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Hispanic link weekly report, July 3, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 3, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This
The New York Times lists U.S. Reps. Henry B. Gonz&lez of Texas and Edward Roybal of California as two of 43 House members who did not accept honorariums last year...The Florida Democratic Party elects Sim6n Ferro, a 36-year-old Cuban American attorney from Miami, as its chairman. Ferro is the U.S. mainland’s only Hispanic state Democratic Party head... Alex Sanchez accepts the presidency of Rio Hondo College in Whittier, Calif. A colonel in the Air Force Reserve, Sanchez is a vice president at the University of New Mexico at Albuquerque...Armando Codina, the founder and president of Codina Group, a development firm in Miami, becomes the first Cuban American chairman of the
Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce. With 3,500 member companies, 65% Anglo-owned, the chamber is Dade County’s largest...The Nogales (Arizona) Unified School District names Raymond Aguilera as its superintendent...The National Education Association honors East Los Angeles calculus teacher Jaime Escalante with its George I. Sanchez Memorial Award for his leadership in the Hispanic community...The U.S. Supreme Court’s June 26 decision lowering the age for capital punishment to 16 affects Texan Ruben Cantu and Arizonan Jesus Jimenez, who were 17 when they committed murder... Scott Molina, a 29-year-old from Boulder, Colo., wins the Baltimore Triathlon in a course record time of 1:49:28. The race involves a mile swim, a 24.8-mile bike ride and a 6.2-mile run...

Court Rulings Engender Affirmative Action Debate
By Danilo Alfaro
In the wake of a series of recent rulings by the U.S. Supreme Court that many advocates say seriously undercut civil rights protections, leaders are expressing concerns about the value to Latinos of affirmative action.
In its latest action, the court June 22 further narrowed the scope of a Reconstruction-era
By Karen Zacarfas
Alan Nelson, who resigned as head of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service June 26, has been criticized by immigrant rights advocates for his June 22 proposal to use a nationwide computer identification system to curtail the use of fraudulent documents by undocumented immigrants seeking work.
Nelson made his proposal at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies conference at the University of California at San Diego, La Jolla. It includes creating a national identity card for all citizens. He also suggested a telephone-computer system employers could call to check the validity of the card and working papers.
law that guaranteed the rights of newly freed slaves to enter into and enforce contracts. The 5-4 ruling prohibited the 1866 law, known as Section 1981, from being invoked in discrimination lawsuits against state and local governments.
The court split along the same 5-4 lines as it did June 15 when it ruled that Section 1981
Daniel Roemer, a paralegal at the Immigration Project in Oakland, Calif., charged that Nelson’s plan deals with "the symptoms and not with the source" of the problem. He said if the United States wants to halt undocumented workers, it should address and help Latin American countries create a healthy economy for their people.
Charles Wheeler, director for the National Center of Immigrants’ Rights in Los Angeles, said the program would be a "bureaucratic nightmare" for the already overburdened INS. Wheeler said the cards ideally might help Hispanics who are in the United States legally because employers would not "look beyond the card" and feel safer hiring Latinos.
protected against discrimination only at the time of hire.
Those decisions capped a string of six rulings dating back to January.
"Affirmative action has not helped Latinos nearly enough," Michael Olivas, a law professor at the University of Houston, told Weekly Report. "The myth that a substantial number of our people have gained as a result of affirmative action is just that — a myth. We have lost ground."
Tony Gallegos, a commissioner at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, said gains Latinos have made are "somewhat minimal. Hispanics are lagging substantially in employment in the public as well as private sectors. In the top three job categories — officials, managers, professionals — we’ve been making a gain of just over 1 % every 10 years."
Abel Quintela, president of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, noted, "Affirmative action is only a secondary way to integrate. The view has been that for a long, long time the term ‘minorities’ was synonymous with blacks."
Lee Avila, Los Angeles County chairwoman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly
continued on page 2
INS Head Proposes National ID System
N.Y. Latinos, 67%, Feel Race Relations ‘Generally
By Karen Zacarfas The poll, taken 11 weeks before the mayoral election that will include
More Hispanics feel that New York race relations are bad than do incumbent Ed Koch and Manhattan Borough President David Dinkins, whites or blacks, according to a New York Times survey published a black, is based on interviews with 1,462 New Yorkers from June 11-June23. 17.
The survey showed New York voters overall are as pessimistic about race relations today as they were last year. Hispanics, however, are the most disillusioned, with only 20% rating race relations as "generally good" and 67% rating them "generally bad."
Rub6n Franco, president of the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund in New York City, said Hispanics are dissatisfied because "we have the strongest feeling of powerlessness.. .We get it from all sides — black and white." Having a Hispanic mayor would probably not relieve the "atmosphere of distrust and dislike," said Franco, but the situation can improve by "empowering Latinos to positions of leadership. The government must start including us as part of the agenda."
N.Y. RACE RELATIONS
Latino White
Race relations in N.Y. today are:
generally good 20% 31%
generally bad 67 58
Race relations compared to a year ago are: better now 20 13
the same 38 47
worse now 38 37
When it comes to race relations:
a mayor can do a lot 56 60
Black
24%
65
11
41
46
51


Nelson Quits INS; Replacement Remains Undetermined
By Karen Zacarfas
Alan Nelson, whose resignation as head of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service had been pending since the start of the Bush administration, stepped down June 26.
In March, after a U.S. Justice Department audit criticizing Nelson’s management, it became clear Attorney General Dick Thornburgh wanted Nelson out. However, the Justice Department did not cite the audit
or comment on why the resignation was acted on. The Justice Department oversees the INS.
During Nelson’s eight-year tenure, he oversaw the landmark 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act. He also proposed the ditch along the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego.
Mario Moreno, counsel for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Washington, D.C., credited Nelson for overseeing one of the world’s largest legalization projects through a difficult period. But, said Moreno, while Nelson had a “posture of accessibility," he "lacked sensitivity."
Michael Zamba, legislative policy analyst with the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, said, "Nel-
son did a good job of enhancing the enforcement aspect of the INS. He was good PR." Unfortunately, Zamba said, "Nelson forgot that the N and S in INS stood for naturalization and service."
St. Louis, Mo., county executive Gene Mc-Nary has been mentioned by Justice Department officials as the Bush administration’s choice to succeed Nelson. Moreno said former U.S. Attorney Peter Nunez has also surfaced as a potential nominee. Nunez, currently in private practice in San Diego, denied being approached about the position.
James Buck, INS deputy director, will act as head until Bush’s INS commissioner nominee is named and confirmed by the Senate.
Leaders Disagree on Affirmative Action
continued from page 1
and a recent appointee to the Small Business Administration, argued that the rulings would not affect Hispanics in a significant way. "I do not believe what has happened is negative. Affirmative action helped everyone, but does that mean it should continue? Is that progress?"
Many feel that employers will continue to integrate their work forces of their own accord. "I don’t think business will turn around and forget 20 years of civil rights fighting," said Rosamelia De La Rocha, president of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women in Washington, D.C.
According to Frank Quevedo, director of corporate relations with Beatrice/ Hunt-Wesson in Fullerton, Calif., "What it’s really done is put out there a very negative view of civil rights legislation that does and will have an adverse effect. Employers may be more nervous or cautious about implementing an affirmative action-related plan." Quevedo, former chairman of the Mexican American Legal Defense and
Foundation Funds Classes
The National Science Foundation awarded a $457,033 grant June 16 for the expansion of mathematics and science programs headed by Jaime Escalante at Garfield High School in Los Angeles. Escalante was the subject of the 1988 hit movie "Stand and Deliver."
The grant is expected to allow about 560 predominantly Hispanic students from low-income families to attend accelerated mathematics, science and English classes at East Los Angeles College and to provide for training for secondary and elementary school teachers in Escalante’s methods. Escalante conducts a daily seminar on teaching methods.
Classes began June 19.
Educational Fund, said that a Hispanic applying for an unskilled job "is not any worse off than he or she was six or eight weeks ago. But one that’s applying for marketing director might be the loser."
In assessing what gains the Latino community has enjoyed as a result of affirmative action, Mario Diaz, chairman of the American G.l. Forum, pointed to the absence of Hispanics in the upper echelons of top U.S. corporations. He said that affirmative action deals mainly in the lower levels of employment and less in the upper managerial levels. "We have tried to look at corporate America — having people in queue to become VPs, board members, where policy is made. Affirmative action did not look into those areas."
U.S. Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas), responding to calls from rights advocates for congressional action to restore the protections, said, "I foresee some legislation but it will be very difficult. In the climate we’re in it doesn’t look good."
Latinas Have 11% of Births
By Adrienne Urbina
Hispanic women in 1988 had an estimated fertility rate of 94.0 births per 1,000 women 18-44 years old, significantly higher than the rate for non-Hispanic women of 67.5 per 1,000 women, according to a report released by the U.S. Census Bureau June 22.
Eleven percent of all births in the 12-month period prior to June 1988 were to Hispanic women, although they constituted only 8% of women in that group, the report found. Latinas averaged 1.6 children each compared with 1.3 for non-Hispanic women. Overall, 400,000 Hispanic women had babies in that period.
The percentages of women 18-24 years of age who had children out of wedlock in the survey period were:
Black Hispanic White
73.8% 29.2% 28.8%
July 3,1989
N.Y. City Council Acts on Anti-Immigrant Bias
In what is said to be the first law of its kind in the nation, the New York City Council is expected to pass in the next two weeks a law that bars discrimination against undocumented immigrants in housing and government services.
Sponsored by Councilwoman Susan Alter, the bill includes a provision empowering the city to grant some licenses, including those for vendors, to immigrants without their providing proof that they are authorized to work in the United States.
The bill, passed 6-0 by a City Council committee June 19, does not offer protections against employment discrimination so as not to conflict with the 1986 federal immigration law. The federal law bars the hiring of undocumented immigrants by employers.
INS Must Give Information
A U.S. district judge in California ruled June 16 that INS officials must provide information to undocumented immigrants within ten days of their request to give them adequate time to prepare for deportation-hearings.
