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Hispanic link weekly report, July 10, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 10, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News
Retired Lt. Col. Oliver North helps raise funds in Miami for the legal defense of former CIA Costa Rica station chief Jos6 Fernandez, accused of covering up his ties to illegal arms shipments in the Iran-contra scandal...Members of the Subcommittee on Census and Population name three Hispanics to the nine-member Congressional Minority Advisory Committee. They are Jerry Apodaca, former New Mexico governor, Lillian Fernandez, director of international affairs for Pfizer Inc. and former staff director for the census subcommittee, and Juanita Tamayo Lott, president of Tamayo Lott Associates, a public policy consulting firm.;.Southern California AIDS organizations pay tribute to Eunice Diaz, the sole Hispanic on the National Commission on
AIDS...Hundreds of Cuban-owned businesses in South Florida close for three hours June 29 to show support for jailed anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch, 62. Bosch, a pediatrician, was ordered deported June 23 for entering the United States illegally in February 1988...Author/educator Arturo Morales Carrion, who served as deputy assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs in the Kennedy administration, dies at age 75 of cancer in San Juan, Puerto Rico...Newsweek magazine picks two Hispanics among its 54 heroes from across the United States who have volunteered time to improve their communities. The two are Pauline G6mez, 69, from Santa Fe, N.M., a blind teacher who helped found a preschool, and Father Patrick Valdez, 40, from San Luis, Colo., a leader in the economic revitalization of his rural community...

Executive Search Firms Tap Into Growing Market
By Rhonda Smith
The Latino professional with a college degree and work experience is fast becoming one of the hottest commodities in corporate America, thanks to the burgeoning Hispanic community and its consumer spending patterns.
In what many say is a seller’s market, executive search firms throughout the country are scrambling to find Hispanic professionals to fill openings in education, business and technical arenas. Within the last decade, Hispanic-owned search firms have sprouted to meet this demand. An estimated 30 to 40 exist today.
Arturo Arreguin, an account executive at Able Executive Search in Lenexa, Kan., said when he began contacting corporations throughout the country last month to measure the demand, he was elated at the responses. "Over and over I kept hearing, ‘Where have you been? We’ve been looking for someone who can find Hispanic professionals on a national basis.’"
Court OKs Official English
By Karen Zacarfas
Hispanics challenging Florida’s designation of English as the state’s official language suffered a major setback July 3 when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a federal court of appeals ruling that deemed legal a ballot initiative giving English official-language status there.
Hispanic residents challenged the ruling on the ground that the petitions seeking signatures to place the official-language proposal on the ballot were not translated into Spanish in six of the state’s 67 counties covered by the Federal Voting Rights Act. The act requires that states distributing "materials or information relating to the electoral process" provide a bilingual translation in covered areas.
Florida voters approved the initiative 84-16% last Nov. 4.
The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last year in the case of Delgado vs. Smith that officials did not violate the voting act because it does not apply to petitions for initiatives by private citizens.
Roland Cordobes, president of Di-REC Services in Dallas, agreed: "Major corporations have their claws out for Hispanic candidates. They are in fantastic demand."
Seven months ago Cordobes signed a one-year contract with the Dallas Independent School District to recruit 100 Hispanic teachers. "In addition to an annual starting salary of $21,000, bilingual teachers in Dallas are in such great demand they are given a $2,500 stipend."
Still, he said, even this is not incentive enough. Many Hispanic college graduates who may have been considering a teaching career are now being courted by corporations offering management-training positions and substantially higher salaries.
In regions where large Hispanic populations reside, it continues to be an asset if a prospective job seeker is bilingual. "Although it’s not necessary," explained Arreguin, "it’s absolutely a plus."
"But," Cordobes said, "we need people who are actually bilingual, not those speaking Tex-Mex’."
Not only must candidates Diva Garcia places have a proven track record, "it’s extremely important that they have level 3, or commercial, Spanish competency." Garcia owns International Team Consultants, a search firm in Houston that places professionals with U,S.
based corporations that may do business in Latin America and abroad.
In addition to bilingual auditors, secretaries and human resource personnel, she said Latinos with three to five years experience in industries like equipment export, industrial sales and consumer goods will have no problem finding employment in that region.
Even though opportunities are springing up in cities nationwide for Hispanic professionals, Arreguin said he is concerned about the reluctance of many to relocate. "I find with women in particular a reluctance to leave their families. While some opportunities may not be in the most romantic cities in the world, they are with major corporations."
A. Arreguin
being bilingual "a plus".
But according to Carlos Rojas-Magnon, president of Delano, Magnon & Associates Inc., a Connecticut-based firm, opportunities are definitely prevalent in areas with heavy concentrations of Latinos. "I recently placed a Cuban marketing manager in Miami. There are also many jobs concentrated in the Hous-
continued on page 2
Dallas Redistricting Plan Spurs Debate
By Rhonda Smith
Dallas citizens will vote on a new City Council redistricting plan Aug. 12, but many Hispanics and blacks fear that the proposed plan will be as detrimental to their political representation as the current system.
The current council consists of eight members elected in single-member districts and three elected at large.
After Hispanic and black citizens complained that the 8-3 plan diluted their voting power, a charter review committee was formed and a 10-4-1 plan proposed. If voters choose this plan, 10 council members will be chosen from
single-member districts, and the mayor and remaining four councilors chosen at large.
Currently, the council is comprised of nine whites and two blacks. Eighteen percent of the Dallas population is Hispanic and 30% is black.
"Under the 10-4-1 plan, three blacks could be safely elected to the City Council and possibly one Latino," said Ray Hutchinson, chairman of the charter review committee.
"The Mexican American Legal Defense (and Educational Fund) and the Southwest Voter Registration (Education) Project have said this is a retrogressive plan,” responded Domingo Garcia, a Dallas attorney and staunch opponent of the 10-4-1 plan. Garcia instead has proposed a 12-1 plan.


Report Finds Hispanics are 3% of U.S. Foreign Service
By Rhonda Smith
Hispanics, blacks and women continue to be significantly underrepresentec in the U.S. State Department’s Foreign Service and disproportionately assigned to administrative and consular rather than political posts, according to a report released by the General Accounting Office.
The June 26 report said that as of September 1987, 2,232 of the Foreign Service’s 9,439 employees were Anglo women (24%), 508 black (5%), 324 Hispanic (3%), 159 Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders (1.7%) and 42 American Indians or Alaskan natives (0.4%).
The report said the State Department’s efforts to recruit qualified members of these
groups "are not currently producing desired results and the number of minorities taking the Foreign Service examination has been declining."
It added, "Minorities pass the examination at only one-fourth the rate of white males." It recommended that the State Department take steps to determine if the test is culturally biased.
A Hispanic manager at the State Department who asked not to be identified told Weekly Report, "I don’t think the examination is culturally biased. (It’s) just that many minorities may not be prepared to take it. The ones who are prepared do well."
When asked about disproportionate assignment of minorities to consular positions — is-
suing visas and passports — and administrative jobs — managing overseas facility operations in budgeting, maintenance and supplies — the official said: "We are mostly assigned to administrative positions which, in essence, means taking care of the ambassador’s toilet.
"Nevertheless, we are making some breakthroughs and will eventually be included in political and economic job posts."
In a letter responding to the GAO’s findings, State Department officials said steps would be taken to improve on its five-year affirmative action plan and that they will review and possibly redesign the written examination "to eliminate any disparate impact therein."
Union Caucus Answers LEAD Proposal
By Danilo Alfaro
In response to actions taken by a splinter group of the United Teachers-Los Angeles that would prohibit the union from negotiating incentive bonuses for Los Angeles’ 4,000 bilingual teachers, the union’s Hispanic Caucus has presented an opposing referendum to the union’s membership. Ballots will be mailed July 13.
The caucus’ referendum would require UTLA to support instructional programs using students’ native languages among curricular options. It also calls for monetary compensation for teachers demonstrating bilingual skills.
The caucus suffered a setback last month when UTLA attorneys rejected a challenge to a measure that sought to rescind yearly bonuses of up to $5,000 for bilingual teachers
offered by the school district in May 1988. The measure was sponsored by Learning English Advocates Drive, a group aligned with U.S. English that advocates an English-immersion approach to bilingual education.
