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Hispanic link weekly report, May 22, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, May 22, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Full Text
Making The News
U.S. Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole names John Florez, a Utah native, as deputy assistant secretary for employment and training...Orange County, Calif., Supervisor Gaddi V^squez says he is considering seeking the Republican nomination for secretary of state...New York City officials contact Dade County, Fla., Superintendent of Schools Joseph Fernandez to check his interest in heading the city’s school system following the death of Chancellor Richard Green...!Ilinois State Attorney Cecil Partee says his office will prosecute 23-year-old Rudy Linares despite pleas from people throughout the country. Linares recently removed at gunpoint his 15-month-old comatose son from a life-support system...After repeated denials, the U.S. State Department
issues a temporary visa for Nicaraguan Constantino Velasquez to visit his son Dimaggio, 18, in a San Francisco hospital. Dimaggio, who has dropped from 160 to 90 pounds, was diagnosed as having bone cancer last September...The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service grants asylum to Carlos Fajardo, his wife, Bermaida, and their children, Yoandys, 12, and Yordalys, 9. The Fajardos unwittingly deported themselves last December when they ventured into Canada while their asylum case was pending...East Los Angeles attorney FrankMunoz, 61, a founding member of California’s Mexican American Political Association, dies of a heart attack...Tony Chaves, 64, deputy director of National Hispanic Democrats, dies of a heart attack in Virginia.. Esteban de Jesus, 37, the 1976-78 World Boxing Council lightweight champ, dies of AIDS in San Juan, Puerto Rico...

College Activism
By Rhonda Smith
Hispanic activism on college campuses today is alive and well. Students have shed the shrillness and confrontational tactics of their predecessors from the ’60s, but their commitment to civil rights and desire to retain Hispanic culture and pride remains intact.
Some authorities on student activism, like Antonio Stevens-Arroyo, professor of Puerto Rican Studies at City University of New York, Brooklyn, see and welcome a return to student demonstrations such as those that occurred on CUNY campuses in recent weeks to protest a
Coelho Reigns in PAC $$
Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) received $444,191 from political action committees during last year’s campaign season, leading all 13 members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus but ranking 22nd in Congress overall behind leader Richard Gephardt (D-Mo.), who accepted $610,107, according to a survey published in the May 10, 11 issues of The Washington Post.
Coelho is majority whip, the third most powerful position in the House.
Of the 435 voting House members, 77 received more than $300,000 and 325 received more than $125,000. Six of the 10 Latino voting members received more than $125,000.
Different Tactics,
tuition hike. But most view the transition from pure advocacy groups to professional and social organizations not as surrender to the establishment, but as a logical adjustment to the times. Today 278,000 Latinos attend four-year
Minn. Groups Attack AIDS
By Julio Ojeda
A coalition of Minnesota’s seven largest Hispanic organizations this month launched a comprehensive statewide AIDS prevention campaign.
Coordinator John Pacheco said the groups united to prevent competition for funds — including $100,000 from the Minnesota legislature — and duplication of programs.
Latino AIDS activities in some Midwestern cities have been marred by intra- agency rivalry, according to Aida Giachello, head of the Midwest Hispanic AIDS Coalition. The Minnesota effort, first of its kind in the region, "has come together as one entity, as one voice," she said.
The partnership’s programs include "piafcas" (talks) with families in their homes, on-the-street counseling for intravenous drug users, radio and cable television programs, a newsletter, a bilingual hotline and a series of public forums to be held throughout the state.
Common Goals
colleges on the continental United States, substantially more than during the ’60s.
Then "the limited number of minorities on campus implied exclusion. The need to improve the lot of Hispanic, black and other minority groups drew students to campuses," explains Armando Rodriguez, former president of East Los Angeles College.
Ignacio Garcfa, professor at the University of Arizona, Tucson, and a member of La Raza Unida, a political activist group formed with strong campus support during the late ’60s, concurs with Rodriguez. His assessment: "Once the students got in (the universities), they found no office of minority affairs, no outreach support group or funds earmarked for minority recruitment or retention. This forced them to stay together and led to aggression" to gain these rights.
Rodriguez adds, "This went on for about 10-15 years. Then, when the students began to be more inclusive, the need for the struggle subsided."
Some former student activists, like Jose Angel Gutierrez, a leader in a ’60s student political group known as MAYO, the Mexican American Youth Organization, and a founding member of La Raza Unida, see the change in Hispanic students as a reflection of contemporary society.
continued on page 2
PAC SCORECARD: 1988
Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) $444,191
Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) 299,053
Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) 232,427
Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) 189,683
Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) 153,349
E. de la Garza (D-Texas) 130,227
Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) 113,931
Solomdn Ortiz (D-Texas) 103,212
Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) 100,001
Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) 49,915
♦Ron de Lugo (D-V.I.) 16,330
♦Jaime Fuster (D-P. R.) 12,628
*Ben Blaz (R-Guam) 11,800
*Non-voting members Source: The Washington Post
Esquivel to Become
U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos announced his intention May 12 to appoint California educator Rita Esquivel as director of the Office of Bilin-gual and Minority Languages Affairs, eliciting an enthusiastic response from bilingual educators.
"Ms. Esquivel’s varied experience as a classroom teacher, including bilingual instruction, as well as administrative, curricular and counseling
Bilingual Ed. Chief
experience, will make her an effective and caring leader," said Cavazos via satellite to a conference in Miami of the National Association for Bilingual Education. Esquivel takes over July 1, succeeding Alicia Coro, director since August 1987.
Lauding her breadth of experience — more than 30 years in Texas and California public schools — Aurora Quevedo, president of the California Association for Bilingual Education, said Esquivel is a "person who foremost speaks what needs to be said for children."
Esquivel presently serves as assistant to the superintendent of Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District.


Many Groups Oppose Rights Nominee, Cite Inexperience
By Danilo Alfaro
Several national civil rights organizations, including leading Hispanic groups, are voicing reservations and outright opposition to the nomination of Detroit attorney William Lucas as assistant U.S. attorney general for civil rights. The groups cite Lucas’ lack of experience in legal practice and the civil rights field.
Mario Moreno, associate counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, expressed "grave concerns" about Lucas’ qualifications to hold the top civil rights position in the federal government. However, the group has not announced an official position. "We need someone who is well versed in civil rights and who knows
how to litigate. Lucas doesn’t come out with sterling credentials in either case," he said.
Lucas, 61, has practiced law part time for less than two years. He comes from a law enforcement background, having worked for the New York City Police Department, the FBI and the Wayne County, Mich., Sheriff’s Department. He was elected in 1982 to the position of Wayne County Executive.
The League of United Latin American Citizens has lobbied against Lucas’ nomination since February.
Arnold Torres, the group’s public policy director, told Weekly Report, "At a time when the country’s diversity is growing and Hispanics’ civil rights difficulties have continued unabated, we don’t think he is the best type of person for this position."
The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, a coalition of 180 organizations, announced May 9 its opposition to Lucas’ nomination.
Neither the National Council of La Raza nor the National Puerto Rican Coalition, both members of the Leadership Conference, have taken a formal position on the Lucas nomination.
Lisa Navarrete, senior policy analyst for La Raza, said the group was still gathering information about him and was hoping to participate in his confirmation hearings.
Other fence-straddling organizations include The Cuban American National Foundation, the National Puerto Rican Forum and the Cuban American National Council.
Authorities Say Activism Mirrors Society
continued from page 1
"Back then we lived our dreams as a group. Today students are more interested in individual goals, ambitions and dreams."
Others, like Hector Garza, assistant dean of the graduate school at Eastern Michigan University, worry that in the process of seeking personal success, students will lose sight of the importance of their predecessors’ struggle.
"Nine years ago when I came to EMU, Hispanic students were much more vocal and assertive. They made more demands and were more politically aware."