The decision was based on immigration attorney James Mayock’s 1985 suit against the INS in which he said that the agency’s delays in providing information to immigrants was in defiance of the Freedom of Information Act. After reviewing the case, U.S. District Judge Charles Legge ruled that under the Freedom of Information Act, the INS must demonstrate "exceptional circumstances" to delay providing information to undocumented immigrants for pending deportation hearings. These exemptions would primarily be applicable to large or complicated cases.
Officials of The Church of Scientology, an active FOIA advocate for 15 years, said they were pleased with the ruling. "The INS kept saying they had backlogs and consequently could not provide immigrants with information for their hearings in time," explained Alex Jones, assistant director of government affairs.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Anita Del Rio
George Munoz
Court vs. Civil Rights
During the month of June, the U.S. Supreme Court dealt an almost mortal legal blow to the aspirations of 20 million Hispanics and to the vast majority of this nation’s poor. In four key decisions, Chief Justice William Rehnquist’s Supreme Court almost seemed to be going out of its way to set back the clock on civil rights at least 25 years.
One of the Rehnquist court’s decisions offers a personal stamp of approval to plantation-style segregation among Alaska cannery workers. At the canneries, minorities held virtually all of the low-paying jobs, while Anglos filled the high-paying, unskilled jobs such as truck drivers. The minorities were segregated from Anglos, subsequently placed in separate and inferior housing, and given separate and inferior eating facilities.
Most shocking about the court’s insensitivity is its assertion that segregation occurred because only minorities are willing to take low-paying jobs.
Is the chief justice unaware that minorities, like everyone else, would prefer better paying, less arduous work?
The disrespect that Rehnquist has for the law was deceptively displayed in this cannery case. The 5-4 majority ruled that the unanimous Supreme Court decision by Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1971 (Griggs v. Duke Power) had been misinterpreted by lawyers, legal scholars, and the Supreme Court itself for 18 years. That is, the Rehnquist court held that overwhelming statistics demonstrating discrimination are no longer of any value.
SMOKING GUN NOT ENOUGH
In Chief Justice Rehnquist’s view, minorities’ only chance to win is if the employer publishes a letter saying "No Hispanics — or blacks, or native Alaskans or Indians — allowed here."
The Rehnquist court issued another opinion in which it appears that even a "smoking gun" anti-minority admission by the employer may not be enough to prove discrimination. It supported the right of white firefighters to take as long as they wanted, up to a decade, to challenge affirmative action gains by minorities in Birmingham, Ala., in a department that until recently allowed no blacks on its force.
In the Rehnquist court’s most ludicrous decision, Justice Anthony Kennedy (whose nomination many California Hispanic groups, including the League of United Latin American Citizens, had opposed) upheld racial harassment on the job. Kennedy said that, despite an 1866 civil rights law, an employer had the right to harass a black teller at a North Carolina bank through racial slurs and assignment of demeaning janitorial work that was clearly intended to force her to quit. But, Kennedy "reassured" minorities, this was not a step backward.
CONGRESSIONAL REDRESS NEEDED Many members of the Hispanic community are asking why we should support a $60,000 pay raise for Chief Justice Rehnquist when his court persists in attacking the needs of minorities and the poor.
In particular, LULAC, at its national convention in Washington, D.C., this week, will raise the question of why Hispanics should support a pay raise to $175,000 for the chief justice when President Bush, who wholeheartedly supports the Supreme Court pay raise, opposes an increase of a few cents in the minimum wage.
Before the Hispanic community supports any pay raises for U.S. Supreme Court justices, the court may wish to consider actions to help those whose minimum wage is well below the poverty line.
Many Hispanics will be asking Congress to overturn the Rehnquist court decisions through stronger civil rights legislation. Unless this is accomplished, the jesting remarks sometimes now heard that Rehnquist heads the Supreme Court of South Africa may become all too stark and bitter a reality.
(Anita Del Rfo is national vice president of the League of United Latin American Citizens for the Far West region.)
Cisneros’ Premature Eulogy
For years, the names Henry Cisneros and San Antonio went hand in hand. But last month, Cisneros’ final term as mayor of that progressive, inviting Texas city ended. His last days in office weren’t what people once expected.
Until less than a year ago, there was talk that Cisneros might run for governor or the U.S. Senate. He achieved national prominence in 1984 when he was considered for the vice presidential slot on the Democratic ticket.
But he stunned everyone when he announced last fall that he was leaving the mayor’s office and politics altogether.
Cisneros is good at articulating complex issues, but he had trouble explaining his sudden decision to leave public life. He said he needed time to reflect, develop new ideas and earn more money for his family. Then he would return.
He also admitted having marital problems.
And that got the press smelling blood.
The press can build giants and it can bury them. Cisneros benefited from the buildup. But as he departed, most of the media attention centered on an extramarital love affair rather than his accomplishments in office.
PERSONIFIES DREAMS, ASPIRATIONS
Now it’s predicted by some that Cisneros’ political future is dead. Such a eulogy is premature.
Henry Cisneros is too valuable a resource to push to the side. He is still viewed by many Hispanics as a person who can speak to their issues. He personifies their dreams and aspirations.
Hispanics are concentrated in the major communities of this country. Los Angeles has more than three million of them. Chicago has the second largest number of Mexican Americans in the country. The nation’s most populous states — New York, California and Texas — also have the largest number of Hispanics. But the Hispanic population is spreading throughout all 50 states.
As the U.S. Hispanic population grows, others want to know more about them. There are still more questions than answers.
Politicians are interested in the swing-vote potential. Those in the social service and health areas can’t serve Hispanics without knowing more about their lifestyles and culture. The educational system has not captured the minds of Hispanic youth.
WHEN HE SPEAKS, PEOPLE LISTEN
Because of the varied backgrounds of Hispanic groups, there is little chance for one person or for a few to speak on behalf of many.
Yet this hunger to know more about Hispanics is what made Henry Cisneros a leader of national reputation. He has been able to convince people that Hispanics are in so many ways like other immigrant groups. Education and jobs will lift them to their rightful place in society.
But he has also made it widely known that Hispanic roots, especially in the Southwest, go back several generations — to before 1776 — and that sections of this country were once part of Mexico. Those are facts in the history books.
There are many Hispanics qualified to speak about their own history, politics, culture and lifestyle. But when Cisneros speaks, people listen.
Henry Cisneros has contributed to the Hispanic image. For that, he won’t easily be forgotten.
His need to leave public office can also be viewed positively.
Many other politicians would not have had a problem finding ways to make more money and at the same time work on personal problems while holding public office.
(George Munoz, of Chicago, is an attorney and former president of the Chicago Board of Education.)
DEL RIO
MUNCZ
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
July 3,1989
3


COLLECTING
FERTILITY: "Fertility of American Women: June 1988" is a 71-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that finds Hispanic women lead ail groups in the number of babies born per 1,000 women agedl 8-44. For a copy contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
CALIFORNIA HIGHER EDUCATION: The most recent issue of La Red/The Net: The Hispanic Journal of Education, Commentary and Reviews contains a 10-page report and a four-page article on Latinos in higher education in California. The 62-page special edition (specify Vol. 2, No. 2) can be obtained by sending $19 to Floricanto Press, 16161 Ventura Blvd., Suite 830, Encino, Calif. 91436-2504 (818) 990-1885.
EDUCATION SYSTEM INVOLVEMENT: The National Committee for Citizens in Education publishes several Spanish-language leaflets on the rights of parents and their children in the public school system. The group also has a toll-free number — 1-800-NET-WORK — with a Spanish-speaking counselor to answer school-related questions. For more information write NCCE, 10840 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 301, Columbia, Md. 21044.
FAMILY HISTORY: Institute> Genealogico e Historico Latinoamericano recently began publishing a quarterly magazine, Revista, with information dealing with Latin American family genealogy. The group’s $20-a-year membership includes subscription to the magazine. Also, for $4 the organization provides information on the Spanish surnames it has investigated. For more information contact IGHL at P.O. Box 2650, Salt Lake City, Utah 84110-2650.
SAFETY SKILLS FOR CHILDREN: "What If I’m Home Alone? Your Family’s Guide to Home and Personal Safety Skills" is a booklet available in Spanish that gives tips for the safety of "latchkey" children. Orders must be a minimum of 100 copies at 500 each. Discounts are available on larger orders. To order (shipping costs are $7 per 100) contact Custom Print, 2611 Shirlington Road, Arlington, Va. 22206 (703) 979-6670.
LA. POVERTY: "The Widening Divide: Income Inequality and Poverty in Los Angeles" is an approximately 300-page report by the University of California at Los Angeles that finds Hispanics are falling further behind whites in income. For a copy send a $20 check to UC Regents at the Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Publications Coordinator, UCLA, 1317 Perloff Hall, 405 Hillgard Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 90024-1467 (213) 825-8957.
CONNECTING
CARDENAS RAMIREZ SWITCHES JOBS
Blandina Cardenas Ramirez, a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, was named director of the American Council of Education’s Office of Minority Concerns June 14.
Cardenas Ramirez, a civil rights commissioner since 1980, will monitor minorities in higher education, collaborate with universities in increasing ethnic diversity, and manage ACE’s Special Minority Initiative to combat racism and declining minority enrollment on college campuses. She will maintain her position as one of the eight USCCR members. Cardenas Ramirez, a native Texan, currently is vice president for institutional advancement at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, a position she will hold until assuming her post at the Washington-based ACE in August.
GRANT CONTINUES PROGRAM
The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $249,420 grant to Texas A&l University’s biology department so that it may continue its program giving biomedical research experience to Hispanic students, it was announced last month.
Directed in its 17 years of existence by John Perez, the Minority Biomedical Research Program has established a reputation for conducting nationally recognized research. All the 110 students who have participated in the program have been Hispanic. Thirty-three have gone on to earn doctorates or become physicians, dentists, pharmacists, veterinarians or medical researchers.
For more information write Texas A&l University, John Perez, Minority Biomedical Research Program, Biology Department, Kingsville, Texas 78363 (512) 595-3803.
SONGS AGAINST AIDS
The Entertainment Industries Council, a non-profit California group, will accept until July 22 entries for its Sing Out Against AIDS radio competition.
Contracted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, EIC will select 12 songs to be used as public service announcements. The songs, which must be written by youth ages 12 to 21 who live in California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas or Arizona, will play on EIC’s 400 member stations. They will be distributed to an additional 800 stations.