Ballots cast in that referendum had been sequestered pending an investigation into charges that signatures required to send the measure to vote had not been collected by the deadline.
Caucus officials said they planned to appeal the lawyers’ decision. If the appeal is unsuccessful, the measure has likely received enough votes to pass. But even if it does, pay differentials are already written into the teachers’ three-year contract, ratified June 22.
The results of the caucus’ referendum will be announced in late August.
Search Companies Fill 'Fantastic Demand’
continued from page 1
ton/San Antonio corridor, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, New Mexico and Denver."
With offices in Connecticut, New York and Mexico, his firm places Hispanic professionals of all types nationally and internationally.
Arreguin said Hispanic engineers, accountants and financial analysts should have no problem in the competitive job market if they meet the stringent standards. "A financial analyst with an M.B.A. from a reputable school and three to five years of experience can easily command a $50,000-$60,000 annual salary."
Arnold Rodriguez, president of Technical Personnel Services in Middleville, Mich., said even though entry-level salaries for engineers can range anywhere from $28,000 to $38,000 annually, "Many times I find that Hispanic and black candidates tend to ask for higher salaries or large benefit packages because they know they are in great demand.
"But by doing this," he added, "sometimes they end up pricing themselves out of the market."
While Hispanics with business, math and science-related degrees will continue to appeal to executive recruiters, those with liberal arts backgrounds are also considered attractive. "The liberal arts major has a lot of friends in corporations," said Rebecca Ruben, vice president of H.C. Smith Ltd., a minority-owned executive search firm in Shaker Heights, Ohio.
C. Rojas-Magnon "In many instances places candidates nationally you find an employee and internationally... with the technical train-
ing and no human skills. Companies are now looking for a combination of both."
With good credentials, a positive attitude and the assistance of a savvy headhunter, executive recruiters from coast to coast agree that the Hispanic professional is well positioned to impact significantly the U.S. job market in the coming years.
EEOC Nixes University English-Only Work Rule
By Adrienne Urbina
A ruling announced June 30 by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s San Francisco office abolished the 1987 English-only work place rule at the University of California, San Francisco.
The complaint was filed by hospital workers whose primary languages are Spanish and Tagalog.
The ruling marked a milestone in the guarantee of the right to speak the language of personal choice, closing loopholes previously used by the university, said Manuel Romero, an attorney at the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund’s San Francisco office. Romero saw the ruling as one with guidelines that can be applied not only in California, but throughout the United States.
INS Extends Airport Raids
By Danilo Alfaro
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service will extend its sweeps for undocumented immigrants from Los Angeles International Airport to airports in the surrounding suburbs, it was announced June 28.
INS officials said a recent upsurge in the smuggling of immigrants aboard continental airline flights necessitated the raids.
Early that morning, INS agents arrested 43 immigrants, mostly from Mexico, as they tried to board overnight flights in Los Angeles. Twenty-nine more were arrested at Detroit Metropolitan Airport when agents boarded a New York-bound flight on a stopover from Los Angeles.
Beto Juarez, staff attorney with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Los Angeles, said INS’ announcement was "a cause for concern because of the potential for abuse. They have a tendency to target only Hispanics as they are going about their business at the airport."
2
July 10,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


I
j Jesus Mena
Cucaracha -1 nf ested HUD
They were so big you could hear them at night as they scurried over the dining room floor. You would have sworn it was mice. But when you flicked on the lights, all you could see were these huge cockroaches with long antennae that swept the air like radar.
Pictures of these ravenous bugs that infested my childhood home in j South Texas grew vivid in my mind as I read about the Reaganite Republicans who have been bilking millions of dollars from the department of Housing and ] Urban Development.
Cucarachas\, I said to myself. That’s what those politicos are. They are even nastier than the ones that infested the run-down tenements J that I grew up in.
It’s aggravating to know that millions of dollars are being squandered while an untold multitude of people live in dilapidated housing projects with stopped-up toilets, broken windows, poor heating and peeling paint.
Consider Paul J. Manafort, a leading strategist in Bush’s presidential campaign, who told Congress he had lobbied j HUD officials to assure his clients received $31 million for the rehabilitation of some low-income apartments. This money was granted for a project that local officials in New Jersey opposed because they said there was no need for it. And the slimy cucaracha Manafort insists he did nothing wrong. He was merely "influence peddling," he said.
WATT PEDDLES NEW WARES
Influence peddling? To me, his actions are little different than the holdup I read about recently. Two men wearing Ronald Reagan masks apparently held up a restaurant in San Francisco and got away with $20,000. Maybe those crooks will also claim they were merely "in-I fluence peddling."
Of course, we can’t forget our old friend James Watt. Add a pair of an-I tenna to his shiny head, darken his Coke-bottle glasses a little and you I have one of the chief cucarachas. The former secretary of interior, who I had previously tried to sell the California coast to oil companies for a song, apparently has new wares to peddle. Though he has no ex-I perience in developing housing, Watt hired himself out as a "consult-J ant" to developers. By making a few calls to old political cronies, he made sure that HUD subsidies were given to client developers willing to pay his exorbitant fees. He admits those calls netted him more than $400,000.
Add to these lowly characters the hundreds of real estate agents who ; siphoned off millions of dollars into personal accounts when they hand-i led HUD forclosures and you’ve got a HUD that under Reagan became a giant cucarachero, a breeding ground for these filthy scavengers.
I guess I shouldn’t get too carried away with the cucaracha metaphor.
UNETHICAL, NOT ILLEGAL
I In many ways, real roaches have more dignity. They are lowly crea-j tures and they know it. They don’t dare show themselves until darkness 1 sets in. And although they too live off the poor, they feed on food crumbs. The consultants who have testified before Congress would never dream of settling for crumbs. Drug dealer kingpins would envy the money they’ve reaped off the housing needs of the poor. Do these j mammoth roaches walk around with heads hung in shame? Do they J hide under manhole covers, waiting for dark to rear their ugly heads?
No, these parasites go on live national television and tell of their eX-| ploits. Worse yet, they insist they did nothing illegal.
Unfortunately, they may prove to be technically correct. Federal investigators may decide their activities were unethical but not illegal.
All that a feisty cucaracha needs to survive is some small crack to hide in. For these politico roaches, the crevice they need to escape prosecution may be the law itself.
| (Jesus Mena, of Oakland, Calif., writes for Hispanic Link and other pub-
j lications.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
NAME TAG: Let’s start with Gene McNary, the very conservative buddy of WiHiam H.T. Bush, the president’s brother. McNary’s the front-runner to replace Alan Nelson as head of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
Many who know him think the St. Louis County executive officer, whose knowledge of immigration law and experience with immigrants (for some reason, they avoid St. Louis) is very limited, would be in over his head.
But of greater concern to Latinos is his insensitivity to Hispanics and blacks. As county exec, he fought against subsidized housing in the suburbs and opposed court-ordered busing to desegregated county schools.
SO HOW ABOUT PETER? The name of former U.S. Attorney Peter Nunez of San Diego is also still being bandied for the job. Could he be a good guy?
Well, columnist Georgie Anne Geyer loves his tough talk against Hispanic border-watchers such as the American Friends Service Committee’s Roberto Martinez almost as much as she loves the Federation for American Immigration Reform. That’s a red flag right there.
Then there’s the matter of Nunez lending his name to a FAIR-back-ed "Open Letter to Congress — Our borders are out of control" pitch earlier this year. The letter called for "extension of fencing and other appropriate physical structures" along the U.S.-Mexico border.
Who else signed the letter?
For starters, how about Barry Hatch, the outrageous mayor of Monterey Park, Calif.; Dr. John Tanton, the even more outrageous founder of FAIR and U.S. English; and ex-Colorado Gov. Richard Lamm.
ADD A PINCH OF GARY: Lamm co-authored "The Immigration Time Bomb: The Fragmenting of America" with Gary Imhoff, who "consults" for FAIR and U.S. English. (He ghostwrote the Tanton response to author James Crawford’s expose of U.S. English syndicated by Hispanic Link last October.)
