Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, June 19, 1989

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, June 19, 1989
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week Florida state Sen. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, the first Latina elected to the Florida legislature, and Carlos P^rez, a Miami business owner who helped raise funds for Oliver North, declare at bilingual press conferences their intentions to seek the Republican nomination for U.S. Rep. Claude Pepper’s seat. Pepper died last month..Aspira of Florida presents its leadership award to Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez for his outstanding community service...The National Aeronautics and Space Administration names Alphonso Diaz as its associate administrator for space science and applications...Rita Torres-Tucker, a manager at Southwestern Bell in San Antonio, receives the National Society of Professional Engineers’ Young Engineer of the Year Award...A federal jury in Alexandria, Va., acquits Army Col. Juan Ltoezde la Cruz of conspiracy and bribery in connection with PentagoJwBjanced contracts with the Salvadoran army...A federal judge in^Hartfor^JConn., sentences Puerto Rican nationalist Antonio Camachomgrdn' £tp 15 years in prison and a $150,000 fine for his part in the 1980f$7.1 m+Hten Wells Fargo robbery. Fellow nationalist Norman RamirezTfllayer^^, was sentenced to five years and fined $50,000...Los Angel^fejptrict Attorney Ira Reiner says that Arthur Jackson, the crazed farrwho served seven years of a 12-year sentence for stabbing actress Theresa Saldana 10 times, has been charged with making death threats against Saldana from prison. Jackson was to be paroled June 15...
I HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I i | June 19, 1989
Frosh Engineerina Ni ■■’ibers Surge
By Rhonda Smith
A surge in the number of Hispanic, black and Native American college freshmen enrolling in engineering programs nationwide for the 1988-89 school year has led to an increase in the total number of students studying in that field for the first time in seven years, according to the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering.
This increase comes at a time when experts in the field are predicting that by the year 2000 the United States will be short 400,000 engineers, making its ability to compete with Japan, the Soviet Union and European countries in math and science arenas virtually nil.
According to data compiled by the Engineering Manpower Commission and released by NACME June 1, the total number of freshmen enrolling in engineering programs inched up 2.7%, from 94,819 to 97,379. More significantly, Hispanic, black and Native American freshmen enrollment jumped from 10,325 to 11,754, a 13.8% increase.
The number of freshmen Hispanic engineering students increased by 11%, from 3,286 to 4,246, compared with a 13.9% gain the previous year. The overall Hispanic engineering representation went to 3.9% last year from 2.5% in 1980.
Some attribute this burst of ethnic student interest in math and science-related fields to U.S. corporations that are reacting to pressing
tc and social conditions. Cognizant of the country’s changing demographics and striving to remain competitive in the international marketplace, many companies are funding programs to recruit and train minority engineering students.
"Within the last nine years or so, companies began to realize there was an increase in minority populations and a shortage of engineers in the country. They then began to in-
LATINO FRESHMEN ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT Four-Year Institutions
1988 4.4% 1985 3.8% 1982 3.2%
1987 4.0 1984 3.8 1981 3.2
1986 3.4 1983 3.6 1980 3.1
Source: National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering
vest in corporate programs geared toward recruiting minority students," explained Jesus Vargas, past president of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, the largest organization of Hispanic engineering students and professionals in the country.
Ricardo Urbanejo, SHPE executive director, said the group, which has 6,000 members, 27 professional chapters and 97 student chapters,
continued on page 2
Experts Dispute Study’s Lower AIDS Rate
Latest Decision Reflects Supreme Court Direction
By Danilo Alfaro
A ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court allowing white male workers.!© challenge a previously court-approved affirmative action settlement in Birmingham, Ala., marks the latest in a string of blows to civil rights dating back to January of this year, according to an attorney with a Hispanic legal services organization.
Ken Kimerling, with the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund in New York, expressed dismay at the trend. "Laws passed because of widespread, recognized racism have been consistently undercut by this court."
The 5-4 decision handed down June 12 in Martin vs. Wilks upheld a federal court ruling that said white firefighters in Birmingham had the right to challenge a 1981 consent decree giving blacks preference in promotions. In a separate case, the court ruled 5-3 that challenges to seniority rules alleged to be discriminatory must be filed within 300 days of the policies’ implementation.
Two weeks ago the court, by a 5-4 margin, limited the use of statistical evidence to prove race or sex discrimination in the workplace. A 6-3 ruling last month lessened the standard of proof by which employers must show that their decisions to hire or promote are legitimate. In January the court ruled 6-3 that minority set-asides are unconstitutional.
Justice Anthony Kennedy, a Reagan appointee, has been the deciding vote in both 5-4 decisions.
By Danilo Alfaro
Hispanics represent only 6% of all U.S. AIDS cases, less than half the figure reported by the federal Centers for Disease Control, according to a national study published June 9. However, the directors of two Hispanic health services organizations challenged the new figures.
Researchers at the University of Chicago analyzed data collected in the 1988 General Social Survey, a sampling of approximately 1,500 households nationwide. They found that the CDC underreports the prevalence of the disease among upper income whites and overestimates it among Hispanics and blacks.
While CDC data state that Hispanics and blacks represent 14% and 26% of all AIDS cases, respectively, the GSS suggests the groups represent only 6% and 18%.
Awilda Mendez, director of Alianza, a Hispanic health services organization in Washington, D.C., was wary of the figures in the new study. "I have my concerns. I think the number of cases probably is even more than CDC estimates."
Jane Delgado, director of the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations in Washington, D.C., said she supports the CDC data.
continued on page 2
SHPE Elects Latina Chief
The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers elected a woman as its president for the first time in its 15-year history, according to a vote tally revealed June 8 at the group’s national headquarters in Los Angeles.
Margarita Col-menares, a native of Sacramento, Calif., has worked at Chevron USA in Los Angeles since 1981. She received her degree from Stanford University that same year. Her one-year term at the helm of the 6,000-member organization begins July 1. She has served on SHPE’s national board twice.


Chelsea, Mass., Latinos Sue to Stop Schools Takeover
By Danilo Alfaro
Seeking to prevent the takeover of the Chelsea, Mass., school district by Boston University, 51 Hispanic residents filed a lawsuit June 13 against the Chelsea school board and the Chelsea Board of Aldermen. That same day, Gov. Michael Dukakis signed legislation allowing the precedent-setting arrangement.
Latino students are approximately 65% of the Chelsea school population.
The suit alleges that the takeover plan is unconstitutional and would deny Hispanic students equal opportunities for education.
"The court action grew out of five months of unsuccessful efforts by the Hispanic community to gain attention to, or respect for, its interests from either local politicians or Boston University," said Marta Rosa, president of the Chelsea Committee on Hispanic Affairs.
Dukakis announced June 9 that he would direct the state Board of Education and the
university to appoint a blue-ribbon oversight panel that would report to him and the state board on the implementation of the agreement. Reacting to the announcement, Javier Colon, attorney for CCHA, said, "It’s better than nothing, but it’s still not enough to ensure public accountability."
Colon added that only one Hispanic would sit on the five-member panel. A spokesperson for the governor’s office could not confirm the information.
Engineering Programs Boost Enrollment
continued from page 1
is negotiating a $200,000 grant from the National Science Foundation that will be aimed at its Advancing Careers in Engineering program.
Newly elected President Margarita Col-menares said, "If we obtain this grant, we can continue to strengthen our existing outreach programs in predominantly Hispanic elementary and high schools."
Urbanejo added, "Programs like this and the MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement) program in California are having a tremendous impact on young Latin children."
MESA is a 19-year-old program based at the University of California, Berkeley, that exposes precollege Hispanic and black students to the possibilities that an engineering career offers. It provides as many as 4,500 students in the state with science workshops, academic and career counseling, and SAT and PSAT preparation through 17 university-affiliated centers.
At the University of Southern California, which has one of the top engineering programs in the country, Hispanic student enrollment in the engineering program has almost tripled since 1988. "Last year, we admitted 50 Hispanic engineering students to our program.