Winners will win cash and/or scholarships and be honored at a Hollywood ceremony in September.
Entries can be in English or Spanish, submitted on cassette and not more than three minutes long. Include address, day and evening phone numbers and title of song. Mail to EIC, Alexandra Medina, 4444 Riverside Dr., Suite 203, Burbank, Calif. 91505 (818) 841-9933.
Calendar____________________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Unk’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
LULAC CONFERENCE
Washington, D.C. July 4-9
The League of United Latin American Citizens is
holding its annual conference with the theme
"Hispanic America: A Time to Stand and Deliver."
Workshops, panel discussions and other activities
will deal with Latino youth, women, education and
employment issues.
Arnold Torres (916) 442-2207 AIDS PREVENTION New York July 7
"HIV Prevention Among Latinos: Issues of Program Development and Administration" is the title of a conference sponsored by the National Puerto Rican Coalition and the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations. There is no fee.
Jose Cruz (202) 223-3915
FESTIVAL BETANCES Boston July 7-9
InquilinosBoricuasenAccion, a Latino human services and housing development agency, is holding its 17th annual Festival Betances. The event features music and dance, special children’s events and food. It will be televised on local cable television.
Wilma Colon (617) 262-1342
COMING SOON
CONFERENCE The National Council of La Raza Kansas City, Mo. July 15-17 Eileen Torres (202) 289-1380
SPOTLIGHT
AIDS INFECTION: This year’s National Conference on HIV Infection and AIDS Among Racial and Ethnic Populations, sponsored by the U.S. Public Health Service, will be held Aug. 13-17 in Washington, D.C. Five principal topic areas have been selected: prevention of AIDS infection; services and the continuum of care for AIDS patients; advocacy and networking; financing; and research. The planning committee includes representatives from community-based organizations and leaders from the Hispanic, black, Asian/Pacific Islander and Native American communities. For more information contact Betty Eger at (202) 245-6268.
4
July 3,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


State, Regional Hispanic Populations: 1980-1985
Region, division, and State April 1, 1980 July 1, 1981 July 1, 1982 July 1, 1983 July 1, 1984 July 1, 1985 Percent Hispanic
1980 1985
United States 14,251,000 15,093,800 15,695,200 16,294,900 16,900,100 17,516,700 6.3 7.3
Northeast 2,549,400 2,647,800 2,710,000 2,782,300 2,862,600 2,937,300 5.2 5.9
Midwest 1,179,900 1,227,200 1,259,400 1,292,100 1,338,700 1,381,200 2.0 2.3
South 4,283,400 4,606,700 4,809,400 4,993,900 5,158,700 5,337,300 5.7 6.5
West 6,238,200 6,612,100 6,916,400 7,226,500 7,540,100 7,861,000 14.4 16.3
New England 273,500 286,100 295,500 304,800 315,900 326,800 2.2 2.6
Maine 3,700 3,700 3,900 4,000 4,100 4,400 (B) (B)
New Hampshire 4,200 4,500 4,700 5,000 5,400 5,700 (B) (B)
Vermont 2,700 3,000 3,100 3,200 3,500 3,700 (B) (B)
Massachusetts 126,700 133,300 138,300 143,100 148,600 154,100 2.2 2.6
Rhode Island 14,900 16,100 17,100 17,900 18,900 19,700 1.6 2.0
Connecticut 121,300 125,500 128,400 131,500 135,500 139,200 3.9 4.4
Middle Atlantic 2,275,800 2,361,800 2,414,500 2,477,600 2,546,700 2,610,400 6.2 7.0
New York 1,653,100 1,706,600 1,742,400 1,788,000 1,836,200 1,878,800 9.4 10.6
New Jersey 485,600 513,000 526,500 539,600 555,900 573,200 6.6 7.6
Pennsylvania 137,200 142,100 145,600 149,900 154,600 158,500 1.2 1.3
East North Central 993,300 1,034,000 1,061,200 1,089,800 1,130,100 1,166,600 2.4 2.8
Ohio 99,600 101,700 102,500 104,100 105,800 107,700 0.9 1.0
Indiana 78,100 79,000 80,000 80,300 81,500 82,600 1.4 1.5
Illinois 616,700 651,100 674,200 696,600 727,600 754,900 5.4 6.5
Michigan 141,000 142,700 143,700 146,600 150,700 155,200 1.5 1.7
Wisconsin 57,900 59,600 60,900 62,100 64,500 66,300 1.2 1.4
West North Central 186,700 193,200 198,200 202,300 208,600 214,500 1.1 1.2
Minnesota 27,600 29,100 30,300 30,700 31,900 33,500 0.7 0.8
Iowa 22,700 23,600 24,100 24,500 25,500 25,800 0.8 0.9
Missouri 41,700 43,100 43,700 44,800 47,000 48,300 0.8 1.0
North Dakota 3,200 3,300 3,600 3,700 3,500 3,400 (B) (B)
South Dakota 3,500 3,400 3,600 3,500 3,400 3,700 (B) (B)
Nebraska 27,000 28,100 28,900 29,400 29,500 29,900 1.7 1.9
Kansas 60,900 62,500 64,000 65,700 67,800 69,900 2.6 2.9
South Atlantic 1,086,300 1,227,500 1,269,400 1,314,000 1,355,600 1,403,500 2.9 3.5
Delaware 8,400 8,500 8,800 9,200 9,600 10,000 1.4 1.6
Maryland 54,800 58,800 61,300 64,600 68,200 71,400 1.3 1.6
District of Columbia 15,600 16,300 16,800 17,200 17,300 18,200 2.5 2.9
Virginia 63,300 69,000 73,800 77,700 82,500 87,000 1.2 1.5
West Virginia 6,900 7,000 7,300 7,700 7,900 7,900 (B) (B)
North Carolina 31,100 32,100 33,100 34,400 37,200 38,900 0.5 0.6
South Carolina 16,900 18,400 18,900 19,400 19,900 20,100 0.5 0.6
Georgia 38,200 39,600 42,200 43,700 44,900 47,700 0.7 0.8
Florida 851,100 977,800 1,007,300 1,040,100 1,068,200 1,102,100 8.7 9.8
East South Central 54,600 56,200 58,100 59,300 60,500 62,500 0.4 0.4
Kentucky 13,500 13,200 14,000 14,000 14,000 14,300 0.4 0.4
Tennessee 15,800 16,100 16,600 16,800 17,600 18,200 0.3 0.4
Alabama 14,300 15,700 16,100 16,600 17,400 18,300 0.4 0.5
Mississippi 11,000 11,200 11,400 11,800 11,500 11,700 0.4 0.4
West South Central 3,142,500 3,323,000 3,481.900 3,620,600 3,742,600 3,871,300 13.2 14.7
Arkansas 10,700 11,400 11,900 12,500 13,600 13,500 0.5 0.6
Louisiana 81,700 87,400 91,400 94,500 96,400 98,400 1.9 2.2
Oklahoma 54,000 58,400 63,700 65,600 68,300 69,800 1.8 2.1
Texas 2,996,000 3,165,700 3,314,800 3,448,100 3,564,400 3,689,600 21.1 22.8
Mountain 1,451,800 1,511,100 1,556,400 1,604,500 1,644,000 1,686,700 12.8 13.2
Montana 9,200 9,800 10,200 10,400 10,500 10,800 1.2 1.3
Idaho 36,200 37,300 38,700 39,900 41,000 41,800 3.8 4.2
Wyoming 24,200 25,200 25,900 26,100 26,200 26,500 5.2 5.3
Colorado 341,000 353,100 361,400 368,500 374,600 383,500 11.8 11.9
New Mexico 482,100 496,100 508,900 526,700 538,400 550,600 37.0 37.8
Arizona 447,000 469,000 485,200 501,900 517,000 533,200 16.4 16.8
Utah 58,900 62,400 64,800 67,300 69,500 70,600 4.0 4.3
Nevada 53,300 58,000 61,300 63,600 66,700 69,700 6.7 7.5
Pacific 4,786,400 5,101,000 5,360,000 5,622,000 5,896,200 6,174,400 15.1 17.5
Washington 116,000 123,300 126,900 131,300 137,800 142,000 2.8 3.2
Oregon 62,500 66,000 68,300 70,100 73,500 76,000 2.4 2.8
California 4,537,100 4,839,200 5,089,400 5,341,500 5,603,400 5,872,500 19.2 22.1
Alaska 8,600 8,900 9,700 10,800 11,200 11,500 2.1 2.2
Hawaii 62,300 63,700 65,700 68,400 70,200 72,300 6.5 6.7
(B) Indicates that 1980 population base was less than 10,000.
Source: MPopulation Estimates by Race and Hispanic Origin for States, Metropolitan Areas, and Selected Counties: 1980 to 1985' Hispanic Link Weekly Report July 3,1989
by the U.S. Census Bureau.
5


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
OPPORTUNITIES WITH THE CENSUS BUREAU
STATISTICIAN
(ECONOMICS)
Exciting employment opportunity at the Census Bureau, Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C., for an economic statistician who speaks fluent Spanish.
Position is for lead instructor of technical training courses in collection and use of economic statistics. Education must include 15 semester hours in statistics or combination of mathematics and statistics. Advanced degree in economics and field data collection experience preferable. Grasp of development economics and Latin American experience highly desirable. Position for 18 months with possibility of conversion to permanent status. U.S. citizenship required. For further information contact Tim Brown at (301) 763-4830 by July 31, 1989.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH
Position opening in Social Science Research. Establish, manage, and analyze research on the behavioral causes of census undercount among Hispanic, the undocumented, and other U.S. populations.
REQUIRES: 1) graduate degree in anthropology, sociology, demography or related social science, 2) prior direct participant observation data gathering, 3) community involvement with subjects, 4) computer skills, 5) administrative skills and ability to work with people. Rank (in GS 11-13 range), salary ($23,000-$45,000) and exact title depend on relevant education and experience. Direct hire or interagency personnel agreement. Send cv or SF-171 to Dr. Elizabeth Martin, Chief, Center for Survey Methods Research, Rm. 433, Washington Plaza, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.