In "Time Bomb," you may recall, the authors attacked the National Council of La Raza, claiming that itsEl Plan EspiritualdeAztlan' calls for a revolutionary nationalism for Chicanos and assumes that ‘social, economic, cultural and political independence is the only road to total liberation from oppression, exploitation and racism.’"
Of course, it’s not NCLR’s "Plan." Lamm and Imhoff confused RaulYzaguirre’s D.C.-based umbrella Latino service group with the once-active Texas-based political organization La Raza Unida.
TOUGH TIMES AHEAD: If McNary and Nunez are the best names the Bush administration can come up with to head our Immigration and Naturalization Service, INS can drop the letter "S" from its name right now.
POSTSCRIPT: Of 17 valedictorians in Boston public schools this year, 13 are foreign-born. Many arrived within the last five years. One is deaf.
Their countries of origin include Portugal, France, Italy, El Salvador, Jamaica, China, Vietnam and Czechoslovakia.
— KayBarbaro
Quoting...
ROBERTO GOIZUETA, Cuba-born president of Coca-Cola, quoted in the June edition of Atlanta’s MundoHispanico on his Latino roots:
"Your roots are there forever. Only when the tree dies, do the roots die."
PETERNUNEZ, former U.S. Attorney and currently in private practice in San Diego, commenting in the May 26 Washington Times on INS’ proposed $2 million border ditch:
"This is the law of the United States. It says it is illegal to enter the United States illegally...And if Mexico is offended by that, I'd say thafs too bad."
Mena
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
July 10,1989
3


COLLECTING
Executive search firms take assignments for corporations and usually work on a retainer-fee basis. They accept resumes but more than likely will not contact you unless they have a specific job for which you are qualified. The following are executive search firms with outreach to the Hispanic professional:
Abel Gonzalez &Assocs., P.O. Box 681845, San Antonio, Texas 78268. Contact: Abel Gonzalez, President, (512) 695-5555. Specialization: Petrochemical engineers and consumer goods/marketing professionals.
Able Executive Search, 8819 Long St., Lenexa, Kan. 66125. Contact: Arturo Arregufn, Account Executive, (913) 894-1200. Specialization: Professionals with 3-5 years experience. Engineering, accounting, financial analysis/forecast-ing, data processing, human resources, sales/marketing, sales operations/in-dustrial engineering, distribution logistics, manufacturing (second- and third-line management).
Delano, Magnon & Associates, Inc., 6 Landmark Square, Fourth Floor, Stamford, Conn. 06901. Contact: Carlos Rojas-Magnon, President, (203) 359-5663. Specialization: Places all professionals nationally and internationally.
GENERAL FIRMS
H.C. Smith Ltd., Executive Search & Recruiting, 3051 Van Aken Blvd., Shaker Heights, Ohio 44120. Contact: Herbert Smith, President, or Rebecca Ruben, Vice President, (216) 752-9966. Specialization: Engineering, aerodynamics, arts & entertainment, marketing, public relations, employee relations and services, real estate, insurance and financial services, manufacturing and utilities.
The following are employment agencies. They work on a contingency-fee basis and are reimbursed by the corporation after the position is filled. They are more likely to be of assistance to the entry-level and low-to-middle management professional. But they ail indicated some placement of Hispanic professionals in upper-level positions.
America’s Inc., 612 N. Michigan St., Suite 617, Chicago, III. 60611. Contact: Enrique Loza, President, (312) 664-7770. Specialization: Entry-level accounting and finance professionals, sales, marketing and technical clients.
Careers/lnc., Suite 1919, Banco Popular Center, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 00918. Contact: Rupert Amy, General Manager, (809) 763- 5176. Specialization: Places candidates in Puerto Rico, the Caribbean, Mexico and Latin America. Mid-to-senior-level management as well as marketing, sales and service professionals, accounting, finance, engineers, systems analysts.
Di-REC Services, 10501 N. Central Expressway, Suite 306, Dallas, Texas 75231. Contact: Roland Cordobes, President, (214) 987- 9834. Specialization: General placement for Hispanic professionals in all fields.
International Team Consultants, 1233 W. Loop South, Suite 1260, Houston, Texas 77027. Contact: Diva Garcia, President, (713) 997- 9188. Specialization: Bilingual professionals in accounting, finance, marketing, sales, secretarial and human resource personnel.
SEARCH FIRMS SURVEY: For a complete list of executive search firms surveyed by Weekly Report, send a self-addressed envelope with 250 postage to Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
CONNECTING
POINTERS ON SEARCH FIRMS
If you are looking for a new job, changing careers or have just graduated from college, here are some tips on using the services of an executive search firm:
• It’s a good idea to send your resume and cover letter to search firms nationwide. However, this alone will not assure a response. Many recruiters receive hundreds of resumes monthly.
o If you are interested in working with one or several recruiters, call them to discuss your qualifications.
• Zero in on those firms that specialize in your skills and interests. The candidate with the best chance of gaining placement through a search firm should have specific requirements for the type of position he or she is interested in.
• Be flexible. Although a position may not meet your exact job specifications, look at long-range benefits you may derive from it.
Sources worth noting are: The Directory of Executive Recruiters, 1988-89 edition, contains an extensive list of search firms nationwide and their specializations. It also contains information on how to use recruiters successfully.
There is also the Hispanic Business National Resume Database for qualified professionals and college juniors and seniors with a minimum 3.0 grade point average. Resumes are sought from people in business, engineering, communications, computer science and related fields. For more information, contact Hispanic Business, 360 S. Hope Ave., Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 93105 (805) 682-5843.
GRANT PROMOTES EDUCATORS
A project to increase the pool of minority leaders in vocational and technical education began July 5 at Texas A&M University at College Station.
The project, titled Minority Leadership in Technical and Vocational Education, is funded by a $325,000 federal grant. It addresses the lack of minorities in decision-making positions. The project seeks to elevate minority technical and vocational professionals into jobs such as vice president, dean, department head and other leadership positions.
Of the 36 participants, all of whom are nominated by Texas community college and technical institute presidents, 15 are Hispanic. The participants will serve year-long internships beginning in the fall. The project has also compiled nearly 200 candidates into a minority data bank available for state community colleges and technical institutes.
Calendar_______________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
IMMIGRATION HEARINGS Chicago July 12, New York July 14 The Committee for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development will be holding hearings on U.S.-Mexico and U.S.-Canada migration and trade issues and the causes
and consequences of unauthorized migration from Latin American and Caribbean countries. The hearings are open to the public. The committee was mandated under the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act.
Diane Gonzalez (202) 254-4954
CHILD CARE
New Orleans July 12-14
Dillard University is hosting a national conference, "Minority Child Care & Family Issues," to be held in conjunction with and directly preceding hearings of the U.S. House Select Committee on Children, Youth and Families. The conference will examine public and private dimensions of health, education and care of children, dependent adults, and the elderly in minority families throughout the United States.
Beatrice Kelley (504) 568-1989
LA RAZA CONFERENCE
Kansas City, Mo. July 15-19
The National Council of La Raza is holding its 1989
annual conference, "Coalitions: Partnerships for Progress." Workshops will focus on education, housing, immigration, employment, health and other issues. Also planned is a job fair where employment recruiters will interview job seekers and match them with job openings in various companies.
Eileen Torres (202) 289-1380
COMING SOON
CONFERENCE
Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers
of Commerce
Austin, Texas July 27-29
Joe Morin (512) 447-9821
FUND-RAISING SEMINAR Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities San Antonio Aug. 4, 5 Pamela Salazar (512) 433-1501
4
July 10,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
CALGON
CALGON CARBON CORPORATION
TECHNICAL SALES REPRESENTATIVE
CALGON CARBON CORPORATION, the world’s leading producer of granular activated carbon, has an immediate opening for an entry level Technical Sales Representative for the Houston Sales Office.
Reporting to the Houston Regional Sales Director, the incumbent will be trained by technical support, marketing and sales people for 6-12 months to become familiar with the Company’s products and services. After the initial training period, the incumbent will be responsible for the direct sale of activated carbon products, services and systems to the industrial process, municipal, industrial and wastewater markets.
A technical degree is required with a B.S. in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering preferred. The ideal candidate will have 1 -2 years direct sales or business experience. Strong oral and written communication skills are essential. Travel is required.