Garcia, whose book on La Raza Unida will be released later this year, explains that students today cannot be blamed entirely for their lack of awareness of some issues. "The greatest apathy is among Hispanic faculty," he charges. "Today’s professors are under the gun to gain tenure, acceptance and promotions.
"The Hispanic faculty used to be a mentor for students and a spokesperson for Hispanics. They were the sparks. But they are not available as much anymore."
Garza points to a different situation at Eastern Michigan. To assist EMU Hispanic students remain aware of their student rights and the issues that affect them, the Latino Advisory Council, composed of several Hispanic faculty members, was formed to serve as a mentor.
Despite the perception of a naivete among students regarding their rights, no one believes they have abandoned the struggle to have Hispanic issues addressed.
"Militancy is relative in terms of what one is seeking. I don’t think the students have betrayed their community," says Garcfa.
Anna Ch&vez, Yale president of MEChA, Movimiento EstudiantilChicanodeAztlan, ana-
NEXT WEEK: HISPANIC CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS TODAY AND IN THE FUTURE.
tional Chicano student political movement founded in 1969, says her group is no less passionate about the issues arising today than were previous Hispanic students. "The scope of the issues is much different today. It’s harder for us to approach them in the form of a protest because they are not as tangible as they were in the ’60s. Now it’s more effective for us to work within the structure."
Nonetheless, Lisa Fortuna, co-chair of Despierta Boricua, a Puerto Rican student organization at Yale, says she is concerned. "Apathy is a question we’ve been trying to address. I realize that I may have student privileges that other people may not have as a result of attending Yale, and it’s easy to get blinded to the problems around us. But once we learn about the issues by coming into contact with Hispanic alumni, faculty and others, we come closer to addressing them."
Cuban Center Woes Grow
By Luis Restrepo
A proposed Cuban research institute that has come under increased criticism will not be housed at Florida International University, said Cuban American National Foundation Chairman Jorge Mas Canosa May 10.
Florida’s Board of Regents passed a resolution a day earlier opposing CANF’s proposal that the institute be at FIU.
Regent Raul Masvidal, a founding member of CANF, said that the institute’s control by an outside group with a political agenda would set a dangerous precedent. At issue is whether the foundation, which is vehemently anti-Castro, would impose its political agenda on academic research.
"It is unfair criticism," said Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R-Miami), a sponsor of a bill that would grant $1 million for the institute. Mas Canosa promised state legislators CANF would raise a matching $1 million in private funds.
Move to Quash Bilingual Ed. Bonus Appears Dead
By Danilo Alfaro
Ballots cast by the United Teachers of Los Angeles to determine whether the union would be prohibited from negotiating incentive bonuses for the Los Angeies Unified School District’s 4,000 bilingual education teachers have been sequestered pending contract talks in a strike that began May 15.
Jose Govea, a member of UTLA’s board of directors, told Weekly Report that the sequester, which took place May 5, was in response to findings that architects of the initiative took nearly six months to gather the 500 signatures required to put the measure on the ballot. The UTLA constitution allows 90 days for the gathering of signatures.
According to Michael Genzuk, director of legislative affairs for the California Association for Bilingual Education, the union will not count the ballots until after the contract has been settled. Since the question of pay differentials will be decided during the negotiations, Genzuk described it as a "moot" issue.
The district had offered bilingual teachers annual bonuses of $5,000 each last May.
Judge Bars Deportations
A federal judge May 15 blocked deportation proceedings against an estimated 23,000 Central American asylum applicants in Los Angeles, ordering the Immigration and Naturalization Service to grant them new interviews to assure they receive fair hearings.
The order, in effect for 90 days, came in response to charges from immigrant rights groups that INS was routinely denying asylum applications after reviewing them only briefly.
The INS agreed that no applicants would be deported without a new interview for the next 90 days. During that time, the INS' asylum procedures will be evaluated by the court.
2
May 22,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
Folbwing is a listing of some colbge student organizations and groups that work on behalf of students.
HISPANIC ASSOCIATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION OF NEW JERSEY: This 500-member group is composed of Hispanic faculty, administrators and counselors who address issues in higher education affecting Hispanics. For more information contact Elsa Nunez Wormack, HAHE, P.O. Box 5084, Iron Bound Station, Newark, N.J. 07105 (718) 390-7666.
MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDENT LEADERSHIP COUNCIL: Composed of 20 Hispanic student groups at the University of Texas, Austin, this group takes on issues facing Hispanic students in the Southwest. For more information contact: University of Texas, c/o Mexican American Student Leadership Council, Consuelo Trevino, Campus Activities Office-UNB 4.304, Austin, Texas 78713 (512) 471-3065.
MICHIGAN COALITION OF CONCERNED HISPANICS:This statewide organization addresses issues concerning Hispanics. It is currently working in conjunction with Hispanic college student leaders to address the issue of racism on college and university campuses in Michigan. For more information contact Paul V6squez, 1636 Colorado St., Flint, Mich. 48506 (313) 232-7855.
MOVIMIENTO ESTUDIANTIL CHICANO DE AZTLAN: MEChA, strongest in California, is among the oldest and more activist of student organizations. For more information contact Elias Serna, University of California, Berkeley, MEChA, Eshleman Hall, Room 516, Berkeley, Calif. 94702 (415) 642-6673.
SOCIETY OF HISPANIC PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS’ NATIONAL STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE: SHPE has 95 student chapters throughout the country that keep students abreast of what’s happening in the field and provide mentors. For more information contact SHPE, Student Affairs, 5400 Olympic Blvd., Suite 120, Los Angeles, Calif. 90022 (213) 725-3970.
STUDENT ORGANIZATION OF LATINOS: This is a Southern California student group addressing campus, community and state issues affecting Hispanics. The 53-member group is composed primarily of Central Americans. For more information contact Rub6n Macareno, Student Organization of Latinos, c/o East Los Angeles College, P.O. Box 742, Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 (213) 669-4306.
TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF CHICANOS IN HIGHER EDUCATION: This organization provides a forum for Texas Hispanic educators, administrators and students to discuss issues in Texas higher education.
It provides two $1,000 scholarships for Hispanic graduate students enrolled in Texas colleges or universities, and 12 $200 scholarships for undergraduate Texas students. For more information contact TACHE President Mary Padilla at (713) 792-4776.
CONNECTING
SENIORS RECEIVE $800,000
One thousand academically talented Hispanic high school seniors will receive $800,000 in scholarships and awards from the National Hispanic Scholars Awards Program to use for the college of their choice next fall, it was announced this month by the New York-based College Board.
Funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the program will present to 500 students scholarships of $1,500 each. The other 500 students won honorable mention awards of $100 each. The top five states in terms of $1,500 scholarship winners were California (99), Texas (83), Florida (47), New York (43) and New Jersey (18).
The College Board, a non-profit educational organization, is primarily known for its Scholastic Aptitude Test.
TOLL-FREE AIDS NUMBER OPENS
Hoping it may spur greater participation by Hispanic and other minorities, federal health officials announced May 9 the opening of a toll-free telephone service that will link people infected with the AIDS virus with various government-sponsored experimental treatment studies around the country.
Sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the service uses a computerized listing to provide callers with the latest information on experimental research. Although the service will initially have information on about a third of AIDS treatment studies, a listing being developed by the Food and Drug Administration that will include private studies will be added in July.
The line, 1 -800-TRIALS-A, is presently staffed by three health workers, one of whom is Spanish-speaking. Hours of operation are 9 am. to 7 p.m. ET.
INS AND OUTS
The Ford Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the Tinker Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation have given grants totaling $1.6 million to the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas, Austin, to continue its ground-breaking research on the political values, attitudes and behavior of U.S. Latinos. The grants were announced this month...
Corporate donors, including Sedano’s Supermarkets, Southern Bell and Sbatfr? Goya, contributed $145,000 May 5 to Florida’s Jos6 Marti scholarship. The scholarship money, matched by the state legislature, goes to needy Hispanic college students...
