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Hispanic link weekly report, June 26, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, June 26, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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1 Making The News This Week
; A federal grand jury indicts U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar on |i racketeering charges. If convicted Aguilar, 58, who sits in San Jose, Calif., could face 55 years in prison, $2 million in fines and impeach-i ment. . . Anita Del Rio, vice president for the Far West Region of the League of United Latin American Citizens, sends a letter to U.S. i Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist stating that the region > opposes pay increases for federal jurists because of what she says are I their anti-civil rights rulings...Mari-Luci Jaramillo, the former U.S. ambassador to Honduras and now an assistant vice president for Educa-
tional Testing Service, speaks at the commencement for the fourth graduating class of The National Hispanic University in Oakland, Calif...California state Sen. Joseph Montoya and- his former aide Amiel Jaramillo plead not guilty to charges of using their positions for extortion and racketeering...T. Emmet Clarie, a U.S. district court judge in Hartford, Conn., sentences Juan Segarra Palmer, the Harvard educated Puerto Rican nationalist charged with masterminding the $7.1 million robbery at a Wells Fargo depot six years ago, to 65 years in prison and fines him $500,000...A California court of appeals upholds the conviction of mass murderer Juan Corona. Corona, a 55-year-old former farm labor contractor, was convicted in the 1971 slayings of 25 migrant farm workers...
HISPANIC LIN^WEEK^^EPO^ ^^June26^939
Bilingual Ed. Revisionist Group Expands Campaign
ByFelixPerez
The rapidly spreading California-based organization that caused a bitter fight in Los Angeles late last winter when it sought to withdraw bonuses for bilingual education teachers has targeted its latest campaign at San Francisco’s bilingual education system.
Pointing to Learning English Advocates Drive’s ties with U.S. English, detractors of the organization question its motivations.
LEAD successfully lobbied the San Francisco American Federation of Teachers to include a plank in its contract proposal to the school district two weeks ago that bilingual education methods be chosen by individual schools, not the district.
There are some bilingual teachers who feel that switching to site-based instructional decision making would lead in many cases to little or no use of the child’s native language.
One critic of the site-based approach is the California Association for Bilingual Education.
"Under the guise of a quest for flexibility, districts are excused from their responsibilities (of educating limited-English-proficient children) more often than not," said CABE President Aurora Quevedo.
Sally Peterson, the leader and founder of LEAD, said her group believes instruction using a student’s native language may not be the best way in all cases.
"All we’re trying to do is, mainly as educators, to speak out and say the bilingual program isn’t working," said Peterson.
LEAD was formed in March 1987 in Sun Valley, Calif., the Los Angeles suburb where Peterson has taught third-graders for 23 of the last 26 years. Peterson, 49, said she turned to U.S. English for support in forming her organization after being rebuffed repeatedly by others.
According to Peterson, who now teaches kindergarten, the 20,000-member organization has chapters in Santa Ana, Garden Grove and Newhall. Last August LEAD set up shop in New York City and seeks to do likewise in Dade County, Fla., Chicago, Boston and Dallas.
While neither Peterson nor U.S. English chairman Stanley Diamond could give precise
figures on the funding LEAD has received from U.S. English, both agreed it is approximately $2,000. Diamond said his organization also gave LEAD a $10,000 grant to publish a book this fall on research supporting LEAD’S philosophy.
"We got involved just as a matter of conscience. We agree with Sally (Peterson) that immigrant children aren’t getting a fair shake," said Diamond from his San Francisco office.
Peterson said the bulk of LEAD’S budget this year, which she said was less than $25,000, comes from membership dues.
Despite the relatively small amount of money it has received from U.S. English to date, there are several people, including CABE’s Quevedo and United Teachers-Los Angeles union representative Antonio Villaragoza, who
continued on page 2
Martinez Decision Helps Hispanic GOP
By Rhonda Smith
In a move that could help Claude Pepper’s 18th Congressional District seat in Florida go to a Hispanic Republican candidate, Hialeah Mayor Raul Martinez chose not to make a bid for it at the last minute.
Democrats were caught off guard June 15 when state Sen. Jack Gordon, the best known Democrat in the race, withdrew two days after announcing his intent to vie for the seat. Gordon said his withdrawal was precipitated by
Latino Population Grows 23%, 1980-’85
By Danilo Alfaro
The U.S. Hispanic population grew 22.9% from 1980 to 1985, more than four times the rate of increase experienced by the overall U.S. population, according to a report released by the U.S. Census Bureau June 21.
The gain for Latinos during those years was 3.2 million, for a total of 17.5 million. Census projections for 1988 put the U.S. Latino population at 19.4 million.
The report, "Population Estimates by Race and Hispanic Origin for States, Metropolitan Areas, and Selected Counties: 1980 to 1985," showed that the Hispanic population was concentrated in a handful of states. As in the past, California (5,873,000), Texas (3,690,000), New York (1,879,000) and Florida (1,102,000) continued to dominate.
Hispanic population and the proportion of Hispanics increased in all 50 states, the report
continued on page 4
Republican National Committee Chairman Lee Atwater’s statement to the Cuban American National Foundation that Pepper’s seat should go to a Cuban American. Gordon, who is white, said the statement was racially polarizing.
Martinez, mentioned early as one of few candidates with a good chance of defeating a Hispanic Republican, opted not to run after Gordon withdrew. He had indicated earlier he would seek the seat if Gordon did not. But according to Steve Bovo, of Martinez’s office, the Democratic Party in Dade County appeared to be splintered and "had not taken a step to back one candidate" as late as June 17, when a meeting of Democratic leaders took place.
Of the four Republican candidates who filed, the two Cuban Americans are state Sen. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and Miami business owner Carlos Perez. Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez and the Cuban American National Foundation have announced they will support Ros-Lehtinen.
Of the nine Democrats who qualified, the Latinos are Miami City Commissioner Rosario Kennedy and Miami banker Raul Masvidal.
The primaries will be held Aug. 1, and the special election Aug. 29
State-by-State Population Counts, 1980-85: See Page 5


Report: Minimum Wage Veto Hurts Latinos and Blacks
By Rhonda Smith
Hispanic and black workers would be most harshly affected by President Bush’s veto of the minimum wage bill, according to a report released June 15 by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in Washington, D.C.
Congress failed to override the veto June 14, the day after Bush rejected the bill.
The proposed bill would have increased the hourly minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.55 over a three-year period. In vetoing the bill,
Bush said the increase would cost the country thousands of jobs. Instead, he proposed an increase to $4.25 over the same period. Included with his proposal was a six-month "training wage" during which the employee would be compensated 80% of the minimum wage, or $3.40.
According to the report, "Among blacks and Hispanics, about one in four workers paid by the hour now earn wages so low that full-time work at these wages [would] not lift a family of three out of poverty."
National Puerto Rican Coalition Vice President Ramon Daubon said, "We have a large segment of our population whose salary is at or near the minimum wage, and the economics today are nowhere near where they were in 1981."
Abel Quintela, president of thfe U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, said he empathizes with both sides. "We recognize that the current minimum wage is not enough, but as business owners we have to look at the bottom line."
Supreme Court Limits Anti-Racism Law
By Danilo Alfaro
While declining to reverse a 1976 civil rights decision allowing the use of a Civil War-era law in race discrimination suits, the U.S. Supreme Court has substantially narrowed the scope of the statute. The 5-4 decision, handed down June 15, restricts the ability of plaintiffs to fight on-the-job discrimination.
"We’re in a period of regression," U.S. Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) told Weekly Report. "‘Kinder and gentler’ doesn’t mean a thing as far as civil rights and affirmative action are concerned."
Richard Larson, legal director at the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Los Angeles, agreed. "This has been a horrible Supreme Court term."
The Civil Rights Act of 1964 provides only for the payment of back pay and allows a judge to
By Karen Zacarfas
An average of 60,000 Hispanics are leaving the U.S. Catholic church yearly and 1 million have left in the last 15 years, according to a report presented at the National Conference of Catholic Bishops’ annual spring meeting June 16-19 in South Orange, N.J.
Although Hispanics make up one-third of the estimated 53 million U.S. Catholics, the bishops expressed concern over the number of Hispanics turning to conservative Protestant denominations.
Some Catholic officials, including the Rev.
believe that their agendas are strikingly similar.
"They’re basically anti any kind of bilingual education," said Villaragoza. What LEAD is doing "falls smack in the middle of their (U.S. English’s) program to make English the official language."
Quevedo offered this blunt assessment of LEAD’S objective: "It’s critical that we deal with what the issue is. It’s not language or pedagogy. It’s racism."
Just as they had in Los Angeles, tensions are running high in San Francisco over LEAD’S bilingual education proposal.
order the racial harasser to stop. The 1866 law, known as Section 1981, was designed to guarantee the right of newly freed slaves to enter into and enforce contracts. It has often been preferred by plaintiffs in bias lawsuits because it allows them to receive punitive damages as well as back pay.
Last year the court voted to reconsider the 1976 decision, Runyon vs. McCrary, that allowed Section 1981 to be used in seeking redress for private acts of racial discrimination. As part of its June 15 decision, the court voted unanimously to uphold Runyon.
Writing the majority opinion last week in Patterson vs. McLean Credit Union was Reagan-appointed Justice Anthony Kennedy. The opinion interpreted Section 1981 as providing protection only at the outset of an agreement, not afterward.
Francis Gillespie of Georgetown University, concede the church has neglected Hispanics.
Gillespie, a specialist in Hispanic research at the Center for Applied Research Apostolate, said the church can stop the defections by encouraging and helping Hispanics attend Catholic institutions of higher learning and by enabling Latinos to reach more leadership positions in the parishes.
"The Hispanic community has a great deal to offer mainstream American Catholicism," said Gillespie, "from the devotion to Our Lady Guadalupe to the strength of family ties."
San Francisco has 19,000 limited-English-proficient students, mostly Hispanic and Chinese. The city has 700 bilingual education and English-as-a-Second-Language teachers.