We offer an excellent compensation and benefits package.
Qualified candidates should submit resume and salary history to:
CALGON CARBON CORPORATION PO BOX 717
PITTSBURGH, PA 15230-0717 ATTN: DEPARTMENT-SL An Equal Opportunity Employer
OFFICE MANAGER
For congenial Hispanic non-profit organization. Must have bookkeeping, com-puter experience, and strong administrative skills. Non-smoker and bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. Good benefits package. Salary negotiable depending on experience. Call for appointment (202) 822-8478.
AA/EOE
TOP HISPANIC MBA
Excellent sales and presentation skills, solid marketing background, thorough knowledge of the Hispanic and Puerto Rican markets, ability to manage special projects and accounts, mergers & acquisitions experience. Seeks large opportunity. Mr. Polo (809) 766-2259. Condominio El Girasol, Apt. 909, Isla Verde, P.R. 00913
SITUATIONS WANTED Hispanic Link intern seeks position 30-to-40 hours a week evenings and/or weekends. Have journalism degree and 5 years of progressive office experience. Am WordPerfect, MultiMate and Lotus 1-2-3 proficient, but will consider all offers. Please contact Rhonda at 234-0280, M-F between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
The following positions are with
RIO HONDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE
NURSING
Position available for ADN instructor. Master’s required.
TEACHING
Women’s Tennis Coach — Part-time, beginning February 1990.
LIBRARY
Full-time position, tenure track. Also part-time position. Provide reference service in college library. Familiarity with OCLC, library automative systems necessary. MSLS required. For additional information and application for these positions, call Jean at (213) 629-0921 ext 309.
RIO HONDO COLLEGE Whittier, Calif. 90608 AA/EOE
STATISTICIAN
(ECONOMICS)
Exciting employment opportunity at the Census Bureau, Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C., for an economic statistician who speaks fluent Spanish. Position is for lead instructor of technical training courses in collection and use of economic statistics. Education must include 15 semester hours in statistics or combination of mathematics and statistics. Advanced degree in economics and field data collection experience preferable. Grasp of development economics and Latin American experience highly desirable. Position for 18 months with possibility of conversion to permanent status. U.S. citizenship required. For further information contact Tim Brown at (301) 763-4830 by July 31,1989. An Equal Opportunity Employer
JTPA TECHNICAL ASSISTANT SPECIALIST
The National Council of La Raza is seeking an individual with experience in JTPA MIS Systems, fund accounting in the nonprofit sector, and JTPA project development and implementation. Must be able to travel and be bilingual English and Spanish.
Mail resume to the attention of Lupe Lemus, Personnel Assistant.
NCLR
810 1st Street NE Suite 300
Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 289-1380 AA/EOE
SPANISH EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT CENTER Spanish-Speakers:
Learn more English. Receive preschool education credential. Financial assistance available. Free Training. Job placement Assistance. Apply now. Call SED CENTER (202) 462-8848.__________
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Ordered by_
CLASSIFIED AD RATES:
90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Organization
Street
City, State & Zip_
Area Code & Phone
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
July 10,1989
5


Arts & Entertainment
ITS A FAMILY AFFAIR: Two generations of the Anthony Quinn family are in the Caribbean island of Tortola filming a TV version of Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea.
Quinn, a two-time Academy Award winner, portrays the title character in the movie being made for NBC. His son Francisco plays the same character in his youth while daughter Valentina portrays the character’s daughter.
At 74 and a veteran of more than 100 motion pictures, Anthony Quinn remains quite active. He has recently been working on two yet-to-be released films: Ghosts Can't Do It, in which he shares love scenes wjth Bo Derek, and Revenge, in which he co-stars with Kevin Costner.
A spokesperson for Quinn in Los Angeles could not confirm news reports from Mexico that Quinn is set to play Pancho Villa in a new film about the Mexican Revolution.
Two other Latino actors are also keeping it in the family. Emilio Estevez and his brother Charlie Sheen have completed work on the upcoming film Men at Work. Estevez wrote and directed the film.
Not to be outdone is Erik Estrada, who is signed to do four feature films this year, including one in which he co-stars with wife, Peggy Rowe.
That film is Silver Circle, scheduled to be shot in Florida. Estrada recently shot Night of the Wilding in Los Angeles and is due in Puerto Rico to shoot A Show of Force opposite Robert Duvall. The fourth film is Trouble in Saigon, which will return Estrada to his home in Los Angeles.
Also traveling: Esaf Morales, who is in Argentina filming Naked Tango, and Richard "Cheech" Marin, headed for Australia where he’ll do Shrimp on the Barbie. Marin stars as a Chicano who opens a restaurant Down Under.
ON THE CALIFORNIA STAGE: The San Diego Repertory Theatre begins its new Teatro Sin Fronteras’ two-play series this week with the staging of Orinoco.
The comedy by Mexican playwright Emilio Carballido, staged in alternate English and Spanish productions with the same cast, plays at San Diego’s Lyceum Space July 13-30. Jorge Huerta directs.
Continuing the series is the world premiere of Lynne Alvarez’s Thin Air, in English only, Aug. 10-30.
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
SUMMER READING LIST: Following are a few titles certain to be seen in the hands of literate sun-seekers and pool-side loungers this summer:
POLI, by Jay Neugeboren (Corona Publishing Co. 1037 S. Alamo, San Antonio, Texas 78210), 123 pp., $13.95 hardcover.
This novel is the true story of Jose Policarpo Rodriguez, who came to the Republic of Texas from Mexico in 1839 and associated with the Mexicans, Indians and Anglos who lived there. As the Mexican War approached, he faced the decision of where to place his loyalties.
THE HARVEST, by Tomas Rivera, edited by Julian Olivares, (flrte Publico Press, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, 2-L, Houston, Texas 77204-2090), 135 pp., $8.50 paper-bound.
This book is a collection of the complete works of short fiction by the celebrated
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina, Karen Zacarfas. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90.cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Chicano author and educator. Each story is printed in English and Spanish.
THE WEDDING, by Mary Helen Ponce (Arte PCbSco Press), 199 pp., $8.50 paperbound.
This novel provides a glimpse of Mexican American blue-collar subculture as seen through the eyes of a young bride-to-be. It is set in California in the ’50s.
THE CONQUEST OF MEXICO, by Beatrice Berler (Corona Publishing Co.), 143 pp., $7.95 paperbound, $16.50 hardcover.
A readaptation of a work originally appearing in 1843, this book describes how Hernando Cortes conquered the powerful Aztec empire.
ACROSS THE GREAT RIVER, by Irene Beltran Hernandez (Arte Publico Press), 136 pp., $8.50 paperbound.
This is the story of a young Mexican girl in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley maturing and taking on the leadership of her family when her parents become separated while crossing the border into the United States.
THE LINE OF THE SUN, by Judith Ortiz Cofer (The University of Georgia Press,
Athens, Ga. 30602), 304 pp., $19.95 hardbound.
Opening in a tiny village in Puerto Rico, this debut novel moves from the lush atmosphere of island life to a tough immigrant neighborhood in New Jersey, juxtaposing one culture with two different worlds.
MUJERES EIGLESIA, edited by Ana Marfa Portugal (Catholics For a Free Choice, 1436 U St. NW, Suite 301, Washington, D.C. 20009-1706), 146 pp., $8.95 paperbound.
Written by Latin American feminists, this book’s six essays explore the historical, political, cultural and religious conditions affecting women’s reproductive health in Latin America. The essays are in Spanish.
NICARAGUA, by William Gentile (W. W. Norton & Co. Inc., 500 Fifth St., New York, N.Y. 10110), 131 pp., $19.95 hardbound.
The photographs in this book vividly depict Nicaraguan people caught between the contra and the Sandinista factions, trying to live life amid the devastation of civil war.