Jury Clips Harvard Bandit
Jose Razo, who after a straight-A high school career began in 1985 what should have been a promising four-year stint at Harvard University, was convicted June 9 in Santa Ana, Calif., of six counts of armed robbery and one count of trying to escape from police.
Razo, 22, was convicted by a jury in Orange County Superior Court. He had been charged with committing 10 robberies from December 1985 to June 1987. Sentencing is set for Aug. 4. Razo, born in Michoacan, Mexico, and reared in La Habra, Calif., faces up to 15 years and four months in prison.
Razo’s criminal spree began three months after entering Harvard, while at home on Christmas vacation. It was then, say authorities, he started a string of grocery store and fast-food restaurant holdups. All the crimes were committed while he was at home on vacation.______________________
This year we admitted 140," said adviser Armando Ramos Reynolds.
He added, "We have an excellent retention rate here. Eighty-eight percent of the minorities in our engineering program graduate."
USC provides a free summer school program, tutoring services, a buddy system and an in-house job placement center.
While the overall percentage of Hispanic engineering students is growing, Colmenares, the first female to be elected SHPE president in its 15-year history, would also like to see more female involvement. "Fourteen percent of SHPE’s professional membership and 25-30% of our student members are female," she said. "One third of our national officers are women, and hopefully our visibility and leadership roles will trickle down."
Ramos Reynolds pointed out it may be easier to retain Hispanic and other engineering students in that field if scholarships were meted out based on the difficulty of study. "I think the country is making a serious mistake in how scholarships are being distributed. Engineering students are seeing their classmates major in less rigorous fields but get the same amount of scholarship funding."
Still, the strenuous course curriculum is worth it for many engineering majors who can command annual starting salaries ranging from $26,000-$38,000.
Ramos Reynolds added, "Outside of the military, there is no other field where you’re accepted solely on your qualifications." According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 1988 Hispanics were 2.6% of the nation’s professional engineers, compared with 3.9% of its primary and secondary school teachers, 4.7% of its doctors, and 2.0% of its lawyers.
Migrants’ AIDS Rate Low
The Centers for Disease Control has discovered a lower rate of AIDS among migrant workers than originally anticipated, according to a study presented June 6 at the Fifth International Conference on AIDS in Montreal.
In the first study of its kind, researchers tested 2,966 migrants who came to health clinics over the past year and found 15 had the AIDS virus, or 0.5%. Eight of the 15 infected migrants were Haitians and five were Hispanic.
Salinas, Calif., Man Wins Election to City Council
Salinas, Calif., elected its first Latino, Simon Salinas, to its six-member City Council under a new single-district electoral system June 6. Four-year incumbent Ralph Portuondo, a Cuban American who was elected under the old at-large system, has requested a recount in his Third District race against a non-Hispanic. The preliminary vote count was 1,305-1,281. The district’s population is predominantly white.
Salinas won a four-year term in the heavily Hispanic Second District with 63.8% of the vote. Prior to implementation of the new system, there were four seats.
The city, with a population of 101,000, is 45% Hispanic.
Its change to single-district elections is partly due to pressure from Hispanic groups. The city was also mindful of the March 20 move by the U.S. Supreme Court that left standing a ruling that Watsonville, Calif., had to adopt district-bydistrict elections to halt the dilution of the Hispanic vote.
Salinas is seen as the first of many municipalities in California that will switch to single-district elections, a development expected to greatly increase local Hispanic political representation. All but 20 of California’s 444 cities with city councils vote at large.
Citizenship Costs Badge
By Adrienne Urbina
Leonard Figueroa, a Miami metro police officer who has accumulated nine commendations and a medal of valor in his 5 1/2 years of service on the force, lost his badge June 2 after it was discovered that he was not a U.S. citizen.
Metro Support Services Chief Tom Arnold said that police discovered Figueroa’s noncitizen status when he recently applied for a travel visa. Figueroa, who came from Cuba in 1962, told police he had applied for citizenship in the past and did not receive a response. Under Florida law, all police officers must be U.S. citizens.
The 30-year-old officer has been assigned administrative duties until he officially becomes a U.S. citizen, which is expected to occur July 3.
2
June 19, 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


James Crawford
Linda Chavez Gives It to Us in Plain English
Is the English Only movement running out of steam? This year, for the first time since 1985, it’s unlikely that any state will adopt English as its ! official language. In the 16 states where such measures have passed j — most recently, Arizona, Colorado and Florida — they are being ig-I nored by government officials.
Meanwhile, U.S. English, the Washington-based lobby that has financed these campaigns, seems rudderless in the wake of a scan-i dal that claimed its top leaders eight months | ago.
Stanley Diamond, the group’s new chairman, still spouts the old slogans around the country about a common language. But Diamond is j dogged by the questions about the Hispanophobic views of his predecessor, Dr.
John Tanton, the founder of U.S. English.
"If borders aren’t controlled," Tanton warned in a 1986 memorandum, fast-breeding Hispanics will stage a political takeover, while "Whites [will] see their power and control over their lives declining... Perhaps this is the first instance in which those with their pants up are going to get caught by those with their pants down!"
Last October, following disclosure of Tanton’s memo, Linda Chavez quit her $70,000-a-year job as president of U.S. English. And Tanton was persuaded, with some difficulty, that his own departure was in the best interest of the English Only cause.
Chavez did not go quietly. She blasted her boss’s "repugnant...not excusable... anti-Hispanic and anti-Catholic” statements. Also she criticized U.S. English for accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars from a donor who had financed what she called "racist, xenophobic and i paranoid" propaganda about immigrants.
Bridges burned in this way — a rarity in Washington — usually stay burned. But apparently, escape from U.S. English is not so simple.
On a recent edition of the Phil Donahue Show, Diamond deflected questions about scandal by saying: "Linda Chavez is an intimate friend of mine...She’s the strongest supporter of our organization, U.S. English, and of English as the official language."
As for Tanton’s views, Diamond insisted, the press "took information out of context. Linda Chavez will be the first one to tell you that.”
For the record, here’s what Chavez had to say:
"I have renounced all formal ties with U.S. English as a matter of principle. This is not a personal dispute but reflects my own sense of outrage at statements by the founder of U.S. English., .(that) were not taken out of context. They reflect a deep-seated and long-term animosity
toward Hispanic and Catholic immigrants that I don’t share, and I felt compelled to resign."
More important, Chavez publicly acknowledged for the first time the divisiveness of the English Only movement: "In states with a large number of Hispanics, these initiatives do polarize the community, whether intentionally or not, and this is not in the interest of bringing Hispanics into the mainstream.
"I still support the goal of a common language," Chavez added, arguing that while "it’s too soon to tell," programs such as bilingual education may "slow down assimilation. But I don’t believe the way you solve problems stemming from government intervention is with (official-English) laws mandating more government intervention."
Instead of claiming "supporters" like Linda Chavez, why doesn’t Stanley Diamond simply announce that John Tanton — with his hidden agenda of restrictionism — is no longer part of U.S. English?
TANTON REMAINS INTIMATELY INVOLVED
Because in good conscience he cannot. According to internal documents and sources, Tanton remains intimately involved with U.S. English in several ways:
• Following his resignation, U.S. English hired a $135-an-hour public relations consultant to rehabilitate Tanton’s image as well as its own.
• The organization’s policies, operations, and fund-raising are the subjects of frequent memos between Tanton and Kathy Bricker, now executive director of U.S. English and formerly Tanton’s administrative assistant.
• In April of this year, Tanton scheduled a meeting of WITAN, the discussion group for which he penned his notorious memo, at the U.S. English office in Washington. When U.S. English staff member Kathy Holmes objected, the meeting was moved. Holmes was fired soon after.
• According to Holmes and other sources, at least three professional staffers who made no secret of their distaste for Tanton’s memo have been asked to leave in recent months.
Do these developments mean John Tanton is making a comeback at U.S. English? Will the group resume its unabashed Hispanic-bashing? Perhaps Stanley Diamond could clarify these matters, but he declined to be interviewed for this article.
