap the community increased political clout.
The court found that the city’s practice of giving each of its five boroughs one vote on the Board of Estimate violated the constitutional principle of one person one vote. Borough populations range from 377,600 on Staten Island to 2,309,600 in Brooklyn.
The eight-member board oversees the city budget, land development, contracts and franchises. In addition to the five borough heads, sitting on the body are the mayor, the comptroller and the City Council president, each with two votes. Bronx Borough Presi-
dent Fernando Ferrer is the sole Latino on the board.
Currently, there are three Hispanics on the 35-member City Council.
Some of the options being considered are increasing the number of council districts to 59, giving the body veto power over the city budget; and elimination of the board, switching to a mayor-council system.
Luis Caban, associate director of the Mid-west/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project, predicted that Latinos should pick up some councilmanic seats if the Charter Revision Committee suggests that more be added in the larger boroughs. But Caban added there is a "real possibility" that
Hispanics may make up a smaller percentage in a larger body.
“I don’t think there will be a net gain of influence," said Caban.
Angelo Falc6n, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, said, "Anything that shakes up the current political arrangement has got to be positive."
Noting that most of the candidates running in the November general elections, the time by which the charter commission hopes to have a new structure in place, will want to say they did something to increase Latino representation, Falcon projected a gain for Latinos.
Falc6n said the three Latinos who serve on the 15-member Charter Revision Commission will give added leverage.
— Felix P6tez
j!

Report Says N.Y.C. Banks Discriminate
Hispanics and blacks trying to open checking accounts at branches away from their homes and jobs are discriminated against by several major banks in New York City, said a new study by two state legislators.
Conducted by Sen. Franz Leichter and Assemblyman Herman Farrell, both Democrats from Manhattan, it found that branches in predominantly white areas of Manhattan’s Upper East and West Sides were reluctant to open accounts for Hispanics and blacks who did not live or work within a 10-block radius.
The study’s six investigators, two of whom were white Hispanic women and one a black Hispanic woman, visited more than 60
Overall, the program would draw about 800,000 participants, say its sponsors.
That number is considerably smaller than the 3.9 million college undergraduates who currently receive some type of federal financial aid.
The bill, co-sponsored by Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.), is one of five national service proposals introduced this congressional session. The McCurdy-Nunn legislation has received the most attention because it contains the more stringent provisions. The House Education and Labor Committee will hold hearings on all of them by early summer.
Nunn's office estimates the bill would cost $13 billion, $5 billion more than the federal government disburses in financial aid for college students.
Janice Petrovich, director of the Washington, D.C., office of Aspira, a leadership training and educational services organization, says a system of separate and unequal education would likely result from the plan.
"It isn't fair," she says, because it establishes “differential treatment" for students who cannot afford college.
branches of Citibank, Chemical Bank, Chase Manhattan, Manufacturers Hanover and Marine Midland Bank. There, the banks waived the 10-block rule 77% of the time for white investigators seeking to open a checking account and 22% for black and Hispanic investigators.
Also, black and Hispanic investigators were asked where they lived and worked 84% of the time, while white inverstigators were asked 50% of the time. White males were asked 40%.
“Right now we are researching if any legislation is necessary," Al Taylor, Farrell’s assistant and one of the investigators, said.
— Mario Santana
She also scoffs at claims that the national service plan would reverse a downward trend of college enrollment by low-income students.
Certainly, she says, Hispanic enrollment is not declining. Even though the increase might simply be a matter of greater Hispanic numbers in general, she says enrollment is not likely to be spurred by the plan.
Among the problems Pena sees are situations in which "students get used to making a living" and leave these jobs for better-paying ones, if they choose military service, he says, there's the possibility that they will stay in .the service without pursuing their education.
He adds that the proposal effectively takes away the momentum of students who wish to continue their education.
"Right at the outset, our students would fall behind a year or two."
Cain, from McCurdy’s office, counters: "Working a year or two before college would make students more mature and clearer about their course of study."
— Doug Martinez
Texas College-Readiness Exam Not Fair: Educator
A new test evaluating the college-level competence of Texas high school seniors and col- j lege freshmen will decrease the number of j Hispanics and blacks who continue their education, said the leader of the Texas As- ! sociation of Chicanos in Higher Education.
The Texas Academic Skills Program Test, designed to measure the students' com- i petence in English, math and writing, will be re- I. quired of all incoming freshmen. Students must | pass the test to take junior-level courses.
Ramon Dovalina, president of TACHE, said } that reliance on the test will considerably : reduce Hispanics’ chances to succeed in col- \ lege. He said that how a student performs in : his or her first college semester should also be considered.
Hispanics had a passing rate of 69%, blacks 58% and Anglos 87%. The test results were an- : nounced March 23.
The rates were criticized by Texas Higher Education Commissioner Kenneth Ashworth j because the test-takers were not repre-sentative. Ashworth noted that 81% of the test- j takers were enrolled or plan to enroll in I four-year universities. Only 28% of Texas’ col- 1 lege freshmen enroll in four-year institutions.
— Luis Restrepo
Law Schools Join Boycott
More than 35 law schools across the j
country will stage a one-day boycott of |
classes April 6 to protest the lack of Latino ; faculty members in Boalt Law School at the University of California, Berkeley.
According to ReneSaucedo, second-year law student at Boalt and co-chair of its Coalition for Diversified Faculty, just one Latino, Daniel Rodriguez, serves on the law school’s 50-member faculty. Recently, the school offered a position to a Latina, Ra-quel Moran. ,
No Latinos and one black man are mem- ; bers of the school’s tenured faculty. Cur-rently, 6 to 8% of Boalt students are Latino.
Experts Deny Plan Would Aid Students
continued from page 1
April 3,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


Arturo Madrid
The Official-Language Myth
One of the many myths that inform U.S. society says that English, or language itself, principally holds us together. According to this view, the use of languages other than English fragments us as a people.
In recent years, we have seen the development of a powerful movement that seeks to restrict the use of languages other than English and to make English the official language of the United States.
The real issue, however, is not the legal status of English or the use of languages other than English in private and public life. The real issue is literacy.
We currently have more than 25 million illiterates in the United States, and the overwhelming majority of them speak only English.
What the United States needs is a highly literate population that is able to deal with accelerating change in all realms of daily life.
Not surprisingly, no national policy requires us to be literate. The national programs that promote literacy are, for the most part, volunteer in nature and privately funded. These include the one just inaugurated by First Lady Barbara Bush.
LANGUAGE POLICY USED TO CONTROL
There is precious little recognition of the fact that persons who are literate in Spanish or any other language are more able and more likely to become literate in English than illiterates, whatever language they speak.
Making English the official language of the United States is a false policy issue. The 1980 census revealed that 98% of U.S. residents speak English. Surveys show that the vast majority of immigrants want to and do learn English.
Surprisingly, however, there is no national policy nor are there programs to support the teaching of English to non-English speakers. Programs that do exist are oversubscribed and poorly funded.
Giving English an official status is the latest manifestation of a tradition of policy-making that has, in large measure, been informed by fear, suspicion and intolerance of persons who are different from the majority. Language policy has been an instrument of control used to exclude certain groups from participating fully in the institutions of our society as well as to deny them the rights and benefits that accrue to members of this nation.
