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Hispanic link weekly report, April 17, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, April 17, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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______ iEC'D. HR/CF
Making The N&Wd fj|
U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp names George Rodriguez, formerly an administrator with the Department of Justice, as a special assistant. . . Sens. Alan Cranston, Bob Dole, Orrin Hatch,. Edward Kennedy, George Mitchell and Pete Wilson pick Eunice Diaz to serve on the 15-member National Commission on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. The sole Hispanic on the commission, Diaz is a faculty member at the University of Southern California’s School of Medicine...LeilaGonzilez-Correa resigns as executive director of the Los Angeles City Housing Authority, citing mount-
ing criticism and lack of support from housing commissioners. She is currently under investigation for awarding more than $200,000 in contracts to acquaintances on a noncompetitive basis...Dr. Rodolfo Gonzdlez, named Illinois Family Physician of the Year in 1986, dies April 4 in a hospital in Park Ridge, III. He was 64...A San Diego judge sets at $250,000 each the bond for Kenneth Kovzelove, 17, and Dennis Bencivenga, 19. The two are charged in what are said to be the racially motivated shooting deaths of Hilario Salgado and Matilde de la Mancha, both 18 years old...Doctors and staff at San Francisco’s Pembroke Pines General Hospital honor Luz Helena Fl6rez, 9, for defying their predictions and walking again. Her right leg was severely mangled by a shark two years ago off the coast of Florida...
Vol. 7 No. 13
fa) HISPANI^JJNKWBEKl^REPQm^^
April 17,1989
Bush Picks Viilalpando forU.S. Treasurer Post
President Bush announced his intention April 4 to nominate Catalina Vasquez Viilalpando to become the 39th U.S. Treasurer. If confirmed by the Senate, she would be the third Hispanic to hold this position.
Viilalpando served as special assistant for public liaison to then-President Reagan from 1983 to 1985.
She is also chairperson of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly and a senior vice president at Communications International.
Villalpando's visibility during the Bush presidential campaign last year also contributed to her winning the nomination. She would succeed Katherine Davalos Ortega, who has held the post since 1983. Romana Acosta Banuelos was the first Hispanic to be U.S. Treasurer. She served during the Nixon and Ford administrations. The Senate is expected to confirm Viilalpando within the next four to six weeks.
In addition to signing all U.S. currency, the treasurer heads the U.S. Mint, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the U.S. Savings Bond Program.
— Rhonda Smith
Magazines Forge On Despite Odds
Hispanic Business magazine, a Santa Barbara, Calif.-based monthly aimed at Hispanic entrepreneurs and the rising Hispanic professional class, celebrated its 10th anniversary April 10. The magazine is something of a survivor among English-language Latino publications. An estimated 80% of them have fallen by the wayside over the last decade.
But, according to Kirk Whisler, coordinator of the National Association of Hispanic Publications, the future may be bright for such publications in the '90s. He notes that many advertisers have false impressions about the Hispanic community that have made them reluctant to advertise in Hispanic print. Many of those misconceptions, he claims, such as Hispanics’ supposed aversion to reading, originated with Hispanic broadcast media, which benefited in terms of advertising dollars. "Those messages stunted the growth of Hispanic print."
Whisler says that if three or four general Hispanic magazines were to come onto the scene at the same time, they would benefit each other. By forming a genre of publications, they would ease the uncertainty of newsstand retailers and advertisers. Several Hispanic publications have had difficulties in dealing with newsstand distribution and have opted for controlled circulation or mail subscriptions.
Launched in 1979 as a newsletter, Hispanic Business today has a paid circulation of 7,200. It has an additional 135,000 controlled circula-
Leaders Meet Over Puerto Rico Status
Puerto Rico Governor Rafael Hernandez Colon met with mainland Puerto Rican community leaders in New York and Miami on April 3 and 8, respectively, as part of a series of gatherings to determine how they feel about mainland Puerto Ricans voting in the forthcoming plebiscite on Puerto Rico’s status.
Sen. Bennett Johnston (D-La.) filed three bills on April 5 that would authorize the plebiscite and commit Congress to put into effect the finalized political status.
Hernandez Colon also plans to visit Philadelphia, Chicago and Hartford, Conn., although no dates have been set.
According to Johnston — who chairs the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee — the first bill would authorize a plebi-scite to choose between existing commonwealth, statehood or independence. The second one would define the options in a general way. The third would set forth legislation with detailed definitions of the three options. The deadline to submit the initial definitions is May 9.
The senator expects to hold the first set of hearings on June 1, 2 and 5 in Washington. June 16 and 19 are target dates for hearings in Puerto Rico.
— Mario Santana
tion — mostly to Latino business people and college campuses. Jesus Chavarria, its editor and publisher, attributes the magazine’s success to its specialized audience and slow-growth strategy. He cautions new magazines against trying to reach too vast a readership too soon. “By narrowing our target audience, we were able to stay in the marketplace long enough to make a difference.”
Fifteen-month-old Hispanic magazine is a Washington, D.C.-based general interest monthly which has built a paid circulation of 82,500. "There is a large segment of educated, English-speaking Hispanics that has not been serviced by print media,” says editor Marfa Sharpe. The magazine conducted a random survey of its subscribers in October 1988. The median annual household income of those readers was $40,000.
Julie Healey, English-language editor of Saludos Hispanos, a quarterly publication in
continued on page 2
Chicagoans Loyal to Party
Of the 1,439 Hispanics polled regarding why they voted for Richard Daley in Chicago’s April 4 mayoral race, 81% said they did so because he is a Democrat, 75% declared he was the most qualified candidate and 70% indicated they voted for him because it was time for a change.
According to exit poll results released April 6 by the Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project, the Hispanic vote was primarily a "young” vote, with 30% of voters in the 25- to 34-year-old category. Hispanics made up 7% of Chicagoans who voted in the race.
In what was characterized as one of the most racially polarized mayoral races in recent history, Hispanics voted for Daley over Alderman Timothy Evans, who ran under the Harold Washington Party banner.
Hispanic Daley 71% Evans 20%
Puerto Rican 78 17
Mexican 73 17
Cuban 59 24
South American 41 37
Central American 62 28
Other 56 35
— Rhonda Smith


Victoria, Tex., Latinos Try Polls After Supreme Court Rebuff
Rejected by the U.S. Supreme Court April 3 in an attempt to nullify a school board policy they charged was intended to dilute Hispanic representation, Latinos in Victoria, Texas, have cast their hopes on the city’s May 6 board elections.
The Supreme Court refused to hear a lawsuit filed in 1985 by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund on behalf of Theresa Gutierrez, Victoria Independent School District’s sole Hispanic member.
It let stand a lower court decision that found the school board policy did not fall under the
federal Voting Rights Act but rather was a parliamentary procedure.
The policy in question gave the school board president the power not to allow on the agenda any matter not backed by at least two of the board’s seven members.
Gutierrez charged in her suit that the policy was instituted shortly after she was elected in 1985 to prevent her from adequately representing the interests of Latino students. Hispanics make up 51% of the students in the city, which is 120 miles east of San Antonio.
"It (the policy) is simply another method of veiled discrimination,” Gutierrez told Weekly Report.
Gutierrez, who was elected to a second three-year term last year, said that she has since formed alliances with other board members but has been unable to tie down a fourth vote to overturn the policy. The first Hispanic woman to sit on the board, Gutierrez said she expects Leonel Rodriguez to win May 6 and carry the last vote necessary on the board to throw out the policy.
— Felix Perez
Magazines Seek Advertiser Commitment
continued from page 1
Tarzana, Calif., calls Latinos "a powerful group of consumers, in both dollars and numbers.’’
Vista magazine, the Coral Gables, Fla.-based weekly newspaper insert, has by far the largest circulation for a Hispanic-oriented publication in the United States — 1.4 million. In February, Warner Publishing, a division of Warner Communications, purchased a 20% share of Horizon Communications, the company that publishes Vista. Arturo Villar, Vista’s publisher, hails the potential of the English-language Hispanic print market. "Hispanics want to know what other Hispanics around the country are doing. That’s what Vista offers its readers."
Two publications geared toward young Latinos are Latin Beat and QuePasa. Both are based in New Jersey and premiered within the last year. The latter is published by D.S. Publications, which produces the teen-oriented magazines Tiger Beat, Right On! and Rock. A third, Low Rider, will publish 10 issues this year after publishing sporadically for several years.
Many Hispanic periodicals failed to survive the ’80s. Magazines such as Caminos, Clamor, Latina and Latino have folded altogether. Washington, D.C.-based Nuestro has struggled over the years. Publisher Dan Lopez declined to speak with Weekly Report, and the magazine’s status is unknown. Hispanic Entrepreneur, also based in the capital, is on hiatus. Publisher Gloria Rodriguez says that four test editions have been dis-
tributed, and publishing should resume in January. Los Angeles-based Americas2001 is also in a state of limbo. Publisher Roberto Rodriguez has been meeting with investors and hopes to return this fall.
Those involved blame a lack of commitment from advertisers rather than lack of a receptive market.
Hispanic Entrepreneur’s Rodriguez says that Latino publications have been "relegated” to second-class status by advertisers. Villar agrees. "The potential for growth also depends on advertisers' realization that this is a market that should be targeted."
Chavarria complains that most advertising dollars go to Spanish-language media rather than English-language. "This is an anomaly, and it is something that needs to be corrected."
Most publishers agree that the market for Spanish-language print will continue to be significant. The ongoing influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants into the United States virtually guarantees this, they say. Many point to language as being the key to culture but agree that an awareness of one’s heritage persists even if English is predominantly spoken. "Being Hispanic is a lot more than language. It’s a state of mind," says Villar.
Latinos differ from mainstream readers in what they look for in a magazine, says Chavarria. “They are looking for information about themselves."
— Danilo Alfaro
Jury Finds Four Guilty in Wells Fargo Robbery
Four Puerto Rican men were convicted April 10 of robbing a Wells Fargo depot in Connecticut six years ago. Officials in West Hartford believe that the group intended to use the $7.1 million it netted to finance Los Macheteros, an extremist Puerto Rican independence organization.
Although charges were originally filed against five, one defendant, Carlos Ayes Suarez, 29, was acquitted of conspiracy charges. The other four, Norman Talavera, 32, Antonio Comacho Negron, 45, Roberto Maldonado Rivera, 53, and Juan Segarra Palmer III, 39, were found guilty of transporting funds from Connecticut to other parts of the country or using portions to sponsor toy giveaways in Hartford and Puerto Rico in early 1985.