INQUIRIES: (301) 763-7976.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ONE YEAR SUBSTITUTE POSITION
DUTIES: Teach Spanish courses from beginning to advanced; grammar courses for native speakers; and civilization courses in Spanish and English. QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. in Spanish language and literature; familiarity with current methodologies in the teaching of foreign languages; two years teaching experience and fluency in English are required; knowledge of French and/or theory of bilingual education desirable. STARTING SALARY RANGE: $28,630 TO $31,716. Commensurate with experience and qualifications.
SEND COVER LETTER AND RESUME BY JULY 28 TO:
DR. ANA MARIA HERNANDEZ HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE/CUNY 31-10 THOMSON AVENUE LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK 11101
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
MARKETING ASSOCIATE-
TELEMARKETING
PBS ADULT LEARNING SERVICE (ALS)
■ 1 « We have a challenging opportunity available for a creative professional to
HOLLAND develop and implement telemarketing plans as a member of the ALS marketing
PUBLIC team.
SCHOOLS Responsibilities include: Developing marketing analyses strategies and goals and follow-up activities for extensive satellite programing service to colleges, cor-
GUIDANCE COUNSELOR HOLLAND HIGH SCHOOL porations and public television stations; analyzing staffing needs and recruiting, 1 training and supervising telemarketing/customer service staff; and developing and maintaining tracking systems.
Qualifications: Minimum of 18 credits towards a Masters in Guidance Qualifications: College degree in marketing or business or equivalent with two
and Counseling with M.A. preferred; Minimum of two years successful teaching experience; Bilingual/Bicul-tural Hispanic preferred. to four years in marketing or telemarketing preferably to higher education. Must have excellent oral and written communications skills, particularly a persuasive telephone voice; data base management skills required. PBS offers a salary commensurate with experience and an excellent benefits package.
Salary Range: $22,262-$33,991, Interested candidates should send a letter of interest, resume and salary require-
based on experience. ments to:
Interested persons should send a resume and references to: PBS
Mr. Paul E. Jolly Attn. Carla Gibson
Assistant Superintendent 1320 Braddock Place
for Personnel Alexandria, VA 22314
Holland Public Schools
633 Apple Avenue Holland, Ml 49423 Application Deadline: August 1, f}PBS
1989
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PBS is an Equal Opportunity Employer
EMPLOYER
6
July 3,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF PUERTO RICAN WOMEN, INC.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
The National Conference of Puerto Rican Women, Inc. (NACOPRW), announces the position of Executive Director to work in the organization’s national office in Washington, D.C.
Candidate for the position must possess excellent written and oral skills. Must be self starter and able to conceptualize and implement initiatives with limited support. Experience in fund-raising activities with non-profit organization is a must. Knowledge and familiarity of corporate and funding cycles is necessary. Ability to supervise support staff required. Knowledge of word-processing equipment and data management systems is preferred. Candidates must have a commitment to women’s rights issues and knowledge of the needs and concerns of Puerto Rican and other Hispanic women.
Salary range will be $35,000/$40,000 per year.
Please send resume to:
National Conference of Puerto Rican Women, Inc.
5 Thomas Circle, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 Deadline for submission: July 20, 1989
SITUATIONS WANTED TOP HISPANIC MBA
Excellent sales and presentation skills, solid marketing background, thorough knowledge of the Hispanic and Puerto Rican markets, ability to manage special projects and accounts, mergers & acquisitions experience. Seeks large opportunity. Mr. Polo (809) 766-2259. Condominio El Girasol, Apt. 909, Isla Verde, P.R. 00913
OFFICE POSITION
Hispanic Link intern seeks position 30-to-40 hours a week evenings and/or weekends. Have journalism degree and 5 years of progressive office experience. Am WordPerfect, MultiMate and Lotus 1-2-3 proficient, but will consider all offers. Please contact Rhonda at 234-0280, M-F between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
PRESS SECRETARY
Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre seeks a bilingual, energetic, creative PR pro to handle media relations, write speeches and make things happen. Salary $24,000 to $30,000. Resume and writing samples to Robin Kramer, 200 N. Spring St., Room 260, Los Angeles, Calif. 90012. (No calls please.)
AA/EOE
COUNTY LIBRARIAN COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES
The County System consists of 91 community libraries and 6 bookmobiles that serve 50 cities and the unincorporated areas with a combined population of 3 million. The system operates a budget of $600.7 million and employs 871 full-time and 792 part-time employees. There are 4.1 million books and 23,000 periodical subscriptions with an annual circulation of 11.9 million. Position has full responsibility for the planning and implementation of programs and activities that provide comprehensive services to residents of the cities, unincorporated areas of the County, and County institutions served by the library. Position reports to 5-member elected Board of Supervisors and requires Master of Library Science degree from an ALA accredited college plus a minimum of 10 years of progressive senior level management experience in a large metropolitan multi-cultural library system. Salary range is $66,795-$100,193. Send resumes by August 4, 1989 to KORN/FERRY INTERNATIONAL, Attn: Jim B. Clarke, 1800 Century Park East, 9th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90067.
AA/EOE
H
REPORTERS/ CREATIVE WRITERS
Hispanic Link News Service buys three 650-word feature/opinion pieces weekly, paying on acceptance. A story you cover locally may have national interest or application. For details and writer’s guidelines, write Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
We are pleased to announce the opening of our new office
EGGLI, CARD, MESA & ORONA Certified Shorthand Reporters 135 East Live Oak Ave.
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90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
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City, State & Zip
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
July 3,1989
7


Sin pelos en la lengua
COVERING EL BARRIO: Two reasons why you should read your daily newspaper:
NUMERO UNO: The June 22 Boston Globe carries a piece on Rolando Cabrera, 17, who came to the United States from El Salvador in 1985, spent 2 1/2 years in a bilingual education program before mainstreaming, and graduated first in his Jamaica Plain High School class this spring.
This fall he’ll start at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, with scholarships covering all but about $500 of the $21,000 annual costs to attend the prestigious school.
According to Margarita P^rez, his guidance counselor, Rolando’s the first bilingual program student MIT has admitted.
NUMERO DOS: The June 23 Washington Times carries a piece about Ever Guandique — also 17, also from El Salvador. Guandi-que, who came to the states in 1984, graduated from T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria, Va., with a 3.85 average and straight A’s in all but one subject, computer studies, in which he received a B. This fall, also with scholarship support, he’ll attend the Indiana Institute of Technology in Ft. Wayne.
WRAP SESSION: Two reasons why you should use your daily paper to wrap soiled diapers:
NUMERO UNO: Los Angeles Times reporter Richard Lee Colvin came up with a gushy feature June 18 on Sally Peterson, the California elementary school teacher who’s being backed by the English-Only mob to destroy public school bilingual education programs.
A sample of his portrait: "A liberal Democrat, she was targeted as a racist. She was laughed at. But she refused to go away.11 He quotes a teacher who heads one of her Learning English Advocates Drive (LEAD) chapters: "She’s our Joan of Arc, she’s our spirit...We’re not going to let people here burn her at the stake...”
He fails to quote any students who have been subjected to her sink-or-swim beliefs. Maybe they all sank.
NUMERO DOS: The bodies of two New York Puerto Rican teenagers who disappeared on their way to school were found in plastic bags near the Hutchison River Parkway in the Bronx.
Creative New York Daily News reporters wrote June 22 that "a chicken and a coconut were found within 10 feet of the bodies, leading to speculation that a ritualistic ceremony was involved."
Speculation by whom? New York detectives gave no credence to such nonsense.
Hispanic Link reporter Danilo Alfaro offers this alternate scoop:
"The bodies of two Irish Americans stuffed in plastic bags were found yesterday near the banks of the Charles River in Boston. A cluster of shamrocks and an unusually shaped rock were found 10 feet from the bodies, leading to speculation that a bizarre Druid ritual may have been involved."
— KayBarbaro
Arts & Entertain
IN PRODUCTION: Two Latino-themed stories are currently in production as network television projects.
Currently filming in Los Angeles is Sweet 15, an upcoming episode of the PBS children’s television series Wonderworks. The program tells the story of the quinceahera of a Mexican American girl who is "symbolically ushered into adulthood through her (15th birthday party), but who experiences true maturity when she helps her proud father gain U.S. citizenship through the legalization program."
Karla Montana plays the story’s 15-year-old Marta; Tony Plana and Jenny Gago are her parents. Sweet 15 is a Richard Soto Production.
Also filming in Los Angeles (with further filming planned for Spain) is the six-hour NBC miniseries Desperados, the story of slain drug enforcement agent Enrique Camarena.
Desperados, based on the book by Elaine Shannon, stars Steven Bauer as Camarena and Elizabeth Pena as his widow, Mika.
Bauer and Pena are Cuba-born. Bauer changed his name from Rocky Echevarria when he began pursuing a Hollywood acting career.
Motown Productions, a Los Angeles-based company, announced last month it has obtained "worldwide exclusive rights" to the life story of Portuguese singer/actress Carmen Miranda.
The company is planning to develop a stage musical starring Spanish guitarist/actress Charo. Plans for a motion picture and TV movie are also being discussed.
"If anybody can play Carmen Miranda, that’s me," Charo told Weekly Report. "I have the same level of energy (as Miranda), besides a great deal of respect and admiration for her."
Miranda was raised in Brazil. She played a "Brazilian bombshell" type in various Hollywood musicals in the ’40s.
A bidding war, meanwhile, is growing around the rights to another Brazilian story — the life of assassinated rubber tapper Francisco (Chico) Mendes, an advocate for the preservation of his country’s rain forests.
Among those pursuing the rights to the Mendes story, reportedly, are industry heavyweights David Puttnam, Robert Redford, Ted Turner and Peter Guber.