Calendar_________________________
THIS WEEK
FIESTA FLAMENCA New York May 23
The second annual fund-raiser for the Carlota Santana Spanish Dance Arts Company will offer an evening of flamenco music and dance.
Carlota Santana (212) 473-4605
MENTAL HEALTH
Washington, D.C. May 23, 24 The International Counseling Center’s fourth annual conference, "Crossing Cultures in Mental Health: Issues for the Nineties," will focus on the unique issues that professional counselors face in working with an increasingly culturally diverse clientele
Unda Camino (202) 483-0700
TRAINING
Austin, Texas May 23-27
National Image Inc., an employment service organization, will hold its 17th annual training conference and convention. The event will include various seminars, workshops and symposia. Alfredo Garda (512) 482-5636
LEADERSHIP Ann Arbor, Mich. May 24-27 The Michigan Coalition of Concerned Hispanics and the University of Michigan's Office of Minority Affairs will present the third annual Hispanic leadership conference. Spedal concerns such as the 1990 census and the Englishkmly movement will be discussed.
Glenda Radine (313) 764-5305
DISABLED CHILDREN Washington, D.C. May 25 The Howard University Center for the Study of Handicapped Children and Youth Is holding a conference titled "Sowing Seeds of Support: Harvest-
May 22, 1989
ing Strategies for Seff-Suffidency." Spedal attention will be given to the needs of persons in the Latino community and other reoent immigrants. Sylvia Walker (202) 686-6726
PUERTO RICANS Boston May 26-28
The National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights will hold its fifth National Puerto Rican Convention. Leaders will discuss the sodal conditions facing Puerto Ricans and dedde on steps to improve those conditions.
Zoilo Torres (212) 864-5178
LA LATINO PROFILE Los Angeles May 27
The University of California at Los Angeles Extension’s symposium titled ‘Los Angeles Revisited: A Chicano/Latino Profile of the City and its Cultures" will focus on assimilation issues and the ways Hispanics are portrayed and revealed through art, literature, music and other media. John Watson (213) 825-1901
4
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


Rhonda Smith
Yell Out or Sell Out?
There’s a fine line between changing with the times and selling out, and Abbie Hoffman’s death last month reminded many of this.
The nuance in stories or discussions about him and his decision to end his own life was that he was a ’60s radical, unable to let go of the past. Those who knew him said he had qualms about the political mood in this country today. One friend described his stint as a stand-up comic last year as "almost pitiful." Apparently, political satire kept rearing its ugly head during his routine.
Others saw him as frustrated with what he perceived as student apathy on college campuses today. This reminded me of a conversation I overheard during my own college days not so long ago.
In 1983 at Howard University in Washington,
D.C., students attempted to take over the administration building to protest University President James Cheek’s treatment of the school newspaper’s managing editor.
POWER NOT REAUZED
I remember standing among a group of students while the issue was being discussed and hearing someone say, "This is not the ’60s." The statement provoked chuckles and the uneasiness that comes with not wanting to be considered out of date, especially at that age.
It implied that standing up for one’s rights by seizing a building or disrupting campus protocol with chants at the annual convocation was about as desirable as being caught with a large Afro, bell-bottoms and a fringed cowhide vest.
More recently, I was discussing students of the ’80s with H6ctor Garza, a graduate school assistant dean at Eastern Michigan University. He made the point: “I don't think students realize how much power they actually have. Their student status brings with it privileges. The administration will listen to them."
TIRE TENDS TO SPREAD’
When students seized the administration building at Howard this semester and persuaded Cheek to reconsider the appointment of Republican National Committee Chairman Lee Atwater to the university’s board of trustees, I think they had again begun to realize their power.
Garza also told me that with events like this, "the fire tends to spread," especially when student demands are met. Most recently, when Hispanic and black students at the City University of New York occupied some 14 administration buildings and Gov. Mario Cuomo acceded to them, they, too, realized their strength.
About the same time, halfway around the world, students in China were mobilizing to demand democratic reforms in their country. They have won little at this point, but achieved international recognition, and things will never be the same in Beijing.
NICER METHODS USED TODAY
When I asked a Latina who's attending Yale about student apathy on college campuses in the United States, she replied with amusement, "What do you want us to do, go shout in front of a building?"
She went on to explain how students today have found ways other than protests to articulate their demands for reforms, such as getting universities to hire more black, Hispanic and Asian faculty members. Careful planning, reason and negotiation are tools they use to meet objectives, she explained.
Her methods are a lot quieter, a little nicer and maybe even more effective at times.
But for stimulating euphoria, tears or anger, nothing beats a good protest.
May Abbie Hoffman rest in peace.
(Rhonda Smith is a reporter with Hispanic Link Weekly Report)
Miguel P6rez
Class Consciousness
The sound of a student demonstration — drums, whistles, chanting voices—could not break the concentration of Alex Echevarria, 20, who was reading a book in a student lounge at New York City’s Hunter College the other day.
Most students were stretching the limits of their vocal cords, some were covering their ears, but Echevarria seemed oblivious. He wasn’t just reading. He was underlining. It seemed as if he was trying to block out the demonstration — but he was trying to learn more about it.
The chapter of the book he was reading was titled "The Paradox of Culture." "This isn’t for a class," he said, showing me the cover of his paperback, "Beyond Culture," by Edward T.
Hall. "I bought it after I started boycotting classes. It deals with the clash of different cultures.
It’s just what’s happening here."
To the white students in the lounge, this last statement wouldn’t seem to make much sense. They see the City University student demonstrations as a protest against possible tuition hikes and cutbacks in the budget.
CUTBACKS AIMED AT MINORITIES
But to the majority of the students in the City University system, who are blacks or Latinos, Echevarria makes perfect sense. They see the irony of attending a university that is becoming unaffordable, although it was free for decades when the bulk of the students represented other ethnic groups, predominantly from Europe.
At Hunter College and other City University campuses, students like Echevarria, who mayor in black and Puerto Rican studies, know the historical significance of budgetary cutbacks. They mean less money for minority programs. Ironically, these are the same programs that were instituted as the result of other City University student struggles, in 1969 and 1975.
"At the moment when, for the first time, Puerto Ricans, other Latinos and blacks were entering the system in great numbers, that’s when they started charging tuition," says Carlos Rodrfguez-Fraticelli, director of the higher education task force at Hunter’s Center for Puerto Rican Studies. "Certainly, that reflected on the lack of political power of blacks and Latinos within the system." More than a decade later, it has become difficult for Governor Cuomo to hike the $1,250 tuition by $200 a year.
CURE’S WORSE THAN ILLNESS
In the wake of the unrest at 16 City University campuses, the governor vetoed the portion of an education spending bill that would have mandated a tuition increase. But for minorities, Hel remedio es peor que la enfermedad" (the cure is worse than the illness). Cuomo’s 11 th-hour veto, which came as Echevarrfa read his book, does not mean that the cutbacks are being eliminated; they’ll have to be imposed — most likely through wholesale layoffs of part-time and recently hired faculty and staff, who are predominantly working in the minority programs.
Using university figures, Rodrfguez-Fraticelli recently compiled a fact sheet that notes that in 1986-1987, the last year for which figures are available, 21.3% of City University undergraduates were Latinos, 30.8% were black and 38.2% were white. He says that of 17,891 instructional staff members in 1987, only 6.2% were Latinos and 13.2% were black.
"I work in the daytime," said Echevarrfa, taking a break from his reading. "If they cut courses in black and Puerto Rican studies, it will be very hard for me to schedule my classes."
Echevarrfa lowered his eyes and sank back into "The Paradox of Culture." Immediately he underlined a sentence he found amusing. It said: "It is impossible to schedule creativity."