— Danilo Alfaro


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Making The News This Week AIDS ... Hundreds of Cuban-owned businesses in South Florida close for three hours June 29 to show support for jailed anti-Castro militant Orlando Bosch, 62. Bosch, a pediatrician, was ordered deported June 23 for entering the United States illegally in February 1988 ... Author/educator Arturo Morales Carrion, who served as deputy assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs in the Kennedy administration, dies at age 75 of cancer in San Juan, Puerto Rico ... Newsweek magazine picks two Hispanics among its 54 heroes from across the United States who have volunteered time to improve their communities. The two are Pauline G6mez, 69, from Santa Fe, N.M., a blind teacher who helped found a preschool, and Father Patrick Valdez, 40, from San Luis, Colo., a leader in the economic revitalizaRetired Lt. Col. Oliver North helps raise funds in Miami for the legal defense of former CIA Costa Rica station chief Jose Fernandez, accused of covering up his ties to illegal arms shipments in the I ran-contra scan dal ... Members of the Subcommittee on Census and Population name three Hispanics to the nine-member Congressional Minority Advisory Committee. They are Jerry Apodaca, former New Mexico governor, Ul_ lian Fernandez, director of international affairs for Pfizer Inc. and former staff director for the census subcommittee, and Juanita Tamayo Lott, president of Tamayo Lott Associates, a public policy consulting firm.;.Southern California AIDS organizations pay tribute to Eunice Diaz, the sole Hispanic on the National Commission on tion of his rural community ... Vol. 7 No. 27 By Rhonda Smith The Latino professional with a college degree and work experience is fast becoming one of the hottest commodities in corporate America, thanks to the burgeoning Hispanic community and its consumer spending patterns. In what many say is a market, execu tive search firms throughout the country are scrambling to find Hispanic professionals to fill openings in education, business and technical arenas. Within the last decade, Hispanic owned search firms have sprouted to meet this demand. An estimated 30 to 40 exist today. Arturo Arregufn, an account executive at Able Executive Search in Lenexa, Kan., said when he began contacting corporations throughout the country last month to measure the demand, he was elated at the responses. u Over and over I kept hearing, 'Where have you been? We've been looking for someone who can find Hispanic professionals on a national basis. •u Court OKs Official English By Karen Zacarias Hispanics challenging Florida's designa tion of English as the state's official lan guage suffered a major setback July 3 when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld a federal court of appeals ruling that deemed legal a ballot initiative giving English offi cial-language status there. Hispanic residents challenged the ruling on the ground that the petitions seeking signatures to place the official-language proposal on the ballot were not translated into Spanish in six of the state's 67 coun ties covered by the Federal Voting Rights Act. The act requires that states distribut ing .. materials or information relating to the electoral process .. provide a bilingual translation in covered areas. Florida voters approved the initiative 8416% last Nov. 4. The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last year in the case of Delgado vs. Smith that officials did not violate the voting act because it does not apply to petitions for initiatives by private citizens. Roland Cordobes, president of Di-REC Ser vices in Dallas, agreed: 11Major corporations have their claws out for Hispanic candidates. They are in fantastic demand.11 Seven months ago Cordobes signed a one year contract with the Dallas Independent School District to recruit 100 Hispanic teachers. 111n addition to an annual starting salary of $21,000, bilingual teachers in Dallas are in such great demand they are given a $2,500 Still, he said, even this is not incentive enough. Many Hispanic college graduates who may have been considering a teaching career are now being courted by corporations offering management training positions and substantially higher salaries. In regions where large Hispanic populations reside, it continues to be an asset if a prospec tive job seeker is bilingual. 11Aithough it's not explained Arreguin, 11it's absolutely a plus.11 II But, II Cordobes said, 11We need people who are actually bilingual, not those speaking 'Tex Mex'.11 Not only must candidates Diva Garda places have a proven track record, 11it's extremely im portant that they have level 3, or commercial, Spanish Garda owns Interna tional Team Consultants, a search firm in Houston that places professionals with 1989 based corporations that may do business in Latin America and abroad. In addition to bilingual auditors, secretaries and human resource personnel, she said Latinos with three to five years experience in industries like equipment export, industrial sales and consumer goods will have no problem find ing employment in that region. Even though oppor-A. Arreguin tunities are springing being bilingual"aplus".. . up in cities nationwide for Hispanic professionals, Arreguin said he is concerned about the reluctance of many to relocate. 111 find with women in particular a reluctance to leave their families . While some opportunities may not be in the most romantic cities in the world, they are with major corpora But according to Carlos Rojas-Magnan, presi dent of Delano, Mag non & Associates Inc., a Connecticut-based firm, opportunities are definitely prevalent in areas with heavy con centrations of Latinos. 111 recently placed a Cuban marketing manager in Miami. There are also many jobs concentrated in the Hous-continued on page 2 Dallas Redistricting Plan Spurs Debate By Rhonda Smith Dallas citizens will vote on a new City Coun cil redistricting plan Aug. 12, but many Hispanics and blacks fear that the proposed plan will be as detrimental to their political representation as the current system. The current council consists of eight mem bers elected in single-member districts and three elected at large. After Hispanic and black citizens complained that the 8-3 plan diluted their voting power, a charter review committee was formed and a 10-4-1 plan proposed. If voters choose this plan, 10 council members will be chosen from single-member districts, and the mayor and remaining four councilors chosen at large. Currently, the council is cor:nprised of nine whites and two blacks. Eighteen percent of the Dallas population is Hispanic and 30% is black. II Under the 1 0-4-1 plan, three blacks could be safely elected to the City Council and possibly one Latino, II said Ray Hutchinson, chairman of the charter review committee. liThe Mexican American Legal Defense (and Educational Fund) and the Southwest Voter Registration (Education) Project have said this is a retrogressive plan, II responded Domingo Garda, a Dallas attorney and staunch op ponent of the 1 0-4-1 plan. Garcfa instead has proposed a 12-1 plan.

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Report Finds Hispanics are 3% of U.S. Foreign Service By Rhonda Sm i th Hispanics, blacks and wome.1 r,ontinue to be significantly underrepresentec in the U.S. State Department's Foreign Service and dis proportionately assigned to administrative and consular rather than political posts, ac cording to a report released by the General Accounting Office. The June 26 report said that as of Septem ber 1987, 2,232 of the Foreign Service's 9,439 employees were Anglo women (24%), 508 black (5%), 324 Hispanic (3%), 159 Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders (1.7%) and 42 American Indians or Alaskan natives (0.4%). The report said the State Department's ef forts to recruit qualified members of these groups "are not currently producing desired results and the number of minorities taking the Foreign Service examination has been declining." It added, "Minorities pass the examination at only one-fourth the rate of white males." It recommended that the State Department take steps to determine if the test is culturally biased. A Hispanic manager at the State Depart ment who asked not to be identified told Weekly Report, "I don't think the examination is culturally biased. (It's) just that many minorities may not be prepared to take it. The ones who are prepared do well." When asked about disproportionate assign ment of minorities to consular positions-is-Union Caucus Answers LEAD Proposal By Danilo Alfaro In response to actions taken by a splinter group of the United Teachers-Los Angeles that would prohibit the union from negotiating in centive bonuses for Los Angeles' 4, 000 bilin gual teachers, the union's Hispanic Caucus has presented an opposing referendum to the union's membership. Ballots will be mailed July 13. The caucus' referendum would require UTLA to support instructional programs using students' native languages among curricular options . It also calls for monetary compensa tion for teachers demonstrating bilingual skills. The caucus suffered a setback last month when UTLA attorneys rejected a challenge to 3 measure that sought to rescind yearly bonuses of up to $5,000 for bilingual teachers offered by the school district in May 1988. The measure was sponsored by Learning English Advocates Drive, a group aligned with U.S. English that advocates an English-immersion approach to bilingual education. Ballots cast in that referendum had been se questered pending an investigation into char ges that signatures required to send the measure to vote had not been collected by the deadline. Caucus officials said they planned to appeal the lawyers' decision . If the appeal is unsuc cessful, the measure has likely received enough votes to pass. But even if it does, pay differentials are already written into the teachers' three-year contract, ratified June 22. The results of the caucus' referendum will be announced in late August. Search Companies Fill 'Fantastic Demand' continued from page 1 ton/San Antonio corridor, New York, Los An geles, Chicago, New Mexico and Denver." With offices in Connecticut, New York and Mexico, his firm places Hispanic professionals of all types nationally and internationally. Arreguin said Hispanic engineers, account ants and financial analysts should have no problem in the competitive job market if they meet the stringent standards. "A financial analyst with an M.B.A. from a reputable school and three to five years of experience can easi ly command a $50,000-$60,000 annual salary." Arnold Rodriguez, president of Technical Per sonnel Services in Middleville, Mich., said even though entry-level salaries for engineers can range anywhere from $28,000 to $38,000 an nually, "Many times I find that Hispanic and black candidates tend to ask for higher salaries or large benefit packages because they know they are in great demand. "But by doing this," he added, they end up pricing themselves out of the market." 