Los Macheteros needed money to revitalize its organization in 1983 and contacted Segarra for assistance. Although Segarra, a Harvard graduate, acknowledged that he knew the robbery was going to take place, he said he did not actually participate or assist in planning it. The other three defendants have indicated that they were the victims of mistaken identity and political repression.
Poll Looks Into Child Care
Twelve percent of Hispanic children six years old or younger are cared for by nonrelatives at homes other than their own, compared with 19% of blacks and 23% of whites, according to a survey by Louis Harris and Assocs.
The poll of 4,050 people, released April 11, also found that 19% of Hispanic children are cared for in a day-care center, compared with 34% of black and 21 % of white children.
Other responses: Are your children (ages six and younger) cared for:
Hispanic Black White — in a nursery school or preschool facility? YES 21% 37% 24%
NO 79 63 76
— in a kindergarten or grade school?
YES 41% 47% 37%
NO 59 53 63
— Mario Santana
Latinos Have Lowest Home-Ownership
Hispanics have a lower home-ownership rate — 40% — than blacks and all other households, according to a U.S. Census Bureau study released April 6.
"Housing in America: 1985/86” shows that while Hispanics’ median monthly cost for housing (rented or owned) was $357, the same median as all other households, it is equivalent to 26% of their income compared with 21 % of the overall median household income.
Hispanic householders occupied 5.1 million units in 1985. Their median unit size was 385 square feet per person. The median for all households was 633 square feet per person. The report also reveals that 45% of Hispanic households had no savings or investments compared with 52% of black households and 24% of all households. Twelve percent of Hispanics lived In public or subsidized housing as opposed to 5% for the total population.
______________________— Luis Restrepo
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
April 17,1989
2


Charles R. Rivera
Movie’s ‘Scratches’ Persist
Between now and the casting of the final ballot In Puerto Rico’s next plebiscite — due sometime in 1991 — this Caribbean island’s 3.3 million U.S. citizens are anticipating a stream of attention from the national news media Depending on the outcome, that stream could become a torrent.
Political convictions and partisan feelings here run deep. General elections routinely turn out more than 80% of eligible voters, so the upcoming vote to determine the future political status of this island democracy (the last plebiscite was held in 1967) carries the promise of high drama.
Two alternatives, applying for admission to the Union as the 51st state or petitioning Congress for its independence, could have seismic political consequences. A less dramatic choice, attempting to persuade Congress to grant the island more autonomy under the current Commonwealth compact with the United States, may prove easier to achieve and implement, but could leave Puerto Rico’s political destiny unclear.
All of the newsprint and air time that will most likely be devoted to tracking the plebiscite, however, may not be enough to overcome some of the lingering misperceptions about Puerto Rico that the movie "West Side Story" left in its wake.
FILM WON STONY SILENCE
The film won kudos from critics and Oscars from the Academy, but only stony silence from most Puerto Ricans. While enjoying the music and choreography, we cringed at the one-dimensional portrayals of our native land — a place of "island breezes and tropical diseases" — and of our supposedly gang-oriented teen-age culture.
Most artists would contend that theater and film are art forms, not history or journalism.
Maybe so. But for viewers who didn’t know better, and for those who wanted to believe the worst, disjointed movie images of switchbladearmed Puerto Ricans and a poverty-ridden Caribbean island carried the force of reality.
"West Side Story" left "scratches on the mind," the metaphor that journalist and MIT professor Harold Isaacs used in explaining the power that images have to influence how we see, feel about, and behave toward those who are noticeably different from us.
Even though more than a quarter-century has passed, I am still saddened by the long reach that such stereotypes can have. In 1968, an ill-prepared TV talk show host introduced me as a Puerto Rican who had stepped out of "West Side Story," and then turned to me and asked when I had immigrated here and become a U.S. citizen.
RATTLING OF CAGES REQUIRED The civil rights movement expanded the moral base and legal remedies available for fighting discrimination. Yet, those "scratches on the mind" are more resistant to change. They require regular doses of reality, and some rattling of cages. Good news reporting can help provide both.
When the national press corps plans its coverage of the plebiscite story, it is bound to consider the island’s strategic importance in the Caribbean and its economic relationship to the rest of the United States. It would do well to look also into the island’s growing urban problems that mirror those in the states.
I hope that it takes as careful a look at truly significant achievements we Puerto Ricans have made in business, the professions and the arts; at the importance that family, religion and dignidad still have in our daily lives; and at why so many of us who left the island years ago are coming home again.
(Charles R. Rivera returned to Puerto Rico two years ago. He is an associate editor with the English-language weekly Caribbean Business, in San Juan.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
THE GOOD OLD DAYS: Recuerdas cuando racists papered properties of Latinos and others of color with vile, anonymous threats and evil epithets? Now racism and nativism straddle a finer line. To wit:
MACHOS, BESOS AND HOT TAMALES: Michael Sneed, a female gossip columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, thinks Hispanics in that city are a barrel of laughs.
She sprinkles her columns with such cutesy talk as "salsa snar-ler" and "besa me mucho" (sic). She loves to give Latinos such labels as "two hot tamales," "the Big Taco," "Macho y macho," and "Latin lover."
When the Latino Coalition in Defense of Affirmative Action sought audience with Chicago’s personnel chief rather than its Hispanic deputy commissioner, she dubbed its members "the macho men." She calls the City Council’s Hispanic aldermen "the four amigos" regularly and on 15 occasions has used "Ay, caram-baaaa" — often followed by some insult to the aldermen.
Mark Eissman, her editor, sees nothing wrong with Sneed’s lingo. "I don’t find references to tacos, frankly, on their face, to be offensive," Jennifer Juarez Robles quoted him in this month’s Chicago Reporter.
The columnist calls a section of offices occupied by the Latino aldermen "Little El Paso." Juarez Robles asks the reasonable question: If Sneed had called black or Jewish aldermen’s offices "Little Harlem" or "Little Jerusalem," would the Sun-Times have printed that?
In an analysis of 507 Sneed columns, Juarez Robles counted 144 items mentioning Hispanics (not including entertainers). She found 73 to be negative, 22 positive and the rest "neutral." "Although Sneed items about Chicago black politicians have been scathing at times, they are almost always written without references to black food, language or culture," Juarez Robles noted.
Alderman Miguel del Valle commented: "If...it makes light of our culture, it can’t help but make light of our politics. Her stereotypes trivialize everything about Hispanics. The real message is: ‘What a bunch of kooks’."
OTHER FRIENDS IN THE PRESS: USA Today reporter William Dunn seemed to buy into another stereotype recently. He led a news story: "The number of Hispanics in the USA is growing five times faster than the total population, posing challenges we must address now, researchers warn.
"‘Hispanics risk becoming a vast underclass that could slam the brakes on U.S. economic competitiveness,’ says Cary Davis of the Population Reference Bureau."
On April 6, the Los Angeles Times offered this headline with a story to match its inflammatory nature: "Border Officials Brace for Central American ‘Invasion’."
WHO ELSE LOVES US? It’s so easy to fan fear and ignorance. When the National Education Association criticized the English-Only movement last year, Larry Pratt, the Pied Piper of English First, sent out a mailer blasting the NEA position (and asking for donations, of course). NEA President Mary Futrell received 10,500 form postcards from the Pratt frat.
Then NEA published a handbook further exposing the movement. Aghast at the dangers of a multilingual society, Pratt turned his followers loose again. In less than a month this spring, Futrell was buried under 15,000 more cards.
— KayBarbaro
Quoting...
KATHERINE ORTEGA, when sworn in as U.S. Treasurer Oct. 3, 1983, explaining why she would sign the nation’s currency "Katherine Davalos Ortega":
"I will be honoring my mother as well as my father."
3
April 17,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Melita Garza
The Forgotten Refugees
MATAMOROS, Mexico — Twenty-four grey, cinderblock beds, three bare light bulbs and a giant-size picture of the Virgin of Guadalupe furnish the women’s dorm at Casa Juan Diego in this Mexican border city of nearly 200,000. The Casa, run by parishioners of San Felipe de Juan church, serves as haven to Central American refugees who fluctuate in number from 60 to 150.
Marlene, 23, is among the latest to arrive. She is aware that the demand for sanctuary limits each new arrival’s stay to just 15 days. She lays on the bed and talks about continuing north to work in Houston, Texas. ciTve never been there," she says. "I don’t have any family there. I have heard of it and think it would be a good place to work."
Marlene made the trip from Guatemala with her husband, Luis, 26, their 4-year-old daughter Cindy, and her sister Leticia, 21.
She relates a not-uncommon story of the group being robbed by Mexican authorities on the journey from their Central American homeland. Four of thousands, they are bunched directly beneath the border in increasing numbers. Their rejection by the United States as political refugees is almost automatic now. The church’s parishioners donate clothes, food and soap, and prepare their meals. A communal tube of Crest toothpaste hangs from a shoestring on the wall.
BORDER CITIES UNITE
About a year ago, the citizens of Matamoros began taking special notice of the refugees’ plight. Andres Cuellar, a history professor, heads the Matamoros Committee on Human Rights. He estimates that the refugees bring an average of $1,000 apiece into Mexico and that 90% of their savings are spent to pay off corrupt officials or others who promise to help them. Refugees unlucky enough to be picked up by the police may spend as many as three days in the municipal jail without food, he says.
"The city government says that they are federal prisoners and that the city does not have enough money in its budget to pay all the food bills." He also complains of a centralized bureaucracy that requires the refugees’ cases be heard in Mexico City, preventing them from receiving legal assistance or essential medical care.
"If we hear that people are going hungry in jail, we will bring food ourselves, but our goal is to make the government do this."
Matamoros Mayor Fernando Montemayor says the situation can be overwhelming at times, but, "The city does the best it can."
Cuellar describes an effort underway to unite groups from cities along both sides of the border into a refugee advocacy organization. Meanwhile, men, women and children flow in and out of Casa Juan Diego.
BIDING TIME, PLANNING JOURNEYS F6lix Rivera, another Guatemalan, sits under a picture of the crucified Jesus, sliding beer and soda bottle caps across a checker board and talking about joining his wife in Stamford, Conn. "She has a job there.