(Miguel P6rez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
May 22.1989
3


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION
50 EAST HURON STREET • CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 60611 * (312) 944-6780
DIRECTOR MEMBERSHIP SERVICES
EDITOR
AMERICAN LIBRARIES, the monthly publication of the American Library Association, is conducting a search for an editorial professional experienced in all phases of magazine writing, editing and production. Our editor is responsible for managing a staff of 8 and a host of freelancers on the production of this award-winning, four-color journal. With an operating budget of $1.2 million, the Editor will develop long range strategic plans to enhance the magazine’s services to the library profession and maintain a strong level of advertising revenues. Knowledge of the application of electronic editing systems, strong supervisory experience, along with a masterful command of English and an understanding of the technological challenges and career concerns of the professional librarian are essential qualifications. Candidates must have an advanced degree in journalism and/or library/information services and at least 5 years of demonstrated experience in a relevant editorial/publishing capacity.
We are offering a starting salary of $39,000-$45,000.
Our attractive benefits package includes low-cost health and dental insurances, 4 weeks paid vacation and an attractive tax-deferred retirement plan (TIAA-CREF), which offers 100% Association matching and immediate vesting.
For confidental consideration, submit resume and complete salary history by July 15, 1989 to:
Marla Powers Gibson Director of Personnel American Library Association 89-Ed/AL-1x Personnel Department 50 East Huron Street Chicago, Illinois 60611
The American Library Association is reopening its search for the Director of Membership Services. The individual in this highly visible and challenging position is responsible for the coordination and management of services to our 47,000 members, and includes membership recruitment and retention activities, and implementation of member benefits programs. Also responsible for chapter relations activities, including program development, coordination and communications with 56 regional chapters.
Candidates need a knowledge of libraries and the library market; knowledge of marketing techniques, market research, and public relations. Supervisory experience and knowledge of computer systems and data base management essential. A Bachelor’s degree required. MLS preferred.
Starting salary range $35,557-$44,446.
Our generous benefits package includes 4 weeks vacation, health and dental insurance options and TIAA-CREF with immediate vesting and 100% Association matching.
For consideration, submit resum6 and 3 names of references by July 15,1989 to:
Marla Powers Gibson Director of Personnel American Library Association 89 - MS/DMS - 2X 50 East Huron Chicago, Illinois 60611
The American Library Association is an Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer. Applications are invited from women, minorities, veterans and disabled individuals.
COPY EDITOR HISPANIC MAGAZINE
PUBLIC HEALTH OUTREACH WORKER #5212
Provides outreach services to individuals and groups in Fairfax Health District to encourage and facilitate utilization of health department services.
Requires ability to communicate orally and in writing, to meet and assist clients, specifically, Hispanic population. Prefer ability to speak Spanish; high school graduate or equivalent; education/experience related to duties. Salary $13,277-$18,134. Locality may supplement salary.
Completed Virginia State Application, including position title and number, must be received by May 26, 1989 to Virginia Department of Health, Room 110, 109 Governor Street, Richmond, Va. 23219 (804) 786-3309.
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
Wanted: Copy Editor for a fast growing, national publication. Must love language and have a great sense of headline style. Needs 3-5 years experience.
Send resume to: Marfa Alvarez, Hispanic Magazine, 111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 410, Washington, D.C. 20001.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week
CLASSIFIED AD RATES: Ordered by.
90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES:
(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Organization________
Street______________
City, State & Zip___
Area Code & Phone
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report
May 22,1989
5


Arts & Entertainment
THE NOMINEES ARE: Five Latinos in an equal number of categories are among this year’s nominees for the 1988-89 daytime Emmy awards.
Actor A Martfnez was nominated for the third time in his career in the "lead actor, drama series" category for his portrayal of Cruz Castillo on NBC’s Santa Barbara. Sonia Manzano, who portrays Marfa on PBS’ Sesame Street, was nominated in the "performer, children’s series" category.
Manzano was also nominated, along with co-star Luis Santeiro and 14 other writers, in the "writing, children’s series" category. Manzano’s character, incidentally, gave birth to a baby girl in this season’s final Sesame Street episode.
Also nominated were Sally Jessy Raphael in the "talk/service show host" category for her syndicated show Sally Jessy Raphael, and Jesus Trevino in the "directing, special class" category for his CBS special Gangs.
Nominations for the daytime Emmy were announced jointly by the Los Angeies-based National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
and the New York-based Academy of Television Arts and Sciences | May 11. Winners will be announced during a non-televised, June 24 ceremony.
BLEAK STATISTICS: A study to be released May 24 in Los Angeles by the Writers Guild of America finds that less than 1 % of the writers [ employed by the film and television industries are Hispanic.
Figures on employment of minorities, women and people over 40 are given. There were 43 Latino writers — out of a total of 6,500 — employed during the study period of 1982 to 1987. The study will provide statistics on how often minority writers are employed and how much money they make and compare those numbers to those of white male writers and writers who are under 40.
For minority writers, a WGA spokesperson said, "statistics are the bleakest. (They) earn less money and don’t work as often.
"The numbers are worse for Latino writers," she added.
The study updates a preliminary report released by WGA in 1987.
ONE LINER: Old Gringo closes the 42nd annual Cannes Film Festival May 23 in France. Jimmy Smits co-stars with Jane Fonda and Gregory Peck in the film based on Carlos Fuentes’ novel.
_________________________ — Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
MAGAZINE UPDATE: Several Latino-oriented publications have sprung onto the scene:
Ahora, a Spanish-language monthly based in Miami, began publication this month with 15,000 copies. Its publisher, Ahora Publications Inc., filed May 10 a trademark infring-ment and unfair competition complaint against Univision Holdings Inc. Univision, a New York-based communications conglomerate, has plans to publish an identically named magazine this summer.
Ahora Publication said it had registered the Ahora trademark with the state of Florida in March and that its application to use the trademark for advertising and magazine publishing was pending in the U.S. Patent and Trademark office.
A Univision spokesman said the matter "is being dealt with by our attorneys.”
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix P6f©z
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Rhonda Smith.
Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Imagen, a monthly Spanish-language glossy magazine targeting upscale Hispanic women, launched its Northeast edition in February. Published by Casiano Communications in San Juan, Puerto Rico, the magazine is an outgrowth of the extremely popular island-based publication of the same name. The Northeast edition has an ABC audited paid circulation of
35.000, and is distributed in Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania, with limited distribution in Washington, D C., and Miami.
Aqul, La revista de la buena vida, a Spanish-language, glossy Hispanic men’s entertainment monthly, was launched in November of last year. Promotional materials describe the magazine as celebrating "the good life with sophisticated topics and contemporary issues important to Hispanic men.” Published by Aqul Publications in River Edge, N.J., the magazine is distributed in 33 cities nationwide and has a paid circulation of
100.000, according to Aquf Publications director Fernando Moreno.
ETCETERA: The Newspaper Guild in Silver Spring, Md., has announced the creation of its Lily White Publishers Award. The recognition will go to the newspaper publisher doing the worst job of integrating its workforce, based on its employment record from January-December 1989. The winner will receive a bouquet of lilies.
Anna Padilla, the Guild’s human rights director, is seeking nominees for the prize. She can be contacted at (301} 585-2990. The names of nominees and documentation must be received by Jan. 10,1990...
Roberto Su&rez, associate publisher of The Miami Herald and publisher of its Spanish-language companion El Nuevo Herald, won the top prize in Knight-Ridder lnc. ’s third annual Employee Excellence Awards. He and 14 other winners will share $18,000 in prize money...Ernie Sotomayor will leave his position as associate editor of the Dallas Times-Herald to become deputy metro editor at New York Newsday June 12.