2 While Hispanics with business, math and science-related degrees will continue to appeal to executive recruiters, those with liberal arts backgrounds are also considered attractive. "The liberal arts major has a lot of friends in corporations," said Rebecca Ruben, vice president of H.C. Smith Ltd., a minorityowned executive search firm in Shaker Heights, Ohio. C. Rojas-Magnon "In many instances placE!s nationally you find an employee and mternatlonally ... with the technical training and no human skills. Companies are now looking for a combination of both." With good credentials, a positive attitude and the assistance of a savvy headhunter, execu tive recruiters from coast to coast agree that the Hispanic professional is well positioned to impact significantly the U.S. job market in the coming years. July 10, 1989 suing visas and passports-and administra jobs-managing overseas facility opera tions in budgeting, maintenance and supplies -the official said: "We are mostly assigned to administrative positions which, in essence, means taking care of the ambassador's toilet. "Nevertheless, we are making some breakthroughs and will eventually be included in political and economic job posts." In a letter responding to the GAO's findings, State Department officials said steps would be taken to improve on its five-year affirmative action plan and that they will review and pos sibly redesign the written examination "to eliminate any disparate impact therein." EEOC Nixes University English-Only Work Rule By Adrienne Urbina A ruling announced June 30 by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's San Francisco office abolished the 1987 English only work place rule at the University of California, San Fran cisco. The complaint was filed by hospital workers whose primary languages are Spanish and Tagalog. The ruling marked a milestone in the guaran tee of the right to speak the language of per sonal choice, closing loopholes previously used by the university, said Manuel Romero, an attorney at the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund ' s San Francisco office. Romero saw the ruling as one with guidelines that can be applied not only in California, but throughout the United States. INS Extends Airport Raids By Dan i/o Alfaro The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service will extend its sweeps for undocu mented immigrants from Los Angeles Inter national Airport to airports in the surrounding suburbs, it was announced June 28. INS officials said a recent upsurge in the smuggling of immigrants aboard continental airline flights necessitated the raids. Early that morning, INS agents arrested 43 immigrants, mostly from Mexico, as they tried to board overnight flights in Los An geles. Twenty-nine more were arrested at Detroit Metropolitan Airport when agents boarded a New York-bound flight on a stopover from Los Angeles. Beta Juarez, staff attorney with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund in Los Angeles, said INS' an nouncement was "a cause for concern be cause of the potential for abuse. They have a tendency to target only Hispanics as they are going about their business at the air port . " Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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1 l. , Jesus Mena Cucaracha-lnfested HUD They were so big you could hear them at night as they scurried over t the dining room floor. You would have sworn it was mice. But when { you flicked on the lights, all you could see were these huge cockroaches v with long that swept the air like radar. ( Pictures of these ravenous bugs that infested my childhood home. in South Texas grew vivid in my mind as I read about the Reagan1te Republicans who have been bilking millions of ) dollars from the department of Housing and J Urban Development. Cucarachas!, I said to myself. That's what t those politicos are. They are even nastier than t the ones that infested the run-down tenements t that I grew up in. It's aggravating to know that millions of dollars ::> are being squandered while an untold multitude ) of people live in dilapidated housing projects v with stopped-up toilets, broken windows, poor 1 . heating and peeling paint. . . Mena Consider Paul J. Manafort, a lead1ng strateg1st 11 in Bush's presidential campaign, who told Congress he had lobbied -i HUD officials to assure his clients received $31 million for the rehabilita-t tion of some low-income apartments. This money was granted for a project that local officials in New opposed because said t there was no need for it. And the sl1my cucaracha Manafort 1ns1sts he ) did nothing wrong. He was merely .. influence peddling, .. he said. l WATT PEDDLES NEW WARES J I Influence peddling? To me, his actions are little different than the hold up 1 read about recently. Two men wearing Reagan masks parently held up a restaurant in San and got away il $20,000. Maybe those crooks will also cla1m they were merely lni fluence peddling ... Of course, we can't forget our old friend James Watt. Add a pair of ant f tenna to his shiny head, darken his Coke-bottle glasses a little and you t have one of the chief cucarachas. The former secretary of interior, who i had previously tried to sell the California coast to oil companies for a song, apparently has new wares to peddle. Though he has no ex perience in developing housing, Watt hired himself as a .. c.onsult ant .. to developers. By making a few calls to old pol1t1cal cron1es, he l made sure that HUD subsidies were given to client developers willing t . to pay his exorbitant fees. He admits those calls netted him more than $400,000. Add to these lowly characters the hundreds of real estate agents who siphoned off millions of dollars into personal accounts when they hand led HUD forclosures and you've got a HUD that under Reagan became 3 a giant cucarachero, a breeding ground for these filthy scavengers. ) , t , 1 1 guess I shouldn't get too carried away with the cucaracha metaphor. UNETHICAL, NOT ILLEGAL In many ways, real roaches have more dignity. They are lowly creatures and they know it. They don't dare show themselves until darkness sets in. And although they too live off the poor, they feed on food crumbs. The consultants who have testified before Congress would never dream of settling for crumbs. Drug dealer kingpins would envy the money they've reaped off the housing needs of the poor. Do these mammoth roaches walk around with heads hung in shame? Do they hide under manhole covers, waiting for dark to rear their ugly heads? No, these parasites go on live national television and tell of their ex-l plaits. Worse yet, they insist they did nothing illegal. Unfortunately, they may prove to be technically correct. Federal invest tigators may decide their activities were unethical but not illegal. All that a feisty cucaracha needs to survive is some small crack to hide in. For these politico roaches, the crevice they need to escape prosecu t tion may be the law itself. (Jesus Mena, of Oakland, Calif., writes for Hispanic Link and other pub\ f /ications.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua NAME TAG: Let's start with Gene McNary, the very conservative buddy of WiHiam H.T. Bush, the president's brother. McNary's the front-runner to Nelson as head of the U.S. Immigration and Natural1zat1on Serv1ce. . . Many who know him think the St. Louis County ex.ecut1ve whose knowledge of immigration law and Im migrants (for some reason, they avoid St. Louis) IS very llm1ted, would be in over his head. . But of greater concern to Latinos is his !o. Hispamcs and blacks. As county exec, he fought aga1nst subs1d1zed hous ing in the suburbs and opposed court-ordered busing to desegregated county schools. SO HOW ABOUT PETER? The name of former U.S. Attorney Peter NUrie:z of San Diego is also still being bandied for the job. Could he be a good guy? . Well columnist Georgie Anne Geyer loves h1s tough talk Hispanic border-watchers such as the American Friends Service Committee's Roberto Martinez almost as much as she loves the Federation for American Immigration Reform. That's a red flag right there. Then there's the matter of Nunez lending his name to a FAIR-back ed .. Open Letter to Congress Our borders are of .. pitch earlier this year . The letter called for .. extension of fenc1.ng and other appropriate physical structures .. along the U.S.