I think it’s a place where you can work in peace.”
Bernarda Luz, 17, of El Salvador, wants to reach her father and brothers in Boston. This is her 15th and final day at the refuge.
Laura Garcia, a Guatemalan, headed north after seeing her husband killed by the military. She was caught almost immediately by the U.S. Border Patrol, but was able to convince the officers that she was Mexican. They dropped her across the line into Matamoros. Now she leans against a cardboard wall hinged with Coca-Cola bottle caps that form an entrance to the refuge’s kitchen and plans her second attempt. Her mother and two children need her to send money.
The conversation of the refugees of Casa Juan Diego blends with the sound and smell of a welcome meal. The aroma offish frying in oil joins the fragile fragrance of freedom — at last so near, still so far.
Julio Ojeda
Out With Passe Labels
NEWS ITEM: Several U.S. black leaders, including the Rev. Jesse Jackson, say members of their race would prefer to be called African Americans rather than blacks.
Attention, please. I have an announcement.
I no longer wish to be called a “Hispanic.'' From this day forward, please use the term "Puerto-Minnesota-Ecuadorean” whenever describing me.
I don’t take this step lightly. Thoughts of my identity have disturbed my slumber, and the word “Hispanic" especially bothers me.
For one thing, it’s too old. I firmly believe that racial and ethnic labels, like fashions, should be swept away every few years. Terms such as "Hispanic" and "Latino" are passe. We need a new spring line.
Also, "Hispanic" is too generic. It says nothing about who I am or where I come from.
Hispanics here have visible roots spreading back to some two dozen countries, and less visible ones that reach every continent. “Puerto-Minnesota-Ecuadorean" serves as a reminder of my birthplace (Ecuador), my childhood home (Puerto Rico) and my adoptive home (Minnesota).
A NEW LABEL SOLVES PROBLEMS
I want strangers to conjure images of snowcapped South American mountains and geometric tapestries, of swaying palms and arroz con polio, of Garrison Keillor and ice-fishing.
It is not enough to have roots. I believe I must wear them on my sleeve wherever I go and knock people over the head with them.
But most importantly, the old “Hispanic" no longer commands sufficient respect.
That is because Hispanics today are plagued by too many problems. There are our skyrocketing drop-out rates. Pesticide-induced illnesses. Run-ins with la migra. Unemployment. Alcoholism. Teen-age pregnancies and welfare dependency.
These crises will never be resolved, and don’t believe anyone who tells you differently. Oh yes, politicians will make promises and commission studies, but nothing will ever get done. Hispanic organizations will posture angrily and hold rallies, but it will be useless.
The simplest escape from all this unpleasantness — for me, at least — is a quick name change. A new label will provide me with instant respectability.
No longer will Anglos assume that i am an "illegal alien” intent on taking a job away from them; or a hardened criminal whom Fidel Castro shuffled onto the deck of a boat in Mariel Harbor; or a Puerto Rican terrorist intent on blowing up Disneyland; or an agitator who wants to foist the Spanish language off on more pure U.S. patriots.
MAN OF MYSTERY, INTRIGUE
Their misperceptions are too difficult to dispel. We shouldn’t even try. Instead, let us all adopt new identities and watch our lives change.
In the past, job interviewers have demanded to see my green card. Policemen have frisked me. Supermarket cashiers still routinely ask, "Will you be paying with food stamps, sir?"
As a “Puerto-Minnesota-Ecuadorean," I will become a man of mystery and intrigue. I will be invited to parties. Waiters will give me good tables. Beautiful women will give me that look.
Tomorrow, as I enter a crowded banquet room in my rented tuxedo, I want to see heads turn and to hear the murmur, "Here comes a man worthy of our respect."
But, realist that I am, I’ll accept it as progress if the other guests don’t give me their best impersonal stare, hand me their champagne glass and ask for a refill.
(Julio Ojeda is a reporter with the St. Paul Pioneer Press Dispatch.)
(Melita Garza is a reporter with the Milwaukee Journal.)
Hispanic LinkWeekly Report April 17,1989


COLLECTING
MAGAZINES: Hispanic is published monthly by The Hispanic Publishing Corporation, 111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 200, Washington, D.C. 20001 1-800-338-2590. Subscriptions are $18 for one year, $30 for two years. Single copies are $2.
Hispanic Business is published monthly by Hispanic Business Inc., 360 S. Hope Ave., Santa Barbara, Calif. 93105 (805) 682-5843. Subscriptions are $18 for one year. Single copies are $2, except for the June issue, which is $3.50.
Puntos is published monthly by D.E.R. Media Group Inc., 12700 Park Central Dr., Suite 440, Dallas, Texas 75251 (214) 991-2544. Subscriptions are $18 for one year, $36 for two years. Single copies are $1.50.
Qu6Pasa is published bimonthly by D.S. Publications, 1086Teaneck Rd., Teaneck, N.J. 07666 (201) 833-1800. Subscriptions are $8.99 for six issues, $17.99 for 12 issues. Single copies are $2.25.
Saludos His pa nos is published quarterly by the United Council of Spanish-Speaking People, 19510 Ventura Bivd., Tarzana, Calif. 91356 (818)609-8363. Subscriptions are $10 for one year.
HOUSING: "Housing in America: 1985/86," a 63-page report by the Census Bureau, looks at housing patterns among Hispanics and other ethnic and racial groups. For a copy (specify Series H-121, No. 19) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 782-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
CHILD SUPPORT, ALIMONY: "Child Support and Alimony: 1985" contains racial and ethnic data. For a copy of the 79-page report (specify Series P-23, No. 154), contact Superintendent of Documents. See address above. (Price was not available at press time.)
CHICAGO AND ILLINOIS BIAS CRIMES: The March issue of The Chicago Reporter includes two articles on bias crimes, one with statistics on such crimes in Chicago according to racial and ethnic group, another about an Illinois law mired by the state police department’s demand for more operational money. In the April issue, reporter Jennifer Juarez Robles details a study that finds potential discrimination against Hispanics by Chicago Sun-Times columnist Michael Sneed. For a copy of either issue, send $2.50 to Community Renewal Society, 332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60604 (312) 427-4836. (Annual subscriptions are $38.)
CONNECTING
CONGRESSIONAL INTERNS SOUGHT
Hispanic high school graduates who will be full-time college freshmen this fall and would like to serve as congressional interns this summer have until May 5 to apply for 24 such internships being offered through the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute.
The internships run from June 12-Aug. 4 and include a $2,000 stipend. Travel arrangements to and from Washington, D.C., are paid for and the interns will receive free housing at George Washington University.
Twelve of the internships are funded by McDonald’s Corp. and the other half by Coca-Cola USA.
For more information and applications, contact CHCI at 504 C St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 543-1771 or 1-800-367-5273.
SCHOOL TARGETS AT-RISK YOUTH
New York City’s Pace University is one of four schools that will share a $500,000 grant to combat the high school dropout rate, it was announced last month. Pace will use its part of the money to help Hispanic students who are likely to drop out.
Pace’s Hispanic Outreach Program will identify potential dropouts in the White Plains School District with the help of high school counselors and provide tutoring in areas such as math, reading and writing. The program will inform the students of career choices and opportunities in postsecondary education.
Officials hope to serve 25-30 students before this academic year finishes and another 75 next fall.
Iris Morales will head the program. She’s a senior at Pace, a student teacher and a mother of three.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
Pam Salazar, public relations representative for the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project and most recently Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, joins the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities in that same capacity...
Eliza May, project manager of the American Public Welfare Association’s task force on immigration reform in Washington, D.C., begins her new job at the start-up office of the National Association of Latino Elected And Appointed Officials in San Antonio...
Calendar______________________________
THIS WEEK
MARKET STUDY Miami April 18
Strategy Research Corporation will hold a seminar to release its fourth U.S. Hispanic Market Study. It will feature panel discussions on brand loyalty and cultural assimilation. Richard Tobin, president of SRC, will present the findings of the 1989 study. Ling Hsu (305) 649-5400
MEDIA CONFERENCE
San Juan, Puerto Rico April 19-22
The seventh National Hispanic Media Conference
and Expo will feature assorted panels and
workshops, film and video screenings and a
photojournalism exhibit. Also scheduled is a job fair
where representatives from media companies will
recruit college students, recent graduates and
professionals.
Jocelyn Cordova (202) 783-6228 MIGRATION HEARING
Washington, D.C. April 20, 21 The Commission for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development, a congressionally mandated body, will hold a hearing on push factors causing migration from Latin America to the United States.
Diane Gonzalez (202) 254-4954
CANCER SYMPOSIUM Houston April 20-22
The University of Texas’ M. D. Anderson Cancer Center is sponsoring a session on cancer prevention, detection and treatment among minorities and the economically disadvantaged. Dr. Louis Sullivan, U.S. secretary of Health and Human Services, will be the keynote speaker.
Shirley Roy (713) 792-2222
AT-RISK CHILDREN St. Louis April 20-22
A training institute sponsored by the National Community Education Association and the Missouri Education Department will focus on early childhood education. Participants will explore current issues and trends in early childhood programs.
Linda Bryant (703) 683-6232
WORKFORCE 2000 El Segundo, Calif. April 21
A symposium sponsored by the Los Angeles chapter of Image, an employment and education organization, will highlight the changing demographics of the nation’s workforce. Discussion will center on issues confronting employers as the year 2000 approaches.
Ron Guillen (213) 643-1793
FAMILIES, CHILDREN San Antonio April 22
Familias, a national network of individuals, private and public agencies, and organizations seeking to improve the lot of Hispanic families and children, will hold its quarterly meeting.
Carmen Cortez (512) 270-4630
NEW YORK HISPANICS Albany, N.Y. April 23-26
The Somos Uno Foundation, an outgrowth of the New York state Assembly Puerto Rican/Hispanic Task Force, will hold its second conference on how to address a broad range of issues through legislative empowerment.
Robert Caldenn (212) 893-0202
5
April 17,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
RADIO BIUNGUE
Radio Bilingue has the following opportunities:
Producer
Producer for daily, 7-minute, national Spanish language newscast—NOTICIERO LATINO—and weekend edition— SEMANARIO LATINO.
Duties: Assign reporters stories, edit tapes, write scripts, mix program, prepare for distribution.
Qualifications: Bilingual (English/Spanish), excellent radio production experience, writing/editing skills.
