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Hispanic link weekly report, April 24, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, April 24, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News
President Bush gives to Aplonio Garda, of Enid, Okla., an award for his volunteer activities. One of 18 to receive the award at the White House, Garcia has developed literacy classes for immigrants and helps them with residency applications...U.S. Rep. Tony Coelho, the third-highest ranking Democrat in the House, denies violating House rules in an alleged use of campaign funds for personal benefit. Coelho says computer error is to blame for his campaign committee, not him, being listed as the purchaser of junk bonds that he profited from...Voters in the 1st District of Los Angeles re-elect Councilwoman Gloria Molina. One of two Hispanics now serving on the body, Molina was first elected
In 1987 after the city underwent court-mandated redistricting...The National Association for Bilingual Education presents to Carla de Herrera, a kindergarten teacher at Furgeson Elementary School in Hawaiian Gardens, Calif., its award for National Bilingual Teacher of the Year...Federal agents arrest Alex Marrero and Drug Enforcement Administration Agent Jorge Villar for offering to protect a man posing as a smuggler who was bringing cocaine from the Bahamas to the Miami area Marrero, a former Miami police officer, was acquitted in 1980 in the beating death of a black businessman. The acquittal sparked race riots that left 18 people dead and $80 million in property damage... Authorities accuse Cuban American Adolfo de Jesus Con-stanzo, 26, as being the leader of a drug cult linked to the deaths of 13 people near Matamoros, Mexico...
Latinos in Nation’s Daily Paper Newsrooms Inch Upward
By Danilo Alfaro
Hispanics make up only 2.1% of newspersons employed in the nation’s daily newspapers, according to the American Society of Newspaper Editors' annual minority employment survey. Up two-tenths of a percentage point from 1.9% in 1988, the figure represents no gain, given Hispanic growth as a percentage of the total U.S. population last year. Latinos now make up 8.1% of the U.S. mainland population.
‘It's incredibly disappointing that that’s all we’ve done in a year’s time,’’ said Evelyn Hernandez, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and a reporter with New York Newsday.
The survey found blacks in the newsroom are now 4.1%, Asians 1.1%, Native Americans 0.2% and whites 92.5%. Employment for all minorities rose from 7.0% in 1988 to 7.5% in 1989.
“It’s another obvious example of how we need more than just good will and polite comments," said David Lawrence, chairman of the industrywide Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business and chairman and publisher of the Detroit Free Press. "We need to insist on more progress."
Gerald Garcfa, editor and publisher of the Knoxville (Tenn.) Journal, said that pluralism in the newspaper industry is "not a priority" with the new leadership at some companies.
"I don’t think the commitment from major companies is there anymore. There has to be a leader to get that job done."
ASNE found the percentage of Hispanics highest among reporters and lowest among supervisors and copy editors. Since 1982 the overall representation of Hispanics in the nation's newsrooms has grown barely one-tenth of a percentage point per year, while the total population of Hispanics has grown by nearly two-tenths of a percentage point yearly.
ASNE’s goal for minorities in the newsroom to reflect the total population by the year 2000 appears increasingly unlikely at the present rate. Minorities are expected to account for more than 25% of the U.S. population by then.
continued on page 6, Media Report
HISPANIC REPRESENTATION IN NATION’S LARGEST NEWSROOMS—APRIL 1989
Newspaper Hisp.Pop. Employees Managers Copy Editors Reporters/Writers Photogs/Artists
% in Area Total Hisp Hisp% Total Hisp Hisp% Total Hisp Hisp% Total Hisp Hisp% Total Hisp Hisp%
Ariz.Republic/Phoenix Gazette 14.8% 332 8 2.4% 60 1 1.7% 80 1 1.3% 158 5 3.2% 34 1 2.9%
Atlanta Journal/Constitution 1.4 371 4 1.0 85 0 0 78 1 1.3 172 2 1.2 36 1 2.8
Boston Globe 6.4 340 6 1.8 80 0 0 85 2 2.4 135 3 2.2 40 1 2.5
Buffalo News 2.6 167 1 0.6 8 0 0 15 0 0 43 1 2.3 21 0 0
Chicago Sun Times 14.0 211 5 2.4 24 2 8.3 40 0 0 117 2 1.7 30 1 3.3
Chicago Tribune 14.0 501 8 1.6 90 0 0 142 2 1.4 208 4 1.9 61 2 3.3
Cleveland Plain Dealer 3.1 261 2 0.8 54 0 0 22 1 4.5 137 1 0.7 24 0 0
Detroit News 2.4 287 2 0.7 76 1 1.3 45 0 0 133 0 0 27 1 3.7
Houston Chronicle 17.6 249 12 4.8 35 1 2.9 56 5 8.9 128 4 3.1 30 2 6.7
Kansas City Star/Times 3.3 298 6 2.0 72 0 0 57 0 0 136 5 3.7 24 1 4.2
Los Angeles Times* 27.5 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 404 25 6.2 82 5 6.0
Miami Herald* 55.6 353 34 9.6 98 5 5.1 53 2.5 4.7 170.5 21 12.3 36 4 11.0
Minneapolis Star & Tribune 1.3 252 4 1.6 19 0 0 78 1 1.3 124 2 1.6 31 1 3.2
New York Times* 20.0 732 15 2.0 122 1 0.8 204 3 1.5 307 6 2.0 99 5 5.0
Newsday, Long Island & N.Y.C. 20.0 623 12 1.9 167 1 0.6 60 0 0 304 6 2.0 92 5 5.4
Orange Co. Register, Calif. 14.8 289 24 8.3 51 1 2.0 65 4 6.2 139 13 9.4 34 6 17.6
Oregonian, Portland* 2.1 241 4 1.7 44 2 4.5 45 1 2.2 135 1 0.7 17 0 0
Philadelphia Inquirer 3.7 494 11 2.2 222 0 0 n/a 1 ? n/a 8 ? 22 2 9.0
Rocky Mountain News, Denver 18.8 170 8 4.7 16 0 0 35 3 8.6 100 5 5.0 20 0 0
San Francisco Chronicle 12.3 253 5 2.0 14 1 7.1 78 2 2.6 156 2 1.3 14 1 7.1
San Jose Mercury News 22.3 284 12 4.2 42 0 0 87 4 4.6 131 7 5.3 24 1 4.2
St. Petersburg Times 1.8 230 5 2.2 51 1 2.0 48 0 0 106 0 0 25 4 16.0
Washington Post 2.8 505 4 0.8 133 1 0.8 84 2 2.4 248 1 0.4 40 0 0
TOTALS — 7,443 192 2.6 1 ,563 18 1.2 1,457 35.5 2.4 3,692 124 3.4 863 44 5.0
*—Los Angeles Times provided figures for reporters and photographers only; The Miami Herald totals do not include the all-Hispanic staff of El Miami Herald-, The New York Times totals do not include editorial page staff; Oregonian totals do not include support staff; newspapers which failed to respond to the survey were: Newark Star Ledger, New Orleans Times-Picayune, New York Post, New York Daily News, Detroit Free Press and Houston Post; Boston Herald responded but could not provide number of Hispanic staffers.
Source: Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., and National Association of Hispanic Journalists Note: Population figures are for 1980.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Only 2.6% of News Staffs at 23 Major Dailies Latino: Survey
By Zita Arocha
Hispanics account for 2.6% of the newsroom staffs at 23 of the largest daily newspapers in the country, according to the first such survey of Hispanics in the newsroom, conducted by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C.
The level of Latino participation at these top papers is only slightly better than the 2.1% found in this year’s survey of all dailies by the American Society of Newspaper Editors.
The NAHJ/HNMA survey was sent last month to the 30 largest-circulation dailies. Twenty-three, including 12 in areas where Hispanics make up between 12-56% of the population, responded.
Released April 21 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, at the National Hispanic Media Conference, the survey also found only 18 Hispanic managers at the newspapers, 1.2% of their total managerial work force.
"What concerns me is that these newspapers are the leaders in the industry...and the numbers are weak," said NAHJ president Evelyn Hem&ndez, a reporter at Newsday.
Carolyn Lee, a senior editor at The New York Times who is in charge of career development and also does some recruiting, said: "I don’t
By Rhonda Smith
The Baytown, Texas, City Council will proceed with its first election in three years May 20 if a voting plan that has been revised several times is approved by the Justice Department.
The city was forced to review its election system in 1985 after two Hispanics and two blacks filed a successful lawsuit alleging that Baytown’s at-large election system was discriminatory. The system called for six council-members and the mayor to be elected at large.