— Danilo Alfaro


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Making_ The News This Week issues a temporary visa for Nicaraguan Constantino Velasquez to visit his son Dimaggio, 18, in a San Francisco hospital. Dimaggio, who has dropped from 160 to 90 pounds, was diagnosed as having bone can cer last September ... The U.S. Immigration . and Naturalization grants asylum to Carlos Fajardo, his wife, Bermalda, and the1r children, Yoandys, 12, and Yordalys, 9. The Fajardos unwittingly deported themselves last December when they ventured into Canada while their asylum case was pending ... East Los Angeles attorney FrankMuiioz, 61, a founding member of California's Mexican American Political Association, dies of a heart attack ... Tony Chaves, 64, deputy director of National Hispanic Democrats, dies of a heart attack in Vir ginia .. Esteban de Jesus, 37, the 1976-78 World Boxing Council lightweight champ, dies of AIDS in San Juan, Puerto Rico ... U.S. Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole names John Florez, a Utah native, as deputy assistant secretary for employment and train ing ... Orange County, Calif., Supervisor GaddiV8squez says he is con sidering seeking the Republican nomination for secretary of state ... New York City officials contact Dade County, Fla., Superintendent of Schools Joseph Fernandez to check his interest in heading the city's school sys tem following the death of Chancellor Richard Green ... lllinois State At torney Cecil Partee says his office will prosecute 23-year -old Rudy Linares despite pleas from people throughout the country. Linares recently removed at gunpoint his 15-month-old comatose son from a life-support system ... After repeated denials, the U.S. State Department 1989 College Activism: Difl'erent Tactics, Common Goals By Rhonda Smith tuition hike. But most view the transition from colleges on the continental United States, sub. HisJ:)anic activism on college campuses today groups to Rrofessional and sostantially t.han during the . . is alive and well. Students have shed the shrill-c1al organ1zat1ons not as surrender to the es. Then .. the hm1ted number of m1nont1es on ness and confrontational tactics of their tablishment, but as a logical adjustment to the campus implied exclusion. The need to impredecessors from the '60s, but their committimes. Today 278,000 Latinos attend four-year prove the lot of Hispanic, black and other ment to civil rights and desire to retain Hispanic minority groups drew students to campuses, II culture and pride remains intact. Minn. Groups Attack AIDS explains Armando Rodriguez, former president Some authorities on student activism, like An-By Julio Ojeda of East Los Angeles College. tonic Stevens-Arroyo, professor of Puerto A coalition of Minnesota's seven largest Ignacio Garcia, professor at the University of Rican Studies at City University of New York, Arizona, Tucson, and a member of La Raza Brooklyn, see and welcome a return to student Hispanic organizations this month launched a Unida, a political activist group formed with demonstrations such as those that occurred on comprehensive statewide AIDS prevention strong campus support during the late '60s, CUNY campuses in recent weeks to protest a campaign. concurs with Rodriguez. His assessment: Coordinator John Pacheco said the groups nonce the students got in (the universities) I Coelho Reigns in PAC $$ Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) received $444,191 from political action committees during last year's campaign season, leading all 13 members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus but ranking 22nd in Congress overall behind leader Richard Gephardt (D-Mo.), who accepted $61 0,1 07, according to a survey published in the May 1 0, 11 issues of The Washington Post. Coelho is majority whip, the third most power ful position in the House. Of the 435 voting House members, 77 received more than $300,000 and 325 received more than $125,000. Six of the 1 0 Latino voting members received more than $125,000. PAC SCORECARD: 1988 . Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) Robert Garcfa (D-N.Y.) Albert Bustamante (DTexas) E. de Ia Garza (DTexas) Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) Solom6n Ortfz (D-T exas) Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) *Ron de Luge (D-V.I.) *Jaime Fuster (D-P.R.) *Ben Blaz (A-Guam) *Non-voting members Source: The Wsstington Post $444,191 299,053 232,427 189,683 153,349 130,227 113,931 103,212 100,001 49,915 16,330 12,628 11,800 united to prevent competition for funds-inthey found no office of minority affairs, no out eluding $1 00,000 from the Minnesota legislareach support group or funds earmarked for ture and duplication of programs. minority recruitment or retention. This forced Latino AIDS activities in some Midwestern them to stay together and led to aggression .. to cities have been marred by intraagency rivalgain these rights. ry, according to Aida Giachello, head of the Rodriguez adds, .. This went on for about 1 0Midwest Hispanic AIDS Coalition. The Min15 years. Then, when the students began to nesota effort, first of its kind in the region, .. has be more inclusive, the need for the struggle come together as one entity, as one voice,.. subsided ... she said. Some former student activists, like Jose Angel The partnership's programs include .. pidicas.. Gutierrez, a leader in a '60s student political (talks) with families in their homes, on-thegroup known as MAYO, the Mexican American street counseling for intravenous drug users, Youth Organization, and a founding member of radio and cable television programs, a La Raza Unida, see the change in Hispanic newsletter, a bilingual hotline and a series of students as a reflection of contemporary public forums to be held throughout the state. society. continued on page 2 Esquivel to Become Bilingual Ed. Chief U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos experience, will make her an effective and announced his intencaring leader," said Cavazos via satellite to a tion May 12 to appoint conference in Miami of the National AssociaCalifornia educator tion for Bilingual Education. Esquivel takes Rita Esquivel as diracover July 1, succeeding Alicia Cora, director tor of the Office of Bilinsince August 1987. g u a I and Minority Lauding her breadth of experience more Languages Affairs, iiit•:::••••••••••mnEII than 30 years in Texas and California public eliciting an enthusiastic schools -Aurora Quevedo, president of the response from bilingual trmumr; III California Association for Bilingual Educaeducators. tion, said Esquivel is a .. person who foremost .. Ms. Esquivel's varied tj.;.t / ... r••••I\N. speaks what needs to be said for children ... experience as a classroom teacher, includEsquivel presently serves as assistant to ing bilingual instruction, as well as adthe superintendent of Santa Monica-Malibu ministrative, curricular and counseling Unified School District.