Assistant Producer
Duties: Record telephone feeds, edit tapes, assist in mixing and distribution, assist in marketing.
Qualifications: Bilingual (English/Spanish), good radio production experience.
Public Affairs Director
Radio Bilingue is recruiting a public affairs director for its new station, KUBO-FM in El Centro, California.
Responsibilities include coordinating volunteers to produce and originate programming for this U.S./Mexico border area. Must be bilingual and with three years experience in radio production.
Sendresumeto: COMMUNITY
Samuel Orozco RADIO...
1111 Fulton Mall, No. 700 SOUND Fresno, Calif. 93721 BUSINESS
(209) 486-5174 ALTERNATIVE.
FREE-LANCE
RADIO
JOURNALISTS
Los Angeles, Miami, New York, and other communities with a significant Hispanic population. Reporters will produce weekly features and news spots.
Look for Isabel Alegri'a, Paz Cohen, and Jose McMurray at this year’s NAHJ conference. Or contact Judy Moore-Smith, NPR’s Latin File, National Public Radio, 2025 M St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
FREE-LANCE WRITERS WANTED
One of the nation’s largest bilingual magazines has afew openings for free-lance writers. If you would like to have your work published in a national publication, call 1 -800-826-0869. Ask for Steve Solomon.
9>PBS
PBS is a private, nonprofit corporation providing quality programming and related services to the nation’s public television stations.
PBS offers extraordinary opportunities for professional growth and responsibility in today's communication environment.
For information on current job opportunities contact:
PBS
Carla A. Gibson 1320 Braddock Place Alexandria, VA 22314
Or call our job information line at (703) 739-5298 PBS is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
HISPANICS MEET THE PRESS
The 1982 winter and summer editions of the civil rights quarterly "Perspectives" offer a two-part series by Hispanic Link founder Charlie Ericksen on "Hispanics Meet the Press." The articles offer a critical analysis of mainstream print media’s treatment and hiring policies relating to Hispanics. Hispanic Link has extra copies of this set of articles it will send to the first 25 individuals or institutions who write and request them. Include $2.65 in postage stamps with your request. Write to Danilo Alfaro, Media Report, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
WPLG/TV 10
Studio Maintenance Technician
An opening exists for a full-time Studio Maintenance Technician. He/she should be experienced in TV studio equipment maintenance, including cameras, film chains, DVEs, still stores, computer graphics and character generator systems, switchers, video tape, and editing systems.
Applicants should have 5 years experience as a Maintenance Technican. Must be able to work flexible shifts including nights and weekends.
Send resume with salary history and qualifications to: Don Hain, Chief Engineer, WPLG/TV 10, 3900 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 33137.
REPORTERS/CREATIVE WRITERS:
Hispanic Link News Service buys three 650 word fea-ture/opinion pieces weekly, paying on acceptance. A story you cover locally may have national interest or application. For details and writer’s guidelines, write Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE
Employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media. Opportunities for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English or Spanish language. Contact Jocelyn Cordova, National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
April 17,1989
6


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
ASSISTANT ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE PUBLIC RELATIONS
We are seeking an ambitious public relations professional, or journalist interested in public relations, to join our St. Louis office. Work will include Hispanic and general market public relations.
Qualifications:
• Strong writing ability
• Good understanding of the media
• Fluency in spoken and written Spanish
• 1-4 years experience in public relations or journalism
• Eager to learn and grow in the public relations profession with a proven leader in the industry.
Please send cover letter, resume, and samples of your work to:
JoeTrevifio
Fleishman-Hillard, Inc.
200 North Broadway St. Louis, Mo. 63102 Equal Opportunity Employer
HEAD WOMEN’S SOFTBALL COACH
To serve as head women's softball coach and assistant women's basketball coach at a division III institution. Individual will also teach 50% in the health and physical education department (preferred health educator). Minimum master’s degree required.
Apply in writing to Dr. Dianna Jones, Athletic Director-Women, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, Wisconsin 53190. Send letter of application, resume, three letters of recommendation and all transcripts.
Application deadline: May 19, 1989.
University of Whitewater-Wisconsinl is an Equal Opportunity Employerl with an Affirmative Action Plan.
M
A
R
DIRECTOR, OHIO UNIONS The Ohio State University
Reporting to the vice provost for student affairs, the director serves as the chief administrator for the two college unions on campus, the Ohio and Drake Unions, and has the administrative responsibility for planning programs, controlling a multi-million dollar annual budget, planning capital improvements, directing food services operations, and managing facilities and personnel.
Qualifications: This position requires a high-energy, dynamic student affairs professional. Applicants should have a master’s degree in student personnel or related field, have demonstrated success in the business and student programming aspects of union operations, and possess excellent communication, interpersonal, and management skills.
Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience. An excellent benefits package is available.
To be assured of consideration, send letter of application, resume, and three letters of reference by MAY 15, 1989 to:
Dr. Edwin R. Haering, Chair
Director, Ohio Unions Search Committee 201 Ohio Union 1739 North High Street Columbus, Ohio 43210-1392 (614) 292-9334
The Ohio State University is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer.
PHYSICIANS Westat, Inc.
Westat, a health research organization, is seeking PHYSICIANS for the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey sponsored by the U.S. Public Health Service. Individuals will be part of a highly trained medical team conducting physical examinations in mobile exam centers traveling to 88 U.S. cities through 1993.
Physicians must be licensed in one state and be BC/BE in internal or family medicine. FULL TIME TRAVEL REQUIRED (ONE YEAR MINIMUM). Competitive salaries, paid malpractice, per diem, car, four weeks paid vacation per year, holidays, and health, life, dental, disability insurance offered.
Call Beverly Geline at 800-937-8281 extension 8248 or 301 -251 -8248 or send CV to:
Westat, Inc.
1650 Research Boulevard Rockville, MD. 20850 Attn: B. Geline EOE/M/V/H
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week
CLASSIFIED AD RATES: Ordered by.
90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES:
(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Organization________
St reet_____________
City, State & Zip___
Area Code & Phone
7
April 17,1989
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
PREMIERING THIS WEEK: Two new daily, U.S.-produced Spanish-language television programs make their debut this week on the Univision network.
The controversial El juez series, a Spanish-language version of the syndicated show The Judge, begins airing April 17. The show was produced with a waiver contract granted by the Screen Actors Guild, under which Spanish-speaking Guild members were hired at a salary lower than union minimum.
Rene Enriquez stars as the series’ title character. El juez will air Mondays through Fridays at 4:30 p.m. (ET). The program is produced by Genesis International.
Also premiering the 17th — immediately following El juez — is the hourlong Cristina.
Hosted by former Cosmopolitan enespaho! editor Cristina Saralegui, the show is decribed as "Oprah with salsa." The audience participation,
talk/interview show will air Mondays through Fridays from 5 to 6 p.m. (ET — check local listings).
El juez and Cristina are the second and third shows premiered by Univision this month. The network's Monday newsmagazine Portada, anchored by Teresa Rodriguez, began airing April 3.
Cristina and Portada are produced by Univision.
EN Ml VIEJO SAN JUAN: Various entertainment-related panels organized by the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences are included in this week’s National Hispanic Media Conference.
The event will be held April 19-22 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
Panels include "Financing for Producers" (April 20), "Developing a National Cinema in Puerto Rico" (April 21) and "Acting as a Profession" (April 22).
A HAMAS Film and Screening Program begins April 19 with the screening of the Oscar-nominated Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, by Spanish director Pedro Almodovar.
Conference attendees can also enjoy a wide array of local entertainment at various San Juan theaters and clubs.
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
WRITERS’ GUIDE: Following are guidelines for submissions from free-lance writers to various Hispanic magazines:
HISPANIC: The magazine is a general-interest monthly. Marfa Sharpe, editor, says she is looking for stories about Hispanics doing exceptionally well in unusual things. Updates on the entertainment and lifestyle industries are also welcome. The magazine prints cartoons, opinion columns, guest columns, short takes and profiles. Pay ranges from $25 to $600 on publication. 111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 200, Washington, D.C. 20001, telephone (202) 682-9020
HISPANIC BUSINESS: This monthly magazine’s focus is on Hispanics in the corporate world and Hispanic entrepreneurs. Joel Russell, senior editor, says that each issue follows a specific theme. One regular feature is a two-page article on a Hispanic woman in the
business world. The minimum length for articles is 1,500 words. A photograph should accompany every 800 words of copy. Pay ranges from 12 to 20 cents per word, on publication. 360 S. Hope Ave., Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 93105, telephone (805) 682-5843
PUNTOS: A general-interest monthly, the magazine seeks to educate readers about "how the American system works," says Fernando Escobar, editor and publisher. He is seeking articles on Hispanics in entertainment, sports and business. Exclusive stories are preferred. Pay ranges from $25 to $100 on publication. 12700 Park Central Dr., Suite 440, Dallas, Texas 75251, telephone (214) 991-2544
QUE PASA: This bimonthly magazine caters mainly to the female teen-age set. Editor Celeste Gomez is looking for pieces on Hispanics in music, TV and film, as well as sports figures. Pay is $50 for pieces up to one magazine page, and $100 for anything longer, on publication. Photos are also accepted.