INSIST ON POWER OF DIVERSITY
Without question, the most pernicious historical example of this has been the imposition of civil restrictions based on literacy. Literacy was denied or its acquisition made difficult for blacks, Indians and Latinos. English literacy tests were used to keep non-whites from voting until the 1963 Voting Rights Act.
If the unity and strength of U.S. society are at issue, then our energies need to be directed at language policies that empower all citizens rather than punish some. Rather than succumb to the rhetoric of those who equate patriotism with speaking English and strength with homogeneity, let us insist on the primacy of literacy, on the power of our diversity, and on the participation of all citizens in the institutions of our society.
One of the principal strengths of our society has been its tradition of struggle against discrimination, exclusion and xenophobia. What keeps it together is tolerance for cultural, religious, social, political and even linguistic differences. What makes us a great nation is the creativity of our diversity.
If the unity and integrity of our nation are what is at issue, then we must learn to respect diversity in all its forms.
(Arturo Madrid is president of the TomSts Rivera Center, an institute for policy studies that addresses Latino issues. It is located in Claremont, Calif.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
REPORT FROM LOCOLAND: Earthquakes aren't the only peril that’s quivering California’s cuckoos. They’re also diddering over: THE BROWN PERIL: This is the week that Los Angeles teachers vote on whether they want to accept bonuses of up to $5,000 a year for learning and using another skill in their work. Of course they’ll accept it. Who would turn down 50 shiny $100 bills?
Truth is, they very well might. The skill that the Los Angeles Unified School District wants to reward them for is language. And, led by LEAD — Learning English Advocates Drive — a number of teachers there have mounted a hateful campaign to reject the offer.
As the student composition of the district changed, these so-called educators were given years to pick up the skills that would keep them from becoming obsolete and incompetent. But they chose to remain monolingual. And now they want to discourage capable, committed teachers from working in a district with more than 160,000 kids who must have bilingual instruction if they are to survive.
Remember when changes in technology eliminated the need for some of those guys in our choochoo trains to do anything more than wave to the kiddies at the RR Xings?
The unions saved their jobs at the public’s expense, and the term "featherbedding" came into popular use. Now teachers’ unions are trying the same tactic to protect their fossils — and nuestros hijos are paying the high price.
THE NEON PERIL: Monterey Park is one of five cities in San Gabriel Valley which toss a tizzy at the sight of foreign signs. Pomona, Temple City, San Marino and San Gabriel also have passed ordinances limiting use of "foreign” languages on commercial signs. Most insist that the signs be 75% English. Snooty San Marino, which some years back tried to ban trucks from its streets unless they were making a delivery in the town, requires 80%.
Suzanne Crowell, its assistant mayor, told Pasadena Star-News reporter Shiela Salazar that the Chinese and Spanish signs "horrified" her, adding: "There’s no reason to have to start catering to a group of people who can’t even read English."
And some firefighters in the Valley have complained that the signs confuse them when they go out on a call. Hmmm. It makes me wonder whether they’ve heard the old adage 'Where there’s smoke...’.
THE 62-INCH PERIL: When United Farm Workers vp Dolores Huerta — all 62 inches and 110 pounds of her — was rebuffed in her quest for justice by the San Francisco Police Commission after cops there broke her ribs and ruptured her spleen because she couldn’t move fast enough for them, reader Virginia Tanzer offered this commentary in the San Francisco Chronicle:
"Editor — Thank heaven Police Chief Frank Jordan won against Dolores Huerta. Nowadays in this city the dominant forces almost always decide in favor of the kooks, the offbeats and the far lefts. It is wonderful indeed to know that somebody still believes in middle class American values of honor and decency." Is she serious?
I don’t know, but I think Califas is finally ready to slip into the sea. Que le vaya bien.
— KayBarbaro
Quoting...
RICHARD LOBO, president of the Miami NBC-TV affiliate, WTVJ, quoted in The New York Times Feb. 6 on his station’s effective efforts to capture young Hispanic viewers:
"If there is no new massive Hispanic migration, in one generation Spanish-language television will become irrelevant as a market force."
3
April 3,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
POVERTY: "Poverty in the United States: 1987“ is a 128-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau which breaks down poverty by racial and ethnic group, geographic region, age and sex. For a copy contact the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 782-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
SCHOOL DESEGREGATION: "Status of School Desegregation: 1968-1986," a 31-page report by the National School Boards Association, concludes that segregation for Hispanic students has increased in nearly every part of the country. Regional, state and city breakdowns are included. To obtain a copy, send $15 to Special Program Services Department, NSBA, 1680 Duke St., Alexandria, Va 22314 (703) 838-6722.
COLLEGE FINANCING: "College Cost Planner" is an eight-page publication that provides information on how to choose the right college, receive financial aid and other issues dealing with higher education. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute publishes it three times ayear. For afree copy, contact CHCI, 504 C St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 543-1771 or 1-800-367-5273.
TRAVEL FRAUD: "Telemarketing Travel Fraud" is a pamphlet that tells how to avoid fradulent travel offers and what to do if you are a victim of one. For a copy send 500 to Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81009.
TEEN AIDS PAMPHLET: "Saturday Night Special" is a 27-page booklet in a “photonovel" format that directs easy-to-understand information about preventing AIDS to teen-agers. Single copies are $1.50 (discounts are available on bulk orders). Order through Network Publications, P.O. Box 1830, Santa Cruz, Calif. 95061-1830 (408) 438-4080.
PUERTO RICAN ORGANIZATIONS: "Directory of Puerto Rican Organizations" is a 215-page publication by the National Puerto Rican Coalition that includes a listing of organizations, their histories and other sources dealing with Puerto Ricans. Copies are $7.50 for NPRC members, $10 for non-members. Contact NPRC, 1700 KSt. NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-3915.
LULAC REPORTER: The League of United Latin American Citizens recently published the first issue of its LULAC National Reporter. The introductory, eight-page publication provides information on initiatives LULAC is undertaking, profiles leaders within the group and comments on events of the day and how they affect Hispanics. For a free copy, send a self-addressed, 10"x13" envelope with 450 postage to LULAC National Office, 342 Wilkens, San Antonio, Texas 78210 (512) 533-1976.
CONNECTING
MCDONALD’S SEEKS STUDENT ARTISTS
McDonald's restaurants are seeking Hispanic students in grades one through nine from the U.S. mainland and Puerto Rico to participate in the 1989 McDonald’s Hispanic Heritage Art Contest.
One grand prize winner will be selected from first-third grade entrants, one from grades four through six and one from seventh- to ninth- grade participants. The winners, each with a parent or guardian and teacher, will receive an all-expense-paid trip to Los Angeles during Hispanic Heritage Week, Sept. 10-16.
The three winners and 45 semifinalists will have their work displayed in an exhibit that will travel the country.
Complete contest rules and entry forms can be obtained by writing McDonald’s Hispanic Heritage Art, P.O. Box 11189, Chicago, III. 60611, or by calling (312) 836-7297. All entries must be postmarked no later than midnight, May 31.
GROUPS AIM TO DEFINE DROPOUTS
Beginning next fall, 28 states will participate in a project attempting to develop a standardized definition of a dropout. If it sticks, the definition will give a more accurate picture of the dropout problem and will allow for comparisons across state lines, comparisons that up to now have been suspect.