For opponents of the English Only movement — indeed, for all who prefer truth in advertising — Tanton’s return would be welcome news indeed.
(James Crawford is the author of ”Bilingual Education: History, Politics, Theory and PracticeCrane Publishing Co., 1989.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
GARY’S MEMO: When Jim Crawford wrote a three-part series for Hispanic Link last fall that bared a racist memo by U.S. English founder John Tanton, the Houston Chronicle, one of the Texas papers that ran Crawford’s expose, invited Tanton to do a rebuttal.
According to a copy of a memo we received, Gary Imhoff ghosted the piece. Imhoff is the hired pen who co-authored "The Immigration Time Bomb: The Fragmenting of America" with ex-Colorado Gov. Richard Lamm a few years ago. In his "Tanton rebuttal," Imhoff repeatedly attacked Crawford for spreading "The Big Lie" that forced Tanton’s resignation.
When Imhoff submitted his draft to Kathy Bricker, who had just taken over as executive director following Linda Chavez’s resignation, he explained in his cover memo:
"I have written something that may surprise you: a direct, personal, and outspoken attack on Crawford. I had not originally planned this, but my rationale for it is much the same as Crawford’s for his attack on John. Crawford isn’t playing hardball; he’s playing hockey. If you
hit enough guys in the head with your stick, you’ll get more elbow room on the ice.
"Crawford has already succeeded, I’m sure, beyond his wildest expectations. We can’t treat him as a good journalist who has made a few errors and whose coverage isn’t fully balanced. If we are to discourage future articles of this kind, we have to call him what he is — a dishonest advocate who breaks the code of journalistic ethics. And by criticizing him hard on the ground of journalistic integrity we have a good chance of making him, not U.S. English, the focus of the controversy. Reporters would rather write about another journalist than about some public interest group.
"I’ve kept the article chatty, and thrown in some slangy usages, so that Tanton appears to be a regular guy being attacked by a member of (the) Washington press corps...”
One good rebuttal deserves another, so Sin Pelos asked Crawford about "The Big Lie" charge.
Responded Jim: "I’ve been writing about U.S. English and its activities for 31/2 years. In that time they have never pointed to a single factual inaccuracy. I think the most damaging thing you can do to these people is to quote them accurately and at length." __________________________________________________— KayBArbaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
June 19,1989
3


COLLECTING
Following is a listing of student engineering resources geared toward Hispanic, black and other ethnic groups.
ADVANCING CAREERS IN ENGINEERING PROGRAM: ACE is sponsored by the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers. It works with students and college affiliate chapters on methods to reach and support precollege Hispanic engineering students nationally. For more information contact: Ricardo Urbanejo, Executive Director, SHPE, 5400 E. Olympic Blvd., Suite 225, Los Angeles, Calif. 90022 (213) 725-3970.
ENGINEERING FIELD SERVICE GRANTS: This program provides assistance to 25 precollege and retention programs nationwide for consultants to work with new and growing initiatives to bring seed funding into areas where potential minority engineering talent has been unsupported or underserved. For more information contact the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, 3 W. 35th St., New York, N.Y. 10001-2281 (212) 279-2626.
INCENTIVE GRANTS PROGRAM: This is a privately funded source of scholarships for minority engineering students. Funds are awarded to a group of accredited engineering schools that emphasize retaining minority students. For more information contact NACME at the above address.
SUMMER ENGINEERING EMPLOYMENT PROJECT: Companies select qualified engineering students for summer employment based on a student's location, field of study and expected date of graduation. For more information contact NACME at the above address.
MESA PROGRAM: The Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement program in California offers science workshops, study groups, academic and career counseling, SAT and PSAT preparation for junior high and high school Hispanic and black students through 17 university-affiliated centers with strong engineering or physical science programs. For more information contact MESA, University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Hall of Science, #1 Centennial Blvd., Berkeley, Calif. 94720 (415) 642-5064.
MINORITY INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING: This program gives high school students an opportunity to learn about the engineering field and campus life in general at the University of Texas, Austin. It is comprised of two one-week programs for qualified students entering their senior year in high school. For more information contact Tom Backus, Director of the Equal Opportunity in Engineering Program Office, ECJ 2.102, College of Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471- 5953.
CONNECTING
DADE SCHOOLS TACKLE RACISM
Beginning next fall, through the aid of a three-year, $450,000 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, nine high schools in Dade County, Fla., will begin a program to reduce racial prejudice among students, Dade County Public Schools Superintendent Joseph Fernandez announced June 8.
Twenty-seven teachers from the humanities — history, English, foreign languages and the arts — will attend a four-week training session at Florida International University in Miami to devise programs they think will work at their schools.Completely up to the teachers, the programs can range from redesigning curricula to staging plays that highlight the positive differences between cultures.
In addition the Dade County Public Schools administration will launch a fund-raising campaign that will supplement the grant so that the program can be spread to other schools.
Dade County is the fourth largest school district in the nation. Forty-five percent of the students are Hispanic, 33% black and 21% white.
CHAMBER OFFERS SCHOLARSHIPS
Applications for the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s five $1,000 scholarships for college students are being accepted until July 15.
The scholarships are based on academic standing, community involvement and financial need. Winners will be announced at USHCC’s 10th annual convention Sept. 6-10 in New Orleans.
For applications, which must include a transcript and a one-page personal statement, contact USHCC, Scholarship Committee, 4900 Main, Suite 700, Kansas City, Mo. 64112 (816) 531-6363.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
The National Endowment for the Humanities gives a $42,934 grant to a group of researchers, including Arnoldo de Leon, history professor at Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas, and Roberto Juarez, vice president of academic affairs at Laredo Community College, to set up a museum exhibit on Tejano history and culture in South Texas. The exhibit is expected to open in September at the John E. Conner Museum at Texas A&l University in Kingsville...
Robert Nava, director of Chicano Student Programs at the University of California, Riverside, is named director of governmental relations and special programs at the university...
Juan Yniguez resigns as half-time assistant dean of students and director of El Centro Chicano at Stanford University...
Calendar_______________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
PUBLIC RELATIONS Los Angeles June 19
Emilio Nicolas, new general manager of Spanish-language television station KMEX in Los Angeles, will discuss the "new look" of Spanish-language
television at the next meeting of the Hispanic Public Relations Association.
John Echeveste (818) 793-9335
MEXICO
La Jolla, Calif. June 20-22 The ninth annual Briefing Session for Journalists sponsored by the Center for U.S.-Mexican Relations at the University of California, San Diego, will feature leading experts and newsmakers from government, business and academia from both countries. Emphasis will be on helping journalists understand trends relating to Mexico.
Julie Healey (213) 851-7372
WOMEN’S CONFERENCE Los Angeles June 23, 24
The National Network of Hispanic Women is holding its third national round table for Hispanic business and corporate women, "Hispana Leadership: In Step With the Future." Activities include discus-
sions, workshops, recognition salutes and a job fair. Katharine Diaz (213) 624-6608 EL SALVADOR Alexandria, Va. June 24
The Pan American Festival Committee is holding its second Pan American Festival. The event is cosponsored by the Alexandria Department of Recreation, Parks and Cultural Activities and members of the local Hispanic community. Each year a different Latin American country is chosen for the festival’s theme. This event will feature Salvadoran music, food, arts and crafts.
Jorge Lozano (703) 979- 7051
COMING SOON
AWARDS DINNER La Raza Centro Legal San Francisco June 29 Mario Salgado (415) 826-5506
4
June 19, 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO FACULTY POSITION
POSITION: Director of Special Collections, University of New Mexico General Library.
TYPE: Permanent, 12 months, tenure track.
SALARY: $35,000 minimum.
MINIMUM RANK: Negotiable from Assistant Professor.
RESPONSIBLE TO: Dean of Library Services.
EDUCATION: Master’s degree from an ALA accredited program and/or Ph.D. or other doctoral degree.