The citizens filing the suit had originally proposed a 5-3-1 system in which five coun-
Martmez Rating Goes Up
More Florida voters rate Republican Gov. Bob Martinez as doing a good or excellent job than they did 18 months ago — 46% to 33%
— but only 27% of the voters would vote to re-elect him, found a poll released this month by The Miami Herald and WCIX-TV.
Martinez, facing a re-election race in November 1990, fared best among Latino voters, with 60% giving the governor a favorable rating and 48% reporting that they would vote for him today. Forty-six percent of white voters rated Martinez's job performance as good or excellent, while 27% would vote to put him back in office. Martinez received the least support from black voters
— 39% gave him a good or excellent rating, while only 8% would vote for the governor’s re-election.
think any paper would claim we're doing as well as we should be doing, but we're trying." Of The New York Times’ 732 newsroom employees, 15—about 2% — were Hispanic.
At 15 of the 23 newspapers, Hispanic representation was 2.2% or less. At four — the Buffalo News, Cleveland Plain Dealer, Detroit News and Washington Post — it was less than 1%. Ten had no Hispanic managers.
Combining totals at the 23 newspapers, Hispanics comprised 3.4% of the reporters, 5% of all photographers/artists, and 2.4% of the copy editors.
The Miami Herald reported the highest number of Hispanics in the newsroom and in management positions. The community it serves, Dade County, is more than 40% Hispanic.
Of the 353 newsroom employees at the Herald, 34, or 9.6%, were Hispanic.
Christine Morris, associate editor for personnel at the Herald, said hiring Hispanics, once not a priority, is one now and “we're playing catch-up.”
Among the reporting staff at the Los Angeles Times, there are 25 Hispanics, or 6.2% of the total. Five or 6% of the paper’s 82 photographers are Hispanic. The Times was unable to supply the total number of Hispanic
cilors would be elected by single-member districts and three new council seats, along with the mayor, would be elected at large.
The city appealed the decision by a U.S. District Court, and the plaintiffs then proposed an 8-1 plan.
According to Pete Alfaro, the first minority to be appointed to the City Council, the Justice Department is currently reviewing and is expected to approve a 5-1-1 election plan because "both sides have agreed upon it." This plan stipulates that five councilmembers would be elected by single-member districts.
Court ‘Houses’ LA. Slumlord
A Los Angeles residential hotel owner, warned repeatedly to correct deplorable living conditions for its tenants, many of whom are Hispanic, has been sentenced to live in the building for 100 consecutive days. This type of sentence is the longest ever imposed on a landlord there.
Amiya Goswami, 54, was to begin serving his sentence on April 13, but his attorneys have since filed an appeal.
According to Deputy City Attorney Diane Stephenson, Goswami's sentence was harsher than similar cases because of the acute condition of the building. Uncontrolled rats and roaches, cracked and peeling paint, non-working elevators and no available hot water led to Goswami’s April 6 sentence for 32 health, fire, building and safety code violations.
managers. The community served by the Times is almost one-third Hispanic.
Mary Lou Bessette, director of news and editorial resources at The Arizona Republic/Phoenix Gazette, said the goal at her newspaper is a newsroom that is 16.5% minority by 1997 to reflect the community it serves.
Hispanics were almost 15% of the population of Phoenix in 1980. Currently, the newspaper’s Hispanic staffers represent 2.4% of the 332-member newsroom force.
Bessette said it is still difficult to find minority journalists who fill its minimum 3-to-5-year experience requirement.
Like many other newspapers seeking to improve the hiring of minorities, The Arizona Republic/Phoenix Gazette has begun a training program for high school minority students. It also attempts to include minorities in its annual fellowship program for 10 college graduates.
"Last year we had 140 applicants and 10 were minority. We had one minority winner and she refused it because she had accepted a summer internship elsewhere," Bessette said.
Arlene Morgan, deputy metro editor/recruiter at the Philadelphia Inquirer, which has 11 Hispanics out of 494 newsroom employees and no Hispanic managers, said she finds that many Hispanic and other minority journalists are unwilling to accept jobs in suburban bureaus where most of the openings occur.
"You talk to people about covering the suburbs and they look at you as if you're nuts," she said. "They don’t realize that we have had people who started off in a suburban bureau and six months later were on the national desk."
Morgan said she also has a difficult time attracting Hispanics because they don't associate the Inquirer with Hispanic issues.
Lee, of The New York Times, said her paper also has a problem in attracting Hispanics, but for different reasons. "We lose people we want to hire because they don’t want to live in New York...or because they can be metro editor right now in Detroit whereas in New York they won’t be metro editor for maybe five years."
Hernandez, NAHJ president, said one way to attract and retain Hispanics is to offer more career and professional development. "You can’t just hire Hispanics and throw them into a bureau and forget about them."
Dear Readers...
You will not be receiving Weekly Report next week.
Weekly Report publishes 50 editions annually.
Its two non-publishing weeks are after Christmas and following the National Hispanic Media Conference.
Your next issue will be May 8.
Hdctor Ericksen-Mendoza _________Publisher _____
Baytown, Texas, Plans May 20 Election
2
April 24,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


William O. Medina
Life in the Burbs
I grew up in the barrio, where most of my neighbors ate tamales for Christmas and went to a Catholic church. Spanish drowned out English at the local market, and no one was ashamed to hang wet clothing from the family laundry line.
Then last year I moved to the white suburbs of Southern California’s Riverside County. Friends and relatives congratulated me on doing the right thing.
But for someone who doesn’t understand the logic of Homeowner Association rules that prohibit leaving your garage door open, the suburbs remain strange.
My new neighborhood is replete with block parties that spew the aroma of barbecued steaks and spare ribs. I always decline invitations to attend — for valid reasons. My precinct is overwhelmingly Republican; I've marched on picket lines boycotting grapes and protested against Ronald Reagan's cuts to education, health and other critical social programs.
I’m afraid my feelings may be construed by my neighbors as anti-American.
My new neighbors work hard during the week and view weekends as minivacations. Come Friday, laden with boats, jet skis and motorcycles, they pilot their campers toward the nearest blue-collar playgrounds.
Skimming lake waters at frightening speeds, climbing Suicide Hill and sleeping on hard dirt helps them forget about their 40-hour weeks.
LAWN COMPETITIONS COMMON Like my homeboys back in the barrio, I still work most weekends and don’t have such toys of escape. Barrio residents can’t afford the cost of fleeing from their monotony or anxieties. When I was growing up, we went to the park or stayed at home inventing simplistic games using a water hose.
Among my new neighbors, a recurring question is: "What do you do for a living?"
In the barrio, such inquiries are taboo. The jobs have less status; layoffs are not uncommon. It often takes two menial jobs to make ends meet. We shun people who boast how important or rich they are.
My suburban neighbors deny that their yards compete, but they do. For a while, I became involved in the tacit competition. I wanted the greenest and cleanest yard. A magazine article said that sprinklers were harsh on infant grass, so I spent untold hours watering my first lawn by hand, hurrying outside each morning to welcome virgin blades of grass.
As I stood watching my green carpet grow, one neighbor would visit me and share the secrets that were going to make him fabulously wealthy. He had it figured out, down to the minute, how much money he earned.
I FEAR I MAY WEAKEN
In the barrio we had concerns that took precedence over luxuries and the health of our plants. There was the constant whining noise of Butcher Boys, a burrito factory across the street that made sitting outdoors unbearable. Enjoying our flower and vegetable gardens at night became increasingly hazardous with the proliferation of gang violence. In the barrio, we never fretted over commuter traffic. Here in suburban Moreno Valley, the freeways are like parking lots.
I sometimes sense that my roots, once deep in barrio clay, are inching into my vitamin-fed lawn and large monthly house payment. I fear that some future summer I may weaken and join a neighbor’s backyard barbecue party.
But I am a transplant and must remain a product of my past. In a mad, nostalgic moment, I may yet defy my neighbors and leave my garage door open all day long. I can never move completely out of the barrio. (William O. Medina manages his family’s restaurant in Riverside, Calif.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
THE YELLOW PERIL; Barry Hatch, loudmouth, nativist mayor of Monterey Park, Calif., now seems set on enlisting Latinos in his campaign against the Asians he sees invading “his" city.
Says he in a recent Associated Press dispatch:
"Monterey Park is a beautiful little suburban town, almost rural in some parts. And now we drive through our little commercial area and feel like we’re in Hong Kong. When you’re an Anglo or Hispanic and you can't read the signs, it makes you feel like a second-class citizen."
OLD LISTS: The National Commission on the Public Service, chaired by Paul Volcker, prodded the Washington establishment a few weeks ago with a series of recommendations on reshaping and rebuilding the federal sector.
