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Hispanic link weekly report, April 10, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, April 10, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
James Richardson Gonzales steps down as director of the Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency. The native Texan served in that capacity for five years...An Internal Revenue Service and five FBI agents search the office of a well-connected lobbying firm in Sacramento in the widening corruption, racketeering and conspiracy investigation of state Sen. Joseph Montoya...George Sdndoval, founder of KDVR-TV in Denver, dies in a car wreck. Sandoval, 57, had a television and radio career that spanned 40 years and was well known for his community activism...Thoroughbred jockeys Jorge
Velasquez and Jacinto V^squez receive nominations to the Racing Hall of Fame. Winners will be announced May 10...Benedict Ferro, district director of the Immigration and Naturalization Service in Buffalo, N.Y., denies a bid by a Cuban family stranded in Canada to return home to Miami while its asylum application is pending. Carlos Fajardo, his wife, Bermaida Zamora-Powers, and two children, Yordalysand Yoandys Diaz, unwittingly crossed over into Canada Dec. 23...More than $6,000 in donations are raised to send Anabel L6pez, 5, and her brother Ipolito, 3, back to Mexico for burial. They left their mother’s car and drowned in a canal in Broward County, Fla., after the mother, Fausta Jaimes, took lunch to her husband, Eugenio, a migrant farm worker...
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NOW Misses Mark With Most Hispanic Feminists
Tens of thousands of women, supporting abortion and the Equal Rights Amendment, converged on the nation's capital April 9, in a march organized by the National Organization for Women. But leaders of Latina organizations say that NOW does not necessarily represent their agendas.
“They are a feminist organization which deals with the needs of white women," said Gloria Santiago, director of the Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey. “We don’t even have jobs, let alone pay equity."
That sentiment was echoed throughout the Hispanic women’s community. Veronica Collazo of Washington, D.C., vice chair ofthe National Association for Women of Color, said, "NOW is not inclusive of other agendas that deal with women of color."
Police Nab Teen-agers in San Diego Slayings
Two well-to-do white teen-agers have been charged in the shooting deaths of a pair of recently legalized Mexican farm workers in San Diego. The workers were shot 11 times in what is alleged to be a racially motivated crime.
Hilario Salgado and Matilde de la Mancha, both 18 years old, were shot with a semiautomatic assault rifle Nov. 9 of last year. On March 23, Kenneth Kovzelove, 17, was arrested in Fort Benning, Ga., where he has been in the Army since last December. Dennis Bencivenga, 19, was arrested the following day at his house at Rancho Bernardo in northern San Diego County.
Homicide detective Frank Martinez said, "There is an indication of a racial overtone..." in these murders.
Bencivenga was charged with first degree murder. The district attorney’s office is requesting that Kovzelove be tried as an adult.
Julie Rocha, editor and publisher of El Sol de San Diego, said that Mexicans are being murdered "as a kind of sport,” adding, "even though they are not citizens, they have the same right to live as others have."
— Mario Santana \
Of NOW’s 32-member board of directors, three, Olga Vives of Illinois, Annabelle Jara-millo of Oregon and Ginny Montes of Georgia, are Latinas. Six board members are black. Although the organization does not keep statistics on its members based on ethnicity, the number of Latinas in the 170,000-member organization is low enough for NOW officials to express concern.
"The number of Hispanics is not as large as it should be,” said Farancoise Jacobsohn, president of NOW’s New York City chapter. ”l know that there is the perception that we are only here for white women, but that’s not true."
The consensus among Latina leaders is that NOW focuses more on political issues, whereas Latina groups are concerned with issues of basic survival, such as education, job training, housing and child care. Additionally, Hispanic women are typically more conservative about many issues espoused by NOW, such as abortion and gay rights.
Esther Favole, president-elect ofthe Coalition of Hispanic American Women in Miami, said her group takes no public position on abortion, gay rights or the ERA. "The fact that we don’t is not because the membership doesn't agree. They are just issues that don't fall within our agenda," she explained.
Study Says Latinos
Hispanics had the highest rearrest rate — more than 68% — of inmates who were released in 1983 and arrested again within three years for a serious misdemeanor or felony, the Justice Department said in a study released April 2.
Overall, slightly more than 62% of inmates in the study were rearrested.
Hispanics accounted for 12.1% of the 108,580 prisoners released in the 11-state study. Those states included California,
RECIDIVISM RATES Rearrest Reconvict Reincarcerate
White 58.7% 44.2% 38.0%
Black 67.1 49.9 45.3
Hispanic* 68.5 52.4 47.0
Loretta Ross, director of NOW’s women of color program, pointed to the difficulty many Hispanic women have in dealing with issues of sexuality. "There is a large amount of resistance to discussing those issues, whether it stems from culture — or religion," she said.
Amid the differences, many commonalities are also to be found, including promoting women in the job market and enhancing their educational potential. Most Latinas agree that while they have made significant advances, they are still not approaching equality, with either Anglo women or Hispanic men. "We have two things working against us," said Favole. “One is that we’re Hispanic and another is that we’re women."
Yillian Coppolechia, vice president of Miami's Latin Business and Professional Women, added that black women also face the double challenge of being women of color. Natacha Millan, also of Miami, president of the National Association of Cuban American Women, agreed. "Hispanics, culturally, have more in common with blacks. It mainly has to do with the extended family and the perception of what the woman’s role was as opposed to what it is now."
Hispanic men's perception of that role is also cited as an issue. While men's attitudes are
continued on page 2
Top Rearrest Rate
Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon and Texas.
Ofthe Hispanics who went backtojail, 84.5% had been arrested 11 or more times before. Blacks were second, with 81.4%, and 73.2% of whites had been arrested that many times previously.
— Mario Santana RECIDIVISTS’ PRIOR ARRESTS
Prior Arrests Hispanic* Black White
1 40.9% 45.1% 31.1%
2-3 53.3 56.2 46.3
4-6 67.8 64.1 54.8
7-10 69.6 71.6 63.0
* Hispanics can be of any race.
Source:*Recidivism of Prisoners Released in 1983*


Study Finds Federal Bilingual Ed. Woefully Underfunded
A $1.2 billion annual increase in federal bilingual education funding to meet the needs of all limited-English-proficient students was called for April 4 by Mary Futrell, president of the National Education Association.
FEDERAL EDUCATION FUNDING (in millions)
FY ’89 Maintain Full
Chapter 1 $4,570
Biling. Ed. 152
Handicapped 1,966 Pell Grants 4,489
Services* Funding** $5,591 $6,893
298 1,355
1,821 8,416
4,388 6,090
"•Funding that would be required to maintain level of 1980 services in 1989 (adjusted for inflation).
**Funding that would be required to serve every student in need of services.
Source: 'Federal Education Funding" by NEA
In the 1989-90 fiscal year, the U.S. Department of Education allotted $152 million for bilingual education. That reaches only one out of every 18 students in need of the service, based on a total of 1.6 million limited-English-proficient students, an NEA analysis noted. It added that the latest census figures count 4.5 million such students.
“Millions of immigrant students...will fall further behind in subjects like math because they haven’t yet mastered the language in which those subjects are taught," Futrell said.
In addition to bilingual education, the report looked at Pell grants and education for handicapped and disadvantaged students. It also prescribed an added $2.3 billion for full funding of programs for the disadvantaged.
Futrell decried "a shocking erosion" of federal support for education.
— Danilo Alfaro
BILINGUAL ED. FUNDING BY STATE (in thousands)
1989 Full Funding*
Arizona $5,841 $34,722
California 37,799 333,664
Colorado 2,602 10,215
Florida 3,599 45,360
Illinois 3,930 61,066
Michigan 4,404 37,499
New Jersey 2,115 38,682
New Mexico 6,361 40,845
New York 23,004 106,617
Texas 10,928 338,027
*Funding necessary to serve every limited-English-proficient student
Hispanic Feminists Say Agendas Differ
continued from page 1
changing, some say the change is not happening fast enough. “Their values are changing," said Santiago. “They are discovering that the macho mentality is not going to get them anywhere."