APPLICATIONS: Submit a resume (including names, addresses, and phone numbers for at least three references) and a letter of application to Rita Critchfield, Personnel Office, General Library, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131. Applications received by 9/1/89 will be given first consideration. Position contingent on available funds. Recruitment will continue until position is filled.
UNM is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
VICE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND CONSTITUENCY SUPPORT
National Hispanic Organization seeks a Vice President for its Office of Technical Assistance and Constituency Support.
Ten years of experience in working with non-profit organizations. Knowledge of project management, especially Federal Programs.
Masters in Public or Business Administration preferred. Training and curriculum development experience preferred. Bilingual Spanish/English. Salary negotiable.
Send resume only to Raul Yzaguirre, President, National Council of La Raza, 810 First St. NE, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20002.
REPORTERS/CREATIVE
WRITERS
Hispanic Link News Service buys three 650-word feature/opinion pieces weekly, paying on acceptance. A story you cover locally may have national interest or application. For details and writer’s guidelines, write Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
SITUATIONS WANTED
Hlspaffi position 30-
to-40 hours a week evenings and/or weekends. Have journalism degree and 5 years of progressive office experience. Am WordPerfect, MultiMate and lotus 1-2-3 proficient, but will consider all offers. Please contact Rhonda at 234-0280, M-F between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ONE YEAR SUBSTITUTE POSITION
DUTIES: Teach Spanish courses from beginning to advanced; grammar courses for native speakers; and civilization courses in Spanish and English.
QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. in Spanish language and literature; familiarity with current methodologies in the teaching of foreign languages; two years teaching experience and fluency in English are required; knowledge of French and/or theory of bilingual education desirable. STARTING SALARY RANGE: $28,630 TO $31,716. Commensurate with experience and qualifications.
SEND COVER LETTER AND RESUME BY JULY 28 TO:
DR. ANA MARIA HERNANDEZ HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COL-LEGE/CUNY
31-10 THOMSON AVENUE LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK 11101 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
CLASSIFIED AD RATES:
90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
SECONDARY EDUCATION
Assistant or Associate Professor (tenure track) or Lecturer, $30,252-$48,204, beginning September 1989.
Doctorate or ABD. At least three years full-time secondary teaching experience. Ability to 1) supervise student teachers in multicultural and/or ethnolinguistic settings, 2) interact cooperatively and effectively with faculty, students and public school personnel, and 3) pursue scholarly activity. Teach courses in secondary education, curriculum and instruction, and computer education. Supervision of secondary student teachers field experiences will be a major responsibility.
Applications received by July 15, 1989 will receive full consideration; open until fined.
Send letter of application, vita and placement file or three letters of recommendation to Dr. Adria F. Klein, Dean, School of Education, California State University, Bakersfield, 9001 Stockdale Hwy., Bakersfield, Calif. 93311-1099.
AA/EOE
NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE
Employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media. Opportunities for internships, entry level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English or Spanish language. Contact Jocelyn Cordova, National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228.
COPY EDITOR HISPANIC MAGAZINE
Wanted: Copy Editor for a fast growing, national publication.
Must love language and have a great sense of headline style. Needs 3-5 years experience.
Send resume to: Maria Alvarez, Hispanic Magazine, 111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 410, Washington, D.C. 20001.
Ordered by__________
Organization________
Street______________
City, State & Zip___
Area Code & Phone
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
June 19,1989
5


Arts & Entertainment
FILMING SOUTH OF THE BORDER: Two current film productions and an upcoming project focus on recent Latin American history.
Production continues this week on a film based on the life of El Salvador’s murdered Archbishop Oscar Romero. The film, shooting on location in Mexico, is titled Romero. It stars Raul Julia in the title role and co-stars Ana Alicia and Eddie Velez.
Filming in neighboring Nicaragua is Sandino, about the life and death of that country’s political figure Cesar Augusto Sandino. Portuguese actor Joaquin Almeida plays the title character. Kris Kristofferson has a featured role. The film is directed by Chile’s Miguel Littin, an Academy Award nominee.
A film version of Nostromo — Joseph Conrad’s novel about power struggles in turn-of-the century Central America — begins filming in Mexico and Spain later this year.
Plans are underway, meanwhile, for a film based on the conquest of Mexico. Spanish singer Miguel Bose is expected to play the title role
in Heman Cortes, with Mexican actor Manuel Ojeda playing Emperor Moctezuma.
And Spanish director Pedro Almodovar has announced plans for his upcoming Amarrame. It begins filming in Madrid in July.
Various U.S. Latinos are featured in current film releases or working in future films: Maria Conchita Alonso can be seen in Vampire's Kiss, Robert Beltran is in Scenes from the Class Struggle in Beverly Hills and Julie Carmen is in Fright Night II. A Martinez stars in the upcoming She Devil and Andy Garcia will be seen in International Affairs.
ONE LINERS: The latest of an ongoing series of "parallel import" lawsuits was filed in a federal court in New Jersey last month by the Recording Industry Association of America. Various local record distributors are charged with infringing the rights of recordings by artists such as Julio Iglesias, Vicente Fernandez and Jose Jose...Recording artists Willie Colon and Sa-Fire are featured in separate Al DS education public service announcements produced by the Education Services Division of Hispanic Designers Inc....Performances of 4 Clowns in Search of a Circus by LosActores de San Antonio continue at that city’s Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center through June 24...
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
SPEAKING OF TELEVISION: The firing of three news staffers early this month from KVEA-TV in Los Angeles, the city’s second-largest Spanish-language station, brought angry criticism from protesters who accused the station’s management of insensitivity to the community’s large Hispanic population.
One of the protesters’ demands is the reinstatement of the station’s former news director, Mexican American Bob Navarro, one of the three people who were dismissed. He was replaced by Roberto Soto, a Cuban American.
Critics charge that Navarro’s ouster, coupled with February’s resignation and subsequent replacement by a non-Hispanic of general manager Frank Cruz, also a Mexican American, has left the area’s Latino viewers without any senior management representation.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
SPEAKING OF RADIO: Thirteen years after losing his legs in a bomb attack, newscaster Emilio Milian launched a new Spanish-language radio station, WWFE-AM, two weeks ago in Miami.
Milian says he hopes to attract younger Hispanic listeners. The station, he says, will provide an alternative to more established Spanish-language stations in the city, mixing music, news and talk shows.
Milian, who during the ’70s publicly criticized anti-Castro terrorism in Miami, was nearly killed in 1976 when a bomb tore through his car in the parking lot of radio station WQBA.
SPEAKING OF AWARDS: The Colorado Hispanic Media Association will honor five individuals at its second annual Media Awards ceremony June 20, said President Frank Martinez.
The winners, all from Denver, are:
In the professional category, Carlos Amez-cua, news anchor at KCNC-TV; in the managerial category, Flor Hernandez-Ramos, president and general manager of bilingual
radio station KUVO; in the community advocate category, Jean Galloway, vice president for community affairs at KUSA- TV; in the technical category, Jose Contreras, chief photographer at KMGH-TV; and for lifetime achievement, George Sandoval, founder of KVDR-TV, who was killed in an April car wreck at the age of 57.
KUDOS AND MOVES: Daniel Molina, NBC correspondent formerly assigned to Burbank, Calif., has been promoted to chief of the network’s Chicago bureau...Carolina Garcia, former assistant state editor of The Milwaukee Journal, has been promoted to state editor...Carlos Sanchez, reporter with The Washington Post, was re-elected president of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C...Jose McMurray, a senior producer at National Public Radio in Washington, D.C., will travel to Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia and Chile through a Fullbright Fellowship exchange program. He leaves July 3 and returns July 27.