In Los Angeles UTLA votes calling on the dis-tric to rescind the $5,000 bonuses for bilingual education teachers remain sequestered. Lawyers are weighing a challenge that the signatures required to put the item on the ballot were not collected by the deadline. UTLA and the teachers were expected to ratify a contract late last week including a pay differential.
Judge Agrees to City’s At-Large Elections Plan
By Danilo Alfaro
Stockton, Calif., can drop its single-district election system and begin voting at large, U.S. District Judge Edward Garcia in Sacramento, Calif., ruled June 15. The change comes amid a move by several California cities to adopt single-district elections because of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in March.
Stockton, a city of 150,000 that is 60 miles east of San Francisco, is 22% Hispanic. One Latino, Tom Olivas, sits on the nine-member council.
The city had moved from at-large to singledistrict voting in 1971. In 1986 the city restored the at-large system through a voter initiative. In December 1987 Rudy Badillo, a student at the University of California at Berkeley and longtime Stockton resident, filed a suit challenging the conversion.
Joaquin Avila, a lead attorney in Badillo vs. City of Stockton, told Weekly Report that the ruling "may provide to other cities the excuse for not providing district elections but I don’t think it sends a message." He added that he planned to appeal the decision.
Moran Relinquishes Chair
By Rhonda Smith
Oscar Moran stepped aside as LULAC Foundation chairman June 10 while an audit is conducted of the organization’s finances, according to Eduardo Pena, a past chairman of the foundation.
Moran relinquished his post after allegations surfaced that funds from the foundation were "commingled with other funds that belonged to LULAC," said Pena,
Moran could not be reached by press time.
"He hasn’t actually resigned," Pena said, "but has agreed to step down as chairman until the audit is completed." Moran was elected chairman April 22.
Catholic Church Suffers Annual Exodus
LEAD Turns to U.S. English for Support
continued from page 1
2
June 26. 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Miguel Perez
China’s Latino Connections
In the Latino community, we know them as bright, hard-working people who came from China to Latin America and enriched our way of life, our family values, our economies and our culture, especially our cuisine. But we have many misconceptions about the Chinese Latinos — especially when we think that they have lost their ties with China Because they came to Latin America three or four generations ago, we tend to think of our"Chinos" almost as if they were indigenous to Latin America But ask them directly and you will hear a different story.
Ask the Latino Chinese who now live in the United States and they will tell you that they are worried for the safety of their friends and relatives — not back home in Cuba, Ecuador,
Panama or Nicaragua, but in the home of their ancestors, their beloved China Even in New York’s Latino community, there are many misconceptions about the Chinos.
Latinos tend to think that most are from Cuba, mainly because there are so many Cuban-Chinese restaurants in the city. But they come from all over Latin America. This is why Latinos became known as the original rainbow people. There are Latinos of every race and ethnic background.
PAIN FROM BOTH SIDES
Chinos have been Latinos since the early 1900s, when they migrated to Latin America seeking the freedom they couldn’t find in their homeland. In many Latin countries, they learned that repression is a universal human condition. "I hurt as much for Latin America as I do for China," a Chinese-Cuban-American acquaintance explained to me. "I’ve had to deal with the pain and the drama of communism from both sides. I saw the pain of my people and country, which I still carry in my heart, and now the pain of the motherland of my father, which I also consider my second homeland. Although I was born in Cuba, I have a sister who is living in Canton Province, so you can imagine how worried lam."
Their family ties and traditions are so strong that — even after at least two migrations through at least three corners of the world with three different cultures and languages—they still know who they are and where they came from.
This is why the massacre of the Chinese people by the so-called People’s Liberation Army is so hard for all Chinos to accept. "Nobody believed that the Army would attack the people. That wasn’t part of the program," says Jorge Cruz, president of the Chinese-Ecuadorian Association in the United States. The whole world saw it very clearly as we watched television reports showing the Chinese army massacring its people and the Chinese people responding only with words of reconciliation.
STUDENTS PAYING WITH THEIR LIVES "As a Latin American, I can say that I have lived through similar experiences, because my country (Ecuador) has gone through repressive, totalitarian, military regimes, and I have noticed that the communication we see in China between the people and the army has never existed in Latin America," says Cruz, who visited China with other Chinese-Ecuadorians in 1987.
We don’t know how long they will have to wait before they can go back to a peaceful China, or how long before the Chinese people can obtain the same freedom cherished by their brothers and sisters in Europe and in some parts of the Americas.
We saw the Chinese students on television, paying with their own lives to show the world the value of democracy and reminding those who take it for granted that we have much for which to be thankful.
The Chinese have given the world its biggest demonstration of the failure of communism and totalitarianism — and los Chinos and other Latinos can now use it as a guide for fighting Latin American repression.
(Miguel Perez i$ a columnist with the New York Daily News.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin peios en la lengua
THE NOT-SO-RICH-AND-FAMOUS: Not everybody can be an incredible athlete like beisbol's Jos6 Canseco (who may be voted into the All-Star Game without lifting a bat) or a fantastic actress like Rita Moreno or a lovable astronaut like Franklin Chang-Diaz.
Some of us have to grab our 15 or 10 or however many minutes of fame Andy Warhol said we were each entitled to, and cherish the moment.
Today, I nominate for Sin Peios' Gallery of Near-Greats:
CANDIDATE NO. 1: He’s Jesse Godinez, an optician who lives in Roseville, Calif. In his spare time, he writes Spanglish limericks. Most, he admits, are "almost nasty."
He claims that he’s composed 30 or 50 of them in the past 18 years. Some day he hopes to have enough for a book.
Here’s a forgettable one he sent me:
A squeamish man of El Dorado, bought raisin bread unahopasado.
He thought, "Of all strange things, this raisin has wings!"
Then he hurried to the excusado\
It may not measure up to the young girl from Nantucket, but at least Jesse made the effort. If you can do better, I’ll reserve a space for you.
CANDIDATE NO. 2: He’s Robert L6pez, a Los Angeles art gallery manager.
A year ago, he started doing a Latino Elvis Presley routine as a joke. But acquaintances went platanos whenever he wiggled in his white Viva Las Vegas jumpsuit, so he tried out his act on stage.
His big moment — so far, at least — came the day after Cinco de Mayo, when he opened Bob Goldthwait’s Los Angeles concert at the Wiltern Theater.
Can he sing?
"I admit I’m not the best,” he says, "but I’ve gotten a whole lot better."
No one with that much humility will ever make it in Hollywood, of course.
CANDIDATE NO. 3: She’s talented New Mexico weaver Teresa Archuleta. When the Coors traveling Hispanic art exhibit opened at the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos recently, Teresa attended wearing a black arm band and a pin she designed — a Coors label with a slash through it and the words, "Arte Sf— Coors No."
Her Coors hosts weren’t amused.
They asked her to remove the pin or leave the museum, where by coincidence some of her weavings hang in the permanent collection. She responded that she was not asking others to remove their jewelry.
Her point made, she went quietly.
Author/husband Jim Sagel reminds Sin Peios, "As Coors continues to wash a bit of its guilt away with its not-unappreciated support for the arts, there are still some of us who refuse to swallow all the suds."
CANDIDATE NO. 4: He’s Chris Herrera, from East Chicago, Ind., where Weekly Report editor FSixP&ez grew up.
Chris’ dog was picked up for loitering and tossed into the city pound. So Chris reacted the way any dog’s best friend would. He broke into the city pound.
For some reason, his arrest on trespass charges was recorded in the national press.
CANDIDATES NO. 5 & 6: In the dayroom of New York's Rikers Island prison, inmates George V£squez and JesusFemindez argued over a dominoes game and Fernandez stabbed Vasquez to death.
— KayBarbam
June 26,1989


State-Level Hispanic Representation: 1985
Percent
â–¡
m
Less than 1.0
1.0 to 2.5
2.5 to 7.5
7.5 to 15.0
15.0 or more
Every Metro Area Shows Increase
continued from page 1
said. The West region of the United States had an increase of 27.3%. The Northeast region experienced only 15.2% growth .
Seven metropolitan areas together contained more than half of the Hispanic population in 1985, the report stated. Los Angeles had the most, 3.7 million. New York (2.3 million), Miami (815,000), San Francisco (775,000) and Chicago (757,000) had the next highest populations. Nearly nine out of every 10 Hispanics resided in metropolitan areas in 1985.
Every metropolitan area with a Latino population of more than 10,000 showed an increase from 1980 to 1985, the report estimated. Those with the highest rate of increase were Midland, Texas (51.9%), Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood-Pompano Beach, Fla. (47.4%), Merced, Calif. (46.1%), Odessa, Texas (41.9%), and Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas (41.3%).
LARGEST HISPANIC COUNTY POPULATIONS:
1980,1985 (in thousands)
TOTAL %HISPANIC %INCREASE
1980 1985 1980 1985
Los Angeles, Calif. 2,077 2,743 27.8% 33.0% 32.1%
Dade, Fla. 588 759 36.2 43.0 28.9
Cook, III. 400 604 9.3 11.4 23.1
Bexar, Texas 465 544 47.0 48.5 17.0
Harris, Texas 368 489 15.3 18.0 33.2
Bronx, N.Y. 396 443 33.9 38.1 11.8
Kings, N.Y. 395 434 17.7 19.3 9.9
Orange, Calif. 286 380 14.8 17.7 32.9
New York, N.Y. 336 377 23.5 25.6 12.0
El Paso, Texas 300 360 62.5 67.5 20.0
San Diego, Calif. 274 358 14.7 76.6 30.7
Queens, N.Y. 263 318 13.9 16.6 20.6
Hidalgo, Texas 232 280 81.9 82.9 21.0
Source:'Population Estimates by Race and Hispanic Origin for States, Metropolitan Areas, and Selected Counties: 1980 to 1985* by the U.S. Bureau of the Census.