1086 Teaneck Rd., Teaneck, N.J. 07666, telephone (201) 833-1800
SALUDOS HISPANOS. Published quarterly, the magazine is general-interest. Editor Julie Healey’s ideal story is one that is inspirational, educational and "a joy to read." Stories on almost any topic are welcome, provided they have a national scope. Pay for stories is between two and three cents per word; payment is made upon acceptance of the piece. 19510 Ventura Blvd., Suite 204, Tarzana, Calif. 91356, telephone (818) 609-8363
VISTA: The magazine is a general-interest weekly newspaper insert. Editor Harry Caicedo says he normally prefers free-lancers to submit ideas for stories first. If he is interested, he will contact the writer to discuss the story, and shape the focus. Vista buys a wide range of stories and pays from $50 to $500 on publication. Cartoons will also be considered. 999 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite 600, Coral Gables, Fla. 33134, telephone (305) 442-2462 — Danilo Alfaro
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana, Rhonda Smith. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

iEC'D. HR/Cf Making The 1-MW fllis Week ing criticism and lack of support from housing commissioners .. she is currently under investigation for awarding more than $200,000 1n con tracts to acquaintances on a noncompetitive basis ... Dr . Gonzalez, named Illinois Family Physician ofthe Year 1n 1986, d1es Apnl 4 in a hospital in Park Ridge, Ill. He was 64 ... A San Diego judge sets at $250,000 each the bond for Kenneth Kovzelove, 17, and Dennis Bencivenga, 19. The two are charged in what are said to be the racially motivated shooting deaths of Hilario Salgado and Matilde de Ia Mancha, both 18 years old ... Doctors and staff at San Francisco's Pembroke Pines General Hospital honor Luz Helena Fl6rez, 9, for defy ing their predictions and walking again. Her right leg was severely mangled by a shark two years ago off the coast of Florida ... U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp names George Rodriguez, formerly an administrator with the Department of Justice, as a special assistant. . . Sens. Alan Cranston, Bob Dole, Orrin Hatch,. Edward Kennedy, George Mitchell and Pete Wilson pick Eunice Diaz to serve on the 15-m ember National Commission on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. The sole Hispanic on the com mission, Dfaz is a faculty member at the University of Southern California's School of Medicine ... LeilaGonzalez-Correa resigns as ex ecutive director of the Los Angeles City Housing Authority, citing mountvoi.7Nol31 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Bush Picks Villalpando for U.S. Treasurer Post President Bush announced his intention April 4 to nominate Catalina Vasquez Villal pando to become the 39th U .S. Treasurer. If confirmed by the Senate, she would be the third Hispanic to hold this position. Villalpando served as special assistant for public liaison to thenPresident Reagan from 1983 to 1985. She is also chairper son of the Republican National Hispanic As sembly and a senior vice president at Com munications Interna tional. Villalpando'sl visibility during the Bush presidential cam paign last year also contributed to her win ning the nomination. She would succeed Katherine Davalos Ortega, who has held the post since 1983 . Romana Acosta Banuelos was the first Hispanic to be U.S. Treasurer. She served during the Nixon and Ford ad ministrations . The Senate is expected to confirm Villalpando within the next four to six weeks. In addition to signing all U.S. currency, the treasurer heads the U.S. Mint, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the U.S. Savings Bond Program. Rhonda Smith Magazines Forge On Despite.Odds Hispanic Business magazine, a Santa BartiOn-mostly to latin': business people and bara, Calif.-based monthly aimed at Hispanic college c.ampuses .. Jesus Chavarna •. 1ts. ed1tor entrepreneurs and the rising Hispanic profesand publisher, attnbutes the magaz1ne s sue siena! class, celebrated its 1Oth anniversary cess to its specialized audience and slow Apri110. The magazine is something of a surgrowth strategy. He cautions new magazines vivor among English-language Latino publicaagainst trying to reach too vast a readership tions . An estimated 80% of them have fallen too soon. "By narrowing our target audience, by the wayside over the last decade. we were able to stay in the marketplace long But, according to Kirk Whisler, coordinator of enough to make a difference." the National Association of Hispanic PublicaFifteen-month-old Hispanic magazine is a tions, the future may be bright for such publiWashington, D.C.-based general interest cations in the '90s . He notes that many monthly which has built a paid circulation of advertisers have false impressions about the 82,500 . "There is a large segment of educated, Hispanic community that have made them English-speaking Hispanics that has not been reluctant to advertise in Hispanic print. Many serviced by print media," says editor Marfa of those misconceptions , he claims, such as Sharpe. The magazine conducted a random Hispanics' supposed aversion to reading, survey of its subscribers in October 1988 . The originated with Hispanic broadcast media, median annual household income of those which benefited in terms of advertising dollars. readers was $40,000. "Those messages stunted the growth of Hispanic print . " Whisler says that if three or four general Hispanic magazines were to come onto the scene at the same time, they would benefit each other . By forming a genre of publications, they would ease the uncertainty of newsstand retailers and advertisers. Several Hispanic publications have had difficulties in dealing with newsstand distribution and have opted for controlled circulation or mail subscriptions. Launched in 1979 as a newsletter, Hispanic Business today has a paid circulation of 7,200. It has an additional135,000 controlled circulaJulie Healey , English-language editor of Sa/udos Hispanos, a quarterly publication in continued on page 2 Chicagoans Loyal to Party Of the 1 ,439 Hispanics polled regarding why they voted for Richard Daley in Chicago ' s April 4 mayoral race, 81% said they did so because he is a Democrat, 75% declared he was the most qualified candidate and 70% indicated they voted for him because it was time for a change . Leaders Meet Over Puerto Rico Status According to exit poll results released April 6 by the Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project, the Hispanic vote was primarily a "young" vote, with 30% of voters in the 25to 34-year-old category. Hispanics made up 7% of Chicagoans who voted in the race. Puerto Rico Governor Rafael Hernandez Colon met with mainland Puerto Rican community leaders in New York and Miami on April3 and 8, respectively, as part of a series of gather ings to determine how they feel about main land Puerto Ricans voting in the forthcoming plebiscite on Puerto Rico's status. Sen. Bennett Johnston (D-La.) filed three bills on April 5 that would authorize the plebi scite and commit Congress to put into effect the finalized political status. Hernandez Colon also plans to visit Philadel phia, Chicago and Hartford, Conn., although no dates have been set. According to Johnston who chairs the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Com mittee the first bill would authorize a plebi scite to choose between existing commonwealth, statehood or independence. The second one would define the options in a general way. The third would set forth legisla tion with detailed definitions of the three op tions . The deadline to submit the initial definitions is May 9 . The senator expects to hold the first set of hearings on June 1, 2 and 5 in Washington . June 16 and 19 are target dates for hearings in Puerto Rico. Mario Santana In what was characterized as one of the most racially polarized mayoral races in recent his tory, Hispanics voted for Daley over Alderman Timothy Evans, who ran under the Harold Washington Party banner. Hispanic Puerto Rican Mexican Cuban South American Central American Other Daley Evans 71% 20% 78 17 73 17 59 24 41 37 62 28 56 35 Rhonda Smith

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• Victoria, Tex., Latinos Try Polls After Supreme Court Rebuff Rejected by the U.S . Supreme Court April 3 in an attempt to nullify a school board policy they charged was intended to dilute Hispanic representation, Latinos in Victoria, Texas, have cast their hopes on the city's May 6 board elections . The Supreme Court refused to hear a law suit filed in 1985 by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund on be half of Theresa Gutierrez, Victoria Indepen dent School District's sole Hispanic member. It let stand a lower court decision that found the school board policy did not fall under the federal Voting Rights Act but rather was a parliamentary procedure. The policy in question gave the school board president the power not to allow on the agenda any matter not backed by at least two of the board's seven members. Gutierrez charged in her suit that the policy was instituted shortly after she was elected in 1985 to prevent her from adequately repre senting the interests of Latino students. Hispanics make up 51% of the students in the city, which is 120 miles east of San Antonio. Magazines Seek Advertiser Commitment continued from page 1 Tarzana, Calif., calls Latinos "a powerful group of consumers, in both dollars and numbers." Vista magazine, the Coral Gables, Fla. based weekly newspaper insert, has by far the largest circulation for a Hispanic-oriented pub lication in the United States 1.4 million . In February, Warner Publishing, a division of Warner Communications, purchased a 20% share of Horizon Communications, the com pany that publishes Vista. Arturo Villar, Vista's publisher, hails the potential of the English-lan guage Hispanic print market. "Hispanics want to know what other Hispanics around the country are doing. That's what Vista offers its readers." Two publications geared toward young Latinos are Latin Beat and QuePasa . Both are based in New Jersey and premiered within the last year. The latter is published by D.S. Publications, which produces the teenoriented magazines Tiger Beat, Right On! and Rock. A third, Low Rider, will publish 10 issues this year after publishing sporadically for several years. Many Hispanic periodicals failed to survive the '80s. Magazines such as Caminos, Clamor, Latina and Latino have folded al together . Washington, D . C . -based Nuestro has struggled over the years. Publisher Dan Lopez declined to speak with Weekly Report, and the magazine's status is unknown. Hispanic Entrepreneur, also based in the capi tal, is on hiatus. Publisher Gloria Rodriguez says that four test editions have been distributed, and publishing should resume in January . Los Angeles-based Arrtericas2001 is also in a state of limbo. Publisher Roberto Rodriguez has been meeting with investors and hopes to return this fall. Those involved blame a lack of commitment from advertisers rather than lack of a receptive market. Hispanic Entrepreneur's Rodriguez says that Latino publications have been "relegated" to second class status by advertisers . Villar agrees. "The potential for growth also depends on advertisers' realization that this is a market that should be targeted." Chavarria complains that most advertising dollars go to Spanish-language media rather than English-language. "This is an anomaly, and it is something that needs to be corrected." Most publishers agree that the market for Spanish-language print will continue to be sig nificant. The ongoing influx of Spanish-speak ing immigrants into the United States virtually guarantees this, they say. Many point to lan guage as being the key to culture but agree that an awareness of one's heritage persists even if English is predominantly spoken . "Being Hispanic is a lot more than language. It's a state of mind," says Villar. Latinos differ from mainstream readers in what they look for in a magazine, says Chavarria. "They are looking for information about themselves." Oanilo Alfaro Latinos Have Lowest Home-Ownership Hispanics have a lower home-ownership rate 40% than blacks and all other households, according to a U.S. Census Bureau study released April 6. "Housing in America: 1985/86" shows that while Hispanics' median monthly cost for housing (rented or owned) was $357, the same median as all other households, it is equivalent to 26% of their income compared with 21% of the overall median household in come. Hispanic Link