— Danilo Alfaro


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making_ The News This Week Professional Engineers' Young Engineer of the Year Award ... A federal jury in Alexandria, Va., acquits Army Col. Juan Ia Cruz of con spiracy and bribery in connection with contracts with the Salvadoran army ... A federal judge inritfor'?Conn., senten ces Puerto Rican nationalist Antonio r6n, years in prison and a $150,000 fine for his part 1n the 1 87$7.1 Wells Fargo robbery. Fellow nationalist Norman sentenced to five years and fined $50,000 ... Los Angel tnct Attor ney Ira Reiner says that Arthur Jackson, the crazed fa who served seven years of a 12-year sentence for stabbing actress Theresa sadaria 10 times, has been charged with making death threats against Saldana from prison. Jackson was to be paroled June 15 ... Florida state Sen. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, the first Latina elected to the Florida legislature, and Carlos Perez, a Miami business owner who helped raise funds for Oliver North, declare at bilingual press conferen ces their intentions to seek the Republican nomination for U.S. Rep. Claude Pepper's seat. Pepper died last month ... Asp ira of Florida presents its leadership award to Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez for his out standing community service ... The National Aeronautics and Space Ad ministration names Alphonso Diaz as its associate administrator"'for space science and applications ... Rita TorresTucker, a manager at Southwestern Bell in San Antonio, receives the National Society of HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 1989 Latest Decision Reflects Supreme Court Direction By Danilo Alfaro A ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court allowing white male workers to challenge a previously . court-approved affirmative action settlement in Birmingham, Ala., marks the latest in a string of blows to civil rights dating back to January of this year, according to an attorney with a Hispanic legal services organization. Ken Kimerling, with the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund in New York, ex pressed dismay at the trend. "Laws passed because of widespread, recognized racism have been consistently undercut by this court." The 5-4 decision handed down June 12 in Martin vs. Wilks upheld a federal court ruling that said white firefighters in Birmingham had the right to challenge a 1981 consent decree giving blacks preference in promotions. In a separate case, the court ruled 5-3 that challen ges to seniority rules alleged to be dis criminatory must be filed within 300 days of the policies' implementation. Two weeks ago the court, by a 5-4 margin, limited the use of statistical evidence to prove race or sex discrimination in the workplace. A 6-3 ruling last month lessened the standard of proof by which employers must show that their decisions to hire or promote are legitimate. In January the court ruled 6-3 that minority set asides are unconstitutional. Justice Anthony Kennedy, a Reagan appoin tee, has been the deciding vote in both 5-4 decisions. Frosh Engineerina N••rnbers Surge By Rhonda Smith -....:-t .1c social of A surge in the number of Hispanic, black and . country s .changmg .. Native American college freshmen enrolling in stnv1ng to rema1n compet1t1ve ln. the engineering programs nationwide for the 1988al marketplace, n:any are fu . ndlng 89 school year has led to an increase in the programs to recru1t and tra1n m1nonty engineer total number of students studying in that field lng students . for the first time in seven years, according to "Within the last nine years or so, companies the National Action Council for Minorities in Enbegan to realize there was an increase in gineering. minority populations and a shortage of enThis increase comes at a time when experts gineers in the country. They then began to inin the field are predicting that by the year 2000 the United States will be short 400,000 en gineers, making its ability to compete with Japan, the Soviet Union and European countries in math and science arenas virtually nil. According to data compiled by the Engineer-ing Manpower Commission and released by NACME June 1, the total number of freshmen enrolling in engineering programs inched up 2.7%, from 94, 819 to 97,379. More significant ly, Hispanic, black and Native American fresh men enrollment jumped from 1 0,325 to 11,754, a 13.8% increase. The number of freshmen Hispanic engineering students increased by 11 %, from 3,286 to 4,246, compared with a 13.9% gain the pre vious year. The overall Hispanic engineering representation went to 3. 9% last year from 2.5% in 1980. Some attribute this burst of ethnic student in terest in math and science-related fields to U.S. corporations that are reacting to pressing LATINO FRESHMEN ENGINEERING ENROLLMENT Four-Year Institutions 1988 4.4% 1985 3 . 8% 1982 1987 4 . 0 1984 3.8 1981 1986 3.4 1983 3.6 1980 3 .2% 3.2 3.1 Source : National Ad ion Coone if for Minorities in Engineering vest in corporate programs geared toward recruiting minority students," explained Jesus Vargas, past president of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, the largest organization of Hispanic engineering students and professionals in the country. Ricardo Urbanejo, SHPE executive director, said the group, which has 6,000 members, 27 professional chapters and 97 student chapters, continued on page 2 SHPE Elects Latina Chief The Society of Hispanic Professional EnExperts Dispute Study's Lower AIDS Rate gineers elected a woman as its president for the first time in its 15-year history, according to a vote tally revealed June 8 at the group's national headquarters in Los Angeles. By Dan i/o Alfaro Hispanics represent only 6% of all U.S. AIDS cases, less than half the figure reported by the federal Centers for Disease Control, according to a national study published June 9. However, the directors of two Hispanic health services or ganizations challenged the new figures. Researchers at the University of Chicago analyzed data collected in the 1988 General Social Survey, a sampling of approximately 1 , 500 households nationwide. They found that the CDC underreports the prevalence of the disease among upper income whites and over estimates it amo'ng Hispanics and blacks . While CDC data state that Hispanics and blacks represent 14% and 26% of all AI OS cases, respectively, the GSS suggests the groups represent only 6% and 18%. Awilda Mendez, director of Alianza, a Hispanic health services organization in Washington, D.C., was wary of the figures in the new study. "I have my concerns. I think the number of cases probably is even more than CDC es timates ... Jane Delgado, director of the National Coali tion of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations in Washington, D.C., said she supports the CDC data. Margarita Col menares, a native of Sacramento, Calif., has worked at Chevron USA in Los Angeles since 1981. She received her degree from Stanford University that same year . Her one-year term at the helm of the 6, GOO member organization begins July 1 . She has served on SHPE's national board twice .

PAGE 2

Chelsea, Mass., Latinos Sue to Stop Schools Takeover By Dani/o Alfaro Seeking to prevent the takeover of the Chelsea, Mass., school district by Boston Univer sity, 51 Hispanic residents filed a lawsuit June 13 against the Chelsea school board and the Chelsea Board of Aldermen. That same day, Gov. Michael Dukakis signed legislation allowing the precedent-setting ar rangement. Latino students are approximately 65% of the Chelsea school population. The suit alleges that the takeover plan is un constitutional and would deny Hispanic stu dents equal opportunities for education. 11The court action grew out of five months of unsuccessful efforts by the Hispanic com munity to gain attention to, or respect for, its interests from either local politicians or Bos ton University," said Marta Rosa, president of the Chelsea Committee on Hispanic Affairs. Dukakis announced June 9 that he would direct the state Board of Education and the Engineering Programs Boost Enrollment continued from page 1 is negotiating a $200,000 grant from the Na tional Science Foundation that will be aimed at . its Advancing Careers in Engineering program. Newly elected President Margarita Col menares said, "If we obtain this grant, we can continue to strengthen our existing outreach programs in predominantly Hispanic elemen tary and high schools." Urbanejo added, "Programs like this and the MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement) program in California are having a tremendous impact on young Latin children ... MESA is a 19-year-old program based at the University of California, Berkeley, that exposes precollege Hispanic and black students to the possibilities that an engineering career offers. It provides as many as 4,500 students in the state with science workshops, academic and career counseling, and SAT and PSAT preparation through 17 university-affiliated centers. At the University of Southern California, which has one of the top engineering programs in the country, Hispanic student enrollment in the engineering program has almost tripled since 1988. "Last year, we admitted 50 Hispanic engineering students to our program. 