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Hispanic link weekly report, July 17, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, July 17, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Full Text
Making The News This
\ U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Elizabeth Dole announces the j appointment of Cari Dominguez as director of the Office of Federal [Contract Compliance Programs...California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints John Molina, principal in the Coachella Valley Unified School District, as chief deputy director for the Department of Economic Opportunity... Chicago Mayor Richard Daley names Ambrosio Medrano as the new executive director of the Mayor’s Advisory Commission on Latino Affairs...The National Aeronautics and Space Administration an-i nounces Air Force Maj. Sidney Gutierrez as the pilot for a shuttle mis-
sion in August 1990...Former U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Darnell Garda, 42, who fled federal charges of creating a nationwide drug distribution network, is caught in Luxembourg...Guillermo Belt, 83, former Cuban ambassador to the United States, dies July 2 in Arlington, Va., after abdominal surgery...Talk-show host Geraldo Rivera gives $20,000 to his alma mater, Brooklyn Law School, to start a Hispanic student scholarship fund in his name...University of Miami pitcher Alex Fern&ndez is named as Baseball America magazine’s freshman of the year...USA Today’s list of top high school athletes, all of whom participated in at least two varsity sports, includes Ver6nica Trujillo, from Roswell, N.M., for track and basketball, and Lisa Fernandez from Lakewood, Calif., for softball and basketball...
vqwno.2»(Q) HISPANIC LI^^WEEK^^EPO^Hjf^Hr
Five Await Confirmation to Cabinet-Level Posts
There are five Hispanic nominees for Cabinet-level posts among the 198 such positions at the assistant secretary level or higher in the Bush administration, according to a list compiled and published July 7 by The Washington Post. Of the non-Hispanic nominees, only 28 still await Senate confirmation.
While President Bush made history by naming two Hispanics as department heads — Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos and Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan — Latinos account for 2.5% of the positions that are assistant secretary or higher.
Four Hispanic nominees at the assistant secretary level are Robert Davila, Education, Lou Gallegos and Stella Guerra, Interior, and Diane Morales, Energy. Catalina Villalpando is the nominee for U.S. treasurer.
Housing Crisis Continues Unabated
By Danilo Alfaro
Hispanics pay substantial portions of their incomes for housing that is inadequate and overcrowded and are less likely to be home owners than non-Hispanics, according to a study released July 10 by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in Washington, D.C.
The report, "The Crisis in Housing for the Poor: A Special Report on Hispanics and Blacks," found that 40% of the nation’s poor Hispanic households paid more than 70% of their income for housing in 1985. Fifty-nine percent of those households paid at least half of their incomes, while 79% paid more than 30%, the report stated. Under standards established by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, housing is considered affordable if it consumes no more than 30% of a household’s income.
The report was based on data from the U.S. Census and the U.S. Office of Policy Develop-
Court Panel Gives Students Right to Sue
By Adrienne Urbina
A three-judge panel of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled July 7 that students may sue the U.S. Department of Education to seek stricter enforcement of civil rights statutes.
The decision was reached after years of related litigation. Judge John Pratt of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia first addressed the issue in 1977 when he announced a consent decree that required timetables for the Education Department to review discrimination complaints and desegregation plans. The decree was challenged by the Reagan administration in 1982 and upheld by Pratt. It is now being contested before the appeals court.
Despite the fact that the Education Department continued to abide voluntarily by the timetables, the civil rights issue arose again when Pratt was-asked-jto-revtewiA4iether the plaintiffs had legal standing in light of a 1984 U.S. Supreme Court ruling. That ruling stated that parents of public school children could not sue the Internal Revenue Service for not revoking tax exemptions for private schools
that discriminate. Pratt concluded that the students in his case also lacked standing to sue.
The appellate court panel, however, said the case before Pratt was different because plaintiffs were actually students in school districts affected by the lack of federal enforcement. In the Supreme Court case, students did not at-tend or attempt to attend the private schools.
ment and Research. The data describe conditions in 1985. The study noted that housing cost burdens were unlikely to have eased since then because rental costs and the average income for poor households have risen at about the same rate.
U.S. Rep. Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas), chairman of the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development, who fought unsuccessfully for major housing reforms during the Reagan administration, has introduced a comprehensive housing bill that would substantially reauthorize existing federal programs as well as introduce new ones. One hearing on the bill was held before the subcommittee last month and more are expected later this summer.
According to the report, one out of every four poor Hispanic households lived in substandard housing in 1985 and one out of every seven non-poor Hispanic households also experienced substandard conditions.