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
MEDIA REPORT WILL RETURN NEXT WEEK.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 *N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina, Karen Zacarfas. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
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Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week The New York Times lists U.S. Reps. Henry B. Gonzalez of Texas and Edward Roybal of California as two of 43 House members who did not accept honorariums last year ... The Florida Democratic Party elects Sim6n Ferro, a 36-year-old Cuban American attorney from Miami, as its chairman. Ferro is the U.S. mainland's only Hispanic state Democratic Party head ... AiexSanchez accepts the presidency of Rio Hondo Col lege in Whittier, Calif. A colonel in the Air Force Reserve, Sanchez is a vice president at the University of New Mexico at Albuquerque ... Ar mando Codina, the founder and president of Godina Group, a develop ment firm in Miami, becomes the first Cuban American chairman of the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce. With 3,500 member com panies, 65% Anglo-owned, the chamber is Dade County's largest..: The Nogales (Arizona) Unified School District Aguilera as its superintendent. .. The National Education honors East Los Angeles calculus teacher Jaime w1th I. Sll1chez Memorial Award for his leadership 1n the H1spamc com munity ... The U.S. Supreme Court's June 26 decjsion lo:-vering age for capital punishment to 16 affects Texan Ruben CCiltU and Anzonan JesUsJimenez, who were 17 when they committed murder ... Scott Molina, a 29-year-old from Boulder, Colo., wins the Baltimor.e lon in a course record time of 1 :49:28. The race involves a m1le sw1m, a 24.8-mile bike ride and a 6.2-mile run ... July 3, 1989 Court Rulings Engender Affinnative Action By Danilo Alfaro In the wake of a series of recent rulings by the U.S. Supreme Court that many advocates say seriously undercut civil rights protections, leaders are expressing concerns about the value to Latinos of affirmative action. In its latest action, the court June 22 further narrowed the scope of a Reconstruction-era law that guaranteed the rights of newly freed slaves to enter into and enforce contracts. The 5-4 ruling prohibited the 1866 law, known as Section 1981, from being invoked in dis crimination lawsuits against state and local governments. The court split along the same 5-4 lines as it did June 15 when it ruled that Section 1981 INS Head Proposes NationaiiD System By Karen Zacarfas Alan Nelson, who resigned as head of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service June 26, has been criticized by immigrant rights advocates for his June 22 proposal to use a nationwide computer identification sys tem to curtail the use of fraudulent documents by undocumented immigrants seeking work. Nelson made his proposal at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies conference at the University of California at San Diego, La Jolla. It includes creating a national identity card for all citizens. He also suggested a telephone computer system employers could call to check the validity of the card and working papers. Daniel Roemer, a paralegal at the Immigra tion Project in Oakland, Calif., charged that Nelson's plan deals with "the symptoms and not with the source" of the problem. He said if the United States wants to halt undocumented workers, it should address and help Latin American countries create a healthy economy for their people. Charles Wheeler, director for the National Center of Immigrants' Rights in Los Angeles, said the program would be a "bureaucratic nightmare" for the already overburdened INS. Wheeler said the cards ideally might help Hispanics who are in the United States legally because employers would not "look beyond the card" and feel safer hiring Latinos. protected against discrimination only at the time of hire. Those decisions capped a string of six rulings dating back to January. "Affirmative action has not helped Latinos nearly enough," Michael Olivas, a law profes sor at the University of Houston, told Weekly Report. "The myth that a substantial number of our people have gained as a result of affirm ative action is just that-a myth. We have lost ground." Tony Gallegos, a commissioner at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, said gains Latinos have made are "somewhat min imal. Hispanics are lagging substantially in employment in the public as well as private sec tors. In the top three job categories officials, managers, professionals -we've been making a gain of just over 1% every 1 0 years." Abel Quintela, president of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, noted, "Affirmative ac tion is only a secondary way to integrate. The view has been that for a long, long time the term 'minorities' was synonymous with blacks." Lee Avila, Los Angeles County chairwoman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly continued on page 2 N.Y. Latinos , 6r>lo, Feel Race Relations 'Generally Bad' By Karen Zacarfas More Hispanics feel that New York race relations are bad than do whites or blacks, according to a New York Times survey published June 23. The survey showed New York voters overall are as pessimistic about race relations today as they were last year. Hispanics, however, are the most disillusioned, with only 20% rating race relations as "general ly good" and 67% rating them "generally bad.'' Ruben Franco, president of the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund in New York City, said Hispanics are dissatisfied be cause "we have the strongest feeling of powerlessness ... We get it from all sides black and white." Having a Hispanic mayor would probab ly not relieve the "atmosphere of distrust and dislike," said Franco, but the situation can improve by "empowering Latinos to positions of leadership. The government must start including us as part of the agenda." The poll, taken 11 weeks before the mayoral election that will include incumbent Ed Koch and Manhattan Borough President David Dinkins, a black, is based on interviews with 1,462 New Yorkers from June 11-17. N.Y. RACE RELATIONS Latino White Black Race relations in N.Y. today are: generally good 20% ' 31% 24% generally bad 67 58 65 Race relations compared to a year ago are: better now 20 13 11 the same 38 47 41 worse now 38 37 46 When it comes to race relations: a mayor can do a lot 56 60 51

PAGE 2

Nelson Quits INS; Replacement Remains Undetermined . By Karen Zacarfas Alan Nelson, whose as head of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Ser vice had been pending since the start of the Bush administra tion, stepped down June 26. In March, after a U.S. Justice Depart ment audit criticizing Nelson's management, it became clear Attorney G e n e r a I D i c k NELSON Thornburgh wanted Nelson out. However, the Justice Department did not cite the audit or comment on why the resignation was acted on. The Justice Department oversees the INS. During Nelson's eight-year tenure, he over saw the landmark 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act. He also proposed the ditch along the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego. Mario Moreno, counsel for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Washington, D.C., credited Nelson for overseeing one of the world's largest legalization projects through a difficult period. But, said Moreno, while Nelson had a "pos ture of accessibility," he "lacked sensitivity." Michael Zamba, legislative policy analyst with the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, said, "Nelson did a good job of enhancing the enforce ment aspect of the INS. He was good PR." Unfortunately, Zamba said, "Nelson forgot that the N and S in INS stood for naturaliza tion and service." St. Louis, Mo., county executive Gene McNary has been mentioned by Justice Depart ment officials as the Bush administration's choice to succeed Nelson. Moreno said former U.S. Attorney Peter Nunez has also sur faced as a potential nominee. Nunez, currently in private practice in San Diego, denied being approached about the position. James Buck, INS deputy director, will act as head until Bush's INS commissioner nominee is named and confirmed by the Senate. Leaders Disagree on Affirmative Action N.Y. City Council Acts on Anti-Immigrant Bias continued from page 1 and a recent appointee to the Small Business Administration, argued that the rulings would not affect Hispanics in a significant way. "I do not believe what has happened is negative. Af firmative action helped everyone, but does that mean it should continue? Is that progress?" Many feel that employers will continue to in tegrate their work forces of their own accord. "I don't think business will turn around and forget 20 years of civil rights fighting," said Rosamelia De La Rocha, president of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women in Washington, D.C. According to Frank Quevedo, director of cor porate relations with Beatrice/ Hunt-Wesson in Fullerton, Calif., "What it's really done is put out there a very negative view of civil rights legis lation that does and will have an adverse ef fect. Employers may be more nervous or cautious about implementing an affirmative ac tion-related plan." Quevedo, former chairman of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Foundation Funds Classes The National Science Foundation awarded a $457,033 grant June 16 for the expansion of mathematics and science programs ' headed by Jaime Escalante at Garfield High School in Los Angeles. Escalante was the subject of the 1988 hit movie "Stand and Deliver ... 2 The grant is expected to allow about 560 predominantly Hispanic students from low income families to attend accelerated math ematics, science and English classes at East Los Angeles College and to provide for training for secondary and elementary school teachers in Escalante's methods. Escalante conducts a daily seminar on teaching methods. Classes began June 19. Educational Fund, said that a Hispanic applying for an unskilled job "is not any worse off than he or she was six or eight weeks ago. But one that's applying for marketing director might be the loser ... In assessing what gains the Latino community has enjoyed as a result of affirmative action, Mario Dfaz, chairman of the American G.l. Forum, pointed to the absence of Hispanics in the upper echelons of top U.S. corporations. He said that affirmative action deals mainly in the lower levels of employment and less in the upper managerial levels . "We have tried to look at corporate America having people in queue to become VPs, board members, where policy is made. Affirmative action did not look into those areas." U.S . Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas), responding to calls from rights advocates for congressional action to restore the protections, said, .. , foresee some legislation but it will be very difficult. In the climate we're in it doesn't look good ... In what is said to be the first law of its kind in the nation, the New York City Council is ex pected to pass in the next two weeks a law that bars discrimination against undocumented immigrants in housing and government services. Sponsored by Councilwoman Susan Alter, the bill includes a provision empowering the city to grant some licenses, including those for vendors, to immigrants without their providing proof that they are authorized to work in the United States. The bill, passed 6-0 by a City Council committee June 19, does not offer protections against employment discrimination so as not to conflict with the 1986 federal immigration law. The federal law bars the hiring of undocu mented immigrants by employers. INS Must Give Information A U.S. district judge in California ruled June 16 that INS officials must provide information to undocumented immigrants within ten days of their request to give them adequate time to Latinas Have 11% of Births prepare for deportatior-1-hearings. The decision was based on immigration attar-By Adrienne Urbina ney James Mayock's 1985 suit against the INS Hispanic women in 1988 had an estimated in which he said that the agency's delays in fertility rate of 94.0 births per 1,000 women 18providing information to immigrants was in 44 years old, significantly higher than the . rate defiance of the Freedom of Information Act. for non-Hispanic women of 67.5 per 1,000 After reviewing the case, U.S. District Judge women, according to a report released by the Charles Legge ruled that under the Freedom U.S. Census Bureau June 22. of Information Act, the INS must demonstrate Eleven percent of all births in the 12-month "exceptional circumstances" to delay providing period prior to June 1988 were to Hispanic information to undocumented immigrants for women, although they constituted only 8% of . pending deportation hearings. These exemp women in that group, the report found. Latinas tions would primarily be applicable to large or averaged 1.6 children each compared with 1.3 complicated cases. fo.r