2 Jury Clips Harvard Bandit Jose Razo, who after a straight-A high school career began in 1985 what should have been a promising four-year stint at Harvard University, was convicted June 9 in Santa Ana, Calif., of six counts of armed robbery and one count of trying to escape from police. Razo, 22, was convicted by a jury in Orange County Superior Court. He had been charged with committing 10 robberies from December 1985 to June 1 987. Sen tencing is set for Aug. 4. Razo, born in Michoacan, Mexico, and reared in La Habra, Calif., faces up to 1 5 years and four months in prison. Raze's criminal spree began three months after entering Harvard, while at home on Christmas vacation. It was then, say authorities, he started a string of grocery store and fast-food restaurant holdups. All the crimes were committed while he was at home on vacation. This year we admitted 140," said adviser Ar mando Ramos Reynolds. He added, "We have an excellent retention rate here . Eighty-eight percent of the minorities in our engineering program graduate ... USC provides a free summer school program, tutoring services, a buddy system and an in house job placement center. While the overall percentage of Hispanic en gineering students is growing, Colmenares, the first female to be elected SHPE president in its 15-year history, would also like to see more female involvement. ,.Fourteen percent of SHPE's professional membership and 25-30% of our student members are female, .. she said. uone third of our national officers are women, and hopefully our visibility and leadership roles will trickle down ... Ramos Reynolds pointed out it may be easier to retain Hispanic and other engineering stu dents in that field if scholarships were meted out based on the difficulty of study. ,.I think the country is making a serious mistake in how scholarships are being distributed. Engineering students are seeing their classmates major in less rigorous fields but get the same amount of scholarship funding ... Still, the strenuous course curriculum is worth it for many engineering majors who can com mand annual starting salaries. ranging from $26,000-$38,000. Ramos Reynolds added, ,.Outside of the military, there is no other field where you're ac cepted solely on your qualifications.,. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 1988 Hispanics were 2.6% of the nation's professional engineers, compared with 3.9% of its primary and secondary school teachers, 4. 7% of its doctors, and 2. 0% of its lawyers. Migrants' AIDS Rate Low The Centers for Disease Control has dis covered a lower rate of AIDS among migrant workers than originally anticipated, according to a study presented June 6 at the Fifth Inter national Conference on AIDS in Montreal. In the first study of its kind, researchers tested 2,966 migrants who came to health clinics over the past year and found 15 had the AIDS virus, or 0.5%. Eight of the 15 infected migrants were Haitians and five were Hispanic. June 19, 1989 university to appoint a blue-ribbon oversight panel that would report to him and the state board on the implementation of the agree ment. Reacting to the announcement, Javier Colon, attorney for CCHA, said, "It's better than nothing, but it's still not enough to ensure public accountability . " Colon added that only one Hispanic would sit on the five-member panel. A spokesperson for the governor's office could not confirm the information. Salinas, Calif., Man Wins Election to City Council Salinas, Calif., elected its first Latino, Simon Salinas, to its six-member City Council under a new single-district electoral system June 6 . Four-year incumbent Ralph Portuondo, a Cuban American who was elected under the old at-large system, has requested a recount in his Third District race against a non-Hispanic. The preliminary vote count was 1 ,305-1,281. The district's population is predominantly white. Salinas won a four-year term in the heavily Hispanic Second District with 63.8% of the vote. Prior to implementation of the new sys tem, there were four seats. The city, with a population of 1 01,000, is 45% Hispanic . Its change to single-district elections is partly due to pressure from Hispanic groups. The city was also mindful of the March 20 move by the U.S. Supreme Court that left standing a ruling that Watsonville, Calif., had to adopt district-by district elections to halt the dilution of the Hispanic vote. Salinas is seen as the first of many municipalities in California that will switch to single-district elections, a development expected to greatly increase local Hispanic political representation. All but 20 of California's 444 cities with city councils vote at large. Citizenship Costs Badge By Adrienne Urbina Leonard Figueroa, a Miami metro police officer who has accumulated nine commendations and a medal of valor in his 5 1/2 years of service on the force, lost his badge June 2 after it was discovered that he was not a U.S. citizen. Metro Support Services Chief Tom Arnold said that police discovered Figueroa's noncitizen statu ' s when he recently applied for a travel visa. Figueroa, who came from Cuba in 1962, told police he had applied for citizenship in the past and did not receive a response. Under Florida law, all police officers must be U.S. citizens. The 30-year -old officer has been as signed administrative duties until he offi cially becomes a U .S. citizen, which is expected to occur July 3. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

James CraWford Linda Chavez Gives It to Us in Plain English Is the English Only movement running out of steam? This year, for the first time since 1985, it's unlikely that any state will adopt English as its official In the 16 states where such measures have passed most recently, Arizona, Colorado and Florida they are being ig( nored by government officials. Meanwhile, U.S. English, the Washington based lobby that has financed these cam paigns, seems rudderless in the wake of a scan dal that claimed its top leaders eight months ago. Stanley Diamond, the group's new chairman, still spouts the old slogans around the country about a common language. But Diamond is dogged by the questions about the Hispanophobic views of his predecessor, Dr. John Tanton, the founder of U.S. English. "If borders aren't controlled," Tanton warned in a 1986 memorandum, fast-breeding Hispanics will stage a political takeover, while "Whites [will] see their power and control over their lives declining ... Perhaps this is the first instance in which those with their pants up are going to get caught by those with their pants down!" Last October, following disclosure of Tanton's memo, Linda Chavez quit her $70,000-a-year job as president of U.S. English. And Tanton was persuaded, with some difficulty, that his own departure was in the best interest of the English Only cause. Chavez did not go quietly. She blasted her boss's "repugnant. .. not ex cusable ... anti-Hispanic and anti-Catholic" statements. Also she criticized U.S. English for accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars from a donor who had financed what she called "racist, xenophobic and paranoid" propaganda about immigrants. Bridges burned in this way -a rarity in Washington usually stay burned. But apparently, escape from U.S. English is not so simple. On a recent edition of the Phil Donahue Show, Diamond deflected questions about scandal by saying: "Linda Chavez is an intimate friend of mine ... She's the strongest supporter of our organization, U.S. English, and of English as the official language." As for Tanton's views, Diamond insisted, the press "took information out of context. Linda Chavez will be the first one to tell you that." For the record, here's what Chavez had to say : "I have renounced all formal ties with U.S. English as a matter of prin ciple. This is not a personal dispute but reflects my own sense of out rage at statements by the founder of U.S. English ... (that) were not taken out of context. They reflect a deep-seated and long-term animosity Sin pelos en Ia lengua GARY'S MEMO: When Jim Crawford wrote a three-part series for Hispanic Link last fall that bared a racist memo by U.S. English founder John Tanton, the Houston Chronicle, one of the Texas papers that ran Crawford's expose, invited Tanton to do a rebuttal. According to a copy of a memo we received, Gary Imhoff ghosted the piece. Imhoff is the hired pen who co-authored "The Immigration Time Bomb: The Fragmenting of America" with ex-Colorado Gov. Richard Lamm a few years ago. In his "Tanton rebuttal," Imhoff repeatedly attacked Crawford for spreading "The Big Lie" that forced Tanton's resignation. When Imhoff submitted his draft to Kathy Bricker, who had just taken over as executive director following Unda Chavez's resignation, he explained in his cover memo: "I have written something that may surprise you: a direct, personal, and outspoken attack on Crawford. I had not originally planned this, but my rationale for it is much the same as Crawford's for his attack on John. Crawford isn't playing hardball; he's playing hockey. If you toward Hispanic and Catholic immigrants that I don't share, and I felt compelled to resign." More important, Chavez publicly acknowledged for the first time the divisiveness of the English Only movement: "In states with a large num ber of Hispanics, these initiatives do polarize the community, whether intentionally or not, and this is not in the interest of bringing Hispanics into the mainstream. "I still support the goal of a common language," Chavez added, argu ing that while "it's too soon to tell," programs such as bilingual educa tion may "slow down assimilation. But I don't believe the way you solve problems stemming from government intervention is with (official English) laws mandating more government intervention." Instead of claiming "supporters" like Linda Chavez, why doesn't Stan ley Diamond simply announce that John Tanton -with his hidden agenda of restrictionism is no longer part of U.S. English? TANTON REMAINS INTIMATELY INVOLVED Because in good conscience he cannot. According to internal docu ments and sources, Tanton remains intimately involved with U.S. English in several ways: • Following his resignation, U.S. English hired a $135-an-hour public relations consultant to