4
June 26, 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


State, Regional Hispanic Populations: 1980-1985
Region, division, and State April 1, 1980 July 1, 1981 July 1, 1982 July 1, 1983 July 1, 1984 July 1, 1985 Percent Hispanic
1980 1985
United States 1,564,000 1,627,700 1,680,000 1,736,900 1,776,000 1,817,800 2.9 3.3
Northeast 31,900 32,800 33,800 34,600 35,500 36,500 0.6 0.6
Midwest 143,800 145,600 146,400 150,000 152,100 156,000 0.8 0.9
South 673,700 704,200 731,400 757,600 777,600 794,800 2.8 3.2
West 714,700 745,200 768,400 794,700 810,800 830,500 9.9 10.6
New England 10,200 10,800 11,100 11,500 11,900 12,400 0.5 0.6
Maine 2,100 2,200 2,200 2,300 2,400 2,600 (B) (B)
New Hampshire 1,000 1,100 1,000 1,100 1,100 1,200 (B) (B)
Vermont 2,000 2,100 2,200 2,200 2,500 2,700 (B) (B)
Massachusetts 1,000 1,100 1,100 1,100 1,200 1,300 (B) (B)
Rhode Island 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,200 1,100 (B) (B)
Connecticut 3,000 3,300 3,400 3,500 3,500 3,600 (B) (B)
Middle Atlantic 21,700 21,900 22,600 23,000 23,600 24,100 0.6 0.7
New York 17,700 17,700 18,200 18,500 18,900 19,200 1.0 1.1
New Jersey - - - - . - - -
Pennsylvania 4,100 4,200 4,500 4,600 4,700 4,900 (B) (B)
East North Central 74,900 74,800 74,900 76,000 77,400 80,000 0.8 0.8
Ohio 19,500 19,400 19,400 19,600 20,000 20,500 0.9 0.9
Indiana 10,100 9,800 10,000 9,600 10,000 10,400 0.6 0.6
Illinois 18,600 18,500 18,500 19,100 19,300 19,800 0.9 1.0
Michigan 19,900 20,200 19,900 20,700 21,200 21,900 1.1 1.2
Wisconsin 6,800 6,900 7,100 7,000 6,900 7,400 (B) (B)
West North Central 68,900 70,700 71,500 74,000 74,700 76,000 0.9 1.0
Minnesota 5,600 5,600 5,500 5,400 5,600 5,700 (B) (B)
Iowa 9,300 9,700 10,000 10,100 10,700 10,700 0.5 0.6
Missouri 7,200 7,200 7,400 8,000 8,000 8,000 (B) (B)
North Dakota 1,700 1,800 1,800 1,900 1,800 1,800 (B) (B)
South Dakota 1,900 1,800 1,700 1,600 1,500 1,500 (B) (B)
Nebraska 13,800 14,100 14,200 14,500 14,400 14,500 1.6 1.7
Kansas 29,400 30,600 30,900 32,500 32,700 33,800 2.4 2.8
South Atlantic 58,500 60,400 63,000 65,500 69,200 70,600 0.6 0.7
Delaware 2,100 2,200 2,300 2,400 2,400 2,600 (B) (B)
Maryland 1,600 1,600 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,800 (B) (B)
District of Columbia . . . . • .
Virginia 4,500 4,700 4,900 4,900 5,300 5,700 (B) (B)
West Virginia 4,400 4,500 4,600 5,100 5,300 5,300 (B) (B)
North Carolina 8,700 8,800 9,300 10,200 10,700 11,200 0.3 0.4
South Carolina 5,300 5,400 5,900 5,700 6,200 6,300 (B) (B)
Georgia 7,700 7,700 8,300 8,500 9,000 9,200 Florida 24,000 25,500 26,100 27,100 28,500 28,400 2.8 2.7
East South Central 17,600 17,700 18,400 18,800 19,600 20,300 0.3 0.3
Kentucky 6,300 6,000 6,400 6,300 6,600 6,600 (B) (B)
Tennessee 3,300 3,300 3,600 3,700 4,100 4,300 (B) (B)
Alabama 2,700 2,900 3,100 3,100 3,400 3,700 (B) (B)
Mississippi 5,300 5,500 5,300 5,700 5,500 5,800 (B) (B)
West South Central 597,600 626,100 650,000 673,300 688,800 703,900 8.6 9.5
Arkansas 5,500 5,600 6,000 6,300 6,900 6,900 (B) (B)
Louisiana 15,400 15,900 16,400 16,900 16,700 16,700 1.2 1.2
Oklahoma 20,500 22,400 24,400 25,100 25,600 25,200 1.6 1.8
Texas 556,200 582,200 603,200 625,000 639,600 655,100 19.0 20.5
Mountain 509,200 527,600 542,200 557,800 567,100 576,300 12.4 12.8
Montana 4,900 5,300 5.600 5,800 5,800 5,800 (B) (B)
Idaho 32,500 33,600 34,500 35,800 36,800 37,600 4.2 4.6
Wyoming 15,100 15,500 15,900 15,800 16,200 16,300 4.6 4.6
Colorado 71,400 73,800 75,000 75,600 75,600 75,700 12.7 12.5
New Mexico 231,500 238,400 245,300 253,700 259,100 264,500 33.4 33.8
Arizona 134,700 140,300 144,100 148,300 149,800 151,300 19.9 19.7
Utah 9,700 10,700 11,200 11,700 12,200 12,500 2.9 3.3
Nevada 9,400 10,000 10,600 11,100 11,800 12,500 6.5 7.5
Pacific 205,500 217,600 226,200 236,900 243,700 254,200 6.7 7.5
Washington 22,300 23,300 23,500 24,100 25,500 26,200 2.8 3.1
Oregon 21,400 22,900 23,500 24,500 25,500 26,200 2.5 2.9
California 143,300 152,100 159,100 167,000 170,700 178,600 14.6 16.3
Alaska 3,700 3,800 4,000 4,400 4,400 4,700 (B) (B)
Hawaii 14,700 15,500 16,100 16,900 17,700 18,400 7.3 7.8
- Represents zero or a number which rounds to zero.
(B) Indicates that 1980 population base was less than 10,000.
Source: MPopulation Estimates by Race and Hispanic Origin for States, Metropolitan Areas, and Selected Counties: 1980 to 1985" by the U.S. Census Bureau.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
June 26, 1989
5


COLLECTING
HISPANIC CATHOLIC DEFECTION: "Defection Among Hispanics" is a two-page article from the July 1988 issue of America magazine, a national Catholic journal. For a copy send $1 to America, 106 W. 56th St., New York, N.Y. 10019 (212) 581-4640.
HISPANIC POPULATION DATA: "Population Estimates by Race and Hispanic Origin for States, Metropolitan Areas, and Selected Counties: 1980 to 1985" is an 81 -page report with a 16-page section on Hispanics. For a copy (specify Series P-25, No. 1040-RD-1) contact the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) MINIMUM WAGE: "The President’s Veto of the Minimum Wage Bill: Impact on Poor and Minority Workers" is a 14-page report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities that includes data on Hispanics. For a copy send $3 to the CBPP, Publications, 236 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Suite 305, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 544-0591.
NEW AIDS SURVEY: In its June 9 issue of Science magazine, the American Association for the Advancement of Science has an article, "Monitoring the AIDS Epidemic in the United States: A Network Approach," based on a survey that concludes Hispanics and other minorities have been overcounted among people inflicted with AIDS. The four-page article states that Hispanics represent 6% of AIDS sufferers, not 14% as reported by the Centers for Disease Control. For a copy send $5.50 to AAAS, 1333 H St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 326-6540.
PLAYWRIGHTS PROJECT: The 1989-90 INTAR Hispanic Playwrights-in-Residence Laboratory seeks scripts. Deadline is June 30. Winners receive a weekly stipend and attend work sessions with the laboratory’s founder, Marfa Irene Fornes, for 20 weeks. Applicants should submit a script, letter of intent and a brief biographical narrative to Fornes at INTAR, Box 788, New York, N.Y. 10108 (212) 664-8561. POPULATION PROFILE: "Population Profile of the United States: 1989," a 56-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau, contains sections on the Hispanic, black and elderly populations and gives trends and projections for the country and by state. The report also contains data on income, migration, marital status and other areas. For a copy (specify Series P-23, No. 159) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
BUSINESS OWNERS: "A Business Owner’s Guide to the Business Opportunity Reform Act of 1989" is a handbook published by the Latin American Manufacturers Association on changes in the Small Business Administration’s 8(a) program. For a free copy, send a self-addressed envelope — at least 6"x9" — with $1.25 postage to LAMA, 419 New Jersey Ave. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-3803.
CONNECTING
CHILDREN WRITERS REACH OUT Several Hispanic elementary and junior high school children from Washington, D.C., read June 19 from books they had written on their experiences as immigrants as part of an effort to improve literacy and ties with students in El Salvador.
The Books Project, coordinated in part by the School Based Mental Health Program at Children’s Hospital and the George Washington University Office of Community Affairs, uses children mostly from eastern El Salvador. The children write and illustrate bilingual books, which are to be delivered to students in El Salvador along with blank books for their responses.
Co-sponsored by the Washington, D.C., Mayor’s Office on Latino Affairs, the reading was patterned after that of an Albuquerque, N.M., group of students, Working Classroom Storytellers, who traveled to Washington in March to read from books they had written and sent to Nicaragua
GROUP PLANS FOR QUINCENTENARY New World Arts Consortia, a Houston-based coalition formed to commemorate the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ exploration of the Americas, began plans last month to sponsor exhibits on trade and cultural ties between Houston and Latin American countries.
The 2-year-old group, made up of 32 Hispanic organizations from the Houston area, will feature an exhibition on a different country for every month in 1992, the year marking the 500th anniversary of Columbus’ voyage. The exhibits will also circulate to other Texas cities.
For more information contact New World Arts Consortia, David Garcia, Director, University of Houston Downtown Center, 101 Main St., Houston, Texas 77002 (713) 221-1095.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES The California Community Reinvestment Corporation names Daniel Lopez, a vice president with Citicorp Savings in Oakland, as its president. The newly formed CCRC is a consortium of California banks, including the four largest, that pooled $100 million for loans to developers of low-income housing. The corporation will open its headquarters this fall in Los Angeles...The Santa Ana, Calif., Rancho Santiago Community College Chancellor, Robert Jensen, names Edward Hernandez as vice chancellor for student affairs and community services... Roberto Barragan, most recently the executive director of Adelante Inc. in Berkeley, Calif., begins his position as executive director of the Mission Economic Development Association in San Francisco...