Weekly Report Hispanic householders occupied 5.1 million units in 1985 . Their median unit size was 385 square feet per person. The median for all .households was 633 square feet per person. The report also reveals that 45% of Hispanic households had no savings or investments compared with 52% of black households and 24% of all households . Twelve percent of Hispanics lived in public or subsidized housing as opposed to 5% for the total population. Luis Restrepo April17, 1989 "It (the policy) is simply another method of veiled discrimination," Gutierrez told Weekly Report. Gutierrez, who was elected to a second three-year term last year, said that she has since formed alliances with other board mem bers but has been unable to tie down a fourth vote to overturn the policy. The first Hispanic woman to sit on the board, Gutierrez said she expects Leone! Rodriguez to win May 6 and carry the last vote necessary on the board to throw out the policy. -Felix Perez Jury Finds Four Guilty in Wells Fargo Robbery Four Puerto Rican men were convicted April 10 of robbing a Wells Fargo depot in Connec ticut six years ago. Officials in West Hartford believe that the group intended to use the $7.1 million it netted to finance Los Macheteros, an extremist Puerto Rican independence or ganization. Although charges were originally filed against five, one defendant, Carlos Ayes Suarez, 29, was acquitted of conspiracy charges . The other four, Norman Talavera, 32, Antonio Comacho Negron, 45, Roberto Maldonado Rivera, 53, and Juan Segarra Palmer Ill, 39, were found guilty of transporting funds from Connecticut to other parts of the country or using portions to sponsor toy giveaways in Hartford and Puerto Rico in early 1985. Los Macheteros needed money to revitalize its organization in 1983 and contacted Segar ra for assistance. Although Segarra, a Harvard graduate, acknowledged that he knew the rob bery was going to take place , he said he did not actually participate or assist in planning it. The other three defendants have indicated that they were the victims of mistaken identity and political repression. Poll Looks Into Child Care Twelve percent of Hispanic children six years old or younger are cared for by nonrelatives at homes other than their own, compared with 19% of blacks and 23% of whites, according to a survey by Louis Harris and Assocs. The poll of 4, 050 people, released April 11 , also found that 19% of Hispanic children are cared for in a day-care center, compared with 34% of black and 21% of white children. Other responses: Are your children (ages six and younger) cared for: Hispanic Black White -in a nursery school or preschool facility? YES 21% 37% 24% NO 79 63 76 -in a kindergarten or grade school? YES 41% 47% 37% NO 59 53 63 Mario Santana 2

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Charles R. Rivera Movie's 'Scratches' Persist Between now and the casting of the final ballot in Puerto Rico's next plebiscite-due sometime in 1991 -this Caribbean island's 3.3 mil lion U.S. citizens are anticipating a stream of attention from the nation al news media. Depending on the outcome , that stream could become a torrent. Political convictions and partisan feelings here run deep. General elections routinely turn out more than 80% of eligible voters, so the up coming vote to determine the future political status of this island democracy (the last plebiscite was held in 1967) carries the promise of high drama. Two alternatives, applying for admission to the Union as the 51st state or petitioning Congress for its independence , could have seismic politi cal consequences. A less dramatic choice, at tempting to persuade Congress to grant the island more autonomy under the current Com monwealth compact with the United States , may prove easier to achieve and implement, but could leave Puerto Rico's political destiny unclear. All of the newsprint and air time that will most likely be devoted to tracking the plebiscite, however, may not be enough to overcome some of the lingering misperceptions about Puer to Rico that the movie "West Side Story" left in its wake. FILM WON STONY SILENCE The film won kudos from critics and Oscars from the Academy , but only stony silence from most Puerto Ricans. While enjoying the music and choreography, we cringed at the one-dimensional portrayals of our native land -a place of "island breezes and tropical diseases" -and of our supposedly gang oriented teen-age culture . Most artists would contend that theater and film are art forms, not his tory or journalism. Maybe so . But for viewers who didn ' t know better , and for those who wanted to believe the worst, disjointed movie images of switchblade armed Puerto Ricans and a poverty-ridden Caribbean island carried the force of reality . " West Side Story" left "scratches on the mind," the metaphor that jour nalist and MIT professor Harold Isaacs used in explaining the power that images have to influence how we see, feel about , and behave toward those who are noticeably different from us. Even though more than a quarter-century has passed, I am still sad dened by the long reach that such stereotypes can have. In 1968, an ill-prepared TV talk show host introduced me as a Puerto Rican who had stepped out of "West Side Story," and then turned to me and asked when I had immigrated here and become a U.S. citizen . RATTLING OF CAGES REQUIRED The civil rights movement expanded the moral base and legal remedies available for fighting discrimination . Yet, those "scratches on the mind" are more resistant to change . They require regular doses of reality, and some rattling of cages . Good news reporting can help provide both. When the national press corps plans its coverage of the plebiscite story, it is bound to consider the island's strategic importance in the Caribbean and its economic relationship to the rest of the United States . It would do well to look also into the island ' s growing urban problems that mirror those in the states. 1 hope that it takes as careful a look at truly significant achievements we Puerto Ricans have made in business, the professions and the arts ; at the importance that family, religion and dignidad still have in our daily lives ; and at why so many of us who left the island years ago are com ing home again . (Charles R . Rivera returned to Puerto Rico two years ago. He is an associate editor with the English-language weekly Caribbean Business, in San Juan.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua THE GOOD OLD DAYS: Recuerdas cuando racists papered properties of Latinos and others of color with vile, anonymous threats and evil epithets? Now racism and nativism straddle a finer line. To wit: MACHOS BESOS AND HOT TAMALES: Michael Sneed, a female go;sip columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times , thinks Hispanics in that city are a barrel of laughs. She sprinkles her columns with such cutesy talk as "salsa snar ler" and "besa me mucho " (sic). She loves to give Latinos such labels as "two hot tamales," "the Big Taco," " Macho y macho, " and "Latin lover . " When the Latino Coalition in Defense of Affirmative Action sought audience with Chicago ' s personnel chief rather than i ts Hispanic deputy commissioner , she dubbed its members "the macho men." She calls the City Council ' s Hispanic aldermen " the four amigos" regularly and on 15 occasions has used "Ay, caram baaaa" often followed by some insult to the aldermen . Mark Eissman , her editor, sees nothing wrong with Sneed ' s lingo . " I don ' t find references to tacos, frankly , on their face , to be offensive," Jennifer Juarez Robles quoted him in this month's Chicago Reporter . The columnist calls a section of offices occupied by the Latino aldermen "Little El Paso." Juarez Robles asks the reasonable question: If Sneed had called black or Jewish aldermen ' s offices "Little Harlem" or "Li ttle Jerusalem," would the Sun-Times have printed that? In an analysis of 507 Sneed columns, Juarez Robles counted 144 items mentioning Hispanics (not including entertainers ) . She found 73 to be negative, 22 positive and the rest " neutral." "Although Sneed items about Chicago black politicians have been scathing at times, they are almost always written without references to black food, language or culture, " Juarez Robles noted. Alderman Miguel del Valle commented : " If ... it makes light of our culture, it can ' t help but make light of our politics . Her stereotypes trivialize everything about Hispanics. The real message is: 'What a bunch of kooks'." OTHER FRIENDS IN THE PRESS: USA Today reporter Wil liam Dunn seemed to buy into another stereotype recently. He led a news story: "The number of Hispanics in the USA is growing five times faster than the total population , posing challenges we must address now, researchers warn . "'Hispanics risk becoming a vast underclass that could slam the brakes on U.S . economic competitiveness, ' says Cary Davis of the Population Reference Bureau." On April 6 , the Los Angeles Times offered this headline with a story to match its inflammatory nature : "Border Officials Brace for Central American 'Invasion'." WHO ELSE LOVES US? It's so easy to fan fear and ignorance . When the National Education Association criticized the English Only movement last year , Larry Pratt, the Pied Piper of English First, sent out a mailer blasting the NEA position (and asking for donations , of course) . NEA President Mary Futrell received 10,500 form postcards from the Pratt frat . Then NEA published a handbook further exposing the move ment. Aghast at the dangers of a multilingual society , Pratt turned his followers loose again . In less than a month this spring , Futrell was buried under 1 5 , 000 more cards. Kay Barbaro Quoting ... KATHERINE ORTEGA, when sworn in as U.S . Treasurer Oct. 3, 1983, explaining why she would sign the nation's currency "Katherine Davalos Ortega": "I will be honoring my mother as well as my father. " 3 April17, 1989 Hispa ni c Link Weekly Report

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Melita Garza The Forgotten Refugees MATAMOROS, Mexico-Twenty-four grey, cinderblock beds, three bare light bulbs and a giant-size picture of the Virgin of Guadalupe fur nish the women's dorm at Casa Juan Diego in this Mexican border city of nearly 200 , 000. The Casa, run by parishioners of San Felipe de Juan church, serves as haven to Central American refugees who fluctuate in number from 60 to 150. Marlene, 23, is among the latest to arrive. She is aware that the demand for sanctuary limits each new arrival ' s stay to just 15 days. She lays on the bed and talks about continuing north to work in Houston, Texas . "I've never been there," she says. "I don't have any family there. I have heard of it and think it would be a good place to work . " Marlene made the trip from Guatemala with her husband, Luis, 26, their 4-year-old daughter Cindy, and her sister Leticia, 21. She relates a not-uncommon story of the group being robbed by Mexican authorities on the journey from their Central American homeland . Four of thousands, they are bunched directly beneath the border in increasing numbers . Their rejection by the United States as political refugees is almost automatic now . The church's parishioners donate clothes, food and soap, and prepare their meals. A communal tube of Crest toothpaste hangs from a shoestring on the wall. BORDER CITIES UNITE About a year ago, the citizens of Matamoros began taking special notice of the refugees' plight. Andres Cuellar, a history professor , heads the Matamoros Committee on Human Rights. He estimates that the refugees bring an average of $1,000 apiece into Mexico and that 90% of their savings are spent to pay off corrupt officials or others who promise to help them . Refugees unlucky enough to be picked up by the police may spend as many as three days in the municipal jail without food, he says. "The city government says that they are federal prisoners and that the city does not have enough money in its budget to pay all the food bills . " He also complains of a centralized bureaucracy that requires the refugees' cases be heard in Mexico City, preventing them from receiving legal assistance or essential medical care. "If we hear that people are going hungry in jail, we will bring food our selves, but our goal is to make the government do this." Matamoros Mayor Fernando Montemayor says the situation can be overwhelming at times, but, "The city does the best it can." Cuellar describes an effort underway to unite groups from cities along both sides of the border into a