rehabilitate Tanton's image as well as its own. • The organization's policies, operations, and fund-raising are the subjects of frequent memos between Tanton and Kathy Bricker, now executive di(ector of U.S. English and formerly Tanton's administrative assistant. • In April of this year, Tanton scheduled a meeting of WIT AN, the dis cussion group for which he penned his notorious memo, at the U.S. English office in Washington. When U.S. English staff member Kathy Holmes objected, the meeting was moved. Holmes was fired soon after. • According to Holmes and other sources, at least three professional staffers who made no secret of their distaste for Tanton's memo have been asked to leave in recent months. Do these developments mean John Tanton is making a comeback at U.S. English? Will the group resume its unabashed Hispanic-bashing? Perhaps Stanley Diamond could clarify these matters, but he declined to be interviewed for this article. For opponents of the English Only movement-indeed, for all who prefer truth in advertising -Tanton's return would be welcome news indeed. (James Crawford is the author of "Bilingual Education: History, Politics, Theory and Practice," Crane Publishing Co., 1989.) . hit enough guys in the head with your stick, you'll get more elbow . room on the ice. "Crawford has already succeeded, I'm sure, beyond his wildest ex pectations. We can't treat him as a good journalist who has made a few errors and whose coverage isn't fully balanced. If we are to dis courage future articles of this kind, we have to call him what he is a dishonest advocate who breaks the code of journalistic ethics. And by criticizing him hard on the ground of journalistic integrity we have a good chance of making him, not U.S. English, the focus of the con troversy. Reporters would rather write about another journalist than about some public interest group. "I've kept the article chatty, and thrown in some slangy usages, so that Tanton appears to be a regular guy being attacked by a member of (the) Washington press corps ... " One good rebuttal deserves another, so Sin Pelos asked Crawford about "The Big Lie" charge. Responded Jim: "I've been writing about U.S. English and its ac tivities f?r 3 1/2 years. that time they have never pointed to a single factual Inaccuracy. I th1nk the most damaging thing you can do to these people is to quote them accurately and at length." -Kay Barbaro Hispanic Link Weekly Report June 19, 1989 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING Following is a listing of student engineering resources geared toward Hispanic, black and other ethnic groups. ADVANCING CAREERS IN ENGINEERING PROGRAM: ACE is sponsored by the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers. It works with students and college affiliate chapters on methods to reach and support precollege Hispanic engineering students nationally. For more information contact: Ricardo Urbanejo, Executive Director, SHPE, 5400 E. Olympic Blvd., Suite 225, Los Angeles, Calif. 90022 (213) 725-3970. ENGINEERING FIELD SERVICE GRANTS: This program provides assistance to 25 precollege and retention programs nationwide for con sultants to work with new and growing initiatives to bring seed funding into areas where potential minority engineering talent has been unsup ported or underserved. For more information contact the National Ac tion Council for Minorities in Engineering, 3 W. 35th St., New York, N.Y. 1 0001-2281 (212) 279-2626. . INCENTIVE GRANTS PROGRAM: This is a privately funded source of scholarships for minority engineering students. Funds are awarded to a group of accredited engineering schools that emphasize retaining minority students. For more information contact NACME at the above address. SUMMER ENGINEERING EMPLOYMENT PROJECT: Companies select qualified engineering students for summer employment based on a student's location, field of study and expected date of graduation. For more information contact NACME at the above address. MESA PROGRAM: The Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achieve ment program in California offers science workshops, study groups, academic and career counseling, SAT and PSAT preparation for junior high and high school Hispanic and black students through 17 univer sity-affiliated centers with strong engineering or physical science programs. For more information contact MESA, University of Califor nia, Berkeley, Lawrence Hall of Science, #1 Centennial Blvd., Berkeley, Calif. 94720 (415) 642-5064. MINORITY INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING: This program gives high school students an opportunity to learn about the engineering field and campus life in general at the University of Texas, Austin. It is com prised of two one-week programs for qualified students entering their senior year in high school. For more information contact Tom Backus, Director of the Equal Opportunity in Engineering Program Office, ECJ 2.1 02, College of Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 4715953. I CONNECTING I DADE SCHOOLS TACKLE RACISM Beginning next fall, through the aid of a three-year, $450,000 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, nine high schools in Dade County, Fla., will begin a program to reduce racial prejudice among students, Dade County Public Schools Superintendent Joseph Fernandez an nounced June 8. Twenty-seven teachers from the humanities history, English, foreign languages and the artswill attend a four-week training ses sion at Florida International University in Miami to devise programs they think will work at their schools. Completely up to the teachers, the programs can range from redesigning curricula to staging plays that highlight the positive differences between cultures. In addition the Dade County Public Schools administration will launch a fund-raising campaign that will supplement the grant so that the program can be spread to other schools. Dade County is the fourth largest school district in the nation. Forty five percent of the students are Hispanic, 33% black and 21% white. CHAMBER OFFERS SCHOLARSHIPS Applications for the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce's five $1,000 scholarships for college students are being accepted until July 15. The scholarships are based on academic standing, community in volvement and financial need. Winners will be announced at USHCC's 1Oth annual convention Sept. 6-1 0 in New Orleans. For applications, which must include a transcript and a one-page per sonal statement, contact USHCC, Scholarship Committee, 4900 Main, Suite 700, Kansas City, Mo . 64112 (816) 531-6363. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES The National Endowment for the Humanities gives a $42,934 grant to a group of researchers, including Arnoldo de Le6n, history professor at Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas, and Roberto Juarez, vice president of academic affairs at Laredo Community College, to set up a museum exhibit on Tejano history and culture in South Texas . The exhibit is expected to open in September at the John E. Conner Museum at Texas A&l University in Kingsville ... Robert Nava, director of Chicano Student Programs at the Univer sity of California, Riverside, is named director of governmental rela tions and special programs at the university ... Juan Yniguez resigns as half-time assistant dean of students and director of El Centro Chicano at Stanford University ... Calendar television at the next meeting of the Hispanic Public Relations Association. sions, workshops, recognition salutes and a job fair. Katharine Dfaz (213) 624-6608 TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. f'N\1, Washington, D.C. 20005. THIS WEEK PUBLIC RELATIONS Los Angeles June 19 Emilio Nicolas, new general manager of Spanish language television station KMEX in Los Angeles, will discuss the "new look" of Spanish-language 4 John Echeveste (818) 793-9335 MEXICO La Jolla, Calif. June 20-22 The ninth annual Briefing Session for Journalists sponsored by the Center for U.S.-Mexican Rela tions at the University of California, San Diego, will feature leading experts and newsmakers from government, business and academia from both countries. Emphasis will be on helping journalists understand trends relating to Mexico. Julie Healey (213) 851-7372 WOMEN'S CONFERENCE Los Angeles June 23, 24 The National Network of Hispanic Women is hold ing its third national round table for Hispanic busi ness and corporate women, "Hispana Leadership: In Step With the Future." Activities include discus-June 19, 1989 EL SALVADOR Alexandria, Va. June 24 The Pan American Festival Committee is holding its second Pan American Festival. The event is co sponsored by the Alexandria Department of Recreation, Parks and Cultural Activities and mem bers of the local Hispanic community. Each year a different Latin American country is chosen for the festival's theme. This event will feature Salvadoran music, food, arts and crafts. Jorge Lozano (703) 979-7051 COMING SOON AWARDS DINNER La Raza Centro Legal San Francisco June 29 Mario Salgado (41 5) 826-5506 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I 1 l i THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO FACUL TV POSITION POSITION: Director of Special Collections University of New Mexico General Library. ' TYPE: Permanent, 12 months, tenure track. SALARY: $35,000 minimum. MINIMUM RANK: Negotiable from Assistant Professor. RESPONSIBLE TO: Dean of Library Services. EDUCATION: Master's degree from an ALA accredited program and/or Ph.D. or other doctoral degree. APPLICATIONS: Submit a resume (including names, addresses, and phone num bers for at least three references) and a letter of application to Rita Critchfield, Per sonnel Office, General Library, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131. Applications