-Mex1co border. Who else signed the letter? For starters, how about Barry Hatch, the outrageous mayor of Monterey Park, Calif.; Dr. John Tanton, the even more out rageous founder of FAIR and U.S. English; and ex-Colorado Gov. Richard Lamm. ADD A PINCH OF GARY: Lamm co-authored .. The Immigration Time Bomb: The Fragmenting of America .. with Gary Imhoff, who .. consults .. for FAIR and U.S . English. (He ghostwrote the Tanton response to author James Crawford's expose of U.S. English syn dicated by Hispanic Link last October.) In .. Time Bomb, .. you may recall, the authors attacked the National Council of La Raza, claiming that its .. 'EI Plan EspiritualdeAztlan' calls for a revolutionary nationalism for Chicanos ana assumes that 'social, economic, cultural and political independence is the only road to total liberation from oppression, exploitation and racism.' .. Of course, it's not NCLR's .. Plan ... Lamm and Imhoff confused RauiYzaguirre's D.C.-based umbrella Latino service group with the once-active Texas-based political organization La Raza Unida. TOUGH TIMES AHEAD: If McNary and Nunez are the best names the Bush administration can come up with to head our Immigra tion and Naturalization Service, INS can drop the letter .. S .. from its name right now. POSTSCRIPT: Of 17 valedictorians in Boston public schools this year, 13 are foreign-born. Many arrived within the last five years. One is deaf. Their countries of origin include Portugal, France, Italy, El Sal vador, Jamaica, China, Vietnam and Czechoslovakia. Kay Barbaro Quoting ... ROBERTO GOIZUETA, Cuba-born president of Coca-Cola, quoted in the June edition of Atlanta's Mundo Hispanico on his Latino roots: .. Your roots are there forever. Only when the tree dies, do the roots die ... PETER NUNEZ, former U.S. Attorney and currently in private practice in San Diego, commenting in the May 26 Washington Times on INS' proposed $2 million border ditch: ., This is the law of the United States. It says it is illegal to enter the United States illegally ... And if Mexico is offended by that, I'd say that's too bad." Hispanic Link Weekly Report July 1 0, 1989 3

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COLLECTING Executive search firms take assignments for corporations and usual ly work on a retainer-fee basis. They accept resumes but more than like ly will not contact you unless they have a specific job for which you are qualified. The following are executive search firms with outreach to the Hispanic professional: AbeiGonzalez&Assocs., P.O. Box681845, San Antonio, Texas 78268. Contact: Abel Gonzalez, President, (512) 695-5555. Specialization: Petrochemical engineers and consumer goods/marketing professionals. Able Executive Search, 8819 Long St., Lenexa, Kan. 66125. Contact: Arturo Arreguin, Account Executive, (913) 894-1200 . Specialization: Professionals with 3-5 years experience. Engineering, accounting, financial analysis/forecast ing, data processing, human resources, sales/marketing, sales operations/in dustrial engineering, distribution logistics, manufacturing (secondand third-line management). Delano, Mag non & Associates, Inc., 6 Landmark Square, Fourth Floor, Stam ford, Conn. 06901. Contact: Carlos Rojas-Magnan, President, (203) 359-5663. Specialization: Places all professionals nationally and internationally. GENERAL FIRMS H.C. Smith Ltd., Executive Search & Recruiting, 3051 Van Aken Blvd., Shaker Heights, Ohio 44120. Contact: Herbert Smith, President, or Rebecca Ruben, Vice President, (216) 752-9966. Specialization: Engineering, aerodynamics, arts & entertainment, marketing, public relations, employee rela tions and services, real estate, insurance and financial services, manufacturing and utilities. The following are employment agencies. They work on a contingen cy-fee basis and are reimbursed by the corporation after the position is filled. They are more likely to be of assistance to the entry-/eve/ and low-to-middle management professional. But they all indicated some placement of Hispanic professionals in upper-level positions. America's Inc., 612 N. Michigan St., Suite 617, Chicago, Ill. 60611. Contact: Enrique Loza, President, (312) 664-7770. Specialization: Entry-level account ing and finance professionals, sales, marketing and technical clients. Careers/Inc., Suite 1919, Banco Popular Center, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 00918. Contact: Rupert Amy, General Manager, (809) 7635176. Specialization: Places candidates in Puerto Rico, the Caribbean, Mexico and Latin America. Mid-to-senior-level management as well as marketing, sales and ser vice professionals, accounting, finance, engineers, systems analysts. Di-REC Services, 10501 N. Central Expressway, Suite 306, Dallas, Texas 75231. Contact: Roland Cordobes, President, (214) 987-9834. Specialization: General placement for Hispanic professionals in all fields. International Team Consultants, 1233 W. Loop South, Suite 1260, Houston, Texas 77027. Contact: Diva Garcia, President, (713) 9979188. Specializa tion: Bilingual professionals in accounting, finance, marketing, sales, secretarial and human resource personnel. SEARCH FIRMS SURVEY: For a complete list of executive search firms sur veyed by Weekly Report, send a self-addressed envelope with 25 postage to Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. I CONNECTING POINTERS ON SEARCH FIRMS If you are looking for a new job, changing careers or have just graduated from college, here are some tips on using the services of an executive search firm: • It's a good idea to send your resume and cover letter to search firms nationwide. However, this alone will not assure a response. Many recruiters receive hundreds of resumes monthly. o If you are interested in working with one or several recruiters, call them to discuss your qualifications. • Zero in on those firms that specialize in your skills and interests. The candidate with the best chance of gaining placement through a search firm should have specific requirements for the type of position he or she is interested in. • Be flexible. Although a position may not meet your exact job specifications, look at long-range benefits you may derive from it. Sources worth noting are: The Directory of Executive Recruiters, 1988-89 edition, contains an extensive list of search firms nationwide and their specializations. It also contains information on how to use recruiters successfully. There is also the Hispanic Business National Resume Database for qualified professionals and college juniors and seniors with a mini mum 3. 0 grade point average. Resumes are sought from people in busi ness, engineering, communications, computer science and related fields. For more information, contact Hispanic Business, 360 S. Hope Ave., Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 93105 (805) 682-5843. GRANT PROMOTES EDUCATORS A project to increase the pool of minority leaders in vocational and technical education began July 5 at Texas A&M University at College Station. The project, titled Minority Leadership in Technical and Vocational Education, is funded by a $325,000 federal grant. It addresses the lack of minorities in decision-making positions. The project seeks to elevate minority technical and vocational professionals into jobs such as vice president, dean, department head and other leadership posi tions . Of the 36 participants, all of whom are nominated by Texas com munity college and technical institute presidents, 15 are Hispanic. The participants will serve year-long internships beginning in the fall. The project has also compiled nearly 200 candidates into a minority data bank available for state community colleges and technical in stitutes. Calendar TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at and consequences of unauthorized migration from Latin American and Caribbean countries. The hear ings are open to the public. The committee was mandated under the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act. annual conference, "Coalitions: Partnerships for Progress." Workshops will focus on education, housing, immigration, employment, health and other issues. Also planned is a job fair where employment recruiters will interview job seekers and match them with job openings in various com pames. least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. THIS WEEK IMMIGRATION HEARINGS Chicago July 12, New York July 14 The Committee for the Study of International Migra tion and Cooperative Economic Development will be holding hearings on U.S.