refugee advocacy organization . Meanwhile, men, women and children flow in and out of Casa Juan Diego . BIDING TIME, PLANNING JOURNEYS Felix Rivera, another Guatemalan, sits under a picture of the crucified . Jesus , sliding beer and soda bottle caps across a checker board and talking about joining his wife in Stamford, Conn. "She has a job there . I think it's a place where you can work in peace . " Bernarda Luz, 17, of El Salvador, wants to reach her father and brothers in Boston. This is her 15th and final day at the refuge . Laura Garda, a Guatemalan, headed north after seeing her husband killed by the military . She was caught almost immediately by the U .S. Border Patrol, but was able to convince the officers that she was Mexican. They dropped her across the line into Matamoros. Now she leans against a cardboard wall hinged with Coca-Cola bottle caps that form an entrance to the refuge's kitchen and plans her second attempt. Her mother and two children need her to send money. The conversation of the refugees of Casa Juan Diego blends with the sound and smell of a welcome meal. The aroma of fish frying in oil joins the fragile fragrance of freedom -at last so near, still so far. (Melita Garza is a reporter with the Milwaukee Journal.) Julio Ojeda Out With Passe Labels NEWS ITEM : Several U . S . black leaders , including the Rev . Jesse Jackson, say members of their race would prefer to be called African Americans rather than blacks . Attention, please . I have an announcement. I no longer wish to be called a "Hispanic . " From this day forward, please use the term "Puerto-Minnesota-Ecuadorean" whenever describing me. I don't take this step lightly . Thoughts of my identity have disturbed my slumber, and the word "Hispanic" especially bothers me. For one thing, it's too old. I firmly believe that racial and ethnic labels, like fashions, should be swept away every few years. Terms such as "Hispanic" and "Latino" are passe. We need a new spring line . Also, "Hispanic" is too generic. It says nothing about who I am or where I come from. Hispanics here have visible roots spreading back to some two dozen countries, and less visible ones that reach every continent. "Puerto-MinnesotaEcuadorean" serves as a reminder of my birthplace (Ecuador), my childhood home (Puerto Rico) and my adoptive home (Minnesota). A NEW LABEL SOLVES PROBLEMS I want strangers to conjure images of snowcapped South American mountains and geometric tapestries, of swaying palms and arroz con polio, of Garrison Keillor and ice-fishing . It is not enough to have roots . I believe I must wear them on my sleeve wherever I go and knock people over the head with them. But most importantly, the old "Hispanic" no longer commands suffi cient respect. That is because Hispanics today are plagued by too many problems . There are our skyrocketing drop-out rates. Pesticide-induced illnesses. Run-ins with /a migra. Unemployment. Alcoholism. Teen-age pregnan cies and welfare dependency . These crises will never be resolved, and don't believe anyone who tells you differently . Oh yes, politicians will make promises and com mission studies, but nothing will ever get done . Hispanic organizations will posture angrily and hold rallies, but it will be useless . The simplest escape from all this unpleasantness-for me, at least -is a quick name change . A new label will provide me with instant re spectability . No longer will Anglos assume that I am an "illegal alien" intent on taking a job away from them ; or a hardened criminal whom Fidel Castro shuffled onto the deck of a boat in Mariel Harbor ; or a Puerto Rican ter rorist intent on blowing up Disneyland; or an agitator who wants to foist the Spanish language off on more pure U . S . patriots. MAN OF MYSTERY, INTRIGUE Their misperceptions are too difficult to dispel. We shouldn't even try . Instead, let us all adopt new identities and watch our lives change. In the past, job interviewers have demanded to see my green card . Policemen have frisked me. Supermarket cashiers still routinely ask, "Will you be paying with food stamps, sir?" As a "Puerto-Minnesota-Ecuadorean," I will become a man of mystery and intrigue . I will be invited to parties . Waiters will give me good tables . Beautiful women will give me that look. Tomorrow, as I enter a crowded banquet room in my rented tuxedo, I want to see heads turn and to hear the murmur, "Here comes a man worthy of our respect." But , realist that I am, I'll accept it as progress if the other guests don't give me their best impersonal stare, hand me their champagne glass and ask for a refill. (Julio Ojeda is a reporter with the St. Paul Pioneer Press Dispatch.} Hispanic Link Weekly Report April17, 1989 4

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COLLECTING MAGAZINES: Hispanic is published monthly by The Hispanic Publishing Corporation, 111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 200, Washington, D.C . 20001 1-800-338-2590. Subscriptions are $18 for one year, $30 for two years. Single copies are $2. Hispanic Business is published monthly by Hispanic Business Inc., 360 S. Hope Ave., Santa Barbara, Calif. 931 05 (805) 682-5843. Sub scriptions are $18 for one year. Single copies are $2, except for the June issue, which is $3.50. Puntas is published monthly by D.E.R. Media Group lnc.,12700 Park Central Dr . , Suite 440, Dallas, Texas 75251 (214) 991-2544. Subscrip tions are $18 for one year, $36 for two years. Single copies are $1.50. Que Pasa is published bimonthly by D.S. Publications, 1 086 Teaneck Rd., Teaneck, N.J. 07666 (201) 833-1800. Subscriptions are $8.99 for six issues, $17.99 for 12 issues . Single copies are $2.25. Sa/udos Hispanos is published quarterly by the United Council of Spanish-Speaking People, 19510 Ventura Blvd . , Tarzana, Calif. 91356 (818)609-8363. Subscriptions are $10 for one year. HOUSING: "Housing in America: 1985/86," a 63-page report by the Census Bureau, looks at housiog patterns among Hispanics and other ethnic and racial groups. For a copy (specify Series H-121, No . 19) con tact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 782-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) CHILD SUPPORT, ALIMONY: "Child Support and Alimony: 1985" contains racial and ethnic data. For a copy of the 79-page report (specify Series P-23, No. 154), contact Superintendent of Documents. See address above. (Price was not available at press time . ) CHICAGO AND ILLINOIS BIAS CRIMES: The March issue of The Chicago Reporter includes two articles on bias crimes, one with statis tics on such crimes in Chicago according to racial and ethnic group, another about an Illinois law mired by the state police department's demand for more operational money. In the April issue, reporter Jen nifer Juarez Robles details a study that finds potential discrimination against Hispanics by Chicago Sun-Times columnist Michael Sneed. For a copy of either issue, send $2.50 to Community Renewal Society, 332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60604 (312) 427-4836. (Annual sub scriptions are $38.) CONNECTING CONGRESSIONAL INTERNS SOUGHT Hispanic high school graduates who will be full-time college fresh men this fall and would like to serve as congress1onal1nterns this sum mer have until May 5 to apply for 24 such internships being offered through the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. The internships run from June 12-Aug . 4 and include a $2,000 stipend. Travel arrangements to and from Washington, D.C., are paid for and the interns will receive free housing at George Washington University. Twelve of the internships are funded by McDonald's Corp. and the other half by Coca-Cola USA For more information and applications, contact CHCI at 504 C St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 543-1771 or 1-800-367-5273. SCHOOL TARGETS AT-RISK YOUTH New York City's Pace University is one of four schools that will share a $500,000 grant to combat the high school dropout rate, it was an nounced last month . Pace will use its part of the money to help Hispanic students who are likely to drop out. Pace ' s Hispanic Outreach Program will identify potential dropouts in the White Plains School District with the help of high school coun selors and provide tutoring in areas such as math, reading and writ ing. The program will inform the students of career choices and opportunities in postsecondary education. Officials hope to serve 25-30 students before this academic year finishes and another 75 next fall. Iris Morales will head the program. She's a senior at Pace, a student teacher and a mother of three. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Pam Salazar, public relations representative for the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project and most recently Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, joins the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities in that same capacity ... Eliza May, project manager of the American Public Welfare Association's task force on immigration reform in Washington, D.C., begins her new job at the start-up office of the National Association of Latino Elected And Appointed Officials in San Antonio ... Calendar Washington, D.C. April 20, 21 WORKFORCE 2000 THIS WEEK MARKET STUDY Miami April 18 Strategy Research Corporation will hold a seminar to release its fourth U.S. Hispanic Market Study. It will feature panel discussions on brand loyalty and cultural assimilation. Richard Tobin, president of SRC, will present the findings of the 1989 study. Ling Hsu (305) 649-5400 MEDIA CONFERENCE San Juan, Puerto Rico April 19-22 The seventh National Hispanic Media Conference and Expo will feature assorted panels and workshops, film and video screenings and a photojournalism exhibit. Also scheduled is a job fair where representatives from media companies will recruit college students, recent graduates and professionals. Jocelyn COrdova (202) 783-6228 MIGRATION HEARING 5 The Commission for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development, a congressionally mandated body, will hold a hearing on push factors causing migration from Latin America to the United States. Diane Gonzalez (202) 254-4954 CANCER SYMPOSIUM Houston April 20-22 The University of Texas' M. D. Anderson Cancer Center is sponsoring a session on cancer prevention, detection and treatment among minorities and the economically disadvantaged. Dr. Louis Sullivan, U.S. secretary of Health and Human Services, will be the keynote speaker. Shirley Roy (713) 792-2222 AT-RISK CHILDREN St. Louis April 20-22 A training institute sponsored by the National Community Education Association and the Missouri Education Department will focus on early childhood education. Participants will explore current issues and trends in early childhood programs. Linda Bryant (703) 683-6232 April17, 1989 El Segundo, Calif. April 21 A symposium sponsored by the Los Angeles chapter of Image, an employment and education organization, will highlight the changing demographics of the nation's workforce. Discussion will center on issues confronting employers as the year 2000 approaches. Ron Guillen (213) 643-1793 FAMILIES, CHILDREN San Antonio April 22 Familias, a national network of individuals, private and public agencies, and organizations seeking to improve the lot of Hispanic families and children, will hold its quarterly meeting. Carmen Cortez (512) 270-4630 NEW YORK HISPANICS Albany, N.Y. April 23-26 The Somas Uno Foundation, an outgrowth of the New York state Assembly Puerto Rican/Hispanic Task Force, will hold its second conference on how to address a broad range of issues through legislative empowerment. Robert Calderfn (212) 893-0202 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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0 p p 0 . R T u N . I T I E s I N T H E M E D . I A CORPORATE CLASSIFIED RADIO BILINGUE Radio Bilingue has the following opportunities : Producer Producer for daily, 7-minute , national Spanish language newscast-NOTICIERO LATINO-and weekend edition SEMANARIO LATINO. Duties : Assign reporters stories, edit tapes, write scripts , mix program, prepare for distribution . Qualifications: Bilingual (English/Spanish), excellent radio production experience, writing/editing skills. Assistant Producer Duties : Record telephone feeds, edit tapes, assist in mixing and distribution, assist in marketing. Qualifications: Bilingual (English/Spanish), good radio production experience . Public Affairs Director Radio Bilingue is recruiting a public affairs director for its new station, KUBO-FM in El Centro , California. Responsibilities include coordinating volunteers to produce and originate programming for this U.S./Mexico border area. Must be bilingual and with three years experience in radio production. Send resume to : COMMUNITY Samuel Orozco RADIO , , , 1111 Fulton Mall, No . 