The project, undertaken by the U.S. Education Department’s National Center for Education Statistics and the Council of Chief State School Officers, hopes to help generate solutions to the dropout problem by defining it more precisely. The new formula will not count as dropouts students who have transferred, those who are suspended or expelled and re-enroll within ayear, and those who are sick or have died.
INS AND OUTS
The National Council of La Raza’s Policy Analysis Center has announced the availability of a 6-12 month fellowship in public policy analysis as part of its Hispanic Initiative on Long-Term Poverty.
The selected fellow will receive approximately $1,200 per month. For more information contact Julie Quiroz at NCLR, 810 First St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002, or call (202) 289-1380...
The Cuban American National Council is seeking applicants who are in college or are recent graduates for three nine-week internships this summer in New York, Miami and Los Angeles. Pay is $8 an hour.
Deadline is May 8. Contact Alina Becker at CANC, 300 S.W. 12th Ave., Third Floor, Miami, Fla. 33130-2038 (305) 642-3484.
Calendar_____________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Unk's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
IMMIGRATION/REFUGEE POLICY Washington, D.C. April 6, 7 The Center for Migrant Studies will hold a conference on the consequences of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act, legal immigration reform and the basis for U.S. refugee policy. Featured will be experts from a range of agencies,
government, legal practice, the social sciences and volunteer organizations.
Lydio Tomasi (718) 351 -8800
THE BLACK AND HISPANIC PRESS Harrisburg, Pa. April 6, 7
College and medical center administrators will meet with minority media representatives to discuss "Working with the Black and Hispanic Press" and to learn how more effectively to publicize their activities in the black and Hispanic press. Jerry Lopes, news director of Sheridan Broadcasting Network, and Harry Caicedo, editor of Vista magazine, will speak.
Arthur Ciervo (717) 691-0983 HISPANIC IDENTITY Riverside, Calif. April 7
The problems of submerged identities and loss of separate cultures, stereotypes imposed by the mainstream population and efforts by Latinos to define and preserve Hispanic culture in U.S. society will be discussed atthe annual Tom&s Rivera Center
conference. San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros heads a lineup of distinguished Hispanic speakers. Dick Uoyd (714) 787-5185
FAMILY HISTORY REVISITED Riverside, Calif. April 8
Some of the nation's best known genealogists will gather for the fifth annual Hispanic Family History Seminar, titled Buscando nuestras rakes—Searching for Our Roots. Topics will include information sources, nobility records and research techniques. George Ryskamp (714) 682-5072
DRUG AND ALCOHOL PREVENTION Ftockville, Md. April 8
The Care Center announces its fourth annual Montgomery County Drug and Alcohol Prevention conference. Special emphasis will be placed on Montgomery County’s multicultural and ethnic diversity, and workshops will be conducted in English and Spanish.
Nancy Berk (301) 770-3280
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
April 3,1989
4


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
f>PBS
MANAGER
Program Business Affairs PBS
PBS is seeking an experienced television professional to manage all PBS program contracts and license agreements. Candidate should have at least 5 years experience in production control or business affairs, along with a Bachelor's degree in TV production or business administration. Strong budgeting skills with the ability to conduct negotiations, and familiarity with licensing practices are required. PBS offers a salary commensurate with experience and a competitive benefits package. Interested candidates should respond with letter of interest, resume, and salary requirement to:
PBS
Attn: Carla A. Gibson 1320 Braddock Place Alexandria, VA 22314 PBS is an equal opportunity employer
DISEASE PREVENTION SPECIALIST I
The Iowa Department of Public Health has a Disease Prevention Specialist I position open. The salary ranges from $21,465.60-$26,332.80 annually.
Applications may be requested by mail from the Iowa Department of Personnel, Grimes State Office Bldg., East 14th and Grand, Des Moines, Iowa. 50319-0075. Completed applications must be returned by April 14,1989, to The Iowa Department of Personnel, Recruitment Section, Grimes State Office Bldg., East 14th and Grand, Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0075. Applicants should also submit a resume to the Iowa Department of Public Health, Disease Prevention Division, Lucas State Office Bldg., Des Moines, Iowa, 50319-0075, ATTN: Carolyn Caquelin.
Although the job is based in Tolk County, applicants must be available for travel and have two years of public contact experience. Knowledge and interest in communicable or sexually transmitted disease control and immunization practices would be valuable. Ability to maintain confidentiality is mandatory. Additional job information may be obtained by calling (515) 242-5149.
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
PERSONNEL DIRECTORS
On April 17, we will publish our 1989 "Media Edition."
This special issue will reach our subscribers (now at 1,200 advocates and professionals across 38 states, Puerto Rico and Canada) AND a projected 1,000 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 19-22 National Hispanic Media Conference in Puerto Rico.
In addition to our regular "Marketplace" section, Weekly Report will carry a full page of “Opportunities in the Media" for the edition. If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, special audience, we welcome your ad in either section.
Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, April 7.
ARLINGTON COUNTY, VIRGINIA PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT
#1 COURTHOUSE PLAZA SUITE SI I
2IOO CLARENDON BOULEVARD ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 22201
Explore Employment Opportunities with Arlington County Government Seminar
Arlington County Government Department of Personnel is sponsoring three (3) evening seminars to provide job seekers with helpful information in the search for employment opportunities with Arlington County.
Workshop presenter Marvin A. Cortez, Outreach Specialist with the Personnel Department, will cover the following topics:
• Identifying the appropriate job match
• Determining relevant skills and abilities for specific positions
• Learning to compete effectively
The Personnel Department will offer individual assistance in English and Spanish after the seminar.
Interested persons must call (703) 358-3501 to register for one of the following dates:
WHEN: Tuesday, April 11,1989 Thursday, May 18, 1989 Thursday, June 29, 1989 All sessions will be held from 7:00 pm- 9:00 pm WHERE: Arlington County Courthouse 2100 Clarendon Boulevard County Board Room - 3rd Floor Room 307 Arlington, Virginia (Across from the Courthouse Metro stop on the Orange Line)
No job interviews or job offers will be made at this workshop
Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer
PRODUCER
Producer for daily, 7-minute, national Spanish language newscast—NOTICIERO LATINO—and weekend edition— SEMANARIO LATINO.
Duties: assign reporters stories, edit tapes, write scripts, mix program, prepare for distribution.
Qualifications: Bilingual (English/Spanish), excellent radio production experience, writing/editing skills.
Send resume to: Samuel Orozco, 1111 Fulton Mall, No. 700, Fresno, Calif. 93721 (209) 489-5174.
ASSISTANT CONFERENCE COORDINATOR
In search of bilingual person for Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards conference. Entails clerical work, research and travel. Firm is located in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. Salary from $15,000-$17,000. Benefits. Call (301) 244-7101.
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April 3,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
GUADALUPE’S FIFTH: Encore screenings of the five most popular films exhibited at San Antonio’s Guadalupe Theater celebrate the fifth anniversary of that city’s historic movie house.
The special film series, The Best of Five Years, will be presented April 6-9 and April 13-16.
Based on audience attendance, the five most popular films screened at the Guadalupe are: Tasio (screening April 6, 8, 14 and 16), Camila (April 6 and 9), El norte (April 7 and 9), Carmen (April 7 and 13) and Zoot Suit (April 8 and 13).
A special reception is planned for the April 6 screenings to welcome Eduardo Dfaz, former Guadalupe Theater manager. Diaz is now executive director of the El Paso Cultural Planning Council.