If I may add a prod of my own: Why no Hispanics on the 36-member commission?
At their national seminar April 6-9 in Washington, the Education Writers Association brought together 66 speakers, presiders, and presenters to enlighten some 200 journalists it attracted from around the country. It was not quite a complete shutout for Hispanics. It did include Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos as a speaker and dominicana Sonia Bu, director of the Youth Action Program in New York, to participate on a panel.
NEW LISTS: The Texas State Teachers Association has been around for 125 years. And that’s how long it took the institution to elect a Hispanic as its president. Olivia Besteiro, a bilingual maestra from Brownsville, was chosen by its membership April 8 to head the 95,000-member group.
In winning, Besteiro, a teacher for 29 years, also becomes the first Latina ever to serve as president of a state affiliate of the 1.9 million-member National Education Association. She takes over July 15.
Three men have served as affiliate presidents, all with NEA — New Mexico. The first: the legendary George I. Sdnchez, in 1933.
In yet another Hispanic first, the Texas teachers elected yet another Latina bilingual education specialist, Sara Flores from Killeen, to NEA's Board of Directors this month.
Finally they accept it: Two languages are better than one. TROPICAL-LOOKING WOMEN, CALL WASHINGTON: You’ve no doubt been reading about Washington, D.C., Mayor Marion Barry and his alleged drug connection.
Well, Latinas here have a different hueso to pick with him. As he was threatening to cut funding for the district’s Latin American Youth Center to the bone, his Department of Recreation sent out a notice, dutifully printed by the Washington Post, inviting "tropical-looking women” to participate in a community activity.
What’s a "tropical-looking woman?"
How about the Latina hotel maid who told police that a friend of the mayor’s had offered her dope for sex in a Ramada Inn room the mayor had been frequenting.
Barry apparently found her too "tropical.” He told the press that her word wasn't very reliable because she was probably “undocumented."
_____________________________________— KayBirbaro______
Quoting...
GLORIA SANTIAGO, director of the Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey, commenting to Weekly Report reporter Danilo Alfaro, on the status of Latinas:
"More Hispanic women, as single heads of household, are being forced to look after their families, to go to school, to get jobs — things the system does not force the males to do. The men are not working. They are on the periphery of the community. They are in jail or on drugs."
April 24,1989
3


COLLECTING
ROSTER OF ELECTED OFFICIALS: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has published its “1988 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials." The 106-page publication includes the names, addresses, level of office, party affiliation and a state-by-state breakdown of more than 3,300 officials. A copy costs $30 plus $2.40 for postage and handling. Contact NALEO Education Fund, 708 G St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536.
MIGRATION COMMISSION NEWSLETTER: The Commission for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development, a body mandated by the Immigration Reform and Control Act to study the push and pull factors of migration into the United States, has published the first issue of its newsletter. For a complimentary copy, contact the commission at 1111 18th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 254-4954.
NATIONAL BUSINESS DIRECTORY: The U S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has released its "1989 National Hispanic Business Directory." Organized by state and industrial classification, the 481-page publication includes products or services offered, number of employees, years in business and gross annual sales on nearly 10,000 Hispanic firms on the U.S. mainland and Puerto Rico. For a copy send $28 to USHCC, Marketing Department, 4900 Main St., Suite 700, Kansas City, Mo. 64112 (816) 531-6363.
CUBAN AMERICAN WRITERS: “Cuban American Writers: Los Atrevidos" is a 170-page anthology of English-language prose, poetry and fiction by 12 young Cuban Americans. The writers come from such places as California, New Jersey, Kansas, New York and Florida. Softcover copies are $12. Contact Linden Lane Magazine, P.O. Box 2384, Princeton, N.J. 08543-2384.
MINNESOTA SERVICES: "The Bilingual Directory," produced by the state’s Spanish Speaking Affairs Council, lists more than 100 private and public agencies in Minnesota that provide bilingual services. Also included is a listing of national and regional Hispanic organizations. For a copy of the 162-page directory, send $6.50 to Minnesota’s Bookstore, 117 University Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 55155 (612) 297-3000.
FEDERAL CONSUMER PUBLICATIONS: “Lista de Publicaciones Federates en EspanolPara el Consumidor" is a listing of more than 100 free federal publications in Spanish. A variety of topics is covered. For a free copy, write Consumer Information Center (XC), Lista-F, General Services Administration, Washington, D.C. 20405.
CONNECTING
LEADERSHIP PROGRAM TO EXPAND In its eighth year of molding bright, Hispanic high school students into leaders who will go to college, return and serve their communities, the Lorenzo de Zavala Youth Legislative Session will expand to Colorado the summer of 1990. This year’s weeklong workshops, set for June 18-25 at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque and July 30-Aug. 5 at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, are full.
The brainchild of Ernesto Nieto and Gloria de Leon, husband and wife, the program places 200-250 students at each site. Among other things, each student is required to draft and try to have passed a bill before a mock legislature.
More than nine out of 10 of the workshop participants enroll in college, and 75-80% of those who finish college enter a professional or graduate program.
For more information contact the National Hispanic Institute, P.O. Box 220, Maxwell, Texas 78656 (512) 357-6137. Applications for 1990 must be in by December.
HEALTH PROGRAM RECEIVES $220,000 ASPIRA’s National Health Careers Program, a project seeking to increase the number of Hispanic doctors and health professionals, has received a two- year, $220,000 grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts. The 20-year-old health program provides counseling, tutoring and placement services to high school and college students.
Of the 1,212 students who have participated in the program since 1975 and applied to medical schools or health profession institutions, 729 have been placed.
For more information contact Hilda Crespo at (202) 835-3600.
STUDENT PROGRAM TO SPREAD The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities will expand its Hispanic Student Success Program to four sites across the nation with the aid of a $49,000 grant from the Sears-Roebuck Foundation. HACU is seeking sites that have large Hispanic populations, a community college and four-year university that have at least 25% Hispanic enrollment, a community-based organization dealing with Hispanic education and committed civic and business leaders. Currently, HACU, which announced the grant April 6, operates its program in San Antonio and South Texas.
For more information call Pamela Salazar at (512) 433-1501.
Calendar
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AWARDS New York April 26
The National Puerto Rican Forum and New York Newsday present the fourth annual Affirmative Action Awards dinner to honor community leaders who have exemplified affirmative action. Among the recipients are Angelo Gonzalez of the Adolph Coors Co., and Josephine Nieves of the Community Service Society.
Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311
EDUCATION FOR PROGRESS
Washington, D.C. April 27, 28 The National Urban Coalition is holding its 22nd anniversary convocation, "Education as the Foundation for National Progress." Forums on the media and ethnic and class isolation will be held. The Rev. Jesse Jackson is a scheduled speaker.
Ramona Hoage (202) 628-2990
QUINCENTENARY FORUM
Washington, D.C. April 29
"After Columbus: Encounters in North America," a forum sponsored by National Museum of American History, looks at the interactions between Spanish colonists and American Indians in the Southwest and Southeast regions of the United States.
Usa Falk (202) 357-1639
FESTIVAL
Takoma Park, Md. April 30 The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission will hold its 10th annual Hispanic Day Festival. Included will be a parade, a tribute to exemplary families as well as arts and crafts, food, dance and music.
Festival (301) 439-4020
LITERACY AND EMPLOYMENT Washington, D.C. May 4
The U.S. Senate Republican Conference Task Force on Hispanic Affairs will sponsor sessions on employment and literacy, with representatives from the government, corporations and community-based organizations. Jack Kemp, U.S. secretary of Housing and Urban Development, will be the lunch-
eon keynote speaker.
Troup Coronado (202) 224-5251
QUINCENTENARY FORUM II College Park, Md. & Washington, D.C. May 4-6 The Smithsonian Institution will sponsor a symposium called ‘Violence and Resistance in the Americas: The Legacy of Conquest" at which scholars examine the impact that European colonists had on indigenous Indian cultures. Conference Services (202) 357-4281
CINCODEMAYO Omaha, Neb. May 5
The Omaha Children's Museum will sponsor a fundraising buffet and a performance by El Ballet Folklorieo Infantil de Sonora.
Graciela Machado (402) 333-7191
FOLK FESTIVAL Arlington, Va. May 5-7
Sponsored in part by the Arlington County Department of Parks, Recreation and Community Resources, the Northern Virginia Folk Festival ’89 will include piriata-making sessions, and food, music and crafts from various Latin American countries. Angela Parkhurst (703) 683-4347
4
April 24,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIED
THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SYSTEM
PRESIDENT
THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT SAN ANTONIO
Nominations and applications for qualified and interested candidates are being sought for President of The University of Texas at San Antonio.