700 A SOUND Fresno, Calif . 93721 BUSINESS (209) 486-5174 ALTERNATIVE. FREE-LANCE WRITERS WANTED One of the nation's largest bilingual magazines has a few open ings for free-lance writers. If you would like to have your work published in a national publication, call 1-800-826-0869. Ask for Steve Solomon. PBS is a private, nonprofit corporation providing quality programming and related services to the nation's public television stations. PBS offers extraordinary opportunities for professional growth and responsibility in today's communication environ ment. For information on current job opportun i ties contact: FREE-LANCE RADIO JOURNALISTS Los Angeles, Miami, New York, and other communities with a significant Hispanic population . Reporters will produce weekly features and news spots. Look for Isabel Alegrfa , Paz Cohen, and Jose McMurray at this year ' s NAHJ conference . Or con tact Judy Moore-Smith , NPR' s Latin File , National Public Radio, 2025 M St. NW , Washington, D . C . 20036. HISPANICS MEET THE PRESS The 1982 winter and summer editions of the civil rights quarterly "Perspectives" offer a two-part series by Hispanic Link founder Charlie Ericksen on "Hispanics Meet the Press." The articles offer a critical analysis of mainstream print media ' s treatment and h i ring policies relating to Hispanics . Hispanic Link has extra copies ofthis set of articles it will send to the first 25 individuals or institutions who write and request them. Include $2.65 in postage stamps with your request. Write to Danilo Alfaro, Media Report, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D . C . 20005 . WPLG/TV 10 Studio Maintenance Technician An opening exists for a full-time Studio Maintenance Tech nician. He/ she should be experienced in TV studio equipment maintenance, including cameras, film chains, DVEs , still stores, computer graphics and character generator systems, switchers, video tape, and editing systems . Applicants should have 5 years experience as a Main tenance Technican . Must be able to work flexible shifts including nights and weekends . Send resume with salary history and qualifications to: Don Hain, Chief Engineer , WPLGJTV 10, 3900 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla . 33137. REPORTERS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Hispanic Link News Service buys three 650 word fea ture/opinion pieces weekly, paying on acceptance . A story you cover locally may have national interest or application . For details and writer ' s guidelines, write Charlie Ericksen , Hispanic Link , 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D.C. 20005 . NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE PBS Employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and Carla A. Gibson students in the media. Opportunities for internships , entry 1320 Braddock Place level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, Alexandria, VA 22314 television, radio and other media, English or Spanish ianOr call our job information line at (703) 739-5298 guage . Contact Jocelyn Cordova, National Association of PBS is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228. Hispanic Link Weekly Report April17, 1989 6

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED ASSISTANT ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE PUBLIC RELATIONS HEAD WOMEN'S SOFTBALL COACH We are seeking an ambitious public relations professional, or journalist interested in public relations, to join our St. Louis office . Work will include Hispanic and general market public relations . To serve as head women's softball coach and assistant women's basket ball coach at a division Ill institution . Individual will also teach 50% in the health and physical education depart ment (preferred health educator). Minimum master's degree required . Qualifications : • Strong writing ability • Good understanding of the media • Fluency in spoken and written Spanish Apply in writing to Dr. Dianna Jones, Athletic Director-Women, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, Wisconsin 53190. Send letter of application, resume, three let ters of recommendation and all • 1-4 years experience in public relations or journalism • Eager to learn and grow in the public relations profess ion with a proven leader in the industry . Please send cover letter, resume, and samples of your work to : Joe T revirio Fleishman-Hillard, Inc. 200 North Broadway St. Louis, Mo. 631 02 Equal Opportunity Employer transcripts. . Application deadline: May 19, 1989. University of Whitewater-Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity Employer with an Affirmative Action Plan . DIRECTOR, OHIO UNIONS The Ohio State University Reporting to the vice provost for student af fairs , the director serves as the chief ad ministrator for the two college unions on campus , the Ohio and Drake Unions, and has the administrative responsibility for planning programs, controlling a multi-million dollar an nual budget , planning capital improvements, directing food services operations , and managing facilities and personnel . Qualifications : This position requires a high energy , dynamic student affairs profes sional. Applicants should have a master ' s degree in student personnel or related field, have demonstrated success in the business and student programming aspects of union operat i ons, and possess excellent com municat ion, interpersonal , and management skills . Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience . An excellent benefits pack age is available. To be assured of consideration, send letter of application, resume , and three letters of reference by MAY 15, 1989 to: Dr. Edwin R. Haering, Chair Director, Ohio Unions Search Committee 201 Ohio Union 1739 North High Street Columbus, Ohio 43210-1392 (614) 292-9334 The Ohio State University is an Equal Op portunity , Affirmative Action Employer . 7 PHYSICIANS Westat, Inc. Westat, a health research organization, is seeking PHYSICIANS for the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey sponsored by the U.S. Public Health Service . Individuals will be part of a highly trained medical team conducting physical examinations in mobile exam centers traveling to 88 U . S . cities through 1993. Physicians must be licensed in one state and be BC/BE in internal or fami ly medicine. FULL TIME TRAVEL REQUIRED (ONE YEAR MINIMUM) . Competitive salaries, paid malpractice , per diem, car , four weeks paid vaca tion per year, holidays, and health, life, dental, disability insurance offered . Call Beverly Geline at 800-937 -8281 extension 8248 or 301-251-8248 or send CVto: Westat, Inc. 1650 Research Boulevard Rockville, MD. 20850 Attn: B . Geline EOE/MN/H DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week CLASSIFIED AD RATES: Ordered by _______ _ 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: Organization ________ _ Street ------------City, State & Zip _______ _ (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone ______ _ April17 , 1989 Hispanic Link Weekly Rep ort

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Arts & Entertainment i t ., i I talk/interview show will air Mondays through Fridays from 5 to 6 p.m. 1 (ETcheck local listings) . El juez and Cristina are the second and third shows premiered by Univision this month. The network's Monday newsmagazine Portada, anchored by Teresa Rodriguez, began airing April 3 . PREMIERING THIS WEEK: Two new daily, U . S . -produced Spanish language television programs make their debut this week on the Univision network. Cristina and Portada are produced by Univision. The controversial El juez series, a Spanish-language version of the syndicated show The Judge , begins airing April 17 . The show was produced with a waiver contract granted by the Screen Actors Guild, under which Spanish-speaking Guild members were hired at a salary lower than union minimum. EN .MI VIEJO SAN JUAN: Various entertainment-related panels organized by the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences are included in this week ' s National Hispanic Media Conference. The event will be held April 19-22 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Panels include "Financing for Producers" (April20), "Developing aNa tional Cinema in Puerto Rico" (April 21) and "Acting as a Profession" (April22). Rene Enriquez stars as the series' title character. El juez will air Mon days through Fridays at 4 :30p. m . (ET). The program is produced by Genesis International. Also premiering the 17th-immediately following El juez-is the hourlong Cristina. A HAMAS Film and Screening Program begins April 19 with the screening of the Oscar-nominated Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, by Spanish director Pedro Almodovar. Hosted by former Cosmopo/itanenespaflol editor Cristina Saralegui, the show is decribed as "Oprah with salsa." The audience participation, Conference attendees can also enjoy a wide array of local entertain ment at various San Juan theaters and clubs. Media Report WRITERS' GUIDE: Following are guidelines for submissions from free-lance writers to various Hispanic magazines: HISPANIC: The magazine is a general-inter est monthly. Marfa Sharpe, editor, says she is looking for stories about Hispanics doing ex ceptionally well in unusual things . Updates on the entertainment and lifestyle industries are also welcome. The magazine prints cartoons , opinion columns , guest columns, short takes and profiles . Pay ranges from $25 to $600 on publication . 111 Massachusetts Ave . NW , Suite 200, Washington , D. C . 20001, telephone (202) 682-9020 HISPANIC BUSINESS: This monthly magazine 's focus is on Hispanics in the cor porate world and Hispanic entrepreneurs . Joel Russell , senior editor, says that each issue fol lows a specific theme. One regular feature is a two-page article on a Hispanic woman in the HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher : Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting : Antonio Mejias Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana, Rhonda Smith . Sales : Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza . No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday , will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week . Hispanic Link Weekly Report business world. The minimum length for ar ticles is 1 ,500 words . A photograph should ac company every 800 words of copy. Pay ranges from 12 to 20 cents per word, on publication . 360 S . Hope Ave ., Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 931 05, telephone (805) 682-5843 PUNTOS: A general-interest monthly , the magazine seeks to educate readers about "how the American system works," says Fer nando Escobar, editor and publisher . He is seeking articles on Hispanics in entertainment, sports and business . Exclusive stories are preferred. Pay ranges from $25 to $1 00 on publication . 12700 Park Central Dr . , Suite 440, Dallas, Texas 75251, telephone (214) 9912544 QUE PASA: This bimonthly magazine caters mainly to the female teen-age set . Editor Celeste Gomez is looking for pieces on Hispanics in music, TV and film, as well as sports figures . Pay is $50 for pieces up to one magazine page , and $100 for anything longer , on publication . Photos are also accepted . Antonio Mejias-Rentas 1086 Teaneck Rd., Teaneck, N .J. 07666, telephone (201) 833-1 800 SALUDOS HISPANOS : Published quarterly, the magazine is general-interest. Editor Julie Healey ' s ideal story is one that is inspirational , educational and "a joy to read." Stories on al most any topic are welcome, provided they have a national scope . Pay for stories is be tween two and three cents per word ; payment is made upon acceptance of the piece . 19510 Ventura Blvd . , Suite 204, Tarzana , Calif . 91356, telephone (818) 609-8363 VISTA: The magazine is a general-interest weekly newspaper insert. Editor Harry Caicedo says he normally prefers free-lancers to submit ideas for stories first. If he is inter ested, he will contact the writer to discuss the story, and shape the focus. Vista buys a wide range of stories and pays from $50 to $500 on publication. Cartoons will also be considered . 999 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suite 600, Coral Gables, Fla . 33134 , telephone (305) 442-2462 Danilo Alfaro