Calendar_________________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Unk’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
DINNER
San Francisco June 29
La Raza Centro Legal is hosting its second annual dinner, "Bridging the Justice Gap." Several individuals and organizations will be honored at the event for their work within the Latino community and
as representatives of the Bay Area Latino community.
Mario Salgado (415) 826-5506 AWARD BANQUET Los Angeles June 29
The Mexican American Bar Association is holding its Hispanic Woman of the Year Award Banquet. Other awards will also be given for community involvement in politics, arts, professional, finan-cial/fund-raising, entrepreneurial, education, government, law, community service and manufacturing.
Valeria Velasco (213) 821-7890
GOLF CLASSIC Los Angeles June 30
The University of Southern California’s Mexican American Alumni Association is holding its ninth annual golf classic. Activities include golf competitions, a cocktail reception and an awards banquet. Proceeds will support the association.
Raul Vargas (213) 743-2456
EDUCATION
Washington, D.C. June 30-July 5 The National Education Association’s annual convention, with the theme "Public Education: America’s Path to Progress," is expected to draw thousands of teachers, college faculty and education support staff. Issues such as bilingual education and the federal role in education will be debated. An NEA-sponsored joint conference on the concerns of minorities and women will also be held June 27,28, with Denver Mayor Federico Pena being a major speaker.
Alicia Sandoval (202) 822-7200
COMING SOON
AIDS PREVENTION National Puerto Rican Coalition New York July 7 Jose Cruz (202) 223-3915
6
June 26, 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
NACME
RESEARCH ASSOCIATE
The National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, Inc. (NACME) seeks a Research Associate. NACME is a nonprofit organization working to increase the number of minority engineers. Its initiatives range from elementary school through college-level programs.
GENERAL DUTIES:
The Associate will participate in the design, conduct, and analysis of research programs. The successful candidate will work with other organization staff as well as university faculty and administration, pre-college program directors, industry sponsors, and other educational organizations.
QUALIFICATIONS:
Candidates should have an earned doctorate, strong quantitative skills, facility with data analysis using SPSS, familiarity with educational development and minority issues, and excellent written and verbal communication skills. Experience with educational program design and evaluation a plus.
SALARY AND BENEFITS:
Located in New York City, the position offers an excellent compensation package commensurate with qualifications.
APPLICATION PROCEDURES:
Cover letter, vitae, salary history, and supporting materials by June 30 to: Dr. Douglas L. Friedman, Director of Research, NACME, 3 West 35th Street, New York, NY 10001.
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Applications received by July 15, 1989 will receive full consideration; open until filled.
Send letter of application, vita and placement file and three letters of recommendation to Dr. Adria F. Klein, Dean, School of Education, California State University, Bakersfield, 9001 Stockdale Hwy., Bakersfield, Calif. 93311-1099.
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Hispanic Link News Service buys three 650 word feature/opinion pieces weekly, paying on acceptance. A story you cover locally may have national interest or application. For details and writer’s guidelines, write Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
I v:SITU^SIwaMdM
Hispanic Link intern seeks position 30-to-40 hours a week evenings and/or weekends. Have journalism degree and 5 years of progressive office experience. Am WordPerfect, MultiMate and Lotus 1-2-3 proficient, but will consider all offers. Please contact Rhonda at 234-0280, M-F between 9 am. and 5 p.m.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ONE YEAR SUBSTITUTE POSITION
DUTIES: Teach Spanish courses from beginning to advanced; grammar courses for native speakers; and civilization courses in Spanish and English.
QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. in Spanish language and literature; familiarity with current methodologies in the teaching of foreign languages; two years teaching experience and fluency in English are required; knowledge of French and/or theory of bilingual education desirable.
STARTING SALARY RANGE: $28,630 TO $31,716. Commensurate with experience and qualifications.
SEND COVER LETTER AND RESUME BY JULY 28 TO:
DR. ANA MARIA HERNANDEZ HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COL-LEGE/CUNY
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MARKETING ASSOCIATE-Telemarketing
College degree in marketing or business, or equivalent combination of education and experience. 2-4 years in marketing, preferably in higher education, telemarketing and telephone sales experience, with management of telemarketers. Must be a creative, energetic self-starter with excellent communication skills, particularly a persuasive telephone style. Expertise in marketing and knowledge of higher education preferred.
Persons interested in applying for the above position should submit a resume to:
PBS
Attn: Carla A. Gibson 1320 Braddock Place Alexandria, Va. 22314 (703) 739-5235 PBS is an equal opportunity employer.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
June 26, 1989


Arts & Entertamment
FINALLY, THE BIG APPLE: The traveling exhibit Hispanic Art in the United States has arrived at its latest engagement to a lukewarm reception by New Yorkers.
The exhibit, which opened earlier this month at the Brooklyn Museum of Fine Arts, has rekindled the argument among critics and art lovers that there is no homogenous Latino art style.
"(That) style is a myth," said Luis Cancel, director of the Bronx Museum. "Twentieth century Latin American artists have engaged in all styles... from surrealism to geometric abstraction to conceptualism and figurative expressionism, just like North Americans and Europeans."
New York Times critic Michael Kimmelman added that "although the quality of the works is high, the premise under which the curators made their selections is doubtful."
Hispanic Art in the United States: Thirty Painters and Sculptors was organized for the Houston Museum of Fine Arts by Jane Livingston and John Beardsley, curators of the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C.
The exhibit, touted as the "largest and most comprehensive" of its kind, premiered in Houston in October 1987. Since then it has had stops in Washington, Miami, Santa Fe, N.M., and Los Angeles.
The show will be on view at its final stop through Sept. 4.
PRIDE OF THE PEACOCK: Two NBC television series captured the sole Imagen Awards given June 15 by the National Conference of Christians and Jews.
The series were the daytime soap opera Santa Barbara, which features actors A Martinez and Carmen Zapata in regular, Hispanic roles, and the prime-time drama LA. Law, with Jimmy Smits in its ensemble cast.
L.A. Law was the sole imagen winner in 1987.
The awards are given in unspecified numbers and categories to organizations or film and television producers whose projects display a positive Latino image. The 1988 winners were the films La Bamba, The Milagro Beanfield War and Stand and Deliver.
ONE LINER: Entries will be accepted through June 30 for the 1988-89 INTAR Hispanic Playwrights-in-Residence Laboratory, a 20-week, paid internship under the tutelage of Maria Irene Fornes (details in Collecting)...
Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
KVEA DISPUTE THICKENS: The February resignation of vice president/general manager Frank Cruz from Spanish-language television station KVEA in Los Angeles and the firing last month of the station’s news director Bob Navarro has caused the National Hispanic Media Coalition in Los Angeles to enter the fray.
In a June 8 letter to KVEA’s parent, the Telemundo network, the coalition noted, "KVEA fails to meet the needs of the Latino community by any measure of responsiveness."
The coalition claimed that KVEA shows only "token support" for Latino community-based organizations. In addition, it said, there is only one Hispanic on Telemundo's board of directors. Reliance Capital Group, the New York corporate holdings company that controls the network, has none.
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No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
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The letter invited Reliance Chairman Saul Steinberg to come to Los Angeles to discuss the corporation’s management policies with the coalition’s steering committee. Reliance offered to send its third-ranking executive, but the coalition responded June 16, saying that was "not acceptable."
NEW PUBLICATIONS: Hispanic Student-USA, a semiannual, controlled-circulation bilingual magazine for high school juniors and seniors, was distributed this spring to more than 600 high schools in 14 states and Puerto Rico. Published by Tinsley Communications Inc., the premiere edition had a circulation of 150,000, said publisher William Tinsley.
The magazine’s goal is "to communicate to Hispanic high school students the importance of preparing themselves to reach desirable educational and career goals," stated promotional materials. The magazine emphasizes careers, career planning, education, self-help strategies, financial aid, lifestyles and sports.
For a free copy or information about advertising rates, contact Marty Muguira at Tinsley
Communications, 101 N. Armistead Ave., Suite 208, Hampton, Va. 23669 (804) 723-4499.
A biweekly Spanish-language newspaper was launched May 26 in the Washington, D.C., area. Las Americas is published by Connie Freeman, former general manager at El Latino, another Washington, D.C., Spanish-language newspaper. Otto Escobar, former editor at El Latino, serves as editor of the new venture.
The newspaper has a circulation of 14,000, says Freeman, adding that she plans to go weekly later this summer.
Subscriptions are $10 for one year. Contact Las Americas at 670 N. Glebe Rd., Suite B-3, Arlington, Va. 22203 (703) 841-1447.
NOTABLE: Charles Rivera, former editor of Social Education and Nuestro magazines, was named managing editor of Caribbean Business in San Juan, Puerto Rico. He began June 23.