U.T. San Antonio, established in 1969, is one of seven general academic institutions and six health-related institutions in The University of Texas System. The institution offers a wide range of baccalaureate and master's degree programs and a joint doctoral program in Educational Administration with U.T. Austin. Additional doctoral programs in the College of Sciences and Engineering are being developed. The degree programs are offered through four colleges: Business, Fine Arts and Humanities, Science and Engineering, and Social and Behavioral Sciences. U.T. San Antonio has developed a number of research and public service institutes within the colleges and is a member of the Southwest Research Consortium. U.T. San Antonio is a major contributor to the region's goal of being a major center of biotechnology and research.
The institution enrolls over 13,000 students, with 7% of that number as graduate students. The vast majority of the students are from the San Antonio and adjacent areas with a rich Spanish heritage. Approximately one-fourth of the enrollment is Hispanic. Located in a rapidly growing area of Texas, the metropolitan and surrounding area approaches 2 million people. This dynamic, young institution has a very bright future.
The president is the chief administrative officer of the University and reports to the Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs of The University of Texas System. Candidates for the presidency should possess an earned doctorate or its equivalent, have demonstrated considerable leadership and administrative ability, have achieved distinction in at least one academic or professional area, have exhibited a commitment to excellence in teaching and research, and possess the ability to communicate the mission and needs of the University to faculty, students, alumni and other constituencies.
Applications will be accepted until May 10,1989. After that date the Advisory Committee may request and consider credentials from candidates nominated from responsible sources. All nominations and applications with supporting materials should be addressed to:
James P. Duncan, Chairman Advisory Committee for the Selection of a President The University of Texas System 601 Colorado Street Austin, Texas 78701
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
DEPUTY COUNTY EXECUTIVE County of Santa Clara San Jose, California
The County of Santa Clara is an outstanding employer and well regarded in the State of California We have been in the forefront in bringing modern leadership practices to our organization.
We are seeking to recruit qualified public sector professionals to fill two (2) of the three Deputy County Executive positions. Under the general direction of the County Executive, the Deputy County Executive will manage departments) of the Office of the County Executive; provide liaison with a major County responsibility; and plan, direct and coordinate activities and/or special projects.
The qualified candidate would normally possess a combination of training and experience which is equivalent to graduation from college with a degree in Public Administration, Business Administration or a closely related field which would provide a foundation for the management in a large public sector organization and 8 to 10 years of progressively responsible administra-tive/management public sector experience which would provide the knowledge and abilities needed to operate within a complex and diverse entity. At least three (3) years of experience should be at an executive level.
Salary: $91,329-$103,145 annually plus approx. 7% retirement contribution. Performance adjustments available up to $116,740.
Benefits: Comprehensive Executive Management Benefit Package
Apply: County of Santa Clara Personnel Department 70 W. Hedding Street, 8th Floor San Jose, Calif. 95110 Telephone: (408) 299-4355
Closing Date: Open-Anticipate closing late May, 1989.
EOE M/F/H
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
The State Board of Trustees of Child and Family Services of Michigan, Inc., a United Way of Michigan agency, is seeking an executive director for the Central Office which provides consultative and coordination services to a statewide network of community-based private direct service agencies.
Position Requirements:
MSW, ACSW, preferably 5-8 years experience as an administrator in a human service agency. Experienced in interagency coordination, fund raising, program development and administrative consultation. Strong innovative leadership qualities are essential.
Resum6 must be received on or before June 30,1989. Send to: Lynwood E. Beekman, Chairperson Personnel Committee 2214 University Park Drive, Suite 200 Okemos, Ml 48864
Child and Family Services of Michigan, Inc. is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
April 24,1989
5


Arts & Entertainment
FOR THE RECORD: From debut albums to long-expected releases by recording veterans, there is a heterogeneous mix of new LPs available this spring.
Debutting with the self-titled album Apollonia (on the Warner Bros, label) is the Mexican American singer who first caught the public’s attention with her lead role in the film and album Purple Rain.
Apollonia's new album includes remakes of the Yardbird’s “For Your Love" and Nancy Sinatra's "These Boots are Made for Walking." Veteran salsero Willie Coldn’s new album Top Secret/Altos Secretos (Fania) includes three songs written by the trombone player and band leader.
Coi6n, the grandson of Puerto Rican immigrants, has sold more than seven million records throughout his career. He boasts six Grammy nominations.
Pianist Michel Camilo, a native of the Dominican Republic, is a well known fixture on the jazz circuit and has contributed performances and compositions to the likes of Dizzy Gillespie and Paquito D’Rivera.
Michel Camito (Epic) is his first U.S. album.
Also on the market: Apasionado by Glenn Monroig (WEA Latina) includes a Spanish-language version of Kenny Loggins' "Forever" and seven songs by the Puerto Rico-born Monroig;
• Pepeu Gomes (Ariola) by Brazil's vocalist and instrumentalist Pepeu Gomes;
•Antecedente (Elektra) by Panamanian salsa superstar Rub6n Blades accompanied by his group Son del Solar; and
• Sa'Fire (Cutting Records/Mercury/Polygram) by the New York Puerto Rican "free stylist" Sa’Fire.
DOCUMENTARY PREMIERES: Plena is Work, Plena is Song, a documentary by Pedro Rivera and Susan Zeig, will have its world premiere April 29 at the 15th annual Global Village Documentary Festival in New York.
The 37-minute film explains the cultural and political history of the plena, a blend of Spanish and African musical legacies. It includes performances by Canario, Cortijo, Cesar Concepcion and Ismael Rivera
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
continued from page 1
"I don't think we're going to achieve anything near parity by 2000," said Melinda Machado, staff director of the Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business, based in Reston, Va. "We have lots of work to do."
“We need to do a better job," admitted William Ketter, chairman of ASNE’s Minorities Committee and editor of the Quincy (Mass.) Patriot Ledger. "One problem we have is that the pool of Hispanics in the job market is not as large as we would like."
When told of Ketter’s rationale, Guillermo Martinez, vice president of news for Univision,
responded, “Bull____!" Ketter said his paper
employs one Hispanic on a news staff of 130. Herndndez noted a related problem — only 0.3% of journalism teachers are Latino. “Even at that level, the lack of role models has an impact on how many kids are successful at col-lege and actively pursue journalism."
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Meijas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana, Rhonda Smith. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza.
No poi 'Ion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be rep oduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch, if placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Ernie Sotomayor, associate editor of the Dallas Times-Herald, said, "We need to start developing kids at the elementary school age. If we don’t, not only won’t they be thinking about journalism as a career, they wont be reading our newspapers."
HISPANIC % OF NEWSPERSONS '82 '83 '84 '85 '86 '87 '88 '89
1.3 N/A N/A 1,5 1.6 1.7 1.9 2.1
The survey figures, released April 12 at ASNE's convention in Washington, D.C., are based on responses from 1,020 of the 1,581 daily newspapers in the United States, or 64%. ASNE uses a mathematical formula to compute numbers from nonresponding newspapers. The report states that the overall proportion of minorities is probably about 0.3% less than the figures indicate.
The survey found that a majority of the nation’s dailies — 54% — employ no minorities. These represent 18% of the total U.S. daily circulation. Of the all-white
newspapers, 59% have circulations of 10,000 or less.
"The numbers are very weak," said Hernandez. “There should be no excuse for never having hired a minority. What needs to be done by ASNE in particular is to pressure these papers.”
Machado identified them as small newspapers in small communities, and said, "A lot of them feel that there are no minorities in their communities. A few are honestly trying and are having difficulty in attracting minorities. We need to change students' perceptions about smaller newspapers, make them aware that the foundations for their careers will be laid at these smaller newspapers."
The survey also found newsroom managers are overwhelmingly white, at 95.5%. Hispanics comprised only 166 of 12,967 total newsroom supervisors. "Even though we're in the newsroom, we are playing little to no role in the decision-making process," said Hernandez. "Latinos still do not have the authority to hire or to assign stories."