Coppolechia said that Hispanic men may be slower in accepting the fact that women are coming to have multiple roles. “It's dangerous to generalize, but I’d say they’re not where I’d like them to be in terms of open-mindedness."
Favole stressed the need for Latinas to be seen by men in a professional working light.
"We need to sensitize them. We need to say,
‘We’re here, we play golf, we're involved in politics, and you’re going to have to contend with us."1
Bill Orders Minority
Congressman Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) introduced a bill April 5 that would establish a National Diabetes Control Program to research methods to prevent and control the incidence of the disease among Hispanics, blacks and Native Americans.
Bustamante said that diabetes affects 5-6% of the U.S. population, but approximately 11-12% of Mexican Americans. He added that lower-income members of this group have a one-in-seven chance of being diagnosed as diabetic. The Diabetes Prevention Act of 1989 includes a stipulation that medical information, counseling and related outreach support be provided in the "language and cultural context most appropriate for the individuals" affected.
The bill seeks appropriation of $30 million for the 1990 fiscal year.
The following day Bustamante joined the director of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Minority Health Program, Sonia Leon Reig, at a news conference on Capitol Hill to discuss the findings of a study by Public Voice, a group focusing on national food and health policy-making issues, on problems affecting migrant farm workers.
Lourdes Saab, executive director of the Hispanic Women’s Council in Los Angeles, said that women’s organizations get some support from traditional male groups, but more headway could be made. “There is a kind of battle between the intellectual and the cultural, and fortunately the intellectual is winning. But the cultural battle is still being waged on the home front, behind closed doors.”
Jacobsohn, who says that NOW does attempt to reach out to women of color, conceded that the organization has "an image problem." She summed up the problem when she said, “If we had more women of color, we would attract more women of color. It’s a vicious circle."
— Danilo Alfaro
Diabetes Research
The study addressed diet inadequacies and working conditions placing this group at risk.
It recommended that the workers’ needs be addressed through legislation and health education, and that a comprehensive outreach program be implemented.
— Rhonda Smith
353.000 More Latinos Live in Poverty in ’87
Slightly more than 28% of Hispanics lived in poverty in 1987, a statistically insignificant change from 1986's 27.3%. But the number of Hispanics in poverty in 1987 increased by
353.000 from the previous year, according to a report released March 30 by the U.S. Census Bureau.
Overall, Hispanics accounted for 16.8% of the U.S. mainland’s poverty stricken. Hispanics account for 8.1 % of the mainland population.
The number of poor Hispanic families also increased from 1.1 million to 1.2 million.
Some 32.5 million people, representing 13.5% of the nation’s population, were below the poverty level in 1987, not significantly different from the 32.4 million in 1986. The poverty threshold for a family of four was $11,611 in 1987. — Mario Santana
HISPANIC POVERTY
1986 1987
Families 26.5% 27.7%
65 Years + 22.5 27.4
Persons 27.3 28.2
Calif. Caucus Presents Unified Agenda
The California Hispanic Caucus introduced March 28 its first legislative agenda — a 17-bill package — seeking, among other things, to strengthen Hispanic participation in elections and to improve education and housing.
One of the bills proposes a shift from at-large to single-district elections in municipalities. More than 400 of 450 cities in California hold such elections. At-large elections have been attacked as a major impediment to Hispanic political representation because they tend to dilute the minority vote.
The undertaking represents the first time the seven-member caucus has introduced such a package since its formation in 1974,
when it was known as the Chicano Caucus. The caucus is headed by Assemblyman Peter Chacon (D-San Diego).
"The bills promote political empowerment for Hispanics and cover top priority issues in health, education, housing and community development,” caucus consultant John Ballesteros said.
Among the objectives the bills seek are affordable housing, establishment of special preschool education for at-risk youth, the inclusion of undocumented immigrants in the 1990 census and a moratorium on immigration raids during the census process.
— Luis Restrepo
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
April 10,1989
2


Irma Maldonado
Latina Feminism Survives
Hispana feminism is alive and well in the U.S.A.
It’s never followed in the footsteps of majority society women’s organizations that have dominated the feminist movement.
That’s not to say that Hispana feminism has been impervious to other feminist groups, because all movements learn and benefit from each other’s achievements. But it wouldn’t be fair to say that Hispana feminism was a copy of other feminist groups. Chicanas, for example, date their movement back to the Mexican revolution.
The perception of many Hispanas is that the movements varied at their roots. While many feminist groups focused on ending male domination and sought the elevation of white females in all aspects of life,
Hispana feminism aimed at equalizing male-female power within a broader community context of family and culture. While many feminist groups focused on women alone, Hispana feminists were looking for broader applications to the family. Given the recent focus of the movement on family issues, Hispanas were ahead of their time.
What has dominated the Hispana activism has been a two-question test that survives today:
How does this affect our people? What does this mean for our women?
Some may view the approach of other feminist groups as more radical and ours as far more conservative. That’s too simple a conclusion. We may differ on some issues, but there are many on which we agree.
LATINA FEMINISTS SEEK EMPOWERMENT As the National Organization for Women prepared to march on Washington, D.C., over the Equal Rights Amendment and abortion rights, it found allies in some of us immediately. Many of us believe that the ERA is long overdue. On the issue of abortion, our attitudes are as mixed as those of the rest of the country.
Hispanas, like other women of color, founded their own organizations for one simple reason — there weren’t any around that responded adequately to their needs as bicultural minority women.
Like other groups, Hispana feminists seek to empower — themselves, as well as their families. And among the strategies they employ are the age-old tools of education, political involvement and leadership development. Those strategies play well for a long-term existence. There are several reasons for this.
Hispanas are cognizant of the demographics of this country. They see j the increased numbers of Hispanics who, in a few more decades, will swell into the largest minority population in the country.
FEMINISTS CAN BENEFIT HISPANICS, U.S.
They also see that as the numbers grow, the problems that have always been our battlegrounds — poverty, low educational attainment, illiteracy, unemployment, low pay, social injustice, teen-age pregnan-
icy, and now AIDS — grow in magnitude.
Latinas — Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Central and South American as well as some from Spain — are joining feminist organizations for some very powerful reasons that can benefit Hispanic America and the United States as a whole.
Recent dialogues conducted by the Mexican American Women’s National Association with its chapters across the country brought home two very important messages. One is that there is a strong need for our j women to maintain a connection to their culture through ties to other Latinas. The other is that Latinas are joining because they want to help attack the problems in their communities.
The talent, the maturity, the creativity, the risk-taking and the determination that Hispanic feminists also demonstrate bodes well for Hispanic communities across the country.
(Irma Maldonado, of Washington, D.C., is president of the Mexican American Women’s National Association — MANA.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
A BLOW BELOW THE SEAT BELT: In labor-management disputes, anything short of physical violence is generally considered fair play, but Eastern Airlines publicists shared with us a photograph of a pilot carrying a picket sign that they charged hit Texas Air President Frank Lorenzo below the seat belt.
“The Gallego Must Go,” the sign read. "Adios, Lorenzo." Claimed Eastern: “It’s an outrage that a man’s cultural heritage is used as an insult."
Gallego? Manuel Lujdn Jr. should get off so easy.
THE ‘YOGI BERRA’ OF THE CABINET: Washington correspondents have been merciless of late in their portrayals of the former New Mexico congressman, who’s been having trouble making the adjustment from prattling with Albuquerque’s protective press to engaging in swordplay with cutthroat big city correspondents.
The big boys have decided that mild-mannered Manny is the Yogi Berra of Bush's cabinet, and they lock in daily battle to show their readers how unpolished the fledgling Secretary of Interior can be.