Danilo Alfaro


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l ; I ' :!Making The News This Week l A federal grand jury indicts U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar on i racketeering charges. If convicted Aguilar, 58, who sits in San Jose, tional Testing Service, speaks at the commencement for the fourth graduating class of The National Hispanic University in Oakland, Calif ... California state Sen . Joseph Montoya and his former aide Amiel Jaramillo plead not guilty to charges of using their positions for extortion and racketeering ... T. Emmet Clarie, a U.S. district court judge in Hartford, Conn., sentences Juan Segarra Palmer, the Harvard edu cated Puerto Rican nationalist charged with masterminding the $7.1 million robbery at a Wells Fargo depot six years ago, to 65 years in prison and fines him $500, 000 ... A California court of appeals upholds the conviction of mass murderer Juan Corona. Corona, a 55-year-old former farm labor contractor, was convicted in the 1971 slayings of 25 migrant farm workers ... Calif., could face 55 years in prison, $2 million in fines and impeach ! ment. .. Anita Del Rio, vice president for the Far West Region of the ' League of United Latin American Citizens, sends a letter to U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist stating that the region . opposes pay increases for federal jurists because of what she says are their anti-civil rights rulings ... Mari-Luci Jaramillo, the former U.S. am11' bassador to Honduras and now an assistant vice president for Educa ! Bilingual Ed. Revisionist Group_. By Felix Perez The rapidly spreading California-based or ganization that caused a bitter fight in Los An geles late last winter when it sought to withdraw bonuses for bilingual education teachers has targeted its latest campaign at San Francisco's bilingual education system. Pointing to Learning English Advocates Drive's ties with U.S. English, detractors of the organization question its motivations. LEAD successfully lobbied the San Francisco American Federation of Teachers to in clude a plank in its contract proposal to the school district two weeks ago that bilingual education methods be chosen by individual schools, not the district. 11AII we're trying to do is, mainly as educators, to speak out and say the bilingual program isn't working, II said Peterson. LEAD was formed in March 1987 in Sun Valley, Calif., the Los Angeles suburb where Peterson has taught third-graders for 23 of the last 26 years. Peterson, 49, said she turned to U.S. English for support in forming her organization after being rebuffed repeatedly by others. According to Peterson, who now teaches kindergarten, the 20,000-member organiza tion has chapters in Santa Ana, Garden Grove and Newhall. Last August LEAD set up shop in New York City and seeks to do likewise in Dade County, Fla., Chicago, Boston and Dallas. While neither Peterson nor U.S. English chairman Stanley Diamond could give precise nds Campaign figures on the funding LEAD has received from U . S . English, both agreed it is approximately $2,000. Diamond said his organization also gave LEAD a $1 0, 000 grant to publish a book this fall on research supporting LEAD's philosophy . "We got involved just as a matter of con science. We agree with Sally (Peterson) that immigrant children aren't getting a fair shake, II said Diamond from his San Francisco office. Peterson said the bulk of LEAD's budget this year, which she said was less than $25,000, comes from membership dues. Despite the relatively small amount of money it has received from U.S. English to date, there are several people, including CASE's Quevedo and United Teachers-Los Angeles union representative Antonio Villaragoza, who continued on page 2 There are some bilingual teachers who feel that switching to site-based instructional decision making would lead in many cases to little or no use of the child's native language. One critic of the site-based approach is the ! California Association for Bilingual Education. Martinez Decision Helps Hispanic GOP ! "Under the guise of a quest for flexibility, dis ! tricts are excused from their responsibilities (of : educating limited-English-proficient children) i more often than not," said CABE President Aurora Quevedo. I Sally Peterson, the leader and founder of LEAD, said her group believes instruction using a student's native language may not be the best way in all cases. By Rhonda Smith In a move that could help Claude Pepper's 18th Congressional District seat in Florida go to a Hispanic Republican candidate, Hialeah Mayor Raul Martinez chose not to make a bid for it at the last minute. Democrats were caught off guard June 15 when state Sen. Jack Gordon, the best known Democrat in the race, withdrew two days after announcing his intent to vie for the seat. Gor don said his withdrawal was precipitated by Latino Population Grows 23%, 1980-'85 By Danilo Alfaro The U.S. Hispanic population grew 22.9% from 1980 to 1985, more than four times the rate of increase experienced by the overall U.S. population, according to a report released by the U.S. Census Bureau June 21. The gain for Latinos during those years was 3.2 million, for a total of 17.5 million. Census projections for 1988 put the U.S. Latino popula tion at 19.4 million. The report, Estimates by Race and Hispanic Origin for States, Metropolitan Areas, and Selected Counties: 1980 to 1985, II showed that the Hispanic population was con centrated in a handful of states. As in the past, California (5,873,000), Texas (3,690,000), New York (1 ,879,000) and Florida (1,1 02,000) con tinued to dominate. Hispanic population and the proportion of Hispanics increased in all 50 states, the report continued on page 4 Republican National Committee Chairman Lee Atwater's statement to the Cuban American National Foundation that Pepper's seat should go to a Cuban American. Gordon, who is white, said the statement was racially polarizing. Martinez, mentioned early as one of few can didates with a good chance of defeating a Hispanic Republican, opted not to run after Gordon withdrew. He had indicated earlier he would seek the seat if Gordon did not . But ac cording to Steve Bovo, of Martinez's office, the Democratic Party in Dade County appeared to be splintered and II had not taken a step to back one as late as June 17, when a meeting of Democratic leaders took place. Of the four Republican candidates who filed, the two Cuban Americans are state Sen. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and Miami business owner Car los Perez. Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez and the Cuban American National Foundation have announced they will support Ros-Lehtinen . Of the nine Democrats who qualified, the Latinos are Miami City Commissioner Rosario Kennedy and Miami banker Raul Masvidal. The primaries will be held Aug. 1, and the spe cial election Aug. 29 State-by-State Population Counts, 1980-85: See Page 5

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Report: Minimum Wage Veto Hurts Latinos and Blacks By Rhonda Smith Hispanic and black workers would be most harshly affected by President Bush's veto of the minimum wage bill, according to a report released June 15 by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in Washington, D. C. Congress failed to override the veto June 14, the day after Bush rejected the bill. The proposed bill would have increased the hourly minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.55 over a three-year period. In vetoing the bill, Bush said the increase would cost the country thousands of jobs. Instead, he proposed an increase to $4.25 over the same period. Included with his proposal was a six month wagell during which the employee would be compensated 80% of the minimum wage, or $3.40. According to the report, 11Among blacks and Hispanics, about one in four workers paid by the hour now earn wages so low that full-time work at these wages [would] not lift a family of three out of Supreme Court Limits Anti-Racism Law By Danilo Alfaro While declining to reverse a 1976 civil rights decision allowing the use of a Civil War-era law in race discrimination suits, the U.S. Supreme Court has substantially narrowed the scope of the statute. The 5-4 decision, handed down June 15, restricts the ability of plaintiffs to fight on-the-job discrimination. in a period of U.S. Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) told Weekly Report. II'Kinder and gentler' doesn't mean a thing as far as civil rights and affirmative action are concerned. II Richard Larson, legal director at the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Los Angeles, agreed. 11This has been a horrible Supreme Court term.11 The Civil Rights Act of 1964 provides only for the payment of back pay and allows a judge to order the racial harasser to stop. The 1866 law, known as Section 1981, was designed to guarantee the right of newly freed slaves to enter into and enforce contracts. It has often been preferred by plaintiffs in bias lawsuits be cause it allows them to receive punitive damages as well as back pay. Last year the court voted to reconsider the 1976 decision, Runyon vs. McCrary, that al lowed Section 1981 to be used in seeking redress for private acts of racial discrimination. As part of its June 15 decision, the court voted unanimously to uphold Runyon. Writing the majority opinion last week in Pat terson vs. Mclean Credit Union was Reagan appointed Justice Anthony Kennedy. The opinion interpreted Section 1981 as providing protection only at the outset of an agreement, not afterward. Catholic Church Suffers Annual Exodus By Karen Zacarias An average of 60,000 Hispanics are leaving the U.S. Catholic church yearly and 1 million have left in the last 15 years, according to a report presented at the National Conference of Catholic Bishops' annual spring meeting June 16-19 in South Orange, N.J. Although Hispanics make up one-third of the estimated 53 million U.S. Catholics, the bishops expressed concern over the number of Hispanics turning to conservative Protestant denominations. Some Catholic officials, including the Rev. Francis Gillespie of Georgetown University, concede the church has neglected Hispanics. Gillespie, a specialist in Hispanic research at the Center for Applied Research Apostolate, said the church can stop the defections by encouraging and helping Hispanics attend Catholic institutions of higher learning and by enabling Latinos to reach more leadership positions in the parishes . liThe Hispanic community has a great deal to offer mainstream American said Gillespie, 11from the devotion to Our Lady Guadalupe to the strength of family ties.11 LEAD Turns to U.S. English for Support continued from page 1 believe that their agendas are strikingly similar. 11They're basically anti any kind of bilingual education, II said Villaragoza. What LEAD is doing 11falls smack in the middle of their (U.S. English's) program to make English the official Quevedo offered this blunt assessment of LEAD's objective: 111t's critical that we deal with what the issue is. It's not language or peda gogy. It's Just as they had in Los Angeles, tensions are running high in San Francisco over LEAD's bilingual education proposal. 