PAGE 3

Anita Del Rio Court vs. Civil Rights During the month of June, the U.S. Supreme Court dealt an almost mortal legal blow to the aspirations of 20 million Hispanics and to the vast majority of this nation's poor. In four key decisions, Chief Justice William Rehnquist's Supreme Court almost seemed to be going out of its way to set back the clock on civil rights at least 25 years. One of the Rehnquist court's decisions offers a personal stamp of ap proval to plantation-style segregation among Alaska cannery workers. At the canneries, minorities held virtually all of the low-paying jobs, while Anglos filled the high-paying, un skilled jobs such as truck drivers. The minorities were segregated from Anglos, subsequently placed in separate and inferior housing, and given separate and inferior eating facilities. Most shocking about the court's insensitivity is its assertion that segregation occurred because only minorities are willing to take low-paying jobs. Is the chief justice unaware that minorities, like DEL RIO everyone else, would prefer better paying, less arduous work? The disrespect that Rehnquist has for the law was deceptively dis played in this cannery case. The 5-4 majority ruled that the unanimous Supreme Court decision by Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1971 (Griggs v. Duke Power) had been misinterpreted by lawyers, legal scholars, and the Supreme Court itself for 18 years. That is, the Rehnquist court held that overwhelming statistics demonstrating dis crimination are no longer of any value. SMOKING GUN NOT ENOUGH In Chief Justice Rehnquist's view, minorities' only chance to win is if the employer publishes a letter saying "No Hispanics or blacks, or native Alaskans or Indians allowed here." The Rehnquist court issued another opinion in which it appears that even a "smoking gun" ant i.-minority admission by the employer may not be enough to prove discrimination. It supported the right of white firefighters to take as long as they wanted, up to a decade, to challenge affirmative action gains by minorities in Birmingham, Ala., in a depart ment that until recently allowed no blacks on its force. In the Rehnquist court's most ludicrous decision, Justice Anthony Ken nedy (whose nomination many California Hispanic groups, including the League of United Latin American Citizens, had opposed) upheld racial harassment on the job. Kennedy said that, despite an 1866 civil rights law, an employer had the right to harass a black teller at a North Carolina bank through racial slurs and assignment of demeaning janitorial work that was clearly intended to force her to quit. But, Ken nedy "reassured" minorities, this was not a step backward. CONGRESSIONAL REDRESS NEEDED Many members of the Hispanic community are asking why we should support a $60,000 pay raise for Chief Justice Rehnquist when his court persists in attacking the needs of minorities and the poor. In particular, LULAC, at its national convention in Washington, D.C., this week, will raise the question of why Hispanics should support a pay raise to $175,000 for the chief justice when President Bush, who wholeheartedly supports the Supreme Court pay raise, opposes an in crease of a few cents in the minimum wage. Before the Hispanic community supports any pay raises for U.S. Supreme Court justices, the court may wish to consider actions to help those whose minimum wage is well below the poverty line. Many Hispanics will be asking Congress to overturn the Rehnquist court decisions through stronger civil rights legislation. Unless this is accomplished, the jesting remarks sometimes now heard that Rehnquist heads the Supreme Court of South Africa may become all too stark and bitter a reality. (Anita Del Rfo is national vice president of the League of United Latin American Citizens for the Far West region.) George Munoz Cisneros' Premature Eulogy For years, the names Henry Cisneros and San Antonio went han? in hand. But last month, Cisneros' final term as mayor of that progressive, inviting Texas city ended. His last days in office weren't what people once expected. Until less than a year ago, there was talk that Cisneros might run for governor or the U.S. Senate. He achieved national prominence in 1984 when he was considered for the vice presiden tial slot on the Democratic ticket. But he stunned everyone when he announced last fall that he was leaving the mayor's office and politics altogether. Cisneros is good at articulating complex issues, but he had trouble explaining his sudden decision to leave public life. He said he needed time to reflect, develop new ideas and earn more money for his family. Then he would return. He also admitted having marital problems. M...N:lz And that got the press smelling blood. The press can build giants and it can bury them. Cisneros benefited from the buildup. But as he departed, most of the media attention centered on an extramarital love affair rather than his accomplishments in office. PERSONIFIES DREAMS, ASPIRATIONS Now it's predicted by some that Cisneros' political future is dead. Such a eulogy is premature. Henry Cisneros is too valuable a resource to push to the side. He is still viewed by many Hispanics as a person who can speak to their is sues. He personifies their dreams and aspirations. Hispanics are concentrated in the major communities of this country. Los Angeles has more than three million of them. Chicago has the second largest number of Mexican Americans in the country. The nation's most populous states New York, California and Texas also have the largest number of Hispanics. But the Hispanic population is spreading throughout all 50 states. As the . U.S. Hispanic population grows, others want to know more about them. There are still more questions than answers. Politicians are interested in the swing-vote potential. Those in the so cial service and health areas can't serve Hispanics without knowing more about their lifestyles and culture. The educational system has not captured the minds of Hispanic youth. WHEN HE SPEAKS, PEOPLE LISTEN Because of the varied backgrounds of Hispanic groups, there is little chance for one person or for a few to speak on behalf of many. Yet this hunger to know more about Hispanics is what made Henry Cisneros a leader of national reputation. He has been able to convince people that Hispanics are in so many ways like other immigrant groups. Education and jobs will lift them to their rightful place in society. But he has also made it widely known that Hispanic roots, especially in the Southwest, go back several generations-to before 1776-and that sections of this country were once part of Mexico. Those are facts in the history books. are many Hispanics qualified to speak about their own history, poltt1cs, culture and lifestyle. But when Cisneros speaks, people listen. Henry Cisneros has contributed to the Hispanic image. For that, he won't easily be forgotten. . His need to leave public office can also be viewed positively . Many other politicians would not have had a problem finding ways to make more money and at the same time work . on personal problems while holding public office. (George Munoz, of Chicago, is an attorney and former president of the Chicago Board of Education.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report July 3, 1989 3

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COLLECTING FERTILITY: "Fertility of American Women: June 1988" is a 71-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that finds Hispanic women lead all groups in the number of babies born per 1,000 women aged18-44. For a copy contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Print ing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) CALIFORNIA HIGHER EDUCATION: The most recent issue of La Red{fhe Net: The Hispanic Journal of Education, Commentary and Reviews contains a 1 0-page report and a four-page article on Latinos in higher education in California. The 62-page special edition (specify Vol. 2, No. 2) can be obtained by sending $19 to Floricanto Press, 16161 Ventura Blvd., Suite 830, Encino, Calif. 91436-2504 (818) 990-1885. EDUCATION SYSTEM INVOLVEMENT: The National Committee for Citizens in Education publishes several Spanish-language leaflets on the rights of parents and their children in the public school system. The group also has a toll-free number 1-800-NET-WORK with a Spanish-speaking counselor to answer school-related questions. For more information write NCCE, 10840 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 301, Columbia, Md. 21 044. FAMILY HISTORY: lnstituto Genea/6gico e Hist6rico Latinoamericano recently began publishing a quarterly magazine, Revista, with informa tion dealing with Latin American family genealogy. The group's $20-a year membership includes subscription to the magazine. Also, for $4 the organization provides information on the Spanish surnames it has investigated. For more information contact IGHL at P.O. Box 2650, Salt Lake City, Utah 8411 0-2650. SAFETY SKILLS FOR CHILDREN: "What If I'm Home Alone? Your Family's Guide to Home and Personal Safety Skills" is a booklet avail able in Spanish that gives tips for the safety of "latchkey" children. Or ders must be a minimum of 1 00 copies at 50 each. Discounts are available on larger orders. To order (shipping costs are $7 per 1 00) con tact Custom Print, 2611 Shirlington Road, Arlington, Va. 22206 (703) 979-6670. LA. POVERTY: "The Widening Divide: Income Inequality and Pover ty in Los Angeles" is an approximately 300-page report by the Univer sity of California at Los Angeles that finds Hispanics are falling further behind whites in income. For a copy send a $20 check to UC Regents at the Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Publica tions Coordinator, UCLA, 1317 Perloff Hall, 405 Hillgard Ave., Los An geles, Calif. 