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Many Groups Oppose Rights Nominee, Cite Inexperience By Dani/o Alfaro Several national civil rights organizations, including leading Hispanic groups, are voic ing reservations and outright opposition to the nomination of Detroit attorney William Lucas as assistant U.S. attorney general for civil rights. The groups cite Lucas' lack of ex perience in legal practice and the civil rights field. Mario Moreno, associate counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, expressed .. grave con cerns .. about Lucas' qualifications to hold the top civil rights position in the federal govern ment. However, the group has not announced an official position. 11We need someone who is well versed in civil rights and who knows how to litigate. Lucas doesn't come out with sterling credentials in either case, .. he said. Lucas, 61, has practiced law part time for less than two years. He comes from a law en forcement background, having worked for the New York City Police Department, the FBI and the Wayne County, Mich., Sheriff's Department. He was elected in 1982 to the position of Wayne County Executive. The League of United Latin American Citizens has lobbied against Lucas' nomina tion since February. Arnold Torres, the group's public policy director, told Weekly Report, .. At a time when the country's diversity is growing and Hispanics' civil rights difficulties have con tinued unabated, we don't think he is the best type of person for this position ... Authorities Say Activism Mirrors Society continued from page 1 "Back then we lived our dreams as a group. Today students are more interested in in dividual goals, ambitions and dreams." Others, like Hector Garza, assistant dean of the graduate school at Eastern Michigan University, worry that in the process of seeking personal success, students will lose sight of the importance of their predecessors' struggle. "Nine years ago when I came to EMU, Hispanic students were much more vocal and assert we. They made more demands and were more politically aware." Garcfa, whose book on La Raza Unida will be released later this year, explains that stu dents today cannot be blamed entirely for their lack of awareness of some issues. "The greatest apathy is among Hispanic faculty," he charges. "Today's professors are under the gun to gain tenure, acceptance and promo tions. "The Hispanic faculty used to be a mentor for students and a spokesperson for Hispanics. They were the sparks. But they are not avail able as much anymore." Garza points to a different situation at Eastern Michigan. To assist EMU Hispanic students remain aware of their student rights and the is sues that affect them, the Latino Advisory Council, composed of several Hispanic faculty members, was formed to serve as a mentor. Despite the perception of a naivete among stu dents regarding their rights, no one believes they have abandoned the struggle to have Hispanic issues addressed. "Militancy is relative in terms of what one is seeking. I don't think the students have betrayed their community," says Garcfa. Anna Chavez, Yale president of MEChA, Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano deAztlan, ana-NEXT WEEK: HISPANIC CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS TODAY AND IN THE FUTURE. 2 tional Chicano student political movement founded in 1969, says her group is no less pas sionate about the issues arising today than were previous Hispanic students ... The scope of the issues is much different today. It's har der for us to approach them in the form of a protest because they are not as tangible as they were in the '60s. Now it's more effective for us to work within the structure." Nonetheless, Lisa Fortuna, co-chair of Despierta Boricua, a Puerto Rican student or ganization at Yale, says she is concerned. "Apathy is a question we've been trying to ad dress. I realize that I may have student privileges that other people may not have as a result of attending Yale, and it's easy to get blinded to the problems around us. But once we learn about the issues by coming into con tact Hispanic alumni, faculty and others, we come closer to addressing them." Cuban Center Woes Grow By Luis Restrepo A proposed Cuban research institute that has come under increased criticism will not be housed at Florida International University, said Cuban American National Foundation Chair man Jorge Mas Canosa May 1 0. Florida's Board of Regents passed a resolu tion a day earlier opposing CANF's proposal that the institute be at FlU. Regent Raul Masvidal, a founding member of CANF, said that the institute's control by an outside group with a political agenda would set a dangerous precedent. At issue is whether the foundation, which is vehemently anti Castro, would impose its political agenda on academic research. "It is unfair criticism, II said Lincoln Dfaz-Balart (A-Miami), a sponsor of a bill that would grant $1 million for the institute. Mas Canosa promised state legislators CANF would raise a matching $1 million in private funds. May22, 1989 The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, a coalition of 180 organizations, announced May 9 its opposition to Lucas' nomination. Neither the National Council of La Raza nor the National Puerto Rican Coalition, both members of the Leadership Conference, have taken a formal position on the Lucas nomination. Usa Navarrete, senior policy analyst for La Raza, said the group was still gathering infor mation about him and was hoping to par ticipate in his confirmation hearings. Other fence-straddling organizations in clude The Cuban American National Foun dation, the National Puerto Rican Forum and the Cuban American National Council. Move to Quash Bilingual Ed. Bonus Appears Dead By Danilo Alfaro Ballots cast by the United Teachers of Los Angeles to determine whether the union would be prohibited from negotiating incentive bonuses for the Los Angeles Unified School District's 4,000 bilingual education teachers have been sequestered pending contract talks in a strike that began May 15. Jose Govea, a member of UTLA's board of directors, told Weekly Report that the se quester, which took place May 5, was in response to findings that architects of the in itiative took nearly six months to gather the 500 signatures required to put the measure on the ballot. The UTLA constitution allows 90 days for the gathering of signatures. According to Michael Genzuk, director of legislative affairs for the California Association for Bilingual Education, the union will not count the ballots until after the contract has been set tled. Since the question of pay differentials will be decided during the negotiations, Genzuk described it as a "moot" issue. The district had offered bilingual teachers annual bonuses of $5,000 each last May. Judge Bars Deportations A federal judge May 15 blocked deporta tion proceedings against an estimated 23,000 Central American asylum ap plicants in Los Angeles, ordering the I mmigration and Naturalization Service to grant them new interviews to assure they receive fair hearings. The order, in effect for 90 days, came in response to charges from immigrant rights groups that INS was routinely denying asylum applications after reviewing them only briefly. The INS agreed that no applicants would be deported without a new interview for the next 90 days. During that time, the INS' asylum procedures will be evaluated by the court. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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COLLECTING Following is a listing of some college student organizations and groups that work on behaff of students. HISPANIC ASSOCIATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION OF NEW This 500-member group is composed of Hispanic faculty, ad ministrators and counselors who address issues in higher education affecting Hispanics. For more information contact Elsa Nunez Warmack t HAHE, P.O. Box 5084, Iron Bound Station, Newark, N.J. 07105 (718) 390-7666. MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDENT LEADERSHIP COUNCIL: Com .of 20 Hispanic student groups at the University of Texas, Aus tin, th1s group takes on issues facing Hispanic students in the Sout.hwest. more information contact: University of Texas, c/o Mex1can Amencan Student Leadership Council, Consuela Trevino, Campus Activities Office-UNB 4.304, Austin, Texas 78713 (512) 4713065. MICHIGAN COALITION OF CONCERNED HISPANICS:This statewide organization addresses issues concerning Hispanics. It is currently working in conjunction with Hispanic college student leaders to address the issue of racism on college and university campuses in Michigan. For more information contact Paul Vasquez, 1636 Colorado St., Flint, Mich. 48506 (313) 232-7855 . . MOV/MIENTO ESTUDIANTIL CHICANO DE AZTLAN: MEChA t strongest in California, is among the oldest and more activist of student organizations. For more information contact Elias Serna, University of California, Berkeley, MEChA, Eshleman Hall, Room 516, Berkeley, Calif. 94 702 ( 415) 642-6673. SOCIETY OF HISPANIC PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS' NATION AL STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE: SHPE has 95 student chap ters throughout the country that keep students abreast of what's happening in the field and provide mentors. For more information con tact SHPE, Student Affairs, 5400 Olympic Blvd . , Suite 120, Los An geles, Calif. 