2 San Francisco has 19,000 limited-English proficient students, mostly Hispanic and Chinese. The city has 700 bilingual education and English-as-a-Second-Language teachers. In Los Angeles UTLA votes calling on the dis tric to rescind the $5,000 bonuses for bilingual education teachers remain sequestered. Lawyers are weighing a challenge that the sig natures required to put the item on the ballot were not collected by the deadline. UTLA and the teachers were expected to ratify a contract late last week including a pay differential. June 26, 1989 National Puerto Rican Coalition Vice Presi dent Ramon Daub6n said, have a large segment of our population whose salary is at or near the minimum wage, and the economics today are nowhere near where they were in 1981.11 Abel Quintela, president of th•e U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, said he empathizes with both sides. 11We recognize that the current minimum wage is not enough, but as business owners we have to look at the bottom line. II Judge Agrees to City's At-Large Elections Plan By Danilo Alfaro Stockton, Calif., can drop its single-district election system and begin voting at large, U.S. District Judge Edward Garda in Sacramento, Calif., ruled June 15. The change comes amid a move by several California cities to adopt single-district elections because of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in March. Stockton, a city of 150,000 that is 60 miles east of San Francisco, is 22% Hispanic. One Latino, Tom Olivas, sits on the nine-member council. The city had moved from at-large to single district voting in 1971. In 1986 the city restored the at-large system through a voter initiative. In December 1987 Rudy Badillo, a student at the University of California at Berkeley and longtime Stockton resident, filed a suit chal lenging the conversion. Joaquin Avila, a lead attorney in Badillo vs. City of Stockton, told Weekly Report that the ruling llmay provide to other cities the excuse for not providing district elections but I don't think it sends a message." He added that he planned to appeal the decision. Marcin Relinquishes Chair By Rhonda Smith Oscar Moran stepped aside as LULAC Foundation chairman June 1 0 while an audit is conducted of the organization's finances, according to Eduardo Pena, a past chairman of the foundation. Moran relinquished his post after allega tions surfaced that funds from the foundation were II com mingled with other funds that belonged to LULAC,11 said Pffa. Moran could not be reached by press time. 11He hasn't actually resigned, II Pena said, II but has agreed to step down as chairman until the audit is completed. II Moran was elected chairman April 22. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Miguel Perez China's Latino Connections In the Latino community, we know them as bright, hard-working people who came from China to Latin America and enriched our way of life, our family values, our economies and our culture, especially our cuisine. But we have many misconceptions about the Chinese Latinos-espe cially when we think that they have lost their ties with China. Because they came to Latin America three or four generations ago, we tend to think of our "Chinos" almost as if they were indigenous to Latin America. But ask them directly and you will hear a different story. Ask the Latino Chinese who now live in the United States and they will tell you that they are worried for the safety of their friends and rela tives not back home in Cuba, Ecuador, Panama or Nicaragua, but in the home of their ancestors, their beloved China Even in New York's Latino community, there are many misconceptions about the Chinos. Latinos tend to think that most are from Cuba, mainly because there are so many Cuban-Chinese restaurants in the city. But they come from all over Latin America. This is why Latinos became known as the original rainbow people. There are Latinos of every race and ethnic background. PAIN FROM BOTH SIDES Chinos have been Latinos since the early 1900s, when they migrated to Latin America seeking the freedom they couldn't find in their homeland. In many Latin countries, they learned that repression is a 1 universal human condition. "I hurt as much for Latin America as I do for .I China," a Chinese-Cuban-American acquaintance explained to me. { " I've had to deal with the pain and the drama of communism from both ! sides. I saw the pain of my people and country, which I still carry in my { heart, and now the pain of the motherland of my father, which I also f consider my second homeland . Although I was born in Cuba, I have a 1 sister who is living in Canton Province, so you can imagine how wor l ried I am." ! ! l I Their family ties and traditions are so strong that-even after at least two migrations through at least three corners of the world with three dif ferent cultures and languages-they still know who they are and where they came from. This is why the massacre of the Chinese people by the so-called People's Liberation Army is so hard for all Chinos to accept. "Nobody believed that the Army would attack the people. That wasn't part of the program," says Jorge Cruz, president of the Chinese-Ecuadorian As sociation in the United States. The whole world saw it very clearly as we watched television reports showing the Chinese -army massacring its people and the Chinese people responding only with words of recon ciliation. STUDENTS PAYING WITH THEIR LIVES "As a Latin American, I can say that I have lived through similar ex periences, because my country (Ecuador) has gone through repres1 sive, totalitarian, military regimes, and I have noticed that the , communication we see in China between the people and the army has never existed in Latin America," says Cruz, who visited China with other 1 Chinese-Ecuadorians in 1987. We don't know how long they will have to wait before they can go back to a peaceful China, or how long before the Chinese people can obtain the same freedom cherished by their brothers and sisters in Europe and in some parts of the Americas. We saw the Chinese students on television, paying with their own lives to show the world the value of democracy and reminding those who take it for granted that we have much for which to be thankful. The Chinese have given the world its biggest demonstration of the failure of communism and totalitarianism and los Chinos and other Latinos can now use it as a guide for fighting Latin American repres s ion . (Miguel Perez i$ a columnist with the New York Daily News.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua THE NOT-SO-RICH-AND-FAMOUS: Not everybody can be an in credible athlete like beisbol's Jose Canseco (who may be voted into the All-Star Game without lifting a bat) or a fantastic actress like Rita Moreno or a lovable astronaut like Franklin Chang-Diaz. Some of us have to grab our 15 or 1 0 or however many minutes of fame Andy Warhol said we were each entitled to, and cherish the moment. Today, I nominate for Sin Pelos' Gallery of Near-Greats: CANDIDATE NO. 1: He's Jesse Godinez, an optician who lives in Roseville, Calif. In his spare time, he writes Spanglish limericks. Most, he admits, are "almost nasty." He claims that he's composed 30 or 50 of them in the past 18 years. Some day he hopes to have enough for a book. Here's a forgettable one he sent me: A squeamish man of ElDorado, bought raisin bread unaiiopasa1o. He thought, "Of all strange things, this raisin has wings!" Then he hurried to the excusado! It may not measure up to the young girl from Nantucket, but at least Jesse made the effort. If you can do better, I'll reserve a space for you. CANDIDATE NO. 2: He's Robert L6pez, a Los Angeles art gallery manager. A year ago, he started doing a Latino Elvis Presley routine as a joke. But acquaintances went {i{taros whenever he wiggled in his white Viva Las Vegas jumpsuit, so he tried out his act on stage. His big moment-so far, at least-came the day after Cinco de Mayo, when he opened Bob Goldthwait's Los Angeles concert at the Wiltern Theater. Can he sing? "I admit I'm not the best," he says, "but I've gotten a whole lot bet ter." No one with that much humility will ever make it in Hollywood, of course. CANDIDATE NO.3: She's talented New Mexico weaver Teresa Archuleta. When the Coors traveling Hispanic art exhibit opened at the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos recently, Teresa attended wearing a black arm band and a pin she designed -a Coors label with a slash through it and the words, "Arte SfCoors No." Her Coors hosts weren't amused. They asked her to remove the pin or leave the museum, where by coincidence some of her weavings hang in the permanent collec tion. She responded that she was not asking others to remove their jewelry. Her point made, she went quietly. Author/husband Jim Sagel reminds Sin Pelos, "As Coors con tinues to wash a bit of its guilt away with its not-unappreciated sup port for the arts, there are still some of us who refuse to swallow all the suds." CANDIDATE NO.4: He's Chris Herrera, from East Chicago, Ind., where Weekly Report editor FelixPerez grew up. Chris' dog was picked up for loitering and tossed into the city pound. So Chris reacted the way any dog's best friend would. He broke into the city pound. For some reason, his arrest on trespass charges was recorded in the national press. CANDIDATES NO. 5 & 6: In the dayroom of New York's Rikers Island prison, inmates George V8squez and JeslsFemandez argued over a dominoes game and Fernandez stabbed Vasquez to death. Kay Barb(3ic o Hi spanic Link Weekly Report June 26, 1989

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State-Level Hispanic Representation: 1985 oR• Every Metro Area Shows Increase continued from page 1 said. The West region of the United States had an increase of 27.3%. The Northeast region experienced only 15.2% growth . Seven metropolitan areas together contained more than half of the Hispanic population in 1985, the report stated. Los Angeles had the most, 3. 7 million. New York (2.3 million), Miami (815,000), San Fran cisco (775, 000) and Chicago (757, 000) had the next highest popula tions. Nearly nine out of every 1 0 Hispanics resided in metropolitan areas in 1 985. Every metropolitan area with a Latino population of more than 10,000 showed an increase from 1980 to 1985, the report estimated. Those with the highest rate of increase were Midland, Texas (51.9%), Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood-Pompano Beach, Fla. (47.4%), Merced, Calif. (46.1 %), Odessa, Texas (41.9%), and Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas (41.3%). NJ DE CT NH MA AI EJ DC Percent u.s. 7.3 Percent D Less than 1.0 [ill 1.0 to 2.5 II 2.5 to 7.5 7.5 to 15.0 15.0 or more LARGEST HISPANIC COUNTY POPULATIONS: 1980, 1985 (in thousands) Los Angeles, Calif. Dade, Fla. Cook, Ill. Bexar, Texas Harris, Texas Bronx, N.Y. Kings, N.Y. Orange, Calif. New York, N.Y. El Paso, Texas San Diego, Calif. Queens, N.Y. Hidalgo, Texas TOTAL %HISPANIC %INCREASE 1980 1985 1980 1985 2,077 588 400 465 368 396 395 286 336 300 274 263 232 2,743 759 604 544 489 443 434 380 377 360 358 318 280 27.8% 36.2 9.3 47.0 15.3 33.9 17.7 14.8 23.5 62.5 14 . 7 13.9 81.9 33.0o/o 43.0 11 .4 48.5 18.0 38.1 19.3 17.7 25.6 67.5 76.6 16.6 82 . 9 32.1% 28.9 23 . 1 17.0 33 . 2 11.8 9.9 32.9 12 . 0 20.0 30 . 7 20.6 21.0 Source: "Population Estimates by Race and Hispanic Origin for States , Metropol i tan Areas , and Selected Counties: 1980 to 1985" by the U .S. Bureau of the Census. 4 June 26, 1989 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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State, Regional Hispanic Populations: 1980-1985 I Region, division, and State Percent Hispanic April 1, July 1, July 1, July 1, July 1, July 1, 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1980 1985 United States ...................... 1,564,000 1,627,700 1,680,000 1,736,900 1,776,000 1,817,800 2 . 9 3.3 Northeast. .............................. 