One major Midwestern daily ran the Page 1 quote, in nice, big type, next to a picture of Lujan: "I don’t know what I’m talking about."
The Washington Post reported that "the confusion about who is in charge is beginning to take its toll within the department." It quoted one lobbyist, “They’re starting to eat their own young." Reporting on a fireside chat Lujan held with a group of correspondents, Douglas Jehl of the Los Angeles Times led off another piece:
“Displaying a lack of knowledge about matters central to his department,...Lujan insisted Wednesday that the government was being compensated with mineral royalties for the public lands it sells for $2.50 an acre...
"He also made clear that he didn’t understand regulations governing leasing for coal mining and other purposes... When corrected..., (he) expressed amazement. 'We don’t get any royalties? We don't get any money? Strike whatever I said about all that..."'
A Scripps Howard news service piece accused the secretary of misstating the nation’s mining law even after being questioned about it on three occasions by different congressional committees. "Lujan wound up asking reporters how the law worked," the story said.
But former Hispanic Link reporter Darryl Lynette Figueroa assures us that the 20-year veteran of congressional and range wars hasn’t lost any of his Western wile and virility.
On assignment for Vista magazine, Figueroa was interviewing him in his office with a few other invited journalists. One inquired about any new moves to open federal land to mining, adding, “I suppose I won’t get an answer from you today."
Sitting tall in his chair, Manuel gave the reporter his best Clint Eastwood grin and fired back, "Watch my mouth.”
Oh, well. George Bush isn’t exactly John Wayne, either. Yesterday, in case you failed to mark your calendar, was Emiliano Zapata's birthday. jVivaZapata! And, what the heck, VivaLujan, too.
— KayBarbaro
Quoting...
JUNIOR ORTIZ, catcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, quoted in The Washington Post April 5 on why he decided to trade his jersey No. 26 and wear No. 0:
"That's because any time you want anything, what do you do? You dial 0.11
3
April 10,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
NEW JERSEY LATINAS: "Hispanic Women in New Jersey: A Survey of Women Raising Families Alone" is a 48-page analysis of the educational status, employment situation and general quality of life of Hispanic women in New Jersey. Copies are $10. The proceedings of the statewide forum “Empowerment of Latinas in New Jersey," held March 8 in Somerset, N. J., are compiled in an 86-page booklet. Copies are $5. For a copy of either publication, write to Wanda Garcia, Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey, c/o Rutgers University, Office of Hispanic Affairs, 327 Cooper St., Camden, N.J. 08102 (609) 757-6349.
FEDERAL EDUCATION FUNDING: “Federal Education Funding: Present Realities and Future Needs" is a 59-page report by the National Education Association that concludes, using a state-by-state breakdown, that the federal government is woefully underfunding Pell grants, bilingual education and disadvantaged and handicapped students. For a free copy, contact NEA Media Relations, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036-3290 (202) 822-7200.
RECIDIVISM: “Recidivism of Prisoners Released in 1983“ is a 13-page report by the U.S. Justice Department that gives the rearrest rates by racial and ethnic group until 1986. For a free copy, contact Justice Statistics Clearinghouse, National Criminal Justice Reference Service, Box 6000, Rockville, Md. 20850 (301) 251-5550 or 1-800-732-3277.
CALIFORNIA LEGISLATIVE AGENDA: The California Hispanic Caucus recently introduced a package of 17 bills in the state legislature addressing the needs of Hispanics in several areas. For a kit containing bill summaries, contact Assemblyman Peter Chacon, Attn.: John Ballesteros, State Capitol, Room 5119, Sacramento, Calif. 95814 (916) 232- 2405.
MIGRANT FARM WORKER HEALTH: A 98-page Public Voice study titled “Full Fields, Empty Cupboards" presents personal and statistical analyses regarding migrant farm worker diet and work conditions. Copies are $15. Contact Jeff Shetland at 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 522, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 659-5930.
DIABETES LEGISLATION: Congressman Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) introduced a bill amending the Public Health Service Act and establishing a National Diabetes Control Program to implement programs geared toward reducing the incidence of diabetes in Hispanics, blacks and Native Americans. For a copy of this legislation, contact Bustamante’s office at 1116 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515 (202) 225-4511.
NEW MEXICO CHILDREN REACH OUT
The Working Classroom Storytellers, a group of 35 Hispanic children 8-17 years old, has been writing and printing books to send to other children in war-torn Nicaragua for three years. Coordinated by Working Classroom Inc., an Albuquerque-based organization, the group visited several sites in Washington, D.C., March 27-31 in the hope that groups there would launch similar projects for children in El Salvador.
The books, about subjects such as science, are in English and Spanish. They are sent to areas of Nicaragua where English and Spanish are spoken. Approximately 4,000 books have been sent since the project began, but many were destroyed when Hurricane Joan struck the country last fall.
The project is funded in part by a grant from the New Mexico Arts Division and the National Endowment for the Arts. For more information contact Storytellers at 218A Gold SW, Albuquerque, N.M. 87102 (505) 242-9267.
CONSTITUTION COMPETITION UNDERWAY
The Commission on the Bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution is seeking proposals from ethnic and minority groups, organizations serving people whose first language is not English and those dealing with disadvantaged groups to compete for $2 million in the second round of its education grants program.
As part of its mission to improve the teaching of the Constitution in grades K-12 and to commemorate the document’s 200th anniversary in 1990, the commission is looking for proposals that will deal with the 200 years of development in the judicial system. Projects funded would take place during the 1990-91 school year.
Deadline for applications is May 15.
For more information contact the commission at 808 17th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 653-5110.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
Tony Guillean and Augusta Del Zotto are named to spearhead the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B’rith’s A World of Difference. The project seeks to reduce racial and ethnic prejudice, particularly among youths, in California through an extensive media and education campaign...
Lillian Fernandez, director of international affairs for Pfizer Inc., is elected to the board of directors of the Girl Scout Council of Greater New York...
Calendar__________________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
THE GREAT PLAINS Uncoln, Neb. April 12-14
The Center for Great Plains Studies at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, will host its 13th annual interdisciplinary symposium. The conference, titled "The Hispanic Presence on the Great Plains," is a project of the Christopher Columbus Quincentenary
Jubilee Commission. Events include sessions on early Spanish exploration and Hispanic farm workers on the Great Plains.
Miguel Carranza (402) 472-3082
REFUGEE FUND-RAISER Los Angeles April 13
The Central American Refugee Center will hold its fifth annual dinner to raise money for refugees fleeing violence in their home countries. At the dinner CARECEN will honor various individuals who have provided outstanding service to the refugee community.
Anna Pomaska (213) 662-2906 WOMEN
Houston April 14,15
The Young Women's Christian Association is sponsoring a national Hispanic women’s conference for the purpose of promoting Hispanic women as a viable and leading force in U.S. society. Government and politics, family and health, the Hispanic media and corporate career options are some of the topics
to be explored.
Rita Ftodriguez (713) 926-2601 EDUCATION BANQUET
Lansing, Mich. April 14,15 The Michigan Board of Education and other organizations are holding a conference and awards banquet to promote greater educational opportunities for Hispanics. Lauro Cavazos, U.S. Secretary of Education, Jaime Escalante, the teacher portrayed in the film "Stand and Deliver," and Isaura Santiago, president of Hostos Community College in New York will be the main speakers.
Miguel Herrera (517) 373- 3261
COMING SOON
CHILDREN AND FAMILIES Familias
San Antonio April 22 Carmen Cortez (512) 270- 4630
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
April 10,1989
4


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) invites nominations and applications for the position of Associate Director for Minority Programs, Office of the Director. This is a Civil Service position in the Senior Executive Service (SES), with a salary range of $65,944 to $77,500 per annum. The person selected may be eligible for Physician’s Comparability Allowance ranging from $5,000 to $20,000 per year. A one-year probationary period must be served by the individual selected if not currently in the Senior Executive Service.