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Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week In 1987 after the city underwent court-mandated redistricting ... The Na tional Association for Bilingual Education presents to Carla de Herrera, a kindergarten teacher at Furgeson Elementary School in Hawaiian Gardens, Calif . , its award for National Bilingual Teacher of the Year . . . Federal agents arrest Alex Marrero and Drug Enforcement Ad ministration Agent Jorge Villar for offering to protect a man a smuggler who was bringing cocaine from the Bahamas to !he area. Marrero, a former Miami police officer, was acquitted m 1980 m the beating death of a black businessman. The acquittal sparked race riots that left 18 people dead and $80 million in property damage . . . Authorities accuse Cuban American Adolfo de Jesus Con stanza, 26, as being the leader of a drug cult linked to the deaths of 13 people near Matamoros, Mexico ... President Bush gives to AplonioGarcia, of Enid, Okla., an award for his volunteer activities. One of 18 to receive the award at the White House, Garda has developed literacy classes for immigrants and helps them with residency applications . . . U.S. Rep . Tony Coelho, the third highest ranking Democrat in the House, denies violating House rules in an alleged use of campaign funds for personal benefit. Coelho says computer error is to blame for his campaign committee, not him, being listed as the purchaser of junk bonds that he profited from .. .Voters in the 1st District of Los Angeles re-elect Councilwoman Gloria Molina. One of two Hispanics now serving on the body, Molina was first elected Vol. 7 No.17 HISPANIC LINK WEE April 24, 1989 Latinos in Nation's Daily Paper NeYisrooms Inch Upward By Danilo Alfaro Hispanics make up only 2 .1% of newspersons employed in the nation's daily newspapers, according to the American Society of Newspaper Editors' annual minority employment survey . Up two-tenths of a per centage point from 1. 9% in 1988, the figure represents no gain, given Hispanic growth as a percentage of the total U.S. population last year. Latinos now make up 8.1% of the U .S. mainland population. "It's incredibly disappointing that that's all we've done in a year's time," said Evelyn Hernandez, president ofthe National Associa tion of Hispanic Journalists and a reporter with New York Newsday . The survey found blacks in the newsroom are now 4.1 %, Asians 1.1 %, Native Americans 0.2% and whites 92.5%. Employ ment for all minorities rose from 7 . 0% in 1988 to 7 .5% in 1989 . "It's another obvious example of how we need more than just good will and polite com ments," said David Lawrence, chairman of the industrywide Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business and chairman and publisher of the Detroit Free Press . "We need to insist on more progress." Gerald Garda, editor and publisher of the Knoxville (Tenn . ) Journal, said that pluralism in the newspaper industry is "not a priority" with the new leadership at some companies. "I don't think the commitment from major com panies is there anymore . There has to be a leader to get that job done . " ASNE found the percentage of Hispanics highest among reporters and lowest among su pervisors and copy editors. Since 1982 the overall representation of Hispanics in the nation ' s newsrooms has grown barely one tenth of a percentage point per year, while the total population of Hispanics has grown by nearly two-tenths of a percentage point yearly. ASNE's goal for minorities in the newsroom to reflect the total population by the year 2000 appears increasingly unlikely at the present rate . Minorities are expected to account for more than 25% of the U.S. population by then. continued on page 6 , Media Report HISPANIC REPRESENTATION IN NATION'S LARGEST NEWSROOMS-APRIL 1989 Newspaper Hisp.Pop. Employees Managers Copy Editors Reporters/Writers Photogs/Artists %in Area Total Hisp Hisp% Total Hisp Hisp% Total Hisp Hisp% Total Hisp Hisp% Total Hisp Hisp% Ariz . Republic/Phoenix Gazette 14.8% 332 8 2. 4% 60 1 1.7% 80 1 1.3% 158 5 3 .2% 34 1 2.9% Atlanta Journal/Constitution 1.4 371 4 1.0 85 0 0 78 1 1.3 172 2 1.2 36 1 2 . 8 Boston Globe 6.4 340 6 1 . 8 80 0 0 85 2 2.4 135 3 2.2 40 1 2.5 Buffalo News 2.6 167 1 0.6 8 0 0 15 0 0 43 1 2.3 21 0 0 Chicago Sun Times 14.0 211 5 2.4 24 2 8.3 40 0 0 117 2 1.7 30 1 3.3 Chicago Tribune 14.0 501 8 1.6 90 0 0 142 2 1.4 208 4 1.9 61 2 3.3 Cleveland Plain Dealer 3.1 261 2 0.8 54 0 0 22 1 4.5 137 1 0.7 24 0 0 Detroit News 2.4 287 2 0.7 76 1 1.3 45 0 0 133 0 . o 27 1 3.7 Houston Chronicle 17.6 249 12 4.8 35 1 2.9 56 5 8 . 9 128 4 3.1 30 2 6.7 Kansas City Star/Times 3.3 298 6 2 . 0 72 0 0 57 0 0 136 5 3.7 24 1 4.2 Los Angeles Times* 27.5 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 404 25 6 . 2 82 5 6.0 Miami Herald* 55.6 353 34 9.6 98 5 5.1 53 2.5 4.7 170 . 5 21 12.3 36 4 11.0 Minneapolis Star & Tribune 1.3 252 4 1.6 19 0 0 78 1 1 . 3 124 2 1.6 31 1 3.2 New York Times* 20.0 732 15 2.0 122 1 0.8 204 3 1.5 307 6 2.0 99 5 5.0 Newsday, Long Island & N.Y.C. 20 . 0 623 12 1.9 167 1 0.6 60 0 . 0 304 6 2.0 92 5 5.4 Orange Co. Register, Calif. 14.8 289 24 8.3 51 1 2.0 65 4 6.2 139 13 9.4 34 6 17.6 Oregonian, Portland* 2.1 241 4 1.7 44 2 4.5 45 1 2.2 135 1 0.7 17 0 0 Philadelphia Inquirer 3.7 494 11 2.2 222 0 0 n/a 1 ? n/a 8 ? 22 2 9.0 Rocky Mountain News, Denver 18.8 170 8 4.7 16 0 0 35 3 8.6 100 5 5.0 20 0 . 0 San Francisco Chronicle 12.3 253 5 2.0 14 1 7.1 78 2 2.6 156 2 1.3 14 1 7 . 1 San Jose Mercury News 22 . 3 284 12 4.2 42 0 0 87 4 4.6 131 7 5.3 24 1 4.2 St . Petersburg Times 1.8 230 5 2.2 51 1 2.0 48 0 0 106 0 0 25 4 16. 0 Washington Post 2.8 505 4 0.8 133 1 0.8 84 2 2.4 248 1 0.4 40 0 0 TOTALS -7,443 192 2.6 1,563 18 1.2 1,457 35.5 2.4 3 , 692 124 3 . 4 863 44 5.0 *-Los Angeles Times provided figures for reporters and photographers only; The Miami Herald totals do not include the all-Hispanic staff of El Miami Herald; The New York Times totals do not include editorial page staff; Oregonian totals do not include support staff; newspapers which failed to respond to the survey were: Newark Star Ledger, New Orleans Tlmes-Picayune, New York Post, New York Daily News, Detro i t Free Press and Houston Post; Boston Herald responded but could not provide number of Hispanic staffers. Source : Hispanic News Media Association of Washington. D . C., and National Association of Hispanic Note: Population figures are for 1980. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 2

Only 2. 6% of News Staffs at 23 Major Dailies Latino: Survey By Zita Arocha Hispanics account for 2.6% of the newsroom staffs at 23 of the largest daily newspapers in the country, according to the first such survey of Hispanics in the newsroom, conducted by the National Association of Hispanic Jour nalists and the Hispanic News Media Associa tion of Washington, D.C. The level of Latino participation at these top papers is only slightly better than the 2.1% found in this year's survey of all dailies by the American Society of Newspaper Editors. The NAHJ/HNMA survey was sent last month to the 30 largest-circulation dailies . Twenty three, including 12 in areas where Hispanics make up between 12-56% of the population, responded. Released April 21 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, at the National Hispanic Media Conference , the survey also found only 18 Hispanic managers at the newspapers, 1 .20/o of their total managerial work force . "What concerns me is that these newspapers are the leaders in the industry ... and the num bers are weak," said NAHJ president Evelyn Hernandez , a reporter at Newsday. Carolyn Lee, a senior editor at The New York Times who is in charge of career development and also does some recruiting, said: "I don ' t think any paper would claim we're doing as well as we should be doing, but we're trying." Of The New York Times' 732 newsroom employees, 15-about 2%-were Hispanic. At 15 of the 23 newspapers, Hispanic repre sentation was 2.2% or less. At four-the Buf falo News, Cleveland Plain Dealer, Detroit News and Washington Postit was less than 1%. Ten had no Hispanic managers . Combining totals at the 23 newspapers , Hispanics comprised 3.4% of the reporters, 5% of all photographers/artists, and 2.4% of the copy editors . The Miami Herald reported the highest num ber of Hispanics in the newsroom and in management positions. The community it serves, Dade County , is more than 40% Hispanic . Of the 353 newsroom employees at the Herald, 34, or 9.6% , were Hispanic . Christine Morris, associate editor for person nel at the Herald, said hiring Hispanics, once not a priority, is one now and "we're playing catch-up." Among the reporting staff at the Los Angeles Times, there are 25 Hispanics, or 6 . 2% of the total. Five or 6% of the paper ' s 82 photog raphers are Hispanic . The Times was unable to supply the total number of Hispanic Baytown, Texas, Plans May 20 Election By Rhonda Smith The Baytown, Texas, City Council will proceed with its first election in three years May 20 if a voting plan that has been revised several times is approved by the Justice Department. The city was forced to review its election system in 1985 after two Hispanics and two blacks filed a successful lawsuit alleging that Baytown's at-large election system was dis. criminatory. The system called for six council members and the mayor to be elected at large. The citizens filing the suit had originally proposed a 5-3-1 system in which five coun-Martinez Rating Goes Up More Florida voters rate Republican Gov. Bob Martinez as doing a good or excellent job than they did 18 months ago-46% to 33% but only 27% of the voters would vote to re-elect him, found a poll released this month by The Miami Herald and WCIX-'TV. Martinez, facing a re-election race in November 1990, fared best among Latino voters , with 60% giving the governor a favoral 1 le rating and 48% reporting that they would vote for him today . Forty-six percent of white voters rated Martinez's job perfor mance as good or excellent, while 27% would vote to put him back in office. Martinez received the least support from black voters 39% gave him a good or excellent rating, while only 8% would vote for the governor's re-election. 