LATIN CANTON: A series of free Latino music, film, dance and drama events continue at Saint Lawrence University in Canton, N.Y., this week as part of its 1989 Steinman Festival of the Arts.
The festival, titled Latin American Art: Voices of Struggle, Vision and Hope, culminates this week with the April 9 unveiling of a mural painted by the Orlando Letelier Mural Brigade.
Other festival events this week include an April 7 poetry reading titled Our Sisters’ Voices and the April 9 screening of the film Kiss of the Spider Woman.
Latin American Art continues through April 12.
INDEPENDENTS DELIVER: Stand and Deliver, the film portraying calculus teacher Jaime Escalante, was named best movie at the Independent Spirit Awards ceremony the weekend of March 24. The film also won best actor, Edward James Olmos, best director, Ramon Menendez, and best supporting actress, Roseanne De Soto. The awards are given out by Independent Feature Project/West.
ONE MORE AWARD: The Univision Spanish-language television network and Billboard magazine have joined forces to produce the new Lo Nuestro music awards.
Nominees in 19 categories in ballad, tropical and regional Mexican genres were announced last month. Winners will be disclosed at a televised ceremony May 31.
ONE LINERS: Linda Ronstadt has announced she will record her second Spanish-language album in Mexico this month...Raquel Welch is in Australia filming Trouble in Paradise, a movie intended for the CBS television network...
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
NOTICIAS DEL DESEMPLEO: The second-largest Spanish-language newspaper in Los Angeles, Noticias del Mundo, has laid off 11 of its 72 employees. Publisher Philip Sanchez said savings from the action will help the chain launch new editions in New Jersey and the San Francisco/San Jose area.
The newspaper also publishes in New York City.
Sanchez denied rumors that the Los Angeles edition of the Sun Yung Moon-owned newspaper would be shut down. He said that revenues from the Los Angeles edition would help sustain the San Francisco venture during its formative years. "In a year or two, we’ll get Los Angeles back into shape and then colonize another city," he said.
MIAMI-BOUND: Giselle Fernandez, Chicago’s first Latina anchorperson, leaves
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana.
Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza, Marfa I. San Jaee
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
WBBM-TV to take a new position at Miami’s WCIX-TV May 1. The Latino Committee on the Media in Chicago is working to ensure that her replacement will be another Hispanic. "There are several prospects," said Chairperson Mary Gonzalez Koenig. "We’ve been talking to the general manager to hold him to his promise of filling the spot with a Hispanic...” KEEPING THEM HONEST: The National Hispanic Media Coalition in Los Angeles is examining figures on Hispanic employment at television stations in New York and New Jersey whose licenses are up for renewal.
"I’m willing to bet that they do not comply," said Chairperson Esther Renteria. In the past year, the group has filed discrimination claims against three radio stations in Miami and three television stations in Los Angeles.
MINORITY STUDENT RECRUITMENT: The premiere screening of an outreach and career information videotape developed to encourage young people to pursue careers in journalism was held March 29 in Washington, D.C.
"Minorities in Journalism: Making a Difference," a production of KETC-TV in St. Louis, was funded primarily by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting with assistance from the National Association of Black Journalists.
Vincent Reed, vice president/communica-tions at The Washington Post said, "We believe the tape will be a valuable resource for students interested in learning about a career in journalism...”
BILINGUAL PHONE DIRECTORY: The Hispanic Yellow Pages, a Spanish/English directory of business and community services, will debut this year in Arizona’s Phoenix/Maricopa County area. Direct Language Inc., the nation's largest publisher of foreign-language directories, will publish the new edition. It will be distributed in November free of charge to 65,000 homes, businesses and community organizations, reaching more than 245,000 readers.
— Danilo Alfaro
"We’ll allow the 12 golden idols and the seven temples you say Mr. Cortez ravaged, but the feathered serpents aren’t deductible."
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


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" \ Making The News This Week sionals who sexually abuse their patients .. .The Los Angeles City Council approves the nomination of Dennis Luna , a corporate and real estate attorney , to the board of commissioners of the Community Redevelopment Agency ... U .S. Immigration and Naturalization Service agents arrest in Washington, D .C., Salvadoran AmericaSosa, leader of Comadres -Committee of the Mothers tor the Disappeared. Charged with "entering without inspection," Sosa now faces deporta tion proceedings ... The Marine Corps releases the names of 18 of the 19 Marines killed March 20 in a helicopter crash in South Korea. Four were Latino : Cpl. John Alfonso, 24, Aztec, N. M.; Pte. Saul Castro, 18, Lamont, Calit.; . Lance Cpl. AndrewHernandez, 19, Arnold, Md.; and Staff Sgt . Jorge Verdugo, 27, Nogales, Ariz ... U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos joins Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan on a tour of Indian schools managed by the Bureau of In dian Affairs in California, New Mexico and Arizona. The trip was the first of its kind by two Cabinet members ... U.S. Transportation Secretary Samuel Skinner appoints Alicia Casanova of Miami to head the department's Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utiliza tion ... Freedom magazine, a California-based publication, honors Colorado state Sen. Bob Martinez of Adams County with its human rights advocate award. Martinez was the sponsor of successful legisla tion passed last year that provides penalties for mental health pratesVol. 7 No.14 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY RE ORT April3, 1989 Leaders Say National Service Proposal Inequitable The dream of a college education tor many "It interrupts the educational cycle," says requirements of weekend duty and a disadvantaged students would be postponed, EduardoPeria, chairmanoftheLeagueofUnited longer duty peno? A and perhaps permanently denied, say Latin American Citizens' Foundation, which voucher would be to 1n?.1V1duals who s1g. n Hispanic leaders, under recently introduced sponsors education programs, and a up for two years of act1ve military duty and s1x legislation that would require many students to Washington, D. C.-based attorney. "It would years of reserve status . perform national service to receive federal create too many situations that tend to siphon Those who opt for the civilian route would be financial aid. off students from continuing their education." paid $100 a week and receive a $10,000 By diverting low-income and even middle-inBut backers of the bill respond to the voucher for one year of civilian duty and a come students into civilian and military service criticisms . $20,000 one for two years . Federal health to earn "vouchers" that would later pay for col"We all owe something to our country, and this also would be lege tuition, Hispanics say the Citizenship and bill offers a way for young people to give someplaced 1n JObs With soc1al serv1ce agenc1es, National Service bill would have the effect of thing back to their country " says Cindy Cain, nurs1ng homes , schools or other commumty sidetracking some of the promising, poor press secretary tor one of, the co sponsors of work . If students need more financial aid to youths who now obtain direct grants and the legislation, Rep. Bill McCurdy (D-Okla.). cover college the.y could apply for federally subsidized loans, or who participate Under the proposal, a quasi-public agency federal 1nclud1ng subs1d1zed loans . in work-study programs . would administer the national service plan, Pena says th1s aspe?t plan offers 1ts ?Wn which would be phased in over a five-year set of drawbacks, p01nt1ng out that the leglsla1Genetics' Cut Off Tests Tests drafted by a professor who in ear lier research concluded that "inherited genetic material" probably causes the poor performance of some Hispanic students were banned March 21 by Bronx school district No . 