The Associate Director for Minority Programs serves as the focal point for establishing NIH-wide goals for minority research and research training programs and for coordinating the direction and activities of these programs. Specifically, the Associate Director for Minority Programs is responsible for the development and coordination of a trans-NIH plan for minority research and training implementation of a plan to enable the NIH to improve the effectiveness of all programs aimed at increasing minority participation in biomedical research; coordination of overall policies related to minority health issues, and liaison with the extramural community.
For more information, contact Ms. Gloria Cantu at (301) 496-6521. The following forms are required: Application for Federal Employment (SF-171) accompanied by a current curriculum vitae and bibliography. These must be submitted to:
Ms. Gloria Cantu
National Institutes of Health
Office of the Director, Personnel Office
Building 31, Room 1C-23
9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, Maryland 20892
APPLICATIONS MUST BE POSTMARKED NO LATER THAN MAY 28,1989.
All qualified candidates will receive consideration without regard to race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin, lawful political affiliation, marital status, union membership, or nondisqualifying physical or mental handicap.
NIH is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Arlington County Personnel Office
Employment Opportunities . .
2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, VA 22201
Employment Information 703-358-3500
Job Line 703-538-3363
TDD (hearing impaired only) 703-284-5521
Equal Opportunity Employer
t
DISEASE PREVENTION SPECIALIST I
The Iowa Department of Public Health has a Disease Prevention Specialist I position open. The salary ranges from $21,465.60-$26,332.80 annually.
Applications may be requested by mail from the Iowa Department of Personnel, Grimes State Office Bldg., East 14th and Grand, Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0075. Completed applications must be returned by April 14, 1989, to the Iowa Department of Personnel, Recruitment Section, Grimes State Office Bldg., East 14th and Grand, Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0075. Applicants should also submit a resume to the Iowa Department of Public Health, Disease Prevention Division, Lucas State Office Bldg., Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0075, ATTN: Carolyn Caquelin.
Although the job is based in Tolk County, applicants must be available for travel and have two years of public contact experience. Knowledge and interest in communicable or sexually transmitted disease control and immunization practices would be valuable. Ability to maintain confidentiality is mandatory. Additional job information may be obtained by calling (515) 242-5149.
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
Vhawk* -university of
WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER
HEAD WOMEN’S SOFTBALL COACH
To serve as head women’s softball coach and assistant women’s basketball coach at a division III institution. Individual will also teach 50% in the health and physical education department (preferred health educator). Minimum master's degree required.
Apply in writing to Dr. Dianna Jones, Athletic Director- Women, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, Wisconsin 53190. Send letter of application, resume, three letters of recommendation and all transcripts.
Application deadline: May 19, 1989.
University of Whitewater-Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity Employer with an Affirmative Action Plan.
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April 10,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report'


Arts & Entertainment
ONE MORE TIME, OSCAR: Last month's 61st annual Academy Awards ceremony delivered the four Cs as promised by its producer Allan Carr — couples, co-stars, compadres and companions — but no Oscars for either of the two Hispanic nominees.
Actor Edward James Olmos was a presenter at the March 29 ceremony, though not a winner for his starring role in Stand and Deliver. Spanish director Pedro Almodovar, nominated for his film Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, did not win either.
But Oscar night did have its Latino touch. A highly publicized postawards party, hosted by actors Esaf Morales and Daphne Zuniga, raised funds for El Rescate, a Cerrtral-American refugee service organization.
The awards ceremony coincided with the publication of the book Sixty Years of the Oscar, which lists Latino winners as follows: Jose Ferrer (1952), Anthony Quinn (1952 and 1956), Rita Moreno (1961), Nestor Al-mendros (1978) and Irene Cara (1983).
In other film news, Hispanic actors are featured in various current releases. Norma Aleandro is featured in Cousins (Paramount), Hector Elizondo in Leviathan (Metro-Goldwyn Mayer) and Charlie Sheen in Major League (Paramount).
And films from various Latin American countries are included in a Latino section of the American Film Institute’s Los Angeles International Film Festival being held April 13-27. Films include Puerto Rico’s La Gran Fiesta, Cuba’s Cartas del parque and the Dominican Republic’s Pasaje de ida.
ONE LINERS: Steven Bauer stars in an upcoming NBC miniseries on the 1985 fatal torture in Mexico of Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena. Elizabeth Pena plays his wife...Ruben Blades and Roberta Flack host a ceremony in New York April 13 in honor of musician/composer Tito Puente. The event is being sponsored by the New York chapter of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences...Marfa Munoz-Bianco has been named curator of exhibitions at The Meadows Museum in Dallas...
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
FCC RULE REVERSED: A federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., ruled March 31 that a Federal Communications Commission policy designed to increase minority ownership of broadcast stations is unconstitutional.
“It’s very dismaying," former FCC Commissioner Henry Rivera said of the decision. ”1 think other policies to assist minorities that the commission has are now suspect and vulnerable."
Under the 11 -year-old policy, the owner of a station that faced a challenge or hearing on its fitness to be licensed could sell the station to a minority-controlled company at 75% of its fair-market value, thus avoiding the possibility that it could be stripped of its license.
According to the FCC, 36 such distress sales have been made since the policy started. Of those, five went to Hispanic ownership groups. Nearly 900 radio and television stations are sold annually.
Rivera disputed the charge that because of the modest number of distress sales, the decision was largely symbolic. "Any time you can put a station into minority hands, it is significant, regardless of the number in absolute terms," he told Weekly Report.
Richard Bozelli of the FCC’s general counsel office said that the commission had not ruled out appealing the decision. Astroline Communications Company, the Hispanic firm that was seeking to purchase WHTC-TV in Hartford, Conn., is also considering an appeal.
HISPANIC OF THE AIRWAVES: Hispanic magazine announced plans March 29 for a weekly English-language television program covering Hispanic personalities and events.
Hispanic Week is scheduled to premiere Oct. 2 after a half-hour pilot program airs this summer in several key cities. The series will be dis-tributed by Advertiser-Supported/Barter Syndication.
In announcing the series, Hispanic's publisher Alfredo Estrada said, "We plan to capitalize on the success of Hispanic magazine by reaching a vast, untapped
television audience — affluent, English-speaking Hispanics."
Each half-hour program will be shot on location in different cities such as Los Angeles, San Juan, New York, El Paso, Miami, Chicago and San Antonio.
ARTISTIC DIFFERENCES: Alejandro Mas-ferrer, night editor of EIDiario La Prensa, was arrested at the offices of the New York Spanish-lanuauge newspaper March 30 and charged with slashing a free-lance photographer in a Greenwich Village restaurant.
NYPD Officer Hugh Barry said Masferrer became involved in an argument with photographer Philip Bennett, bounded into the restaurant’s kitchen and returned brandishing two knives. Barry said Masferrer then lashed out at Bennett, cutting him on the throat and chin before fleeing. Bennett’s wounds were not serious, and he refused medical assistance at the scene. Masferrer was booked for attempted murder, second-degree assault and two counts of criminal possession of a deadly weapon.