2 cilors would be elected by single-member dis tricts and three new council seats, along with the mayor, would be elected at large . The city appealed the decision by a U . S . Dis trict Court, and the plaintiffs then proposed an 8-1 plan . According to Pete Alfaro , the first minority to be appointed to the City Council, the Justice Department is currently reviewing and is ex pected to approve a 5-1-1 election plan because "both sides have agreed upon it." This plan stipulates that five councilmembers would be elected by single-member districts . Court 'Houses' LA. Slumlord A Los Angeles residential hotel owner, warned repeatedly to correct deplorable living conditions for its tenants, many of whom are Hispanic, has been sentenced to live in the building for 1 00 consecutive days . This type of sentence is the longest ever imposed on a landlord there. Amiya Goswami, 54, was to begin serving his sentence on April 13, but his attorneys have since filed an appeal. According to Deputy City Attorney Diane Stephenson, Goswami's sentence was harsher than similar cases because of the acute condition of the building. Uncontrolled rats and roaches, cracked and peeling paint , non-work ing elevators and no available hot water led to Goswami's April 6 sentence for 32 health, fire, building and safety code violations . April 24, 1989 managers . The community served by the Times is almost one-third Hispanic . Mary Lou Bessette, director of news and editorial resources at The Arizona Republic/Phoenix Gazette, said the goal at her newspaper is a newsroom that is 16.5% minority by 1997 to reflect the community it serves. Hispanics were almost 15% of the population of Phoenix in 1980 . Currently, the newspaper's Hispanic staffers represent 2.4% of the 332-member newsroom force . Bessette said it is still difficult to find minority journalists who fill its minimum 3-to-5-year ex perience requirement. Like many other newspapers seeking to improve the hiring of minorities , The Arizona Republic/Phoenix Gazette has begun a training program for high school minority students . It also attempts to include minorities in its an nual fellowship program for 10 college graduates . "Last year we had 140 applicants and 1 0 were minority. We had one minority winner and she refused it because she had accepted a summer internship elsewhere," Bessette said . Arlene Morgan , deputy metro editor/recruiter at the Philadelphia Inquirer, which has 11 Hispanics out of 494 newsroom employees and no Hispanic managers, sa i d she finds that many Hispanic and other minority journalists are unwilling to accept jobs in suburban bureaus where most of the openings occur . "You talk to people about covering the suburbs and they look at you as i f you 're nuts," she said . "They don ' t realize that we have had people who started off in a suburban bureau and six months later were on the national desk." Morgan said she also has a difficult time attracting Hispanics because they don 't as sociate the Inquirer with Hispanic issues . Lee, of The New York Times , said her paper also has a problem in attracting Hispanics , but for different reasons . "We lose people we want to hire because they don ' t want to live in New York ... or because they can be metro editor right now in Detroit whereas in New York they won ' t be metro editor for maybe five years." Hernandez, NAHJ president, said one way to attract and retain Hispanics is to offer more career and professional development. "You can' t just hire Hispanics and throw them into a bureau and forget about them." Dear Readers ... You will not be receiving Weekly Report next week . Weekly Report publishes 50 editions an nually . Its two non-publishing weeks are after Christmas and following the National Hispanic Media Conference. Your next issue will be May 8 . Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Publisher Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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William 0. Medina Life in the Burbs I grew up in the barrio, where most of my neighbors ate tamales for Christmas and went to a Catholic church. Spanish drowned out English at the local market , and no one was ashamed to hang wet clothing from the family laundry line . Then last year I moved to the white suburbs of Southern California's Riverside County. Friends and relatives congratulated me on doing the right thing . But for someone who doesn ' t understand the logic of Homeowner As sociation rules that prohibit leaving your garage door open, the sub urbs remain strange. My new neighborhood is replete with block parties that spew the aroma of barbecued steaks and spare ribs. I always decline invita tions to attend-for valid reasons. My precinct is overwhelmingly Republican; I' ve marched on picket lines boycotting grapes and protested against Ronald Reagan ' s cuts to education, health and other critical social programs . I'm afraid my feelings may be construed by my neighbors as anti-American. My new neighbors work hard during the week and view weekends as minivacations. Come Friday, laden with boats, jet skis and motorcycles, they pilot their campe r s toward the nearest blue-collar playgrounds . Skimming lake waters at frightening speeds , climbing Suicide Hill and sleeping on hard dirt helps them forget about their 40-hour weeks . LAWN COMPETITIONS COMMON Like my homeboys back in the barrio , I still work most weekends and don ' t have such toys of escape. Barrio residents can ' t afford the cost of fleeing from their monotony or anxieties. When I was growing up , we went to the park or stayed at home inventing simplistic games using a water hose . Among my new neighbors, a recurring question is: " What do you do for a living?" In the barrio, such inquiries are taboo. The jobs have less status ; layoffs are not uncommon. It often takes two menial jobs to make ends meet. We shun people who boast how important or rich they are . My suburban neighbors deny that their yards compete, but they do . For a while, I became involved in the tacit competition . I wanted the greenest and cleanest yard . A magazine article said that sprinklers were harsh on infant grass, so I spent untold hours watering rny first lawn by hand , hurrying outside each morning to welcome virgin blades of grass . As I stood watching my green carpet grow , one neighbor would visit me and share the secrets that were going to make him fabulously wealthy. He had it figured out, down to the minute, how much money he earned . I FEAR I MAY WEAKEN In the barrio we had concerns that took precedence over luxuries and the health of our plants . There was the constant whining noise of Butcher Boys, a burrito factory across the street that made sitting out doors unbearable . Enjoying our flower and vegetable gardens at night became increasingly hazardous with the proliferation of gang violence. In the barrio, we never fretted over commuter traffic. Here in subur ban Moreno Valley, the freeways are like parking lots. I sometimes sense that my roots, once deep in barrio clay, are inch ing into my vitamin-fed lawn and large monthly house payment. I fear that some future summer I may weaken and join a neighbor ' s backyard barbecue party . But I am a transplant and must remain a product of my past . In a mad, nostalgic moment, I may yet defy my neighbors and leave my garage door open all day long . I can never move completely out of the barrio . {William 0. Medina manages his family's restaurant in Riverside, Calif.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua THE YELLOW PERIL: Barry Hatch, loudmouth, nativist mayor of Monterey Park, Calif., now seems set on enlisting Latinos in his campaign against the Asians he sees invading "his" city . Says he in a recent Associated Press dispatch: "Monterey Park is a beautiful little suburban town , almost rural in some parts. And now we drive through our little commercial area and feel like we're in Hong Kong . When you're an Anglo or Hispanic and you can ' t read the signs, it makes you feel like a second-class citizen." OLD LISTS : The National Commission on the Public Service, chaired by Paul Volcker , prodded the Washington establishment a few weeks ago with a series of recommendations on reshaping and rebuilding the federal sector. If I may add a prod of my own : Why no Hispanics on the 36member commission? At their national seminar April 6-9 in Washington , the Education Writers Assoc i ation brought together 66 speakers, presiders, and presenters to enlighten some 200 journalists it attracted from around the country. It was not quite a complete shutout for Hispanics . It did include Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos as a speaker and dominicana Sonia Bu , director of the Youth Ac tion Program in New York, to participate on a panel. NEW LISTS : The Texas State Teachers Association has been around for 125 years. And that's how long it took the institution to elect a Hispanic as its president. Olivia Besteiro , a bilingual maestra from Brownsville, was chosen by its membership April 8 to head the 95 , 000-member group . In winning, Besteiro, a teacher for 29 years, also becomes the first Latina ever to serve as president of a state affiliate of the 1 .9 million-member National Education Association . She takes over July 15 . Three men have served as affiliate presidents, all