received by 9/1/89 will be given first consideration. Position contingent on available funds. Recruitment will continue until position is filled. UNM is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. VICE PRESIDENT OFFICE OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND CONSTITUENCY SUPPORT National Hispanic Organization seeks a Vice President for its Office of Technical Assistance and Constituency Support. Ten years of experience in working with non-profit organizations. Knowledge of project management, especially Federal Programs. Masters in Public or Business Ad ministration preferred. Training and cur riculum development experience preferred. Bilingual Spanish/English. Salary negotiable. Send resume only to Raul Yzaguirre, Presi dent, National Council of La Raza, 810 First St. NE, Suite 300, Washington, D. C. 20002. REPORTERS/CREATIVE WRITERS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ONE YEAR SUBSTITUTE POSITION DUTIES: Teach Spanish courses from beginning to advanced; grammar courses for native speakers; and civilization cour ses in Spanish and English. QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. in Spanish lan guage and literature; familiarity with cur rent methodologies in the teaching of foreign languages; two years teaching ex perience and fluency in English are required; knowledge of French and/or theory of bilingual education desirable. STARTING SALARY RANGE: $28,630 TO $31,716. Commensurate with ex perience and qualifications. SEND COVER LETTER AND RESUME BY JULY 28 TO: DR. ANA MARIA HERNANDEZ HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE/CUNY l i Hispanic Link News Service buys three 31-10 THOMSON AVENUE LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK 11101 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER SECONDARY EDUCATION Assistant or Associate Professor (tenure track) or Lecturer, $30,252-$48,204, beginning September 1989. Doctorate or ABO. At least three years full-time secondary teaching experience. Ability to 1) supervise student teachers in multicultural and/or ethnolinguistic set tings, 2) interact cooperatively and effec tively with faculty, students and public school personnel, and 3) pursue scholarly activity. Teach courses in secondary education, curriculum and instruction, and computer education. Supervision of secondary student teachers field ex periences will be a major responsibility. Applications received by July 15, 1989 will receive full consideration; open until fined. Send letter of application, vita and place ment file or three letters of recommenda tion to Dr. Adria F. Klein, Dean, School of Education, California State University, Bakersfield, 9001 Stockdale Hwy., Bakersfield, Calif . 93311-1 099. AA/EOE NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE Employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media. Opportunities for internships, entry level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English or Spanish language. Contact Jocelyn Cordova, National As sociation of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228. COPY EDITOR HISPANIC MAGAZINE Wanted: Copy Editor for a fast growing, national publication. Must love language and have a great sense of headline style. Needs 3-5 years experience. Send resume to: Marfa Alvarez, Hispanic Magazine, 111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 410, Washington, D.C. 20001. 1 650-word feature/opinion pieces weekly, t paying on acceptance. A story you cover ' locally may have national interest or ap! plication. For details and writer's f guidelines, write Charlie Ericksen, \ Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, r Washington, D.C. 20005. ( ilillilililllllllllllllillllllli.illlili.ilil . DEAR PERS.ONNEL No publication or system lets you target ana tional pool of Lat1no w1th the and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To an ad 1n Marketplace, please call 1n or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washmgton, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Hispanic Link intern seeks position to-40 hours a week evenings and/or weekends. Have journalism degree and 5 years of progressive office experience. Am WordPerfect, MultiMate and lotus 12-3 proficient, but will consider all offers. Please contact Rhonda at 234-0280, M F between 9 a..m. and 5 p.m. His panic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: Ordered by ________ _ Organization ---------Street -----------------------City, State & Zip ----------------(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone _______ _ June 19, 1989 5

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment in l-len18n Cortes, with Mexican actor Manuel Ojeda playing Emperor Moctezuma. And Spanish director Pedro Almodovar has announced plans for his upcoming Amarrame. It begins filming in Madrid in July. FILMING SOUTH OF THE BORDER: Two current film productions and an upcoming project focus on recent Latin American history. Various U.S. Latinos are featured in current film releases or working in future films: Marfa Conchita Alonso can be seen in Vampire's Kiss, Robert ran is in Scenes from the Class Struggle in Beverly Hills and Julie Carmen is in Fright Night II. A Martinez stars in the upcoming She Devil and Andy Garcfa will be seen in International Affairs. Production continues this week on a film based on the life of El Oscar Romero. The film, shooting on location 1n Mex1co, 1s t1tled Romero. It stars Raul Julia in the title role and co-stars Ana Alicia and Eddie Velez. Filming in neighboring Nicaragua is Sandino, about the life and death of that country's political figure Cesar Augusto Sandino. Portuguese actor Joaqufn Almeida plays the title character . Kris Kristofferson has a featured role. The film is directed by Chile's Miguel Littin, an Academy Award nominee. A film version of Nostromo-Joseph Conrad's novel about power struggles in turn-of-the century Central America begins filming in Mexico and Spain later this year. Plans are underway, meanwhile, for a film based on the conquest of Mexico. Spanish singer Miguel Bose is expected to play the title role ONE LINERS: The latest of an ongoing series of "parallel import" law suits was filed in a federal court in New Jersey last month by the Recording Industry Association of America. Various local record distributors are charged with infringing the rights of recordings by ar tists such as Julio Iglesias, Vicente Fernandez and Jose Jose ... Recording artists Willie Colon and Sa-Fire are featured in separate AI OS education public service announcements produced by the Education Services Division of Hispanic Designers lnc .... Performances of 4 Clowns in Search of a Circus by Los Actores de San Antonio continue at that city's Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center through June 24 ... Media Report SPEAKING OF TELEVISION: The firing of three news staffers early this month from KVEA-TV in Los Angeles, the city's second largest Spanish-language station, brought angry criticism from protesters who accused the station's management of insensitivity to the community's large Hispanic population . One of the protesters' demands is the reinstatement of the station's former news director, Mexican American Bob Navarro, one of the three people who were dismissed . He was replaced by Roberto Soto, a Cuban American. Critics charge that Navarro ' s ouster, coupled with February's resignation and subsequent replacement by a non-Hispanic of general manager Frank Cruz, also a Mexican American, has left the area's Latino viewers without any senior management representation. , HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Luis Restrepo, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. SPEAKING OF RADIO: Thirteen years after losing his legs in a bomb attack, newscaster Emilio Milian launched a new Spanish-lan guage radio station, WWFE-AM, two weeks ago in Miami. Milian says he hopes to attract younger Hispanic listeners. The station, he says, will provide an alternative to more established Spanish-language stations in the city, mixing music, news and talk shows . Milian, who during the '70s publicly criticized anti-Castro terrorism in Miami, was nearly killed in 1976 when a bomb tore through his car in the parking lot of radio station WQBA. SPEAKING OF AWARDS: The Colorado Hispanic Media Association will honor five individuals at its second annual Media Awards ceremony June 20, said President Frank Martinez. The winners, all from Denver, are : In the professional category, Carlos Amez cua, news anchor at KCNC-TV; in the managerial category, Flor Hernandez-Ramos, president and general manager of bilingual Antonio Mejias-Rentas radio station KUVO; in the community advo cate category, Jean Galloway, vice president for community affairs at KUSATV; in the tech nical category, Jose Contreras, chief photographer at KMGH-TV; and for lifetime achievement, George Sandoval, founder of KVDRTV, who was killed in an April car wreck at the age of 57 . KUDOS AND MOVES: Daniel Molina, NBC correspondent formerly assigned to Burbank, Calif., has been promoted to chief of the network's Chicago bureau ... Carolina Garda, former assistant state editor of The Milwaukee Journal, has been promoted to state editor ... Carlos Sanchez, reporter with The Washington Post, was re-elected president of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C ... Jose McMurray, a senior producer at National Public Radio in Washington, D.C . , will travel to Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia and Chile through a Fullbright Fellowship exchange program. He leaves July 3 and returns July 27. Oanilo Alfaro "BIENVENIDOS A CHEZ PANCHO. WILL YOU BE HAVING RED OR WHITE MENUDO WITH YOUR MEAL TONIGHT?"