— Danilo Alfaro
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana, Rhonda Smith. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza, Marfa I. San Jose
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
FEDERAL FUNDS FALL SHORT
(IN BILLIONS)
1.4
W/INFLATION ELIGIBLE
4.6
FY’89
6.9
KEEP PACE SERVE ALL W/INFLATION ELIGIBLE
BILINGUAL EDUCATION CHAPTER 1
Source: National Education Association
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
April 10,1989
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Making The News This Week Velasquez and Jacinto Vasquez receive nominations the of Fame . Winners will be announced May 1 0 ... Benedict Ferro , d1stnct director of the Immigration and Naturalization Service in Buffalo , N .Y., denies a bid by a Cuban family stranded in Canada to return home to Miami while its asylum appl i cat ion is pending . Carlos Fajardo, his wife , Berm aida Zamora-Powers, and two ch i ldren, Yordalys and Yoandys Diaz, unwittingly crossed over into Canada Dec . 23 ... More than $6 , ?00 in donations are raised to send Anabel L6pez , 5 , and he r brother lpohto, 3 , back to Mexico for burial. They left their mother ' s car and drowned in a canal in B r oward County , Fla., after the mother, Fausta Jaimes, took lunch to her husband, Eugenio, a migrant farm worker ... James Richardson Gonzales steps down as director of the Depart ment of Commerce ' s Minori t y Business Development Agency . The na tive Texan served in that capacity for f ive years ... An Internal Revenue Service and five FBI agents search the office of a well connected lob bying firm in Sacramento in the widening corruption, racketeering and conspiracy investigation of state Sen . Joseph Montoya ... George sandoval, founder of KDVR-TV in Denver , dies in a car wreck . Sandoval , 57, had a television and radio career that spanned 40 years and was well known for h i s community activism ... Thoroughbred jockeys Jorge Voi7No1Sil HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Apri110, 1989 NOW Misses Mark With Most Hispanic Feminists Tens of thousands of women , supporting abortion and the Equal R i ghts Amendment , converged on the nation ' s capital April 9 , in a march o r ganized by. the National Organ i zation for Women . But leaders of Latina organiza tions say that NOW does not necessarily rep resent the i r agendas . "They are a feminist organization which deals w i th the needs of wh i te women, " said Gloria Santiago , director of the H i spanic Women ' s Task Force of New Jersey . " We don ' t even have jobs , let alone pay equity . " That sentiment was echoed throughout the Hispanic women ' s community. Veron i ca Co llazo of Washington, D . C., vice cha i r of the Na tional Association for Women of Color , said , "NOW is not inclusive of other agendas that dea l with women of color." Police Nab Teen-agers in San Diego Slayings Two well to-do wh i te teen-agers have b een charged i n the shoot i ng deaths of a pair of recently legalized Mexican farm workers in San Diego . The workers were shot 11 times in what is alleged to be a ra cially mot i vat ed crime . Hilario Salgado and Matilde de Ia Mancha, both 18 years old , were shot w ith a semiautomat i c assault rifle Nov . 9 of last year . On March 23 , Kenneth Kovzelove, 17, was arrested in Fort Benning , Ga . , where he has been in the Army s i nce last December . Denn i s Bencivenga, 1 9 , was arrested the following day at h i s house at Rancho Bernardo in northern San Diego County . Homicide detective Frank Martinez said , " There is an indication of a rac ial over tone ... " in these murders . Bencivenga was charged with f irst degree murder . The district attorney's office is re questing that Kovzelove be tried as an adult. Julie Rocha , editor and publisher of El Sol de San Diego, said that Mexicans are being murdered " as a kind of sport," adding, " even though they are not c i tizens , they have the same right to live as others have . " Mario Santana Of NOW ' s 32-member board of directors , three , Olga Vives of Illinois, Annabelle Jara millo of Oregon and Ginny Montes of Georgia , are Latinas . Six board members are black . Al though the organ i zation does not keep stat i s t ics on its members based on ethnic i ty , the number of Lati nas i n the 170 , 000 member or ganization is low enough for NOW officials to e x press concern . " The number of Hispanics is not as large as it shou l d be," sa i d Farancoise Jacobsohn, pres i dent of NOW's New York City chapter. "I know that there is the perception that we are only here for white women , but that's not true." The consensus among Latina leaders is that NOW focuses more on political issues, whereas Latina groups are concerned with is sues of bas i c survival, such as education , job training, housing and child care . Additionally , H i spanic women are typically more conserva tive about many issues espoused by NOW , such as abortion and gay rights . Esther Favale , president elect of the Coali t ion of Hispanic American Women in Miam i , said her group takes no public posit ion on abortion , gay rights or the ERA. " The fact that we don ' t is not because the membership doesn ' t agree . They are just issues that don ' t fall within our agenda, " she explained . Loretta Ross, director of NOW ' s women of color program , pointed to the d i fficulty many Hispanic women have in dealing with issues of sexuality. " There is a large amount of resis tance to d i scuss i ng those i ssues, whether it stems from cultureor religion," she sa id. Ami d the differences, many commonalit i es are also to be found , including promoting women in the job market and enhancing their educational potential. Most Lat i nas agree that while they have made signif i cant advances , they are still not approaching equality, with e i ther Anglo women or H i spanic men . " We have two things working aga i nst us," said Favale . " One is that we 're Hispanic and another is that we 're women." Yillian Coppolechia , vice president of Miami ' s Latin Business and Profess i onal Women, added that black women also face the double challenge of being women of color . Natacha Millan , also of Miami , president of the Nat ional Association of Cuban Amer i can Women , agreed . " Hispanics , culturally , have more in common w i th blacks . It mainly has to do with the extended family and the perception of what the woman ' s role was as opposed to what it i s now." Hispan i c men ' s perception of that role is also c i ted as an issue . While men ' s att i tudes are co nt i nued o n p a g e 2 Study Says Latinos Top Rearrest Rate Hispan ics had the highest rearrest rate more than 68 % of inmates who were released in 1983 and arrested again within three years for a serious misdemeanor or felony , the Justice Department said in a study released Apr i l 2 . Overall , slightly more than 62 % of inmates in the study were rearrested . Hispanics accounted for 12.1 % of the 1 08 , 580 pr i soners released in the 11state study . Those states included California, White Black Hispanic* RECIDIVISM RATES Rearrest Reconvict Reinca r -58. 7 % 67. 1 68. 5 44 .2 % 49 . 9 52.4 cerate 38 . 0 % 45 . 3 47 . 0 Florida , Illinois , Michigan , Minnesota , New Jer sey , New York, North Carolina , Ohio , Oregon and Texas . Of the Hispanics who went back to jail, 84.5 % had been arrested 11 or more times before . Blacks were second , with 81.4%, and 73 . 2 % of whites had been ar r ested tha t many times previously. Mario Santana RECIDIVISTS' PRIOR ARRESTS Prior Arrests Hispanic* Black White 1 40.9% 45. 1% 31 0 1 % 2-3 53. 3 56 .2 46 . 3 4-6 67 . 8 64 . 1 54. 8 7 10 69. 6 71. 6 63. 0 • His pa ni cs c an b e o f a ny race. S o u rce: " Recidi v i s m o f P ri s o n ers R e l eased i n 1983,"

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Study Finds Federal Bilingual Ed. Woefully Underfunded A $1.2 billion annual increase in federal bilingual education funding to meet the needs of all limited-English-proficient students was called for April4 by Mary Futrell, president of the National Education Association . FEDERAL EDUCATION FUNDING (in millions) FY '89 Maintain Full Chapter 1 $4,570 Biling. Ed. 152 Handicapped 1 , 966 Pell Grants 4,489 Services* Funding** $5 ,591 $6,893 298 1,355 1,821 8,416 4 , 388 6,090 * Funding that would be required to maintain level of 1980 services in 1989 (adjusted for inflation) . **Funding that would be required to serve every student i n need of services. Source : " Federal Education Funding " by NEA In the 1989-90 fiscal year, the U . S . Depart !llent of Education allotted $152 million for bilingual education. That reaches only one out of every 18 students in need of the ser vice, based on a total of 1 . 6 million limited English-proficient students , an NEA analysis noted . It added that the latest census figures count 4.5 million such students. " Millions of immigrant students ... will fall fur ther behind in subjects like math because they haven't yet mastered the language in which those subjects are taught," Futrell said . In addition to bilingual education , the report looked at Pell grants and education for hand icapped and disadvantaged students. It also prescribed an added $2 . 