-Mexico and U.S. Canada migration and trade issues and the causes 4 Diane Gonzalez (202) 254-4954 CHILD CARE New Orleans July 12-14 Dillard University is hosting a national conference, "Minority Child Care & Family Issues," to be held in conjunction with and directly preceding hearings of the U.S. House Select Committee on Children, Youth and Families. The conference will examine public and private dimensions of health, education and care of children, dependent adults, and the elderly in minority families throughout the United States. Beatrice Kelley (504) 568-1989 LA RAZA CONFERENCE Kansas City, Mo. July 1 5-19 The National Council of La Raza is holding its 1989 July 1 0, 1989 Eileen Torres (202) 289-1380 COMING SOON CONFERENCE Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce Austin, Texas July 27-29 Joe Morin (512) 447-9821 FUND-RAISING SEMINAR Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities San Antonio Aug. 4, 5 Pamela Salazar (512) 433-1501 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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l t s _________ ________ CALGON CARBON CORPORATION TECHNICAL SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALGON CARBON CORPORATION, the world's leading producer of granular activated carbon, has an immediate opening for an entry level Technical Sales Representative for the Houston Sales Office. Reporting to the Houston Regional Sales Director, the incumbent will be trained by technical support, marketing and sales people for 6-12 months to become familiar with the Company's products and services. After the initial training period, the incumbent will be responsible for the direct sale of activated carbon products, services and systems to the industrial process, municipal, industrial and wastewater markets. A technical degree is required with a B.S. in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering preferred. The ideal candidate will have 1-2 years direct sales or business ex perience. Strong oral and written communication skills are essential. Travel is re quired. We offer an excellent compensation and benefits package. Qualified candidates should submit resume and salary history to: CALGON CARBON CORPORATION PO BOX 717 PITTSBURGH, PA 15230-0717 ATTN: DEPARTMENT-SL An Equal Opportunity Employer OFFICE MANAGER For congenial Hispanic non-profit or ganization. Must have bookkeeping, com puter experience, and strong administrative skills. Non-smoker and bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred . Good benefits package. Salary negotiable depending on experience. Call for ap pointment (202) 822-8478. M/EOE TOP HISPANIC MBA The following positions are with RIO HONDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE NURSING Position available for ADN instruc tor. Master's required. TEACHING Women's Tennis Coach Part time, beginning February 1990 . LIBRARY Full-time position, tenure track. Also part-time position . Provide reference service in college library. Familiarity with OCLC, library automative sys tems necessary. MSLS required. For additional information and application for these positions, call Jean at (213) 629-0921 ext 309. RIO HONDO COLLEGE Whittier, Calif. 90608 M/EOE STATISTICIAN (ECONOMICS) Exciting employment opportunity at the Census Bureau, Department of Com merce, Washington, D.C., for an economic statistician who speaks fluent Spanish. Position is for lead instructor of technical training courses in collection and use of economic statistics. Education must include 15 semester hours in statis tics or combination of mathematics and statistics. Advanced degree in economics and field data collection experience preferable. Grasp of development economics and Latin American ex perience highly desirable. Position for 18 months with possibility of conversion to permanent status. U.S. citizenship re quired. For further information contact Tim Brown at (301) 763-4830 by July 31, 1989 . An Equal Opportunity Employer JTPA TECHNICAL ASSISTANT SPECIALIST The National Council of La Raza is seek ing an individual with experience in JTPA Ml S Systems, fund accounting in the non profit sector, and JTPA project develop ment and implementation. Must be able to travel and be bilingual English and Spanish. Mail resume to the attention of Lupe Lemus, Personnel Assistant. NCLR 810 1st Street NE Suite 300 Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 289-1380 M/EOE SPANISH EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT CENTER Spanish-Speakers: Learn more English. Receive preschool education credential. Financial assis tance available. Free Training . Job place ment Assistance . Apply now. Call SED CENTER (202) 462-8848 . Excellent sales and presentation skills, solid marketing background, thorougl-1 knowledge of the Hispanic and Puerto Rican markets, ability to manage special projects and accounts, mergers & acquisi tions experience. Seeks large oppor tunity. Mr. Polo (809) 766-2259. Condominia El Girasol, Apt. 909, Isla Verde, P.R. 00913 SITUATIONS WANTED . DEAR No publication or system lets you target ana tional pool of Latmo w1th the and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To an ad 1n Marketplace, please call1n or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washmgton, D.C . 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p .m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Hispanic Link intern seeks position 30-to-40 hours a week evenings and/or weekends. Have journalism degree and 5 years of progressive office experience. Am WordPerfect, MultiMate and Lotus 12-3 proficient, but will consider all offers. Please contact Rhonda at 234-0280, M-F between 9 a .m. and 5 p.m. Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: Ordered by -------------------Organization -------------------Street -----------------------City, State & Zip ----------------(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone ____________ _ July 10, 1989 5

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Arts & Entertainment Not to be outdone is Erik Estrada, who is signed to do four feature films this year, including one in which he co-stars with wife, Peggy Rowe. IT'S A FAMILY AFFAIR: Two generations of the Anthony Quinn family are in the Caribbean island of Tortola filming a lV version of Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea. That film is Silver Circle, scheduled to be shot in Florida. Estrada recently shot Night of the Wilding in Los Angeles and is due in Puer to Rico to shoot A Show of Force opposite Robert Duvall. The fourth film is Trouble in Saigon, which will return Estrada to his home in Los Angeles. Quinn, a two-time Academy Award winner, portrays the title charac ter in the movie _ being made for NBC. His son Francisco plays the same character in his youth while daughter Valentina portrays the character's daughter. At 7 4 and a veteran of more than 1 00 motion pictures, Anthony Quinn remains quite active. He has recently been working on two yet to-be released films: Ghosts Can't Do It, in which he shares love scenes with Bo Derek, and Revenge, in which he co-stars with Kevin Costner. Also traveling: Esal Morales, who is in Argentina filming Naked Tango, and Richard .. Cheech .. Marin, headed for Australia where he'll do Shrimp on the Barbie. Marfn stars as a Chicano who opens a res taurant Down Under. ON THE CALIFORNIA STAGE: The San Diego Repertory Theatre begins its new Teatro Sin Fronteras' two-play series this week with the staging of Orinoco. A spokesperson for Quinn in Los Angeles could not confirm news reports from Mexico that Quinn is set to play Pancho Villa in a new film about the Mexican Revolution. The comedy by Mexican playwright Emilio Carballido, staged in al ternate English and Spanish productions with the same cast, plays at San Diego's Lyceum Space July 13-30. Jorge Huerta directs. Continuing the series is the world premiere of Lynne Alvarez's Thin Air, in English only, Aug. 1 0-30. Two other Latino actors are also keeping it in the family. Emilio Es tevez and his brother Charlie Sheen have completed work on the up coming film Men at Work. Estevez wrote and directed the film. Media Report SUMMER READING LIST: Following are a few titles certain to be seen in the hands of literate sun-seekers and pool-side loungers this summer: POLl, by Jay Neugeboren (Corona Publish ing Co. 1037 S. Alamo, San Antonio, Texas 7821 0), 123 pp., $13.95 hardcover. This novel is the true story of Jose Policarpo Rodriguez, who came to the Republic of Texas from Mexico in 1839 and _ associated with the Mexicans, Indians and Anglos who lived there. As the Mexican War approached, he faced the decision of where to place his loyal ties. THE HARVEST, by Tomas Rivera, edited by Julian Olivares, (Atte Publico Press, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, 2-L, Houston, Texas 77204-2090), 135 pp., $8.50 paper bound. This book is a collection of the complete works of short fiction by the celebrated HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne' Urbina, Karen Zacarias. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 , cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports Chicano author and educator. Each story is printed in English and Spanish. THE WEDDING, by Mary Helen Ponce (Arte Pt1JibJ Press), 199 pp., $8.50 paperbound. This novel provides a glimpse of Mexican American blue-collar subculture as seen through the eyes of a young bride-to-be. It is set in California in the '50s. THE CONQUEST OF MEXICO, by Beatrice Berler (Corona Publishing Co.), 143 pp., $7.95 paperbound, $16.50 hardcover. A readaptation of a work originally appearing in 1843, this book describes how Hernando Cortes conquered the powerful Aztec empire. ACROSS THE GREAT RIVER, by Irene Bettran Hemandez (Arte Publico Press), 136 pp . , $8.50 paperbound. This is the story of a young Mexican girl in Texas' Rio Grande Valley maturing and taking on the leadership of her family when her parents become separated while crossing the border into the United States. THE LINE OF THE SUN, by Judith Ortiz Cofer (The University of Georgia Press, Antonio Mejias-Rentas Athens, Ga. 30602), 304 pp., $19.95 hardbound. Opening in a tiny village in Puerto Rico, this debut novel moves from the lush atmosphere of island life to a tough immigrant neighbor hood in New Jersey, juxtaposing one culture with two different worlds. MUJERES E IGLESIA, edited by Ana Marfa Portugal (Catholics For a Free Choice, 1436 U St. NW, Suite 301, Washington, D.C. 20009-1706), 146 pp., $8.95 paperbound. Written by Latin American feminists, this book's six essays explore the historical, politi cal, cultural and religious conditions affecting women's reproductive health in Latin America. The essays are in Spanish. NICARAGUA, by William Gentile (W. W. Norton & Co. Inc., 500 Fifth St., New York, N.Y. 10110), 131 pp., $19.95 hardbound. The photographs in this book vividly depict Nicaraguan people caught between the con tra and the Sandinista factions, trying to live life amid the devastation of civil war. Danilo Alfaro 'HERNANDEZ'S HEADHUNTERS' EXECUTiVE SeARcH, lNC. • mailed Friday of the same week: "NO, NO, CUANITLAXCALLI! YOU STILL DON'T HAVE IT RIGHT. "