with NEA New Mexico . The first: the legendary George I. Sanchez , in 1933. In yet another Hispanic first, the Texas teachers elected yet another Latina bilingual education specialist, Sara Flores from Killeen, to NEA's Board of Directors this month. Finally they accept it: Two languages are better than one . TROPICAL-LOOKING WOMEN, CALL WASHINGTON: You've no doubt been reading about Washington, D .C., Mayor Marion Barry and his alleged drug connection. Well, Latinas here have a different hue so to pick with him . As he was threatening to cut funding for the district ' s Latin American Youth Center to the bone, his Department of Recreation sent out a notice, dutifully printed by the Washington Post, inviting "tropi cal-looking women" to participate in a community activity. What's a " tropical-looking woman?" How about the Latina hotel maid who told police that a friend of the mayor's had offered her dope for sex in a Ramada Inn room the mayor had been frequenting. Barry apparently found her too "tropical." He told the press that her word wasn't very reliable because she was probably "undocu mented." Ka Barbaro Quoting ... GLORIA SANTIAGO, director of the Hispanic Women's Task Force of New Jersey, commenting to Weekly Report reporter Danilo Alfaro , on the status of Latinas : "More Hispanic women, as single heads of household, are being forced to look after their families, to go to school, to get jobs things the system does not force the males to do. The men are not working . They are on the periphery of the community. They are in jail or on drugs . " Hispanic Link Weekly Report April24 , 1989 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING ROSTER OF ELECTED OFFICIALS: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has published its "1988 National Roster of Hispanic Elected Officials . " The 1 06-page publication in cludes the names, addresses, level of office, party affiliation and a state-by-state breakdown of more than 3,300 officials. A copy costs $30 plus $2.40 for postage and handling. Contact NALEO Education Fund, 708 G St. NE, Washington, D .C. 20003 (202) 546-2536 . MIGRATION COMMISSION NEWSLETTER: The Commission for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development, a body mandated by the Immigration Reform and Con trol Act to study the push and pull factors of migration into the United States, has published the first issue of its newsletter . For a complimen tary copy, contact the commission at 1111 18th St. NW, Suite 800 , Washington , D .C. 20036 (202) 254-4954 . NATIONAL BUSINESS DIRECTORY: The U. S . Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has released its "1989 National Hispanic Business Direc tory." Organized by state and industrial classification, the 481-page publication includes products or services offered, number of employees, years in business and gross annual sales on nearly 10,000 Hispanic firms on the U.S. mainland and Puerto Rico . For a copy send $28 to USHCC, Marketing Department, 4900 Main St., Suite 700, Kan sas City, Mo . 64112 (816) 5316363 . CUBAN AMERICAN WRITERS: "Cuban American Writers : Los Atrevidos" is a 170-page anthology of English-language prose, poetry and fiction by 12 young Cuban Americans. The writers come from such places as California , New Jersey, Kansas, New York and Florida. Softcover copies are $12. Contact Linden Lane Magazine, P.O. Box 2384, Princeton, N.J . 08543-2384 . MINNESOTA SERVICES: "The Bilingual Directory," produced by the state's Spanish Speaking Affairs Council, lists more than 1 00 private and public agencies in Minnesota that provide bilingual services. Also included is a listing of national and regional Hispanic organizations. For a copy of the 162-page directory, send $6 . 50 to Minnesota's Bookstore, 117 University Ave . , St. Paul, Minn . 55155 (612) 297-3000. FEDERAL CONSUMER PUBLICATIONS: "Usta de Pub/icaciones Federates en Espana/ Parae/ Consumidor" is a listing of more than 1 00 free federal publications in Spanish . A variety of topics is covered. For a free copy, write Consumer Information Center (XC), Usta-F, General Services Administration, Washington, D . C . 20405 . Washington, D .C. April 29 CONNECTING LEADERSHIP PROGRAM TO EXPAND In its eighth year of molding bright, Hispanic high school students into leaders who will go to college, return and serve their communities, the Lorenzo de Zavala Youth Legislative Session will expand to Colorado the summer of 1990 . This year ' s weeklong workshops, set for June 18-25 at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque and July 30-Aug. 5 at Southwestern University in Georgetown , Texas , are full. The brainchild of Ernesto Nieto and Gloria de Le6n, husband and wife, the program places 200-250 students at each site . Among other things, each student is required to draft and try to have passed a bill before a mock legislature . More than nine out of 1 0 of the workshop participants enroll in col lege, and 75-80% of those who finish college enter a professional or graduate program . For more information contact the National Hispanic Institute , P.O. Box 220, Maxwell, Texas 78656 (512) 357-6137 . Applications for 1990 must be in by December . HEALTH PROGRAM RECEIVES $220,000 ASPIRA ' s National Health Careers Program, a project seeking to in crease the number of Hispanic doctors and health professionals, has received a twoyear, $220 , 000 grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts . The 20-year-old health program provides counseling, tutoring and placement services to high school and college students. Of the 1,212 students who have participated in the program since 1975 and applied to medical schools or health profession institutions, 729 have been placed. For more information contact Hilda Crespo at (202) 835-3600 . STUDENT PROGRAM TO SPREAD The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities will expand its Hispanic Student Success Program to four sites across the nation with the aid of a $49,000 grant from the Sears-Roebuck Foundation . HACU is seeking sites that have large Hispanic populations, a com munity college and four-year university that have at least 25 % Hispanic enrollment, a community-based organization dealing with Hispanic education and committed civic and business leaders. Cur rently, HACU, which announced the grant April 6, operates its program in San Antonio and South Texas . For more information call Pamela Salazar at (512) 433-1501 . eon keynote speaker . calendar AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AWARDS New York April26 The National Puerto Rican Forum and New York Newsday present the fourth annual Affirmative Ac tion Awards dinner to honor community leaders who have exemplified affirmative action. Among the recipients are Angelo Gonzalez of the Adolph Coors Co. , and Josephine Nieves of the Community Ser vice Society . 'After Columbus : Encounters in North America, ' a forum sponsored by National Museum of American History, looks at the interactions between Spanish colonists and American Indians in the Southwest and Southeast regions of the United States. Troup Coronado (202) 224-5251 QUINCENTENARY FORUM II College Park, Md. & Washington, D .C. May 4-6 The Smithsonian Institution will sponsor a sym posium called ' Violence and Resistance in the Americas: The Legacy of Conquest ' at which scholars examine the impact that European colonists had on indigenous Indian cultures. Conference Services (202) 357-4281 Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311 EDUCATION FOR PROGRESS Washinr .ton, D.C. April27, 28 The Nat . onal Urban Coalition is holding its 22nd an niversary convocation, ' Education as the Founda tion for National Progress. • Forums on the media and ethnic and class isolation will be held. The Rev . Jesse Jackson is a scheduled speaker. Ramona Hoage (202) 628-2990 QUINCENTENARY FORUM 4 Lisa Falk (202) 357-1639 FESTIVAL Takoma Park, Md. April 30 The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission will hold its 1Oth annual Hispanic Day Festival. Included will be a parade, a tribute to ex emplary families as well as arts and crafts, food, dance and music . Festival (301) 439-4020 LITERACY AND EMPLOYMENT Washington, D .C. May 4 The U . S . Senate Republican Conference Task Force on Hispanic Affairs will sponsor sessions on employment and literacy , with representatives from the government, corporations and community based organizations. Jack Kemp, U . S . secretary of Housing and Urban Development, will be the lunch-April24, 1989 CINCO DEMAYO Omaha, Neb . May 5 The Omaha Children's Museum will sponsor a fund raising buffet and a performance by El BaJ/et Folklorico lnfantil de Sonora. Graciela Machado (402) 333-7191 FOLK FESTIVAL Arlington, Va. May 5-7 Sponsored in part by the Arlington County Depart ment of Parks , Recreation and Community Resour ces, the Northern Virginia Folk Festival ' 89 will include pinata-making sessions, and food, music and crafts from various Latin American countries. Angela Parkhurst (703) 683-4347 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIED • ' THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SYSTEM PRESIDENT THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT SAN ANTONIO Nominations and applications for qualified and interested candidates are being sought for President of The University of Texas at San Antonio . U .T. San Antonio, established in 1969, is one of seven general academic institutions and six health-related institu tions in The University of Texas System . The institution of fers a wide range of baccalaureate and master's degree programs and a joint doctoral program in Educational Ad ministration with U .T. Austin. Additional doctoral programs in the College of Sciences and Engineering are being developed . The degree programs