3 billion for full fund ing of programs for the disadvantaged. Hispanic Feminists Say Agendas Differ continued from page 1 changing, some say the change is not happen ing fast enough. "Their values are changing," said Santiago . "They are discovering that the macho mentality is not going to get them anywhere . " Coppolechia said that Hispanic men may be slower in accepting the fact that women are coming to have multiple roles . "It ' s dangerous to generalize , but I ' d say they ' re not where I'd like them to be in terms of open-mindedness . " Lourdes Saab, executive director of the Hispanic Women's Council in Los Angeles, said that women's organizations get some support from traditional male groups , but more headway could be made. "There is a kind of battle between the intellectual and the cultural, and fortunately the intellectual is winn ing. But the cultural battle is still being waged on the home front, behind closed doors. " Jacobsohn, who says that NOW does at tempt to reach out to women of color, con ceded that the organization has " an image problem . " She summed up the problem when she said, " If we had more women of color, we would attract more women of color . It's a viFavale stressed the need for Latinas to be seen by men in a professional working light. "We need to sensitize them . We need to say, 'We're here , we play golf, we're involved in politics, and you 're going to have to contend with us."' cious circle . " Danilo Alfaro Bill Orders Minority Diabetes Research Congressman Albert Bustamante (DTexas) introduced a bill April 5 that would establish a National Diabetes Control Program to research methods to prevent and control the incidence of the disease among Hispanics , blacks and Native Americans. The study addressed diet inadequacies and working conditions placing this group at risk . It recommended that the workers' needs be addressed through legislation and health education, and that a comprehensive outreach program be implemented . Rhonda Smith Futrell decried " a shocking erosion" of federal support for education . Danilo Alfaro BILINGUAL ED. FUNDING BY STATE (in thousands) Arizona California Colorado Florida Illinois Michigan New Jersey New Mexico New York Texas 1989 Full Funding* $5 ,841 $34,722 37,799 333,664 2,602 10,215 3,599 45 , 360 3 , 930 61,066 4,404 37,499 2 , 115 38 , 682 6,361 40 , 845 23 , 004 106,617 10,928 338,027 * Funding necessary to serve every limited-English-p rofi cient student. 353,000 More Latinos Live in Poverty in '87 Slightly more than 28% of Hispanics lived in poverty in 1987 , a statistically insignificant change from 1986 ' s 27 . 3% . But the number of Hispanics in poverty in 1987 increased by 353,000 from the previous year, according to a report released March 30 by the U.S . Census Bureau. Overall , Hispanics accounted for 16 . 8 % of the U.S . mainland ' s poverty stricken. Hispanics account for 8. 1 % of the mainland population . The number of poor Hispanic families also in creased from 1 . 1 million to 1 . 2 million . Some 32. 5 million people, representing 13 .5% of the nation's population , were below the poverty level in 1987, not significantly dif ferent from the 32.4 million in 1986. The pover ty threshold for a family of four was $11 ,611 in 1987 . -Mario Santana HISPANIC POVERTY 1986 1987 Families 65 Years+ Persons 26 . 5 % 22 . 5 27.3 27.7 % 27.4 28 . 2 Bustamante said that diabetes affects 5-6% of the U . S . population, but approximately 1112% of Mexican Americans . He added that lower-income members of this group have a one in-seven chance of being diagnosed as diabetic . The Diabetes Prevention Act of 1989 Calif. Caucus Presents Unified Agenda includes a stipulation that medical information, counseling and related outreach support be provided in the "language and cultural context most appropriate for the individuals" affected . The bill seeks appropriation of $30 million for the 1990 fiscal year. The following day Bustamante joined the director of the U.S . Department of Health and Human Services ' Minority Health Program, Sonia Leon Reig, at a news conference on Capitol Hill to discuss the findings of a study by Public Voice , a group focusing on national food and health policy-making issues , on problems affecting migrant farm workers . Hispanic Link Weekly Report The California Hispanic Caucus introduced March 28 its first legislat i ve agenda-a 17bill package seeking, among other things , to strengthen Hispanic participation in elec tions and to improve education and housing . One of the bills proposes a shift from at large to single-district elections in municipalities. More than 400 of 450 cities in California hold such elections. At-large elec tions have been attacked as a major impedi ment to Hispanic political representation because they tend to dilute the minority vote . The undertaking represents the first time the seven-member caucus has introduced such a package since its formation in 1974, April10 , 1989 when it was known as the Chicano Caucus. The caucus i s headed by Assemblyman Peter Chacon (DSan Diego) . "The bills promote political empowe r ment for Hispanics and cover top priority issues in health , education, housing and community development, " caucus consultant John Ba llesteros said . Among the objectives the bills seek are af fordable housing, establishment of special preschool education for at-risk youth , the in clusion of undocumented imm i grants in the 1990 census and a moratorium on immigra tion raids during the census process . Luis Restrepo 2

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Irma Maldonado Latina Feminism Survives Hispana feminism is alive and well in the U . S.A. It's never followed in the footsteps of majority society women ' s organizations that have dominated the feminist movement. That's not to say that Hispana feminism has been impervious to other feminist groups, because all movements learn and benefit from each other's achievements. But it wouldn't be fair to say that Hispana feminism was a copy of other feminist groups . Chicanas, for example , date their movement back to the Mexican revolution . The perception of many Hispanas is that the movements varied at their roots. While many feminist groups focused on ending male domination and sought the elevation of white females in all aspects of life , Hispana feminism aimed at equalizing male female power within a broader community con text of family and culture . Whi l e many feminist groups focused on women alone, Hispana feminists were looking for broader applications to the family . Given the recent focus of the movement on family issues, Hispanas were ahead of their time . What has dominated the Hispana activism has been a two-question test that survives today: How does this affect our people? What does this mean for our women? Some may view the approach of other feminist groups as more radi cal and ours as far more conservative. That's too simple a conclusion. We may differ on some issues, but there are many on which we agree. LATINA FEMINISTS SEEK EMPOWERMENT As the National Organization for Women prepared to march on Washington, D .C., over the Equal Rights Amendment and abortion rights, it found allies in some of us immediately. Many of us believe that the ERA is long overdue . On the issue of abortion , our attitudes are as mixed as those of the rest of the country. Hispanas, like other women of color, founded their own organizations for one simple reason-there weren't any around that responded ade quately to their needs as bicultural minority women. Like other groups, Hispana feminists seek to empower -them selves, as well as their families . And among the strategies they employ are the age-old tools of education, political involvement and leadership development. Those strategies play well for a long-term existence . There are several reasons for this. Hispanas are cognizant of the demographics of this country. They see the increased numbers of Hispanics who, in a few more decades, will swell into the largest minority population in the country . FEMINISTS CAN BENEFIT HISPANICS, U.S. They also see that as the numbers grow, the problems that have al ways been our battlegrounds poverty, low educational attainment, illiteracy, unemployment, low pay, social injustice, teen-age pregnancy, and now AIDS grow in magnitude. Latinas Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Central and South American as well as some from Spainare joining feminist organiza tions for some very powerful reasons that can benefit Hispanic America and the United States as a whole. Recent dialogues conducted by the Mexican American Women ' s Na tional Association with its chapters across the country brought home two very important messages . One is that there is a strong need for our women to maintain a connection to their culture through ties to other Latinas . The other is that Latin as are joining because they want to help attack the problems in their communities. The talent, the maturity, the creativity, the risk-taking and the deter mination that Hispanic feminists also demonstrate bodes well for Hispanic communities across the country. {Irma Maldonado, of Washington, D.C., is president of the Mexican American Women ' s National Association-MANA.