90022 (213) 725-3970. S TUDENT ORGANIZATION OF LATINOS: This is a Southern California student group addressing campus, community and state is sues affecting Hispanics. The 53-member group is composed primari ly of Central Americans. For more information contact Ruben Macareno ' Student Organization of Latinos, c/o East Los Angeles College, P.O. Box 7 42, Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 (213) 669-4306. TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF CHICANOS IN HIGHER EDUCATION: This organization provides a forum for Texas Hispanic educators, ad ministrators and students to discuss issues in Texas higher education. It provides two $1,000 scholarships for Hispanic graduate students en rolled in Texas colleges or universities, and 12 $200 scholarships for undergraduate Texas students. For more information contact TACHE President Mary Padilla at (713) 792-4 n6. TRAINING Austin, Texas May 23-27 I CONNECTING I SENIORS RECEIVE $800,000 One thousand academically talented Hispanic high school seniors will receive $800,000 in scholarships and awards from the National Hispanic Scholars Awards Program to use for the college of their choice next fall, it was announced this month by the New York-based College Board. Funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the program will present to 500 students scholarships of $1 ,500 each. The other 500 students won honorable mention awards of $1 00 each. The top five states in terms of $1,500 scholarship winners were California (99), Texas (83), Florida (47), New York (43) and New Jer sey (18). The College Board, a non-profit educational organization, is primari ly known for its Scholastic Aptitude Test. TOLL-FREE AIDS NUMBER OPENS Hoping it may spur greater participation by Hispanic and other minorities, federal health officials announced May 9 the opening of a toll-free telephone service that will link people infected with the AIDS virus with various government-sponsored experimental treatment studies around the country. Sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Dis eases, the service uses a computerized listing to provide callers with the latest information on experimental research. Although the service will initially have information on about a third of AI OS treatment studies, a listing being developed by the Food and Drug Administra tion that will include private studies will be added in July. The line, 1-800TRIALS-A, is presently staffed by three health workers, one of whom is Spanish-speaking. Hours of operation are 9 am. to 7 p.m. ET. INS AND OUTS The Ford Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the Tinker Founda tion and the RockefeUer Foundation have given grants totaling $1.6 million to the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas, Austin, to continue its ground-breaking research on the political values, attitudes and behavior of U.S. Latinos. The grants were announced this month ... Corporate donors, including Sedano's Supermarkets, Southern Bell and S:itn Goya, contributed $145,000 May 5 to Florida's Jose Martf scholarship. The scholarship money, matched by the state legisla ture, goes to needy Hispanic college students ... Calendar THIS WEEK FIESTA FLAMENCA National Image Inc., an employment service or ganization, will hold its 17th annual training con ference and convention. The event will include various seminars, workshops and symposia. Alfredo Garcia (512) 482-5636 ing Strategies for Self-Sufficiency.• Special atten tion will be given to the needs of persons in the Latino community and other recent immigrants. Sylvia Walker (202) 686-6726 PUERTO RICANS Boston May 26-28 The National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights will hold its fifth National Puerto Rican Convention. Leaders will discuss the social conditions facing Puerto Ricans and decide on step s to improve those conditions. New York May 23 The second annual fund-raiser for the Carlota San tana Spanish Dance Arts Company will offer an eve ning of flamenco music and dance. Cartota Santana (212) 473-4605 MENTAL HEALTH Washington, D.C. May 23, 24 The International Counseling Center's fourth an nual conference, •crossing Cultures in Mental Health: Issues for the Nineties, • will focus on the unique issues that professional counselors face in working with an ina-easingly culturally diverse clien tele. Unda Camino (202) 483-0700 4 LEADERSHIP Ann Arbor, Mich. May 24-27 The Michigan Coalition of Concerned Hispanics and the University of Michigan's Office of Minority Affairs will present the third annual Hispanic leader ship conference. Special concerns such as the 1990 census and the movement will be discussed. Glenda Radine (313) 764-5305 DISABLED CHILDREN Washington, D.C. May 25 The Howard University Center for the Study of Handicapped Children and Youth is holding a con ference titled 'Sowing Seeds of Support: Harvest-May22,1989 Zoilo Torres (212) 864-5178 LA. LATINO PROFILE Los Angeles May 27 The University of California at Los Angeles Extension's symposium titled 'Los Angeles Revisited: A Chicano/Latino Profile of the City and its Cultures• will focus on assimilation issues and the ways Hispanics are portrayed and revealed through art, literature, music and other media. John Watson (213) 825-1901 Hspanic Unk Weekly Report

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Rhonda Smith Yell Out or Sell Out? a fine line, between changing with the times and selling out, and Abbte Hoffman s death last month reminded many of this. The nuance in stories or discussions about him and his decision to end his own life was that he was a '60s radical, unable to let go of the past: Those who knew him said he had qualms about the political mood tn th1s country today. One friend described his stint as a stand-up comic last year as "almost pitiful." Apparently, political satire kept rearing its ugly head during his routine. Others saw him as frustrated with what he per ceived as student apathy on college campuses today. This reminded me of a conversation I overheard during my own college days not so long ago. In 1983 at Howard University in Washington, D.C., students attempted to take over the ad ministration building to protest University Presi dent James Cheek's treatment of the school . newspaper's managing editor. POWER NOT REAUZED I remember standing among a group of students while the issue was being discussed and hearing someone say, "This is not the '60s." The statement provoked chuckles and the uneasiness that comes with not wanting to be considered out of date, especially at that age. It implied that standing up for one's rights by seizing a building or dis rupting campus protocol with chants at the annual convocation was about as desirable as being caught with a large Afro, bell-bottoms and a fringed cowhide vest. More recently, I was discussing students of the '80s with Hector Garza, a graduate school assistant dean at Eastern Michigan University. He made the point: "I don't think students realize how much power they actually have. Their student status brings with it privileges. The ad ministration will listen to them.'' 'FIRE TENDS TO SPREAD' When students seized the administration building at Howard this semester and persuaded Cheek to reconsider the appointment of Republican National Committee Chairman Lee Atwater to the university's board of trustees, I think they had again begun to realize their power. Garza also told me that with events like this, "the fire tends to spread," especially when student demands are met. Most recently, when Hispanic and black students at the City University of New York oc cupied some 14 administration buildings and Gov. Mario Cuomo ac ceded to them, they, too, realized their strength. About the same time, halfway around the world, students in China were mobilizing to demand democratic reforms in their country. They have won little at this point, but achieved international recognition, and things will never be the same in Beijing. NICER METHODS USED TODAY When I asked a Latina who's attending Yale about student apathy on . college campuses in the United States, she replied with amusement, "What do you want us to do, go shout in front of a building?" She went on to explain how students today have found ways other than protests to articulate their demands for reforms, such as getting universities to hire more black, Hispanic and Asian faculty members. Careful planning, reason and negotiation are tools they use to meet ob jectives, she explained. Her methods are a lot quieter, a little nicer and maybe even more ef fective at times. But for stimulating euphoria, tears or anger, nothing beats a good protest. May Abbie Hoffman rest in peace. (Rhonda Smith is a reporter with Hispanic Unk Wsekly Report.) Miguel Perez Class Consciousness The sound of a student demonstration drums, whistles, chanting voices-could not break the concentration of Alex Echevarrfa, 20, who was reading a book in a student lounge at New York City's Hunter College the other day. . Most students were stretching the limits of their vocal cords, some were covering their ears, but Echevarria seemed oblivious. He wasn't just reading. He was underlining. It seemed as if he was trying to block out the demonstration but he was trying to learn more about it. The chapter of the book he was reading was titled "The Paradox of Culture. " ' "This isn't for a class," he said, showing me the cover of his paperback, "Beyond Culture," by Edward T. Hall. "I bought it after I started boycotting clas ses. It deals with the clash of different cultures. It's just what's happening here." To the white students in the lounge, this last statement wouldn't seem to make much sense. They see the City University student demonstrations as a protest against possible tuition hikes and cutbacks in the budget. CUTBACKS AIMED AT MINORITIES But to the majority of the students in ' the City University system, who are blacks or Latinos, Echevarria makes perfect sense. They see the irony of attending a university that is becoming unaffordable, although it was free for decades when the bulk of the students represented other ethnic groups, predominantly from Europe. At Hunter College and other City University campuses, students like Echevarria, who major in black and Puerto Rican studies, know the his torical significance of budgetary cutbacks. They mean less money for minority programs. Ironically, these are the same programs that were instituted as the result of other City University student struggles, in 1969 and 1975. "At the moment when, for the first time, Puerto Ricans, other Latinos and blacks were entering the system in great numbers, that's when they started charging tuition," says Carlos Rodrlguez-Fraticelli, direc torof the higher education task force at Hunter's Center for Puerto Rican Studies. "Certainly, that reflected on the lack of political power of blac . ks and Latinos within the system." More than a decade later, has be come difficult for Governor Cuomo to hike the $1 ,250 tuition by $200 a year. CURE'S WORSE THAN ILLNESS In the wake of the unrest at 16 City University campuses, the gover nor vetoed the portion of an education spending bill that would have mandated a tuition increase. But for minorities, "el rernedio es peor que Ia enfermedad" (the cure is worse than the illness). Cuomo's 11th-hour veto, which came as Echevarria read his book, does not mean that the cutbacks are being eliminated; they'll have to be imposed-most like ly through wholesale layoffs of part-time and recently hired faculty and staff, who are predominantly working in the minority programs. Using university figures, Rodrfguez-Fraticelli recently compiled a fact sheet that notes that in 1986-1987, the last year for which figures are available, 21.3% of City University undergraduates were Latinos, 30.8% were black and 38.20.4 were white. He says that of 17,891 in structional staff members in 1987, only 6.2<>.4 were Latinos and 13.2% were black. "I work in the daytime," said Echevarria, taking a break from his read ing. "If they cut courses in black and Puerto Rican studies, it will be very hard for me to schedule my classes." Echevarria lowered his eyes and sank back into "The Paradox of Cul ture." Immediately he underlined a sentence he found amusing. It said: "It is impossible to schedule creativity." (Miguel Perez is a columnist with the New York Daily News.) Hspanic Unk Weekly Report May22.1989 3