31,900 32,800 33,800 34 , 600 35,500 36,500 0.6 0.6 Midwest ................................ 143,800 145,600 146,400 150,000 152,100 156,000 0.8 0.9 South . . ................................ 673,700 704,200 731,400 757,600 777,600 794,800 2.8 3 . 2 West .................................. 714,700 745,200 768,400 794,700 810,800 830,500 9.9 10.6 ' , • New England ........................ 10,200 10,800 11,100 11,500 11,900 12,400 0 . 5 0.6 Maine .... .............................. 2,100 2,200 2,200 2,300 2,400 2,600 (B) (B) New Hampshire .......................... 1,000 1,100 1 , 000 1,100 1,100 1,200 (B) (B) Vermont. ............................. . . 2,000 2,100 2,200 2,200 2,500 2,700 (B) (B) Massachusetts .... ....................... 1,000 1,100 1 '100 1,100 1,200 1,300 (B) (B) Rhode Island ............................ 1 , 000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,200 1,100 (B) (B) Connecticut ............................. 3,000 3,300 3,400 3,500 3,500 3,600 (B) (B) Middle Atlantic ..... ......... ........ . 21, 700 21,900 22,600 23,000 23,600 24 , 100 0.6 0.7 New York ............................... 17,700 17,700 18,200 18,500 18 , 900 19,200 1.0 1.1 New .Jersey ..... ........................ --Pennsylvania .... ........................ 4,100 4,200 4,500 4,600 4,700 4,900 (B) (B) East North Central .................... 74,900 74, 800 74,900 76,000 77,400 80,000 0.8 0 . 8 Ohio ................................... 19,500 19 , 400 19,400 19,600 20,000 20,500 0 . 9 0.9 Indiana ..... ............ ................ 10,100 9 , 800 10,000 9,600 10,000 10,400 0.6 0.6 Illinois ••• 0 0 ••••••••••••• 0 ••• 0 0 ••••• 0. 0. 18,600 18,500 18,500 19,100 19,300 19,800 0.9 1.0 Michigan ............................... 19,900 20,200 19,900 20,700 21,200 21, 900 1.1 1.2 Wisconsin ................. .......... ... 6,800 6,900 7,100 7,000 6,900 7,400 (B) (B) West North Central . ... ................ 68,900 70,700 71,500 74,000 74,700 76,000 0 . 9 1.0 Minnesota .......... .................... 5,600 5 , 600 5 , 500 5,400 5,600 5 , 700 (B) (B) Iowa ................................... 9,300 9,700 10,000 10,100 10,700 10,700 0.5 0 . 6 Missouri ...... ..................... ..... 7,200 7,200 7,400 8,000 8 , 000 8,000 (B) (B) North Dakota . ........................... 1,700 1,800 1,800 1,900 1,800 1,800 (B) (B) South Dakota ........ .................... 1,900 1,800 1,700 1,600 1,500 1,500 (B) (B) Nebraska ............................... 13,800 14,100 14,200 14,500 14,400 14,500 1.6 1.7 Kansas •••• 0 •••• 0 0 •••••••• 0 •••••• 0 ••••• 29,400 30,600 30,900 32,500 32,700 33,800 2 . 4 2 . 8 South Atlantic ........................ 58, 500 60,400 63 , 000 65,500 69,200 70,600 0.6 0 . 7 Delaware ............................... 2,100 2,200 2,300 2,400 2,400 2,600 (B) (B) Maryland ............................... 1,600 1,600 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,800 (B) (B) District of Columbia ....................... -. . . Virginia ................................. 4,500 4,700 4,900 4,900 5,300 5,700 (B) (B) West Virginia ............................ 4,400 4,500 4,600 5,100 5,300 5,300 (B) (B) North Carolina ........................... 8,700 8,800 9,300 10,200 10,700 11,200 0.3 0.4 South Carolina ........................... 5,300 5,400 5,900 5,700 6,200 6,300 (B) (B) Georgia ................................ 7,700 7,700 8,300 8,500 9,000 9,200 (B) (B) Florida ................................. 24,000 25,500 26,100 27,100 28,500 28,400 2.8 2 . 7 East South Central .................... 17,600 17,700 18,400 18,800 19,600 20,300 0.3 0.3 Kentucky ............................... 6,300 6,000 6,400 6,300 6,600 6,600 (B) (B) Tennessee .............................. 3,300 3,300 3,600 3,700 4,100 4,300 (B) (B) Alabama ............................... 2,700 2,900 3,100 3,100 3,400 3,700 (B) (B) Mississippi .............................. 5,300 5,500 5,300 5,700 5,500 5,800 (8) (B) West South Central •••••••••••••••••• 0 597,600 626,100 650,000 673,300 688,800 703,900 8 . 6 9.5 Arkansas ............................... 5,500 5,600 6,000 6,300 6,900 6,900 (B) (B) Louisiana ............................... 15,400 15,900 16,400 16,900 16,700 16,700 1.2 1.2 Oklahoma .............................. 20,500 22,400 24,400 25,100 25,600 25,200 1.6 1.8 Texas .................................. 556,200 582,200 603,200 625,000 639,600 655,100 19.0 20.5 Mountain ............................ 509,200 527,600 542,200 557,800 567,100 576,300 12.4 12.8 Montana ............................... 4,900 5,300 5.600 5,800 5,800 5,800 (B) (B) Idaho .................................. 32,500 33,600 34,500 35,800 36,800 37,600 4.2 4.6 Wyoming ............................... 15,100 15,500 15,900 15,800 16,200 16,300 4.6 4 . 6 Colorado ............................... 71,400 73,800 75,000 75,600 75,600 75,700 12.7 12.5 New Mexico ............................. 231,500 238,400 245,300 253,700 259,100 264,500 33.4 33.8 Arizona ................................ 134,700 140,300 144,100 148,300 149,800 151,300 19.9 19.7 Utah ................................... 9,700 10 , 700 11,200 11,700 12,200 12,500 2 . 9 3.3 Nevada ................................ 9,400 10,000 10,600 11,100 11,800 12,500 6.5 7.5 Pacific .............................. 205,500 217,600 226,200 236,900 243,700 254,200 6 . 7 7.5 Washington ............................. 22,300 23,300 23,500 24,100 25,500 26,200 2.8 3.1 Oregon • 0 •• 0 ••• 0. 0 ••••••••••••••••••••• 21,400 22,900 23,500 24,500 25,500 26,200 2.5 2.9 California ............................ . . . 143,300 152,100 159,100 167,000 170,700 178,600 14 . 6 16.3 Alaska ................................. 3,700 3,800 4,000 4,400 4,400 4,700 (B) (B) Hawaii ................................. 14,700 15,500 16,100 16,900 17,700 18,400 7.3 7.8 Represents zero or a number which rounds to zero. (B) Indicates that 1980 population base was less than 1 0,000. Source: "Population Estimates by Race and Hispanic Origin for States, Metropolitan Areas, and Selected Counties: 1980 to 198511 by the U.S. Census Bureau. Hispanic Link Weekly Report June 26, 1989 5

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COLLECTING HISPANIC CATHOLIC DEFECTION: "Defection Among Hispanics" is a two-page article from the July 1988 issue of America magazine, a national Catholic journal. For a copy send $1 to America, 1 06 W. 56th St., New York, N.Y. 10019 (212) 581-4640. HISPANIC POPULATION DATA: "Population Estimates by Race and Hispanic Origin for States, Metropolitan Areas, and Selected Counties: 1980 to 1985" is an 81-page report with a 16-page section on Hispanics. For a copy (specify Series P-25, No. 1 040-RD-1) contact the Superin tendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) MINIMUM WAGE: "The President's Veto of the Minimum Wage Bill: Impact on Poor and Minority Workers" is a 14-page report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities that includes data on Hispanics. For a copy send $3 to the CBPP, Publications, 236 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Suite 305, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 544-0591. NEW AIDS SURVEY: In its June 9 issue of Science magazine, the American Association for the Advancement of Science has an article, "Monitoring the AIDS Epidemic in the United States: A . Network Ap proach," based on a survey that concludes Hispanics and other minorities have been over counted among people inflicted with AIDS. The four-page article states that Hispanics represent 6% of AIDS suf ferers, not 14% as reported by the Centers for Disease Control. For a copy send $5.50 to AAAS, 1333 H St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 326-6540. PLAYWRIGHTS PROJECT: The 1989-90 I NTAR Hispanic Playwrights-in-Residence Laboratory seeks scripts. Deadline is June 30. Winners receive a weekly stipend and attend work sessions with the laboratory's founder, Marfa I rene Fornes, for 20 weeks. Applicants should submit a script, letter of intent and a brief biographical narrative to Fornes at INTAR, Box 788, New York, N.Y. 10108 (212) 664-8561 . POPULATION PROFILE: "Population Profile of the United States: 1989," a 56-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau, contains sections on the Hispanic, black and elderly populations and gives trends and projections for the country and by state. The report also contains data on income, migration, marital status and other areas. For a copy (specify Series P-23, No. 159) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) BUSINESS OWNERS: .. A Business Owner's Guide to the Business Opportunity Reform Act of 1989" is a handbook published by the Latin American Manufacturers Association on changes in the Small Business Administration's 8(a) program. For a free copy, send a self-addressed envelope at least 6"x9" with $1.25 postage to LAMA, 419 New Jersey Ave. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-3803. I CONNECTING I CHILDREN WRITERS REACH OUT Several Hispanic elementary and junior high school children from Washington, D.C., read June 19 from books they had written on their experiences as immigrants as part of an effort to improve literacy and ties with students in El Salvador. The Books Project, coordinated in part by the School Based Mental Health Program at Children's Hospital and the George Washington University Office of Community Affairs, uses children mostly from eastern El Salvador. The children write and illustrate bilingual books, which are to be delivered to students in El Salvador alohg with blank books for their responses. Co-sponsored by the Washington, D. C., Mayor's Office on Latino Af fairs, the reading was patterned after that of an Albuquerque, N.M., group of students, Working Classroom Storytellers, who traveled to Washington in March to read from books they had written and sent to Nicaragua GROUP PLANS FOR QUINCENTENARY New World Arts Consortia, a Houston-based coalition formed to commemorate the SOOth anniversary of Christopher Columbus' ex ploration of the Americas, began plans last month to sponsor exhibits on trade and cultural ties between Houston and Latin American countries. The 2-year-old group, made up of 32 Hispanic organizations from the Houston area, will feature an exhibition on a different country for every month in 1992, the year marking the SOOth anniversary of Columbus' voyage. The exhibits will also circulate to other Texas cities. For more information contact New World Arts Consortia, David Garcfa, Director, University of Houston Downtown Center, 1 01 Main St., Houston, Texas 77002 (713) 221-1095. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES The California Community Reinvestment Corporation names Daniel Lopez, a vice president with Citicorp Savings in Oakland, as its presi dent. The newly formed CCRC is a consortium of California banks, including the four largest, that pooled $100 million for loans to developers of low-income housing. The corporation will open its headquarters this fall in Los Angeles ... The Santa Ana, Calif., Rancho San tiago Community College Chancellor, Robert Jensen, names Edward Hernandez as vice chancellor for student affairs and community ser vices ... Roberto Barragan, most recently the executive director of Adelante Inc. in Berkeley, Calif., begins his position as executive director of the Mission Economic Development Association in San Francisco ... Calendar as representatives of the Bay Area Latino com munity . EDUCATION Washington, D.C. June 30-July 5 TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two f..ridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. THIS WEEK DINNER San Fran cisco June 29 La Raza Centro Legal is hosting its second annual dinner, •Bridging the Justice Gap. • Several in dividuals and organizations will be honored at the event for their work within the Latino community and 6 Mario Salgado (41 5) 826-5506 AWARD BANQUET Los Angeles June 29 The Mexican American Bar Association is holding its Hispanic Woman of the Year Award Banquet. Other awards will also be given for community in volvement in politics, arts, professional, financial/fund-raising, entrepreneurial, education, government, law, community service and manufac turing. Valeria Velasco (213) 821-7890 GOLF CLASSIC Los Angeles June 30 The University of Southern California's Mexican American Alumni Association is holding its ninth an nual golf classic. Activities include golf competi tions, a cocktail reception and an awards banquet. Proceeds will support the association. Raul Vargas (213) 743-2456 June 26, 1989 The National Education Association's annual convention, with the theme "Public Education: America's Path to Progress," is expected to draw thousands of teachers, college faculty and educa tion support staff. Issues such as bilingual educa tion and the federal role in education will be debated. An NEA-sponsored joint conference on the concerns of minorities and women will also be held June 27, 28, with Denver Mayor Federico Peria being a major speaker. Alicia Sandoval (202) 822-7200 COMING SOON AIDS PREVENTION National Puerto Rican Coalition New York July 7 Jose Cruz (202) 223-3915 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I RESEARCH ASSOCIATE The National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, Inc. (NACME) seeks a Research Associate. NACME is a nonprofit organization working to increase the number of minority engineers. Its initiatives range from elementary school through college-level programs. GENERAL DUTIES: The Associate will participate in the design, conduct, and analysis of research programs. The successful candidate will work with other organization staff as well as university faculty and administration, pre-college program directors, industry sponsors, and other educational organizations. QUALIFICATIONS: C andidates should have an earned doctorate, strong quantitative skills, facility with data analysis using SPSS, familiarity with educational development and min ority issues, and excellent written and verbal communication skills. Experience with educational program design and evaluation a plus. SALARY AND BENEFITS: Located in New York City, the position offers an excellent compensation pack a ge commensurate with qualifications. A PPLICATION PROCEDURES: C over letter, vitae, salary history, and supporting materials by June 30 to: Dr. Douglas L. Friedman, Director of Research, NACME, 3 West 35th Street, New York, NY 10001. AA/EOE We are pleased to announce the open ing of our new office EGGLI, CARD, MESA & ORONA Certified Shorthand Reporters 135 East Live Oak Ave. Suite 208 Arcadia, Calif. 91 006 (818) 446-4849 SECONDARY EDUCATION Assistant or Associate Professor (tenure track) or Lecturer, $30,252-$48,204, beginning September 1989. REPORTERS/ CREATIVE WRITERS Hispanic Link News Service buys three 650 word feature/opinion pieces weekly, paying on acceptance. A story you cover locally may have national interest or application. For details and writer's guidelines, write Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. \1\il'li'ill \ lliil!llll\llillllll!l\11\lll! l Hispanic Link intern seeks position 30-to-40 hours a week evenings and/or weekends. Have journalism degree and 5 years of progressive office experience. Am WordPerfect, MultiMate and Lotus 1-2-3 proficient, but will consider all offers. Please contact Rhonda at 234-0280, M-F between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ONE YEAR SUBSTITUTE POSITION DUTIES: Teach Spanish courses from beginning to advanced; grammar courses for native speakers; and civilization cour ses in Spanish and English. QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. in Spanish language and literature; familiarity with current methodologies in the teaching of foreign languages; two years teaching ex perience and fluency in English are required; knowledge of French and/or theory of bilingual education desirable. STARTING SALARY RANGE: $28,630 TO $31,716 . Commensurate with ex perience and qualifications . SEND COVER LETTER AND RESUME BY JULY 28 TO: DR. ANA MARIA HERNANDEZ HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COL LEGE/CUNY 31-10 THOMSON AVENUE LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK 11101 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE AC TION EMPLOYER MARKETING ASSOCIATE Telemarketing College degree in marketing or busi ness, or equivalent combination of education and experience. 2-4 years in marketing, preferably in higher educa tion, telemarketing and telephone sales experience, with management of telemarketers. Must be a creative, ener getic self-starter with excellent communication skills, particularly a persuasive telephone style. Expertise in marketing and knowledge of higher education preferred. Persons interested in applying for the above position should submit a resume to: PBS Attn: Carla A. Gibson 1320 Braddock Place Alexandria, Va. 22314 (703) 739-5235 PBS is an equal oppottunity em /o er. Doctorate or ABO. At least three years full-time secondary teaching experience. Ability to 1) supervise student teachers in multicultural and/or ethnolinguistic set tings, 2) interact cooperatively and effec tively with faculty, students and public school personnel, and 3) pursue scholarly activity. Teach courses in secondary education, curriculum and instruction, and computer education. Supervision of secondary student teachers field ex periences will be a major responsibility. Applications received by July 15, 1989 will receive full consideration; open until filled. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target ana tional pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Send letter of application, vita and place ment file and three letters of recommen dation to Dr. Adria F. Klein, Dean, School of Education, California State University, Bakersfield, 9001 Stockdale Hwy., Bakersfield, Calif. 93311-1099. M!EOE Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: Ordered by ________ _ Organization ------------------Street -----------------------City, State & Zip _______ _ (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 Area Code & Phone per column inch. --------June 26, 1989 7

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Arts & Entertainment The exhibit, touted as the "largest and most comprehensive" of its kind, premiered in Houston in October 1987. Since then it has had stops in Washington, Miami, Santa Fe, N.M., and Los Angeles. FINALLY, THE BIG APPLE: The traveling exhibit Hispanic Art in the United States has arrived at its latest engagement to a lukewarm recep tion by New Yorkers. The show will be on view at its final stop through Sept. 4. PRIDE OF THE PEACOCK: Two NBC television series captured the sole Imagen Awards given June 15 by the National Conference of Christians and Jews. The exhibit, which opened earlier this month at the Brooklyn Museum of Fine Arts, has rekindled the argument among critics and art lovers that there is no homogenous Latino art style. "(That) style is a myth," said Luis Cancel, director of the Bronx Museum. "Twentieth century Latin American artists have engaged in all styles ... from surrealism to geometric abstraction to conceptualism and figurative expressionism, just like North Americans and Europeans." The series were the daytime soap opera Santa Barbara, which fea tures actors A Martinez and Carmen Zapata in regular, Hispanic roles, and the prime-time drama LA. Law, with Jimmy Smits in its ensemble cast. L.A. Law was the sole Imagen winner in 1987. New York Times critic Michael Kimmelman added that "although the quality of the works is high, the premise under which the curators made their selections is doubtful." The awards are given in unspecified numbers and categories to or ganizations or film and television producers whose projects display a positive Latino image. The 1988 winners were the films La Bamba, The Milagro Beanfield War and Stand and Deliver. ONE LINER: Entries will be accepted through June 30 for the 198889 INTAR Hispanic Playwrights-in-Residence Laboratory, a 20-week, paid internship under the tutelage of Marfa Irene Fornes (details in Col lecting) ... Hispanic Art in the United States: Thirty Painters and Sculptors was organized for the Houston Museum of Fine Arts by Jane Livingston and John Beardsley, curators of the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D. C. Media Report KVEA DISPUTE THICKENS: The February resignation of vice president/general manager Frank Cruz from Spanish-language television station KVEA in Los Angeles and the firing last month of the station's news director Bob Navarro has caused the National Hispanic Media Coalition in Los Angeles to enter the fray. In a June 8 letter to KVEA's parent, . the Telemundo network, the coalition noted, "KVEA fails to meet the needs of the Latino community by any measure of responsive ness." The coalition claimed that KVEA shows only "token support" for Latino community-based organizations. In addition, it said, there is only one Hispanic on Telemundo's board of direc tors. Reliance Capital Group, the New York corporate holdings company that controls the network, has none. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector EricksenMendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina, Karen Zacarias . Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASS I FlED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. The letter invited Reliance Chairman Saul Steinberg to come to Los Angeles to discuss the corporation's management policies with the coalition's steering committee. Reliance offered to send its third-ranking executive, but the coalition responded June 16, saying that was "not acceptable." NEW PUBLICATIONS: Hispanic Student USA, a semiannual, controlled-circulation bilingual magazine for high school juniors and seniors, was distributed this spring to more than 600 high schools in 14 states and Puerto Rico. Published by Tinsley Communications Inc., the premiere edition had a circulation of 150,000, said publisher William Tinsley. The magazine's goal is "to communicate to Hispanic high school students the importance of preparing themselves to reach desirable educational and career goals," stated promo tional materials. The magazine emphasizes careers, career planning, education, self-help strategies, financial aid, lifestyles and sports. For a free copy or information about adver tising rates, contact Marty Muguira at Tinsley Antonio Mejias-Rentas Communications, 101 N. Armistead Ave . , Suite 208, Hampton, Va. 23669 (804) 7234499. A biweekly Spanish-language newspaper was launched May 26 in the Washington, D.C . , area. Las Americas is published by Connie Freeman , former general manager at El Latino, another Washington, D.C., Spanish language newspaper. Otto Escobar, former editor at El Latino, serves as editor of the new venture. The newspaper has a circulation of 14,000, says Freeman, adding that she plans to go weekly later this summer. Subscriptions are $1 0 for one year. Contact LasAmericas at 670 N. Glebe Rd., Suite B-3, Arlington, Va. 22203 (703) 841-1447. NOTABLE: Charles Rivera, former editor of Social Education and Nuestro magazines: was named managing editor of Caribbean Business in San Juan, Puerto Rico. He began June 23. Dani/o Alfaro