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua A BLOW BELOW THE SEAT BELT : In labor-management dis putes, anything short of physical violence is generally considered fair play, but Eastern Airlines publicists shared with us a photograph of a pilot carrying a picket sign that they charged hit Texas Air President Frank Lorenzo below the seat belt. "The Gallego Must Go," the sign read. "Adios, Lorenzo . " Claimed Eastern : "It's an outrage that a man's cultural heritage is used as an insult." Gallego? Manuel Lujan Jr. should get off so easy . THE 'YOGI BERRA' OF THE CABINET : Washington cor respondents have been merciless of late in their portrayals of the former New Mexico congressman, who ' s been having trouble making the adjustment from prattling with Albuquerque ' s protec tive press to engaging in swordplay with cutthroat big city cor respondents . The big boys have decided that mild-mannered Manny is the Yogi Berra of Bush's cabinet, and they lock in daily battle to show their readers how unpolished the fledgling Secretary of Interior One major Midwestern daily ran the Page 1 quote , in nice, big type, next to a picture of Lujan : "I don't know what I'm talking about." The Washington Post reported that "the confusion about who is in charge is beginning to take its toll within the department." It quoted one lobbyist , "They're starting to eat their own young . " Reporting on a fireside chat Lujan held with a group of correspon dents, Douglas Jehl of the Los Angeles Times led off another piece : "Displaying a lack of knowledge about matters central to his department, ... Lujan insisted Wednesday that the government was being compensated with mineral royalties for the public lands it sells for $2.50 an acre ... "He also made clear that he didn ' t understand regulations governing leasing for coal mining and other purposes ... When cor rected ... , (he) expressed amazement . 'We don ' t get any royal ties? We don't get any money? Strike whatever I said about all that. . . "' A Scripps Howard news service piece accused the secretary of misstating the nation ' s mining law even after being questioned about it on three occasions by different congressional commit tees. "Lujan wound up asking reporters how the law worked," the story said. But former Hispanic Link reporter Darryl Lynette Figueroa as sures us that the 20-year veteran of congressional and range wars hasn't lost any of his Western wile and virility. On assignment for Vista magazine, Figueroa was interviewing him in his office with a few other invited journalists. One inquired about any new moves to open federal land to mining, adding, "I suppose I won't get an answer from you today." Sitting tall in his chair, Manuel gave the reporter his best Clint Eastwood grin and fired back, "Watch my mouth . " Oh, well. George Bush isn't exactly John Wayne, either. Yesterday, in case you failed to mark your calendar, was Emiliano Zapata's birthday . iVivaZapata! And, what the heck, VNaLuj{m, too . -Kay Barbaro Quoting ... JUNIOR ORTIZ, catcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates, quoted in The Washington Post April 5 on why he decided to trade his jersey No . 26 and wear No. 0 : "That's because any time you want anything, what do you do? You dial 0." 3 April10 , 1989 Hispanic Link Weekly Rep ort

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COLLECTING NEW JERSEY LATINAS: "Hispanic Women in New Jersey: A Survey Women Raising Families Alone" is a 48-page analysis of the educa tronal status, employment situation and general quality of life of Hispanic in New Jersey. Copies are $10 . The proceedings of the forum "Empowerment of Latinas in New Jersey," held March 8 rn Somerset, N. J., are compiled in an 86-page booklet. Copies are $5. For ,a copy of either publication, write to Wanda Garcfa, Hispanic s Task Force of New Jersey, c/o Rutgers University, Office of Hrspanrc Affairs, 327 Cooper St., Camden, N .J. 081 02 (609) 757-6349. FEDERAL EDUCATION FUNDING: "Federal Education Funding: Present Realities and Future Needs" is a 59-page report by the Nation al Education Association that concludes, using a state-by-state break d? . wn , that the federal government is woefully underfunding Pell grants, brlrngual education and disadvantaged and handicapped students . For a free copy, contact NEA Media Relations, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20036-3290 (202) 822-7200 . RECIDIVISM: "Recidivism of Prisoners Released in 1983" is a 13page report by the U.S. Justice Department that gives the rearrest rates by racial and ethnic group until 1986. For a free copy, contact Justice Statistics Clearinghouse, National Criminal Justice Reference Service Box 6000 , Rockville, Md. 20850 (301) 251-5550 or 1 -800-732-3277 . ' CALIFORNIA LEGISLATIVE AGENDA: The California Hispanic Caucus recently introduced a package of 17 bills in the state legislature addressing the needs of Hispanics in several areas . For a kit contain ing bill summaries , contact Assemblyman Peter Chacon, Attn. : John Ballesteros , State Capitol, Room 5119, Sacramento, Calif. 95814 (916) 232-2405 . MIGRANT FARM WORKER HEALTH: A 98-page Public Voice study titled "Full Fields, Empty Cupboards" presents personal and statistical analyses regarding migrant farm worker diet and work conditions . Copies are $15 . Contact Jeff Shetland at 1001 Connecticut Ave . NW, Suite 522 , Washington, D .C. 20036 (202) 659-5930 . DIABETES LEGISLATION: Congressman Albert Bustamante (D Texas) introduced a bill amending the Public Health Service Act andes tablishing a National Diabetes Control Program to implement programs geared toward reducing the incidence of diabetes in Hispanics, blacks and Native Americans. For a copy of this legislation, contact Bustamante ' s office at 1116 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, D . C . 20515 (202) 225-4511. CONNECTING NEW MEXICO CHILDREN REACH OUT The Working Classroom Storytellers, a group of 35 Hispanic children 8-17 years old, has been writing and printing books to send to other children in war-torn Nicaragua for three years. Coordinated by Working Classroom Inc., an Albuquerque-based organization, the group visited several sites in Washington, D . C., March 27-31 in the hope that groups there would launch similar projects for children in El Sal vador. The books, about subjects such as science, are in English and Spanish . They are sent to areas of Nicaragua where English and Spanish are spoken. Approximately 4,000 books have been sent since the project began, but many were destroyed when Hurricane Joan struck the country last fall. The project is funded in part by a grant from the New Mexico Arts Division and the National Endowment for the Arts . For more informa tion contact Storytellers at 218A Gold SW, Albuquerque, N . M . 87102 (505) 242-9267 . CONSTITUTION COMPETITION UNDERWAY The Commission on the Bicentennial of the U .S. Constitution is seeking proposals from ethnic and minority groups, organizations serving people whose first language is not English and those dealing with disadvantaged groups to compete for $2 million in the second round of its education grants program. As part of its mission to improve the teaching of the Constitution in grades K-12 and to commemorate the document's 200th anniversary in 1990, the commission is looking for proposals that will deal with the 200 years of development in the judicial system . Projects funded would take place during the 1990-91 school year . Deadline for applications is May 15. For more information contact the commission at 808 17th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 653-5110 . OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Tony Guillean and Augusta Del Zotto are named to spearhead the Anti-Defamation League of B 'nai B'rith's A World of Difference. The project seeks to reduce racial and ethnic prejudice, particularly among youths, in California through an extensive media and education campaign ... Lillian Fernandez , director of international affairs for Pfizer Inc., is elected to the board of directors of the Girl Scout Council of Greater New York ... Calendar Jubilee Commission . Events include sessions on early Spanish exploration and Hispanic farm workers on the Great Plains . to be explored . Rita Rodriguez (713) 926-2601 EDUCATION BANQUET Lansing, Mich . April14, 15 TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear . There is no charge . Please include date, location , contact name and phone number. Address items to Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D.C. 20005 . THIS WEEK THE GREAT PLAINS Lincoln, Neb. April12-14 The Center for Great Plains Studies at the Univer sity of Nebraska, Lincoln, will host its 13th annual interdisciplinary symposium . The conference, titled 'The Hispanic Presence on the Great Plains, ' is a project of the Christopher Columbus Qui ncentenary Hispanic Link Weekly Report Miguel Carranza (402) 472-3082 REFUGEE FUND-RAISER Los Angeles April 13 The Central American Refugee Center will hold its fifth annual dinner to raise money for refugees flee ing violence in their home countries . At the dinner CARECEN will honor various individuals who have provided outstanding service to the refugee com munity. Anna Pomaska (213) 662-2906 WOMEN Houston ARril 14, 15 The Young Women ' s Christian Association is spon soring a national Hispanic women's conference for the purpose of promoting Hispanic women as a vi able and leading force in U.S . society. Government and politics , family and health, the Hispanic media and corporate career options are some of the topics April10, 1989 The Michigan Board of Education and other or ganizations are holding a conference and awards banquet to promote greater educational opportunities for Hispani cs. Lauro Cavazos, U . S . Secretary of Education, Jaime Escalante, the teacher portrayed in the film "Stand and Deliver," and lsaura Santiago, president of Hostos Com munity College in New York will be the main speakers . Miguel Herrera (517) 373-3261 COMING SOON CHILDREN AND FAMILIES Familias San Antonio April 22 Carmen Cortez (512) 2704630 4