are offered through four colleges : Business , Fine Arts and Humanities, Science and Engineering, and Social and Behavioral Sciences . U .T. San Antonio has developed a number of research and public service institutes within the colleges and is a member of the Southwest Research Consortium . U .T. San Antonio is a major contributor to the region's goal of being a major cen ter of biotechnology and research . The institution enrolls over 13 , 000 students , with 7% of that number as graduate students . The vast majority of the stu dents are from the San Antonio and adjacent areas with a rich Spanish heritage . Approximately one-fourth of the en rollment is Hispanic . Located in a rapidly growing area of Texas, the metropolitan and surrounding area approaches 2 million people. This dynamic, young institution has a very bright future . The president is the chief administrative officer of the University and reports to the Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs of The University of Texas System. Can didates for the presidency should possess an earned doc torate or its equivalent, have demonstrated considerable leadership and administrative ability, have achieved distinc tion in at least one academic or professional area, have ex hibited a commitment to excellence in teaching and research, and possess the ability to communicate the mis sion and needs of the University to faculty, students, alum ni and other constituencies . Applications will be accepted until May 1 0, 1989. After date the Advisory Committee may request and cons1der credentials from candidates nominated from responsible sources . All nominations and applications with supporting materials should be addressed to : James P . Duncan, Chairman Advisory Committee for the Selection of a President The University of Texas System 601 Colorado Street Austin, Texas 78701 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER Hispanic Unk Weekly Report DEPUTY COUNTY EXECUTIVE County of Santa Clara San Jose, California The County of Santa Clara is an outstanding employer and well regarded in the State of California w_e have been in the forefront in bringing modern leadership prac tices to our organization . We are seeking to recruit qualified public sector profes sionals to fill two (2) of the three Deputy County Execu tive positions . Under the general direction of the County Executive, the Deputy County Executive will department(s) of the Office of the County provide liaison with a major County responsibility; plan, direct and coordinate activities and/or spec1al projects. The qualified candidate would normally possess a com' bination of training and experience which is equivalent to graduation from college with a degree in Public Ad ministration, Business Administration or a closely related field which would provide a foundation for the manage ment in a large public sector organization and 8 to 10 years of progressively responsible administra tive/management public sector experience which would provide the knowledge and abilities needed to operate within a complex and diverse entity . At least three (3) years of experience should be at an executive level . Salary: $91 ,329-$1 03,145 annually plus approx . 7% retirement contribution . Performance adjustments avail able up to $116,740. Benefits: Comprehensive Executive Management Benefit Package Apply : County of Santa Clara Personnel Department 70 W. Hedding Street, 8th Floor San Jose, Calif . 95110 Telephone: (408) 299-4355 Closing Date: Open--Anticipate closing late May , 1989 . EOE M/F/H EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The State Board of Trustees of Child and Family Services of Michigan, Inc., a United Way of Michigan agency, is seeking an executive director for the Central Office which provides consult ative and coordination services to a statewide network of com munity-based private direct service agencies . Position Requirements : MSW , ACSW, preferably 5-8 years experience as an ad ministrator in a human service agency. Experienced in inter agency coordination, fund raising, program development and administrative consultation . Strong innovative leadership qualities are essential. Resume must be received on or before June 30, 1989 . Send to: Lynwood E. Beekman, Chairperson Personnel Committee 2214 University Park Drive , Suite 200 Okemos, Ml 48864 Child and Family Services of Michigan, Inc. is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer . April 24, 1989 5

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Arts & Entertainment Michel Camilo (Epic) is his first U .S. album . FOR THE RECORD: From debut albums to long-expected releases by recording veterans, there is a heterogeneous mix of new LPs avail able this spring. Also on the market: Apasionado by Glenn Monroig rt'/EA Latina) in cludes a Spanish-language version of Kenny Loggins' "Forever" and seven songs by the Puerto Rico-born Monroig; Debutting with the self-titled album Apollonia (on the Warner Bros. label) is the Mexican American s i nger who first caught the public's at tention with her lead role in the film and album Purple Rain. • Pepeu Gomes (Ariola) by Brazil's vocalist and instrumentalist Pepeu Gomes; eAntecetJente (Eiektra) by Panamanian salsa superstar Ruben Blades accompanied by his group Son del Solar; and Apollonia ' s new album includes remakes of the Yardbird's "For Your Love" and Nancy Sinatra's "These Boots are Made for Walking." • Sa'Fire (Cutting Records/Mercury/Polygram) by the New York Puerto Rican "free stylist" Sa' Fire . Veteran salsero Willie Colon's new album Top Secret/Altos Secretos (Fania) includes three songs written by the trombone player and band leader. Colon, the grandson of Puerto Rican immigrants, has sold more than seven million records throughout his career . He boasts six Grammy nom in at ions. DOCUMENTARY PREMIERES: Plena is Work, Plena is Song, a documentary by Pedro Rivera and Susan Zeig, will have its world premiere April 29 at the 15th annual Global Village Documentary Fes tival in New York . Pianist Michel Camilo, a native of the Dominican Republic, is a well known fixture on the jazz circuit and has contributed performances and compositions to the likes of Dizzy Gillespie and Paquito D ' Rivera The 37-minute film explains the cultural and political history of the plena, a blend of Spanish and African musical legacies . It includes per formances by Canario, Cortijo, Cesar Concepcion and lsmael Rivera Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report continued from page 1 " I don't think we're going to achieve anything near parity by 2000 , " said Melinda Machado, staff director of the Task Force on Minorities in the Newspaper Business , based i n Reston, Va . "We have lots of work to do . " "We need to do a better job," admitted William Ketter , chairman of ASNE's Minorities Com mittee and editor of the Quincy (Mass . ) Patriot Ledger . "One problem we have is that the pool of Hispanics in the job market is not as large as we would like." When told of Ketter's rationale, Guillermo Martinez, v i ce president of news for Univision, responded, "Bull ____ !" Ketter said his paper employs one Hispanic on a news staff of 130 . Hernandez noted a related problem only 0 . 3% of journalism teachers are Latino . "Even at that level , the lack of role models has an im pact on how many kids are successful at col lege and actively pursue journalism." HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Mario Santana, Rhonda Smith. Sales : Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No po1 'i on of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be rep oduced or broadcast in any form without advanc;e permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 I ssues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word. Disp l a y ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in W ee k ly Repo rts mailed Friday of the same week . Ernie Sotomayor, associate editor of the Dal las Times-Herald , said, "We need to start developing kids at the elementary school age. If we don't , not only won ' t they be thinking about journalism as a career, they won't be reading our newspapers." HISPANIC % OF NEWSPERSONS '82 '83 '84 '85 '86 '87 '88 '89 1 . 3 N/A N/A 1 . 5 1 . 6 1 . 7 1.9 2.1 The survey figures, released April 12 at ASNE's convention in Washington, D . C., are based on responses from 1 , 020 of the 1,581 daily newspapers in the United States, or 64% . ASNE uses a mathematical formula to compute numbers from nonresponding newspapers . The report states that the overall proport ion of minorit i es is probably about 0 . 3% less than the figures indicate . The survey found that a majority of the nation's dailies 54% employ no minorities . These represent 18% of the total U . S. daily circulation. Of the all-white newspapers, 59% have circulations of 10,000 or less . "The numbers are very weak," said Hernandez . "There should be no excuse for never having hired a minority. What needs to be done by ASNE in particular is to pressure these papers . " Machado identified them as small newspapers in small communities, and said , "A lot of them feel that there are no minorities in their communities . A few are honestly trying and are having difficulty in attracting minorities . We need to change students' perceptions about smaller newspapers, make them aware that the foundations for their careers will be laid at these smaller newspapers . " The survey also found newsroom managers are overwhelmingly white, at 95.5%. Hispanics comprised only 166 of 12,967 total newsroom supervisors. "Even though we're in the newsroom, we are playing little to no role in the decision-making process," said Hernandez . "Latinos still do not have the authority to hire or to assign stories . " Hispanic Link Weekly Report