11. The tests, written by Lloyd Dunn, Univer sity of Hawaii faculty affiliate, are used worldwide and available in every New York City school district to measure lan guage and spelling skills and screen pupils tor special education c l asses . A 1987 research paper by Dunn sparked the ban. In it, he wrote: "While many people are willing to blame the low scores of Puer to Ricans and MexicanAmericans on their poor conditions, few are prepared to face the probability that inherited genetic material is a contributing factor." In the 87-page document, Dunn con cluded, " . . . Hispanic pupils and their parents have also failed the schools and society because they have not been motivated and dedicated enough to make the system work tor them." According to a spokesman for the city's Board of Education, the research paper is being reviewed. He noted , however, that the decision to ban tests is one made by in dividual districts . period . lion provides no money to assist community on the military side, participants would earn organizations with training or vouchers worth $ 1 2 000 for eight years of 1ng these workers-expected to number 1n the military reserve based on the current reserve hundreds of thousands. continued on page 2 Groups Differ on Legalization Fund Use The National Council of La Raza has en dorsed legislation introduced March 22 by Rep . Howard Berman (D-Calif.) that would borrow more than $150 million from funds in tended for newly legalized immigrants and use the money to help resettle Soviet Jews . The funds would be taken from State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants and repaid in 1991. Another bill, recently introduced by Sens. Ed ward Kennedy (D-Mass . ) and Robert Kasten (R-Wis .), proposed the transfer of SLIAG funds without repayment. SUAG funds are provided to states on a for mula basis to offset public health, public assis tance and education costs associated with legalization under the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act. Among those costs are the English and civics classes that many immigrants need to be eligible for permanent residency. These requirements must be ful filled 30 months after filing . The 1991 repayment date in the Berman bill would come too late tor the funds to be. used tor education of applicants seeking permanent residency . Mario Moreno, director of the Washington , D . C : , office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said that although his group took no position on the Berman bill , it had serious reservations. One concern was that the repayment provision might be dropped . But, he added, "We don't have the muscle to fight with the Jewish community . If push comes to shove, Hispanics will take a back seat." Cecilia Munoz, senior immigration policy analyst for the NCLR, called the Berman bill a compromise. It issued a report finding that even before any diminished funding, "the capacity of the current ESLJcivics delivery system will be severely tested." Munoz said that the problem was less a financial one and more one of implementation. "We would not be endorsing this bill if we thought it would endanger even one applicant , " she said . The bill is currently under consideration by the House Judiciary and Appropriations commit tees . -Danilo Alfaro

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N.Y.C. Latinos Disagree on Benefits of City Govt. Overhaul Latinos in New York City disagree whether a March 22 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that will upend the city ' s monumental government will r eap the community in creased polit i cal clout. The court found that the city's practice of giving each of i ts five boroughs one vote on the Board of Estimate violated the constitu tional principle of one person one vote . Borough populations range from 377,600 on Staten Island to 2,309,600 in Brooklyn. The eight member board oversees the city budget, land development, contracts and franchises . In addit i on to the five borough heads, sitting on the body are the mayor, the comptroller and the City Council president , each with two votes . Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer is the sole Latino on the board. Currently , there are three Hispanics on the 35-member City Council. Some of the options being considered are increasing the number of council districts to 59 , giving the body veto power over the city budget; and elimination of the board, switching to a mayor-council system . Luis Caban, associate d irector of the Mid west/Northeast Voter Registrat i on Educat ion Project, predicted that Latinos should pick up some councilmanic seats if the Charter Revis i on Committee suggests that more be added in the larger boroughs. But Caban added there is a "real possibility" t hat Report Says N.Y.C. Banks Discriminate Hispanics and b l acks trying to open checking accounts at branches away from their homes and jobs are disc r iminated against by several major banks in New York City, said a new study by two state leg i slators . Conducted by Sen. Franz Leichter and As semblyman Herman Farrell, both Democrats from Manhattan, it found that branches in predominantly white areas of Manhattan ' s Upper East and West Sides were reluctant to open accounts for Hispanics and blacks who did not live or work within a 1 0-block radius. The study's six investigators, two of whom were white Hispanic women and one a black Hispanic woman, visited more than 60 branches of Citibank, Chemical Bank , Chase Manhattan, Manufacturers Hanover and Marine Midland Bank . There, the banks waived the 1 0 block rul e 77% of the t i me for white invest i gators seeking to open a checking account and 22% for black and Hispanic inves tigators . Also , black and Hispanic investigators were asked where they lived and worked 84% of the t ime, while white inverstigators were asked 50% of the time. White males we r e asked 40%. "Right now we are researching if any legisla tion is necessary , " AI Taylor, Farrell's ass i stant and one of the investigators, said. Mario Santana Experts Deny Plan Would Aid Students continued from page 1 Overall, the program would draw about 800 , 000 participants, say its sponsors. That number is considerably smaller than the 3 . 9 million college undergraduates who cur rently rece i ve some type of federal financial aid . The bill, co-sponsored by Sen. Sam Nunn (DGa . ) , is one of five national service proposals int r oduced this congressional session . The McCurdy-Nunn legislation has received the most attention because it contains the more stringent provisions . The House Education and Labor Committee will hold hearings on all of them by early summer. Nunn's office estimates the bill would cost $13 billion, $5 billion more than the federal government disburses in financial aid for col lege students. Janice Petrovich, director of the Washington, D.C., office of Aspira, a leadership training and educational services organ i zation, says a sys tem of separate and unequal education would likely result from the plan . "It isn't fair," she says , because it establishes "differential treatment" for students who can not afford college. Hispan i c Link Weekly Report She also scoffs at claims that the national service plan would reverse a downward trend of college enrollment by low-income students. Certainly, she says, Hispanic enrollment is not declining . Even though the increase might simply be a matter of greater Hispan i c num bers in general, she says enrollment is not likely to be spurred by the plan . Among the problems Peria sees are situations in whi ch "students get used to making a living" and leave these jobs for better-paying ones . If they choose military service, he says, there's the possibility that they will stay in . the service without pursuing their education. He adds that the proposal effectively takes away the momentum of students who wish to continue their education . "Right a t the outset, our students would fall behind a year or two . " Cain , from McCurdy's office, counters : "Working a year or two before college would make students more mature and clearer about their course of study . " Doug Martinez April3 , 1989 Hispanics may make up a smaller percent age in a larger body . "I don't think there will be a net gain of in fluence," said Caban. Angelo Falcon, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, said , "Anything that shakes up the current political arrangement has got to be positive . " Noting that most of the candidates running in the November general elections, the t i me by which the charter commissio n hopes to have a new structure in place, will want to say they did something to increase Latino repre sentation, Falcon projected a gain for Latinos . Falcon said the three Latinos who serve on the 15-member Charter Revision Commis sion will give added leverage . FelixP&ez Texas College-Readiness Exam Not Fair: Educator A new test evaluat ing the college-level com petence of Texas high schoo l seniors and col lege