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED I NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES The National Institutes of Health (NIH) invites nominations and applications for the position of Associate Director for Minority Programs, Office of the Director . This is a Civil Ser vice position in the Senior Executive Service (SES), with a salary range of $65,944 to $77,500 per annum. The person selected may be eligible for Physician ' s Comparability Al lowance ranging from $5,000 to $20,000 per year . A one-year probationary period must be served by the individual selected if not currently in the Senior Executive Service. The Associate Director for Minority Programs serves as the focal point for establishing NIH-wide goals for minority research and research training programs and for coordinating the direction and activities ofthese programs . Specifically, the Associate Director for Minority Programs is responsible for the development and coordination of a trans-NIH plan for minority research and training implementation of a plan to enable the NIH to improve the effectiveness of all programs aimed at increasing minority participation in biomedical re search; coordination of overall policies related to minority health issues, and liaison with the extramural community . For more information, contact Ms . Gloria Cantu at (301) 4966521. The following forms are required: Applicat i on for Federal Employment (SF-171) accompanied by a current cur riculum vitae and bibliography . These must be submitted to: Ms. Gloria Cantu National Institutes of Health Office of the Director, Personnel Office Building 31, Room 1 C-23 9000 Rockville Pike Bethesda, Maryland 20892 APPLICATIONS MUST BE POSTMARKED NO LATER THAN MAY 28, 1989. All qualified candidates will receive consideration without regard to race , religion, color, sex, age, national origin, lawful political affiliation, marital status, union membership, or non disqualifying physical or mental handicap . NIH is an Equal Opportunity Employer. IIVsr, O;:-HEP.'OX'DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or sys tem lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effec tiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report . To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p . m . (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on re quest. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch . 5 A
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Arts & Entertainment In other film news , Hispanic actors are featured in various current releases . No r ma Aleandro is featured in Cousins (Paramount) , Hoocr Elizondo in Leviathan (Metro-Goldwyn Mayer) and Charlie Sheen in Major League (Paramount) . ONE MORE TIME, OSCAR: Last month's 61 st annual Academy Awards ceremony delivered the four Cs as promised by its producer Allan Carrcouples, co-stars, compadres and companions-but no Oscars for either of the two Hispanic nominees . And films from various Latin American countries are included in a Latino section of the American Film Institute's Los Angeles Internation al Film Festival being held April 13-27. Films include Puerto Rico ' s La Gran Fiesta , Cuba ' s Cartas del parque and the Dominican Republic ' s Pasaje de ida . Actor Edward James Olmos was a presenter at the March 29 ceremony , though not a winner for his starring role in Stand and Deliver. Spanish director Pedro Almodovar, nominated for his film Women on the Verge of a NeNous Breakdown, did not win either . But Oscar night did have its Latino touch . A highly publicized post awards party, hosted by actors Esaf Morales and Daphne Zuniga, raised funds for El Rescate, a Central-American refugee service organization. The awards ceremony coincided with the publication of the book Sixty Years of the Oscar, which lists Latino winners as follows: Jose Ferrer . (1952), Anthony Quinn (1952 and 1956), Rita Mo r eno (1961), Nestor Al mendros (1978) and Irene Cara (1983). ONE LINERS: Steven Bauer stars in an upcoming NBC miniseries on the 1985 fatal torture in Mexico of Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena . Elizabeth Pena plays his wife ... Ruben Blades and Roberta Flack host a ceremony in New York April 13 in honor of musician/composer Tito Puente . The event i s being sponsored by the New York chapter of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences ... Marfa Munoz-Bianco has been named curator of exhibitions at The Meadows Museum in Dallas ... Media Report FCC RULE REVERSED: A federal appeals court in Washington , D . C., ruled March 31 that a Federal Communications Commission policy designed to increase minority ownership of broadcast stations is unconstitutional. "It' s very dismaying," former FCC Commis sioner Henry Rivera sa i d of the decision . " I think other policies to assist minorities that the commission has are now suspect and vul nerable." Under the 11-year-old policy , the owner of a station that faced a challenge or hearing on its f i tness to be licensed could sell the station to a minority-controlled company at 75% of its fair market value, thus avoiding the poss i bility that it could be stripped of its license . Acco r d ing to the FCC , 36 such distress sales have been made since the policy started . Of t hose , five went to Hispanic ownership groups. Nearly 900 radio and television stations are sold annually . HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N ' Street NW Washington , D.C. 20005 (202) 234 0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Lui s Restrepo, Mari o Santana, Rhonda Smith. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza, Marfa I. San J::se No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast i n any form w i thout advance permission . Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Hispanic Link Weekly R e port R i vera disputed the charge that because of the modest number of distress sales, the decision was largely symbolic. "Any time you can put a station into minority hands , it is sig nif i cant , regardless of the number in absolute terms," he told Weekly Report. R i chard Bozelli of the FCC ' s general counsel off ice said that the commission had not ruled out appealing the decision . Astroline Com munications Company, the Hispanic firm that was seeki ng to purchase WHTC-TV in Hartford , Conn., is also considering an appeal . HISPANIC OF THE AIRWAVES: Hispanic magaz ine announced plans March 29 for a weekly English-language televis i on program covering Hispan i c personalities and events . Hispanic Week is scheduled to premiere Oct. 2 after a half-hour pilot program airs this sum mer in several key c i ties . The series will be dis tributed by Advertiser-Supported/Barter Syndication. In announcing the series, Hispanic' s publisher Alfredo Estrada sa i d , " We plan to capitalize on the success of Hispanic magazine by reaching a vast, untapped Antonio Mejfas-Rentas television audienceaffluent, English-speak ing Hispanics . " Each half hour program will be shot on loca tion in different cities such as Los Angeles , San Juan , New York , El Paso , Miami , Chicago and San Anton i o . ARTISTIC DIFFERENCES: Alejandro Mas ferrer, night editor of El Diario La Pre.nsa , was arrested at the offices of the New York Spanish lanuauge newspaper March 30 and charged with slash ing a free-lance photog rapher in a Greenwich Village restaurant. NYPD Officer Hugh Barry said Masferrer be came involved in an argument with photog rapher Philip Bennett , bounded into the restaurant's kitchen and returned brandish ing two knives . Barry said Masferrer then lashed out at Bennett , cutting him on the throat and chin before fleeing . Bennett ' s wounds were not ser i ous, and he ref used medical assistance at the scene . Masferrer was booked for at tempted murder, second-degree assault and two counts of criminal possess ion of a dead l y weapon . Danilo Alfaro FEDERAL FUNDS FALL SHORT (IN BILLIONS) 1.4 6.9 5.6 0 . 3 FY'89 KEEP PACE SERVE ALL FY' 8 9 KEEP PAC E SERV E ALL W /INFLATIO N ELIG IBLE W/INFLATION E L I G I BL E BILINGUAL EDUCATION CHAPTER 1 Source : Nat i onal Educ a tion Association April10, 1989 6