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 50 EAST HURON STREET CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60611 (312) 944-6780 EDITOR AMERICAN UBRARIES, the monthly publication of the American Asso:ciation,. is conducting a search for an editorial profesSional expenenced 1n all phases of magazine writing, editing and production. Our editor is responsible for managing a staff of 8 and a of freelar:'cers on the production of this award-winning, four color Journal. W1th an operating budget of $1.2 million, the Editor will develop long range strategic plans to enhance the magazine's ser to the library profession and maintain a strong level of adver tiSing revenues. Knowledge of the application of electronic editing systems, strong supervisory experience, along with a masterful command of English and an understanding of the technological challenges and career concerns of the professional librarian are es sential qualifications. Candidates must have an advanced degree in journalism and/or library/information services and at least 5 years of demonstrated experience in a relevant editorial/publishing capacity. We are offering a starting salary of $39,000-$45,000. Our attractive benefits package includes low-cost health and den tal insurances, 4 weeks paid vacation and an attractive tax-deferred retirement plan (TIAA-CREF), which offers 1 00% Association matching and immediate vesting. For confidental consideration, submit resume and complete salary history by July 15, 1989 to: Marla Powers Gibson Director of Personnel American Library Association 89-Ed/AL-1 X Personnel Department 50 East Huron Street Chicago, Illinois 60611 DIRECTOR MEMBERSHIP SERVICES The American Ubrary Association is reopening its search for the Director of Membership Services. The individual in this highly visible and challenging position. is responsible for the coordination and management of services to our 47,000 members, and includes membership recruitment and reten tion activities, and implementation of member benefits programs. Also responsible for chapter relations activities, including program development, coordination and com munications with 56 regional chapters. Candidates need a knowledge of libraries and the library market; knowledge of marketing techniques, market re search, and public relations. Supervisory experience and , . knowledge of computer systems and data base manage ment essential. A Bachelor's degree required. MLS preferred. Starting salary range $35,557-$44,446. Our generous benefits package includes 4 weeks vacation, health and dental insurance options and TIAA-CREF with immediate vesting and 1 00% Association matching. For consideration, submit resume and 3 names of referen ces by July 15, 1989 to: Marla Powers Gibson Director of Personnel American Library Association 89 MS/DMS -2X 50 East Huron Chicago, Illinois 60611 The American Library Association is an Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer. Applica tions are invited from women, minorities, veterans and disabled individuals. PUBLIC HEALTH OUTREACH WORKER #5212 Provides outreach services to individuals and groups in Fairfax Health District to en courage and facilitate utilization of health department services. Requires ability to communicate orally and in writing, to meet and assist clients, specifi cally, Hispanic population. Prefer ability to speak Spanish; high school graduate or equivalent; education/experience related to duties. Salary $13,277-$18, 134. Locality may supplement salary. Completed Virginia State Application, in cluding position title and number, must be received by May 26, 1989 to Virginia Depart ment of Health, Room 11 0, 1 09 Governor Street, Richmond, Va. 23219 (804) 786-3309. Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report COPY EDITOR HISPANIC MAGAZINE Wanted: Copy Editor for a fast growing, national publication. Must love and have a great sense of headline style. Needs 3-5 years ex penance. Send resume to: Marfa Alvarez, Hispanic Magazine, 111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 410, Washington, D.C. 20001. DEAR DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you tar a pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of H1span1c Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Unk, .1420 N St. NW, Washington, D. C. 20005 (202) 2340280. Ad copy rece1ved (maJI or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. May22,1989 Ordered by ________ _ Organization ----------Street -------------City, State & Zip ______ _ Area Code & Phone --------5

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Arts & Entertainment and the New York-based Academy of Television Arts and Sciences May 11. Winners will be announced during a non-televised, June 24 ceremony. THE NOMINEES ARE: Five Latinos in an equal number of categories are among this year's nominees for the 1988-89 daytime Emmy awards. BLEAK STATISTICS: A study to be released May 24 in Los Angeles by the Writers GuJid of America finds that less than 1% of the writers employed by the film and television industries are Hispanic. Actor A Martfnez was nominated for the third time in his career in the "lead actor, drama series" category for his portrayal of Cruz Castillo on NBC's Santa Barbara. Sonia Manzano, who portrays Marfa on PBS' Sesame Street, was nominated in the "performer, children's series" category. Manzano was also nominated, along with co-star Luis Santeiro and 14 other writers, in the "writing, children's series" category. Manzano's character, incidentally, gave birth to a baby girl in this season's final Sesame Street episode. Figures on employment of minorities, women and people over 40 are given. There were 43 Latino writers out of a total of 6,500 employed during the study period of 1982 to 1987. The study will provide statistics on how often minority writers are employed and how much money they make and compare those numbers to those of white male writers and writers who are under 40. For minority writers, a WGA spokesperson said, ''statistics are the bleakest. (They) earn less money and don't work as often. Also nominated were Sally Jessy Raphael in the "talk/service show host" category for her syndicated show Sally Jessy Raphael, and JesUs Trevino in the "directing, special class" category for his CBS special Gangs. "The numbers are worse for Latino writers," she added. The study updates a preliminary report released by WGA in 1987. ONE LINER: Old Gringo closes the 42nd annual Cannes Film Festival May 23 in France. Jimmy Smits co-stars with Jane Fonda and Gregory Peck in the film based on Carlos Fuentes' novel. Nominations for the daytime Emmy were announced jointly by the Los Angeles-based National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Media Report MAGAZINE UPDATE: Several Latina oriented publications have sprung onto the scene: Ahora, a Spanish-language monthly based in Miami, began publication this month with 15,000 copies. Its publisher, Ahara Publica tions Inc., filed May 1 0 a trademark infring ment and unfair competition complaint against Unlvision Holdings Inc. Univision, a New York-based communications conglomerate, has plans to publish an identically named magazine this summer. Ahora Publication said it had registered the Ahora trademark with the state of Florida in March and that its application to use the trademark for advertising and magazine publishing was pending in the U.S. Patent and Trademark office. A Univision spokesman said the matter "is being dealt with by our attorneys." Imagen, a monthly Spanish-language glossy magazine targeting upscale Hispanic women, launched its Northeast edition in February. Published by Casiano Communications in San Juan, Puerto Rico, the magazine is an out growth of the extremely popular island-based publication of the same name. The Northeast edition has an ABC audited paid circulation of 35,000, and is distributed in Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania, with limited distribution in Washington, D.'C., and Miami. Aquf, La revlsta de Ia buena vida, a Spanish-language, glossy Hispanic men's entertainment monthly, was launched in November of last year. Promotional materials describe the magazine as celebrating "the good life with sophisticated topics and contem porary issues important to Hispanic men." Published by AqLi Publications in River Edge, N.J., the magazine is distributed in 33 cities nationwide and has a paid circulation of 100,000, according to Pquf Publications direc tor Fernando Moreno. Antonio Mejfas-Rentas ETCETERA: The Newspaper Guild in Sil ver Spring, Md., has announced the creation of its Lily White Publishers Award. The recog ,-nitiori will go to the newspaper publisher doing the worst job of integrating its workforce, based on its employment record from January December 1989. The winner will receive a bouquet of lilies. Anna Padilla, the Guild's human rights direc tor, is seeking nominees for the prize. She can be contacted at (301 ) 585-2990. The names nominees and documentation must be received by Jan. 1 0, 1990 ... Roberto Suarez, associate publisher of The Miami Herald and publisher of its Spanish language companion El Nuevo Herald, won the top prize in Knlght-Ridder Inc.'s third an nual Employee Excellence Awards. He and 14 other winners will share $18,000 in prize money ... Ernie Sotomayor will leave his posi tion as associate editor of the Dallas Times Herald to become deputy metro editor at New York NewsdayJune 12. Danilo Alfaro HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 'fHE HISPANIC COLLEGE STUDEN'r ... A national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-G280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Ecitor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Rhonda Smith. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 oents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. more pamphlets ll, protest marching shoes I wall street jml. orglUl. chem. hmwk. nulll (uazcbing shoes finance b. law