freshmen will decrease the number of Hispanics and blacks who continue their education, said the leader of the Texas As soc i ation of Chicanos in Higher Education. i l l 1 1 t l The Texas Academic Skills Program Test , n designed to measure the students' com' petence in English, math and writing, will be reti qui red of all incoming freshmen . Students must pass the test to take junior-leve l courses. Ramon Dovalina, president of TACHE, said that reliance on the test will considerably reduce Hispanics' chances to succeed in col lege . He said that how a student performs in h i s or her first college semester should also be considered. Hispanics had a passing rate of 69%, blacks 58% and Anglos 87% . The test results were an nounced March 23 . The rates were criticized by Texas Higher Education Commissioner Kenneth Ashworth because the test-takers were not repre sentative . Ashworth noted that 81% of the test takers were enrolled or plan to enroll in four-year univers i ties. Only 28% of Texas ' col lege freshmen enroll in four year institutions . Luis Restrepo Law Schools Join Boycott More than 35 law schools across the country will stage a one-day boycott of classes April 6 to protest the lack of Latino faculty members in Boalt Law School at the University of California, Berkeley . According to Rene Saucedo, second-year law student at Boalt and co chair of its Coalition for Diversified Faculty, just one Latino, Daniel Rodriguez, serves on the law school's 50-member faculty. Recently, the school offered a pos i tion to a Latina, Ra quel Moran . No Latinos and one black man are mem bers of the school's tenured faculty . Cur rently, 6 to 8% of Boalt students are Latino . 2

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Arturo Madrid The Official-Language Myth One of the many myths that inform U.S. society says that English , or language i tself, principally holds us together . According to this view, the use of languages other than English fragments us as a people. In r ecent years, we have seen the development of a powerful move ment that seeks to restrict t he use of languages other than English and to make English the official language of the United States. The real issue, however, i s not the legal status of English or the use of languages other than Engl i sh in private and public life . The real issue is literacy. We currently have more than 25 million il literates in the United States, and the over whelming majority of them speak only English. What the United States needs is a highly literate population that is able to deal with accelerating change in all realms of daily life. Not surprisingly , no national policy requires u s to be literate . The nat i onal programs that promote literacy are, for the most part, volun teer in nature and privately funded . These in clude the one just inaugurated by First Lady Barbara Bush. LANGUAGE POLICY USED TO CONTROL There is precious little r ecognit ion of the fact that persons who are literate in Spanish or any other language are more able and more likely to become literate in English than illiterates, whatever language they speak . Making English the official language of the United States is a false policy issue. The 1980 census revealed that 98% of U.S . residents speak English. Surveys show that the vast majority of immigrants want to and do learn English. Surprisingly, however, there is no national policy nor are there p r ograms to support the teaching of English to non-English speakers . Programs that do exist are oversubscribed and poorly funded. Giving Engl i sh an official status is the latest manifestat ion of a tradi tion of policy making that has, in large measure , been informed by fear, suspicion and intolerance of persons who are different from the majority . Language policy has been an instrument of control used to exclude certain groups from participating fully in the institutions of our society as well as to deny them the rights and benefits that accrue to members of this nation . INSIST ON POWER OF DIVERSITY Without question, the most pernicious historical example of this has been the imposition of civil restrictions based on literacy . Literacy was denied or its acquisition made difficult for blacks, Indians and Latinos. English literacy tests were used to keep non whites from voting until the 1963 Voting Rights Act. If the unity and strength of U .S. society are at issue, then our ener gies need to be directed at l anguage policies that empower all citizens rather than punish some . Rather than succumb to the rhetor i c of those who eq u ate patriotism with speaking English and strength with homogene i ty, let us insist on the primacy of literacy, on the power of our diversity, and on the participation of all citizens in the institut i ons of our society . One of the principal strengths of our soc i ety has been its tradition of struggle against discrimination , exclusion and xenophob i a . What keeps it together is tolerance for cultural, religious, social, pol i tical and even linguistic differences. What makes us a great nation is the creativity of our diversity. If the unity and i ntegrity of our nation are what is at issue, then we must learn to respect diversity in all its forms. (Arturo Madrid is president of the Tomas Rivera Center, an institute for policy studies that addresses Latino issues. It is located in Claremont, Calif.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua REPORT FROM LOCOLAND: Earthquakes aren't the only peril that's quivering California's cuckoos. They're also diddering over : THE BROWN PERIL : This is the week that Los Angeles teachers vote on whether they want to accept bonuses of up to $5,000 a year for learning and using another skill in their work . Of course they 'll accept it. Who would turn down 50 shiny $100 bills? Truth is, they very well might. The skill that the Los Angeles Unified School District wants to reward them for is language . And, led by LEAD Learning English Advocates Drive -a number of teachers there have mounted a hateful campa i gn to reject the offer. As the student composition of the district changed, these so called educators were given years to pick up the skills that would keep them from becoming obsolete and incompetent. But they chose to remain monol i ngual. And now they want to discourage capable, committed teachers from working in a district with more than 160,000 kids who must have bilingual instruction if they are to survive. Remember when changes in technology eliminated the need for some of those guys in our choochoo trains to do anything more than wave to the kiddies at the RR Xings? The unions saved their jobs at the public's expense , and the term "featherbedding" came into popular use . Now teachers ' unions are trying the same tactic to protect their fossi l s and nuestros hijos are paying the high price. THE NEON PERIL : Monterey Park is one of five cities in San Gabriel Valley which toss a tizzy at the sight of foreign signs . Pomona, Temple City, San Marino and San Gabriel also have passed ordinances l i miting use ot "foreign" languages on com mercial signs. Most insist that the signs be 75% English. Snooty San Mar i no , which some years back tried to ban trucks from its streets unless they we r e making a delivery in the town , requires 80%. Suzanne Crowell, its ass i stant mayor , told Pasadena Star News reporter Shiela Salazar that the Chinese and Spanish signs "horrified" her , adding : "There ' s no reason to have to start catering to a group of people who can ' t even read English . " And some firefighters in the Valley have complained that the s i gns confuse them when they go out on a call. Hmmm. It makes me wonder whether they ' ve heard the old adage 'Where there's smoke . . . ' . THE 62-INCH PERIL : When United Farm Workers vp polores Huerta all 62 inches and 110 pounds of her was rebuffed in her quest for justice by the San Franc i sco Police Commission after cops there broke her ribs and ruptured her spleen because she couldn't move fast enough for them, reader Virgi nia Tanzer offered this commentary in the San Francisco Chronicle : "Editor Thank heaven Police Chief Frank Jordan won against Dolores Huerta . Nowadays in this city the dominant for ces almost always decide in favor of the kooks, the offbeats and the far lefts. It is wonderful indeed to know that somebody still believes in middle class American values of honor and decency." Is she serious? I don't know, but I think Ca/ifas is finally ready to slip into the sea . Que le vaya bien. -Kay B8rba.ro Quoting ... RICHARD LOBO, president of the Miami NBC-TV affiliate, WTVJ , quoted in The New York Times Feb . 6 on his station's effective efforts to capture young Hispanic viewers: "If there is no new massive Hispanic migration , in one generation Spanish-language television will become irrelevant as a market force . " 3 April3, 1989 Hispani c Link W ee kly R e p o rt