90024-1467 (213) 825-8957. employment issues. I CONNECTING I CARDENAS RAMIREZ SWITCHES JOBS Bland ina Cardenas Ramirez, a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, was named director of the American Council of Education's Office of Minority Concerns June 14. Cardenas Ramirez, a civil rights commissioner since 1980, will monitor minorities in higher education, collaborate with universities in increas ing ethnic diversity, and manage ACE's Special Minority Initiative to combat racism and declining minority enrollment on college campuses. She will maintain her position as one of the eight USCCR mem bers. Cardenas Ramfrez, a native Texan, currently is vice president for institutional advancement at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, a position she will hold until assuming her post at the Washington-based ACE in August. GRANT CONTINUES PROGRAM The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $249,420 grant to Texas A&l University's biology department so that it may continue its program giving biomedical research experience to His panic students, it was announced last month. Directed in its 17 years of existence by John Perez, the Minority Biomedical Research Program has established a reputation for con ducting nationally recognized research. All the 110 students who have participated in the program have been Hispanic. Thirty-three have gone on to earn . doctorates or become physicians, dentists, pharmacists, veterinarians or medical researchers. For more information write Texas A&l University, John Perez, Minority Biomedical Research Program, Biology Department, Kingsville , Texas 78363 (512) 595-3803. SONGS AGAINST AIDS The Entertainment Industries Council, a non-profit California group, will accept until July 22 entries for its Sing Out Against AIDS radio competition. Contracted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, EIC will select 12 songs to be used as public service announcements. The songs, which must be written by youth ages 12 to 21 who live in California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas or Arizona, will play on EIC's 400 mem ber stations. They will be distributed to an additional 800 stations. Winners will win cash and/or scholarships and be honored at a Hollywood ceremony in September. Entries can be in English or Spanish, submitted on cassette and not more than three minutes long. Include address, day and evening phone numbers and title of song. Mail to EIC, Alexandra Medina, 4444 Riverside Dr., Suite 203, Burbank, Calif. 91505 (818) 841-9933. Calendar Arnold Torres (916) 442-2207 COMING SOON CONFERENCE TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. THIS WEEK LULAC CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. July 4-9 The League of United Latin American Citizens is holding its annual conference with the theme •Hispanic America: A Time to Stand and Deliver. • Workshops, panel discussions and other activities will deal with Latino youth, women, education and 4 AIDS PREVENTION New York July 7 .. HIV Prevention Among Latinos: Issues of Program Development and AdministrationM is the title of a conference sponsored by the National Puerto Rican Coalition and the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations. There is no fee. Jose Cruz (202) 223-3915 FESTIVAL BETANCES Boston July 7-9 lnquilinosBoricuasenAcci6n, a Latino human ser vices and housing development agency, is holding its 17th annual Festival Betances. The event fea tures music and dance, special children's events and food. It will be televised on local cable television. Wilma Colon (617) 262-1342 July 3, 1989 The National Council of La Raza Kansas City, Mo. July 1 5-17 Eileen Torres (202) 289-1380 SPOTLIGHT AIDS INFECTION: This year's National Conference on HIV Infection and AIDS Among Racial and Eth nic Populations, sponsored by the U.S. Public Health Service, will held Aug. 13-17 in Washington, D.C. Five principal topic areas have been selected: prevention of AIDS infection; ser vices and the continuum of care for AIDS patients; advocacy and networking; financing; and research. The planning committee includes representatives from community-based organizations and leaders from the Hispanic, black, Asian/Pacific Islander and Native American communities. For more informa tion contact Betty Eger at (202) 245-6268. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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State, Regional Hispanic Populations: 1980-1985 Percent Hispanic Region, division, and State April1, July 1, July 1, July 1, July 1, July 1, 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1980 1985 United States .................... 14,251,000 15,093,800 15,695,200 16,294,900 16,900,100 17,516,700 6.3 7.3 Northeast ............................ 2,549,400 2,647,800 2,710,000 2,782,300 2,862,600 2,937,300 5.2 5.9 Midwest .............................. 1,179,900 1,227,200 1,259,400 1,292,100 1,338,700 1,381,200 2.0 2.3 South ................................ 4,283,400 4,606,700 4,809,400 4,993,900 5,158,700 5,337,300 5 . 7 6.5 West ................................ 6,238,200 6,612,100 6,916,400 7,226,500 7,540,100 7,861,000 14.4 16.3 New England ...................... 273,500 286,100 295,500 304,800 315,900 326,800 2.2 2 . 6 Maine ............................... 3,700 3,700 3,900 4,000 4,100 4,400 (B) (B) New Hampshire ........................ 4,200 4,500 4,700 5,000 5,400 5,700 (B) (B) Vermont ............................. 2,700 3,000 3,100 3,200 3,500 3,700 (B) (B) Massachusetts ........................ 126,700 133,300 138,300 143,100 148,600 154,100 2.2 2.6 Rhode Island ........................ .. 14,900 16,100 17,100 17,900 18,900 19,700 1.6 2.0 Connecticut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121,300 125,500 128,400 131,500 135,500 139,200 3.9 4.4 Middle Atlantic ..................... 2,275,800 2,361,800 2,414,500 2,477,600 2,546,700 2,610,400 6.2 7.0 New York ............................ 1,653,100 1,706,600 1,742,400 1,788,000 1,836,200 1,878,800 9.4 10.6 New Jersey ........................... 485,600 513,000 526,500 539,600 555,900 573,200 6.6 7 . 6 Pennsylvania ..................... ..... 137,200 142,100 145,600 149,900 154,600 158,500 1.2 1.3 East North Central . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 993,300 1,034,000 1,061,200 1,089,800 1,130,100 1,166,600 2.4 2.8 Ohio ................................ 99,600 101,700 102,500 104,100 105,800 107,700 0.9 1.0 Indiana .............................. 78,100 79,000 80,000 80,300 81,500 82,600 1 . 4 1.5 Illinois ............................... 616,700 651,100 674,200 696,600 727,600 754,900 5.4 6.5 Michigan .......... ................... 141,000 142,700 143,700 146,600 150,700 155,2 .00 1.5 1.7 Wisconsin ........... ................. 57,900 59,600 60,900 62,100 64,500 66,300 1.2 1.4 West North Central ••••• 0 0 0 0 •••• 0 0 0 0 186,700 193 , 200 198,200 202,300 208,600 214,500 1.1 1.2 Minnesota ............................ 27,600 29,100 30,300 30,700 31,900 33,500 0.7 0.8 Iowa ................................ 22,700 23,600 24,100 24,500 25,500 25,800 0.8 0.9 Missouri .............................. 41,700 43,100 43,700 44,800 47,000 48,300 0.8 1.0 North Dakota .......................... 3,200 3,300 3,600 3,700 3,500 3,400 (B) (B) South Dakota ......................... 3,500 3,400 3,600 3,500 3,400 3,700 (B) (B) Nebraska ............................. 27,000 28,100 28,900 29,400 29,500 29,900 1.7 1.9 Kansas .............................. 60,900 62,500 64,000 65,700 67,800 69,900 2 . 6 2.9 South Atlantic ...................... 1,086,300 1,227,500 1,269,400 1,314,000 1,355,600 1,403,500 2 . 9 3.5 Delaware ............................. 8,400 8,500 8,800 9,200 9,600 10,000 1.4 1.6 Maryland ............................. 54,800 58,800 61,300 64,600 68,200 71,400 1.3 1.6 District of Columbia ..................... 15,600 16,300 16,800 17,200 17,300 18,200 2.5 2.9 Virginia .............................. 63,300 69,000 73,800 77,700 82,500 87,000 1.2 1.5 West Virginia .......................... 6,900 7,000 7,300 7,700 7,900 7,900 (B) (B) North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31,100 32,100 33,100 34,400 37,200 38,900 0.5 0.6 South Carolina ........................ 16 , 900 18,400 18,900 19,400 19,900 20,100 0.5 0.6 Georgia ................. ............. 38,200 39,600 42,200 43,700 44,900 47,700 0.7 0.8 Florida ............................... 851,100 977,800 1,007,300 1,040,100 1,068,200 1,102,100 8.7 9.8 East South Central . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54,600 56,200 58,100 59,300 60,500 62,500 0.4 0.4 Kentucky ............................. 13,500 13,200 14,000 14,000 14,000 14,300 0.4 0.4 Tennessee ............................ 15,800 16,100 16,600 16,800 17,600 18,200 0.3 0.4 Alabama ............................. 14,300 15,700 16,100 16,600 17,400 18,300 0.4 0.5 Mississippi ............................ 11,000 11,200 11,400 11,800 11,500 11,700 0.4 0.4 West South Central ................. 3,142,500 3,323,000 3,481,900 3,620,600 3,742,600 3,871,300 13.2 14.7 Arkansas ............................. 10,700 11,400 11,900 12,500 13,600 13,500 0.5 0.6 Louisiana ............................. 81,700 87,400 91,400 94,500 96,400 98,400 1.9 2.2 Oklahoma ............................ 54,000 58,400 63,700 65,600 68,300 69,800 1.8 2.1 Texas .............................. . 2,996,000 3,165,700 3,314,800 3,448,100 3,564,400 3,689,600 21.1 22.8 Mountain ......................... 1,451,800 1,511 '100 1,556,400 1,604,500 1,644,000 1,686,700 12.8 13.2 Montana ............................. 9,200 9,800 10,200 10,400 10,500 10,800 1.2 1.3 Idaho ................................ 36,200 37,300 38,700 39,900 41,000 41,800 3.8 4.2 Wyoming ............................. 24,200 25,200 25,900 26,100 26,200 26,500 5.2 5.3 Colorado ............................. 341,000 353,100 361,400 368,500 374,600 383,500 11.8 11.9 New Mexico .......................... 482,100 496,100 508,900 526,700 538,400 550,600 37.0 37.8 Arizona .............................. 447,000 469,000 485,200 501,900 517,000 533,200 16.4 16. 8 Utah ................................ 58,900 62,400 64,800 67,300 69,500 70,600 4.0 4.3 Nevada .............................. 53,300 58,000 61,300 63,600 66,700 69,700 6.7 7.5 Pacific ........................... 4,786,400 5,101,000 5,360,000 5,622,000 5,896,200 6,174,400 15.1 17.5 Washington ........................... 116,000 123,300 126,900 131,300 137,800 142,000 2.8 3.2 Oregon .............................. 62,500 6'6,000 68,300 70,100 73,500 76,000 2.4 2.8 California ............................. 4,537,100 4,839,200 5,089,400 5,341,500 5,603,400 5,872,500 19.2 22. 1 Alaska ............................... 8,600 8,900 9,700 10,800 11,200 11,500 2.1 2.2 Hawaii ............................... 62,300 63,700 65,700 68,400 70,200 72,300 6.5 6.7 (B) Indicates that 1980 population base was less than 1 0,000. Source: "Population Estimates by Race and Hispanic Origin for States, Metropolitan Areas, and Selected Counties: 1980 to 1985" by the U.S. Census Bureau. Hispanic link Weekly Report July 3, 1989 5

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6 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I OPPORTUNITIES WITH THE CENSUS BUREAU ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ONE YEAR SUBSTITUTE POSITION STATISTICIAN (ECONOMICS) Exciting employment opportunity at the Census Bureau, Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C., for an economic statistician who speaks fluent Spanish. Position is for lead instructor of techni cal training courses in collection and use of economic statistics. Education must include 15 semester hours in statistics or combination of mathematics and statistics. Advanced degree in economics and field data collection ex perience preferable. Grasp of develop ment economics and Latin American experience highly desirable. Position for 18 months with possibility of conversion to permanent status. U.S. citizenship re quired. For further information contact Tim Brown at (301) 763-4830 by July 31, 1989. An Equal Opportunity Employer HOLLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS GUIDANCE COUNSELOR HOLLAND HIGH SCHOOL Qualifications: Minimum of 18 credits towards a Masters in Guidance and Counseling with M.A. preferred; Minimum of two years successful teaching experience; Bilingual/Bicul tural Hispanic preferred. Salary Range: $22,262-$33,991, based on experience. Interested persons should send a resume and references to: Mr. Paul E. Jolly Assistant Superintendent for Personnel Holland Public Schools 633 Apple Avenue Holland, Ml 49423 Application Deadline: August 1, 1989 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH Position opening in Social Science Research. Establish, manage, and analyze research on the behavioral causes of census undercount among Hispanic, the undocumented, and other U.S. populations. REQUIRES: 1) graduate degree in anthropology, sociology, demography or related social science, 2) prior direct par ticipant observation data gathering, 3) community involvement with subjects, 4) computer skills, 5) administrative