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COLLECTING POVERTY: "Poverty in the United States : 1987" is a 128-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau which breaks down poverty by racial and ethnic group, geographic region, age and sex. For a copy contact the Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402 (202) 782-3238 . (Price was not available at press time . ) SCHOOL DESEGREGATION: "Status of School Desegregation : 1968-1986," a 31-page report by the National School Boards Associa tion, concludes that segregation for Hispanic students has increased in nearly every part of the country. Regional, state and city breakdowns are included. To obtain a copy, send $15 to Special Program Services Department, NSBA, 1680 Duke St., Alexandria, Va. 22314 (703) 8386722. COLLEGE FINANCING: "College Cost Planner" is an eight-page pub lication that provides information on how to choose the right college , receive financial aid and other issues dealing with higher education . The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute publishes it three times a year . For a free copy, contact CHCI, 504 C St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 543-1771 or 1-800-367-5273. TRAVEL FRAUD: "Telemarketing Travel Fraud" is a pamphlet that tells how to avoid fradulent travel offers and what to do if you are a vic tim of one. For a copy send 50 to Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81 009. TEEN AIDS PAMPHLET: "Saturday Night Special " is a27-page book let in a " photonovel" format that directs easy-to-understand information about preventing AIDS to teen-agers. Single copies are $1 :so (dis counts are available on bulk orders) . Order through Network Publica tions, P .O. Box 1830, Santa Cruz, Calif . 95061-1830 (408) 438-4080 . PUERTO RICAN ORGANIZATIONS: "Directory of Puerto Rican Or ganizations" is a 215-page publication by the National Puerto Rican Coalition that includes a listing of organizations, their histories and other sources dealing with Puerto Ricans. Copies are $7.50 for NPRC mem bers, $1 0 for non-members . Contact NPRC, 1700 K St. NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C . 20006 (202) 223-3915 . LULAC REPORTER: The League of United Latin American Citizens recently published the first issue of its LULAC National Reporter . The introductory, eight-page publication provides information on initiatives LULAC is undertaking, profiles leaders within the group and comments on events of the day and how they affect Hispanics. For a free copy, send a self-addressed, 1 O"x13" envelope with 45 postage to LULAC National Office , 342 Wilkens, San Antonio, Texas 78210 (512) 5331976 . CONNECTING MCDONALD'S SEEKS STUDENT ARTISTS McDonald's restaurants are seeking Hispanic students in grades one through nine from the U.S . mainland and Puerto Rico to par ticipate in the 1989 McDonald's Hispanic Heritage Art Contest. One grand prize winner will be selected from first-third grade entrants, one from grades four through six and one from seventh to ninthgrade participants . The winners, each with a parent or guardian and teacher, will receive an all-expense-paid trip to Los Angeles during Hispanic Heritage Week, Sept. 1 0-16 . The three winners and 45 semifinalists will have their work displayed in an exhibit that will travel the country . Complete contest rules and entry forms can be obtained by writing McDonald's Hispanic Heritage Art, P.O . Box 11189, Chicago , Ill. 60611, or by calling (312) 836 7297. All entries must be postmarked no later than midnight, May 31. GROUPS AIM TO DEFINE DROPOUTS Beginning next fall, 28 states will participate in a project attempting to develop a standardized definition of a dropout. If it sticks, the defini tion will give a more accurate picture of the dropout problem and will allow for comparisons across state lines , comparisons that up to now have been suspect. The project, undertaken by the U.S. Education Department's Nation al Center for Education Statistics and the Council of Chief State School Officers, hopes to help generate solutions to the dropout problem by defining it more precisely . The new formula will not count as dropouts students who have transferred, those who are suspended or expelled and re-enroll within a year, and those who are sick or have died . INS AND OUTS The National Council of La Raza's Policy Analysis Center has an nounced the availability of a 6-12 month fellowship in public policy analysis as part of its Hispanic Initiative on Long-Term Poverty . The selected fellow will receive approximately $1,200 per month . For more information contact Julie Quiroz at NCLR , 810 First St. NE, Washington, D . C . 20002, or call (202) 289-1380 ... The Cuban American National Council is seeking applicants who are in college or are recent graduates for three nine week internships this summer in New York , Miami and Los Angeles. Pay is $8 an hour . Deadline is May 8. Contact Alina Becker at CANC, 300 S.W . 12th Ave., Third Floor, Miami , Fla . 33130-2038 (305) 642-3484. Calendar government , legal practice, the social sciences and volunteer organizations. conference . San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros heads a lineup of distinguished Hispanic speakers . Dick Lloyd (714) 787-5185 TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear . There is no charge. Please include date, location , contact name and phone number . Address items to: Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20005. THIS WEEK IMMIGRATION/REFUGEE POLICY Washington, D .C. April 6, 7 The Center for Migrant Studies will hold a con ference on the consequences of the 1986 Immigra tion Reform and Control Act, legal immigration reform and the basis for U .S. refugee policy. Fea tured w ill be experts from a range of agencies, Hispanic Link Weekly Report Lydio Tomasi (718) 351-8800 THE BLACK AND HISPANIC PRESS Harrisburg , Pa. April 6, 7 College and medical center administrators will meet with minority media . representatives to discuss ' Working with the Black and Hispanic Press ' and to learn how more effectively to publicize their ac tivities in the black and Hispanic press . Jerry Lopes, news director of Sheridan Broadcasting Network, and Harry Caicedo, editor of Vista magazine, will speak. Arthur Ciervo (717) 691-0983 HISPANIC IDENTITY Riverside, Calif . April? The problems of submerged identities and loss of separate cultures, stereotypes imposed by the mainstream population and efforts by Latinos to define and preserve Hispanic culture in U .S. society will be discussed at the annual Tomas Rivera Center April3, 1989 FAMILY HISTORY REVISITED Riverside, Calif. April 8 Some of the nation's best known genealogists will gather for the fifth annual Hispanic Family History Seminar, titled Buscando nuestras rafces-Searching for Our Roots. Topics will include info r mation sources , nobility records and research techniques . George Ryskamp (714) 682 5072 DRUG AND ALCOHOL PREVENTION Rockville, Md. AprilS The Care Center announces its fourth annual Montgomery County Drug and Alcohol Prevention conference . Special emphasis will be placed on Montgomery County's multicultural and ethnic d i versity , and workshops will be conducted i n English and Spanish. Nancy Berk (301) 770-3280 4

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED MANAGER Program Business Affairs PBS PBS is seeking an experienced television professional to manage all PBS program contracts and license agreements . Candidate should have at least 5 years experience in produc tion control or business affairs, along with a Bachelor ' s de gree in TV production or business administration. Strong budgeting skills with the ability to conduct negotiations, and familiarity with licensing practices are required . PBS offers a salary commensurate with experience and a competitive benefits package. Interested candidates should respond with letter of interest , resume, and salary requirement to : PBS Attn : Carla A. Gibson 1320 Braddock Place Alexandria, VA 22314 PBS is an equal opportunity employer DISEASE PREVENTION SPECIALIST I The Iowa Department of Public Health has a Disease Prevention Specialist I position open. The salary ranges from $21,465 . 60-$26,332 . 80 annually . Applications may be requested by mail from the Iowa Department of Personnel, Grimes State Office Bldg., East 14th and Grand, Des Moines, Iowa. 50319-0075. Completed applications must be returned by April14, 1989, to The Iowa Department of Personnel, Recruitment Section, Grimes State Office Bldg., East 14th and Grand, Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0075 . Applicants should also submit a resume to the I ow a Department of Public Health, Disease Prevention Division, Lucas State Office Bldg . , Des Moines, Iowa, 50319-0075, ATTN : Carolyn Caquelin . Although the job is based in Tolk County, applicants must be available for travel and have two years of public contact ex perience . Knowledge and interest in communicable or sexually transmitted disease control and immunization practices would be valuable . Ability to maintain confidentiality is mandatory . Addition al job information may be obtained by calling (515) 242-5149 . Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer . PERSONNEL DIRECTORS On April 17, we will publish our 1989 "Media Edition. " This special issue will reach our subscribers (now at 1 ,200 advo cates and professionals across 38 states, Puerto Rico and Canada) AND a projected 1, 000 journalists and media professionals who will be attending the April 19-22 National Hispanic Media Conference in Puerto Rico. In addition to our regular "Marketplace" section, Weekly Report will carry a full page of "Opportunities in the Media" for the edi tion . If you have a position or service to offer this expanded, spe cial audience, we welcome your ad in either section . Deadline for copy to reach us is Friday, April 7 . 5 ARLINGTON COUNTY, . .- •.. PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT m11--1 -' I COURTHOUSE PLAZA SUIT 2100 CLARENDON BOULEVARO ,, lt.RLINGTON, VIRGINIA 22201 Explore Employment Opportunities with Arlington County Government Seminar Arlington County Government Department of Personnel is sponsoring three (3) evening seminars to provide job seekers with helpful information in the search for employment oppor tunities with Arlington County . Workshop presenter Marvin A. Cortez, Outreach Specialist with the Personnel Department, will cover the following topics : • Identifying the appropriate job match • Determining relevant skills and abilities for specific positions • Learning to compete effectively The Personnel Department will offer individual assistance in English and Spanish after the seminar . Interested persons must call (703) 358-3501 to register for one of the following dates : WHEN: Tuesday, April 11, 1989 Thursday, May 18, 1989 Thursday , June 29 , 1989 All sessions will be held from 7:00pm-9:00pm WHERE: Arlington County Courthouse 21 00 Clarendon Boulevard County Board Room 3rd Floor Room 307 Arlington, Virginia (Across from the Courthouse Metro stop on the Orange Line) No job interviews or job offers will be made at this workshop Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer PRODUCER Producer for daily, 7-minute, national Spanish language newscast-NOTICIERO LATINO-and weekend edit ion SEMANARIO LATINO . Duties: assign reporters stories, edit tapes, write scripts , mix program, prepare for distribution . Qualifications: Bilingual (English/Spanish), excellent radio production experience, writing/editing skills. Send resume to: Samuel Orozco, 1111 Fulton Mall, No. 700, Fresno, Calif. 93721 (209) 489-5174. ASSISTANT CONFERENCE COORDINATOR In search of bilingual person for Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards conference . Entails clerical work, re search and travel. Firm is located in Baltimore's Inner Harbor . Salary from $15,000-$17,000. Benefits. Call (301) 244-7101 . April 3, 1989 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Arts & Entertainment Other festival events this week include an April 7 poetry reading titled Our Sisters' Voices and the April 9 screening of the film Kiss of the Spider Woman. GUADALUPE'S FIFTH: Encore screenings of the five most popular films exhibited at San Antonio's Guadalupe Theater celebrate the fifth anniversary of that city ' s historic movie house. Latin American Art continues through April 12 . INDEPENDENTS DELIVER: Stand and Deliver, the film portraying calculus teacher Jaime Escalante, was named best movie at the In dependent Spirit Awards ceremony the weekend of March 24. The film also won best actor, Edward James Olmos, best director, Ramon Menendez, and best supporting actress, Roseanne DeSoto. The awards are given out by Independent Feature Project/West. The special film series, The Best of Five Years, will be presented April 6-9 and April 13-16. Based on audience attendance, the five most popular films screened at the Guadalupe are: Tasio (screening April 6, 8, 14 and 16), Camila (April 6 and 9), El norte (April 7 and 9), Carmen (April 7 and 13) and Zoot Suit (April 8 and 13). A special reception is planned for the April 6 screenings to welcome Eduardo Dfaz, former Guadalupe Theater manager . Dfaz is now execu tive director of the El Paso Cultural Planning Council. ONE MORE AWARD: The Univision Spanish-language television network and Billboard magazine have joined forces to produce the new Lo Nuestro music awards. LATIN CANTON: A series of free Latino music, film, dance and drama events continue at Saint Lawrence University in Canton, N .Y., this week as part of its 1989 Steinman Festival of the Arts. Nominees in 19 categories in ballad, tropical and regional Mexican genres were announced last month. Winners will be disclosed at a televised ceremony May 31. ONE LINERS: Linda Ronstadt has announced she will record her second Spanish-language album in Mexico this month ... Raquel Welch is in Australia filming Trouble in Paradise, a movie intended for the CBS television network ... The festival, titled Latin American Art: Voices of Struggle, Vision and Hope, culminates this week with the April 9 unveiling of a mural painted by the Orlando Letelier Mural Brigade. Media Report NOTICIAS DEL DESEMPLEO: The second largest Spanish-language newspaper in Los Angeles, Noticias del Mundo, has laid off 11 of its 72 employees. Publisher Philip Sanchez said savings from the action will help the chain launch new editions in New Jersey and the San Francisco/San Jose area. The newspaper also publishes in New York City. Sanchez denied rumors that the Los Angeles edition of the Sun Yung Moon-owned newspaper would be shut down. He said that revenues from the Los Angeles edition would help sustain the San Francisco venture during its formative years. "In a year or two, we'll get Los Angeles back into shape and then colonize another city," he said . MIAMI-BOUND: G i s e II e F e rna n d e z, Chicago's first Latina anchorperson, leaves HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana . Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza, Marfa I. San ..tee No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 WBBM-TV to take a new position at Miam['s WCIX-TV May 1. The Latino Committee on the Media in Chicago is working to ensure that her replacement will be another Hispanic. "There are several prospects," said Chairper son Mary Gonzalez Koenig. "We've been talking to the general manager to hold him to his promise of filling the spot with a Hispanic ... " KEEPING THEM HONEST: The National Hispanic Media Coalition in Los Angeles is examining figures on Hispanic employment at television stations in New York and New Jer sey whose licenses are up for renewal. "I'm willing to bet that they do not comply," said Chairperson Esther Renteria. In the past year, the group has filed discrimination claims against three radio stations in Miami and three television stations in Los Angeles. MINORITY STUDENT RECRUITMENT: The premiere screening of an outreach and career information videotape developed to encourage young people to pursue careers in journalism was held March 29 in Washington, D.C. PRoPERTY LOSS DEDUCTioNS Antonio Mejias-Rentas "Minorities in Journalism: Making a Dif ference," a production of KETC-TV in St. Louis, was funded primarily by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting with assistance from the National Association of Black Journalists. Vincent Reed, vice president/communica tions at The Washington Post said, "We believe the tape will be a valuable resource for students interested in learning about a career in journalism ... " BILINGUAL PHONE DIRECTORY: The Hispanic Yellow Pages, a Spanish/English directory of business and community services, will debut this year in Arizona's Phoenix/Maricopa County area. Direct Lan guage Inc., the nation's largest publisher of foreign language directories, will publish the new edition. It will be distributed in November free of charge to 65,000 homes, businesses and community organizations, reaching more than 245,000 readers. Danilo Alfaro CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week . "We'll allow the 12 golden idols and the seven temples you say Mr. Cortez ravaged, but the feathered serpents aren't deductible." Hispanic Link Weekly Report