skills and abllity to work with people. Rank (in GS 11-13 range), salary ($23, 000$45, 000) and exact title depend on relevant education and experience. Direct hire or interagency personnel agreement. Send cv or SF-171 to Dr. Elizabeth Martin, Chief, Center for Sur vey Methods Research, Am. 433, Washington Plaza, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. INQUIRIES: (301) 763-7976. DUTIES: Teach Spanish courses from beginning to advanced; grammar courses for native speakers; and civilization cours es in Spanish and English. QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. in Spanish language and literature; familiarity with current methodologies in the teaching of foreign languages; two years teaching ex perience and fluency in English are required; knowledge of French and/or theory of bilingual education desirable. STARTING SALARY RANGE: $28,630 TO $31,716. Commensurate with ex perience and qualifications. SEND COVER LEITER AND RESUME BY JULY 28 TO: DR. ANA MARIA HERNANDEZ HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE/CUNY 31-10 THOMSON AVENUE LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK 11101 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER MARKETING ASSOCIATE TELEMARKETING PBS ADULT LEARNING SERVICE (ALS) We have a challenging opportunity available for a creative professional to develop and implement telemarketing plans as a member of the ALS marketing team. Responsibilities include: Developing marketing analyses strategies and goals and follow-up activities for extensive satellite programing service to colleges, cor and television analyzing staffing needs and recruiting, tra1n1ng and superv1s1ng telemarketing/customer service staff; and developing and maintaining tracking systems. Qualifications: College degree in marketing or business or equivalent with two to four years in marketing or telemarketing preferably to higher education. Must have excellent oral and written communications skills, particularly a persuasive telephone voice; data base management skills required. PBS offers a salary com mensurate with experience and an excellent benefits package. Interested candidates should send a letter of interest, resume and salary require ments to: July 3, 1989 PBS Attn. Carla Gibson 1320 Braddock Place Alexandria, VA 22314 PBS is an Equal Opportunity Employer Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF PUERTO RICAN WOMEN, INC. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The National Conference of Puerto Rican Women, Inc. (NACOPRW), announces the position of Executive Director to work in the organization's national office in Washington, D.C. Candidate for the position must possess excellent written and oral skills. Must be self starter and able to conceptualize and implement initiatives with limited support. Experience in fund-raising activities with non-profit organization is a must. Knowledge and familiarity of corporate and funding cycles is necessary. Ability to supervise support staff required. Knowledge of word-processing equipment and data management systems is preferred. Candidates must have a commitment to women's rights issues and knowledge of the needs and concerns of Puerto Rican and other Hispanic women. Salary range will be $35,000/$40,000 per year. Please send resume to: National Conference of P uerto Rican Women, Inc. 5 Thomas Circle, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20005 Deadline for submission: July 20, 1989 ......................-....-.-.................................... . . . ......... . ... .-::::w .-:--:--A::::::::N-:::::m -. . e-.-:o--:-:: ::::: ::::::_:: :::::::i . : :!._::;'.:::::_: ::::::::::--:_::\::::i::_ :::::::::::i : : i::::::::_!-:::::::::::::::::-:.::::: :::::.::.:!:::::::::::::::: ::::.:: TOP HISPANIC MBA Excellent sales and presentation skills, solid marketing background, thorough knowledge of the Hispanic and Puerto Rican markets, ability to manage special projects and ac counts, mergers & acquisitions ex perience. Seeks large opportunity. Mr. Polo (809) 766-2259. Condominia El Girasol, Apt. 909, Isla Verde, P.R. 00913 OFFICE POSITION PRESS SECRETARY Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre seeks a bilingual, energetic, creative PR pro to handle media relations, write speeches and make things happen. Salary $24,000 to $30,000. Resume and writing samples to Robin Kramer, 200 N. Spring St., Room 260, Los Angeles, Calif. 90012. (No calls please.) AA/EOE COUNTY LIBRARIAN COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES The County System consists of 91 community libraries and 6 book mobiles that serve 50 cities and the unincorporated areas with a combined population of 3 million. The system operates a budget of $600.7 million and employs 871 full-time and 792 part-time employees. There are 4.1 million books and 23,000 periodical subscriptions with an annual circula tion of 11.9 million. Position has full responsibility for the planning and im plementation of programs and ac tivities that provide comprehensive services to residents of the cities, unin corporated areas of the County, and County institutions served by the library. Position reports to 5-member elected Board of Supervisors and requires Master of Library Science de gree from an ALA accredited college plus a minimum of 10 years of progres sive senior level management ex perience in a large metropolitan multi-cultural library system. Salary range is $66,795-$1 00, 1 93. Send resumes by August 4, 1989 to KORN/FERRY INTERNATIONAL, Attn: Jim B. Clarke, 1800 Century Park East, 9th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90067. AA/EOE REPORTERS/ CREATIVE WRITERS Hispanic Link News Service buys three 650-word feature/opinion pieces weekly, paying on acceptance. A story you cover locally may have national interest or ap plication. For details and writer's guidelines, write Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Hispanic Link intern seeks position 30-to-40 hours a week evenings and/or weekends. Have journalism degree and 5 years of progressive of fice experience. Am WordPerfect, MultiMate and Lotus 1-2-3 proficient, but will consider all offers. Please con tact Rhonda at 234-0280, M-F be tween 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. DEAR PERSONNI;L DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target ana tional pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. We are pleased to announce the opening of our new office CLASSIFIED AD RATES: Ordered by ------------------------------------------EGGLI, CARD, MESA & ORONA Certified Shorthand Reporters 135 East Live Oak Ave. Suite 208 Arcadia, Calif. 91 006 (818) 446-4849 Hispanic Link Weekly Report 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: Organization -------------------------Street --------------------------------City, State & Zip ____________ _ (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 Area Code & Phone per column inch. ----------------------July 3, 1989 7

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua EL BARRIO: Two reasons why you should read your da1ly newspaper: NUMERO UNO: The June 22 Boston Globe carries a piece on Rolando Cabrera, 17, who came to the United States from El Sal vador in 1.985, 2 1/2 years in a bilingual education program before ma1nstream1ng, and graduated first in his Jamaica Plain High School class this spring. This fall he'll start at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with scholarships covering all but about $500 of the $21,000 annual to attend the prestigious school. According to Margarita Perez, his guidance counselor Rolando's the first bilingual program student MIT has admitted. ' NUMERO DOS: The June 23 Washington Times carries a piece about Ever Guandiquealso 17, also from El Salvador. Guandi que, who came to the states in 1984, graduated from T.C. Williams School in Va., with a 3. 85 average and straight A's 1n all but one subject, computer studies, in which he received a B. This fall, also with scholarship support, he'll attend the Indiana 1 n stitute of Technology in Ft. Wayne. WRAP SESSION: Two reasons why you should use your daily paper to wrap soiled diapers: Arts & Entertainment IN PRODUCTION: Two Latino-themed stories are currently in production as network television projects. Currently filming in Los Angeles is Sweet 15, an upcoming episode of the PBS children's television series Wonderworks. The program tells the story of the quinceaf1era of a Mexican American girl who is .. sym bolically ushered into adulthood through her (15th birthday party), but who experiences true maturity when she helps her proud father gain U.S. citizenship through the legalization program." Karla . Montana plays the story's 15-year-old Marta; Tony Plana and Jenny Gaga are her parents. Sweet 15 is a Richard Soto Production. Also filming in Los Angeles (with further filming planned for Spain) is the six-hour NBC miniseries Desperados, the story of slain drug en forcement agent Enrique Camarena. Desperados, based on the book by Elaine Shannon, stars Steven Bauer as Camarena and Elizabeth Peria as his widow, Mika. Bauer and Peria are Cuba-born. Bauer changed his name from Rocky Echevarria when he began pursuing a Hollywood acting career. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina, Karen Zacarias. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word . Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. NUMERO UNO: Los Ange les Times reporter Richard Lee Colvin came up with a gushy feature June 18 on Sally Peterson, the Califor nia elementary school teacher who's being backed by the English Only mob to destroy public school bilingual education programs. A sample of his portrait: .. A liberal Democrat, she was targeted as a racist. She was laughed at. But she refused to go away ... He quotes a teacher who heads one of her Learning English Advocates Drive (LEAD) chapters: "She's our Joan of Arc, she's our spirit. .. We're not going to let people here burn her at the stake ..... He fails to quote any students who have been subjected to her sink or-swim beliefs. Maybe they all sank. NUMERO DOS: The bodies of two New York Puerto Rican teen agers who disappeared on their way to school were found in plastic bags near the Hutchison River Parkway in the Bronx. Creative New York Daily News reporters wrote June 22 that .. a chicken and a coconut were found within 1 0 feet of the bodies, lead ing to speculation that a ritualistic ceremony was involved ... Speculation by whom? New York detectives gave no credence to such nonsense. Hispanic Link reporter Danilo Alfaro offers this alternate scoop: ..The bodies of two Irish Americans stuffed in plastic bags were found yesterday near the banks of the Charles River in Boston . A cluster of shamrocks and an unusually shaped rock were found 1 0 feet from the bodies, leading to speculation that a bizarre Druid ritual may have been involved ... -Kay Barbaro Motown Productions, a Los Angeles-based company, announced last month it has obtained .. worldwide exclusive rights .. to the life story of Portuguese singer/actress Carmen Miranda. The company is plan11ing to develop a stage musical starring Spanish guitarist/actress Charo. Plans for a motion picture and TV movie are also being discussed. .. If anybody can play Carmen Miranda, that's me, .. Charo told Week ly Report ... 1 have the same level of energy (as Miranda), besides a great deal of respect and admiration for her ... Miranda was raised in Brazil. She played a .. Brazilian bombshell" type in various Hollywood musicals in the '40s . A bidding war, meanwhile, is growing around the rights to another Brazilian story the life of assassinated rubber tapper Francisco (Chico) Mendes, an advocate for the preservation of his country's rain forests. Among those pursuing the rights to the Mendes story, reportedly, are industry heavyweights David Puttnam, Robert Redford, Ted Turner and Peter Guber. .. .. .... : ... : . . : . . :: . . : :.:: . . ri.\ .. :: .. : ..... : : . . 0 () () ---0 said BEAM me down! II