Among poor households, Hispanics were more than twice as likely as blacks and four times as likely as whites to live in overcrowded housing. The proportion of all Hispanics — including poor and non-poor — living in overcrowded conditions exceeded both the proportion of poor blacks and poor whites living in such conditions.
Reacting to the study, Judy Canales, senior housing policy fellow at the National Council of
continued on page 2
DNC Picks Apodaca as Senior Adviser
By Karen Zacarfas
Clara Apodaca has been appointed a senior adviser to Democratic National Committee Chairman Ron Brown, Brown announced July 7 in Washington,
D.C., at the annual convention of the League of United Latin American Citizens.
Apodoca, who will
assume her posi- Apodaca
tion July 10, will be the highest ranking Hispanic in the DNC.
Apodaca was assistant national field director for the Dukakis presidential campaign. The wife of former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca, she was director of the office of cultural affairs in New Mexico under former Gov. Toney Anaya and Gov. Garey Car-ruthers until September 1987.
In her new capacity, Apodaca will work directly with the DNC’s three directors in the areas of communication, politics and finance. "The committee realizes that Hispanics are needed in the mainstream of the party and the nation," Apodaca told Weekly Report.___________________________


De Lara Wins Race for 2nd Term as LULAC President
By Rhonda Smith
Jos6 Garcia De Lara retained his seat as national president of the League of United Latin American Citizens during elections held July 9 at its 60th annual convention in Washington, D.C.
De Lara, the owner of an architectural firm in San Antonio, defeated his closest competitor, Jose Velez, by a333-250 delegate vote. Velez, an entrepreneur, has been affiliated with LULAC since 1970, most recently as the board chairman of its National Economic Development division.
During the July 5-9 convention, attended by approximately 1,500, De Lara said his agen-
da for the coming year will include addressing the Hispanic student dropout rate, immigrant rights, drug awareness issues and civil rights.
In a strongly worded letter to the U.S. Supreme Court July 3, De Lara expressed LULAC’s dissatisfaction with what he called the court’s hostility toward minorities.
"There is a growing outcry among this nation’s more than 20 million Hispanics, as well as among blacks, regarding what is now described as the anti-civil rights Rehnquist court," he wrote.
LULAC also announced that it will form a fact-finding committee to conduct a survey regarding the impact of abortion on the
Hispanic community. This follows the Supreme Court’s recent decision giving states more latitude on this issue. The committee will be composed of physicians, community leaders and other LULAC members. It is expected to issue its findings this fall.
In addition to De Lara, other victors in the elections were Jose Botello, re-elected national treasurer; Sally Martinez, re-elected national vice president for women; and Paula Plascencia, elected national vice president for youth. The five regional vice presidents elected were Margaret Gonzalez (Southwest), Anita Del Rio (Far West), Rafael Alcala (Midwest), Jess Quintero (Northeast) and Roberto Canino (Southeast).
Latinas Set Pace for Congressional Seat
A poll conducted by a Miami television station the week of July 3 showed that Republican state Sen. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and former Miami City Commissioner Rosario Kennedy, a Democrat, are the top contenders for the vacant 18th Congressional District seat in Florida.
The WSCV-Channel 51 poll revealed that Ros-Lehtinen pos- Ros-Lehtinen sessed a large lead over her closest competitor, Miami businessman Carlos Perez,
La Raza In Washington, D.C., said, "Housing for Hispanics in the United States has reached crisis conditions and is continuing to worsen."
Jose Garza, former president of the National Hispanic Housing Coalition, which lost its federal support and folded shortly after Ronald Reagan became president, attributed most of the present problems to the Reagan administration’s massive cutbacks in federal
HOME OWNERSHIP RATES Poor Households All Households
Hispanic 22% 40%
Black 30 44
White 46 68
housing assistance. He also pointed out that older buildings have deteriorated and the Latino population has increased. "Hispanics are still almost at the bottom of the barrel," he said, adding that only Native Americans experience more severe housing problems.
The report found that deep cutbacks in federal housing programs have added to the problems. In the late ’70s, it stated, HUD provided rental assistance to an average of 316,000 low-income households yearly. In the
59%-14%. The senator is favored to win the seat.
Kennedy, who had to relinquish her commis-sionership to enter the race, led JoAnn Pepper 22%-19% in the poll of 222 registered voters. Pepper is the daughter of the late Claude Pepper, who held the post since 1962 until his death in May. Banker Raul Masvidal withdrew from the race the week before the poll results were released. He was running fourth.
While showing Kennedy ahead in the large Democratic field, the poll failed to offer a clear picture. Its margin of error was six percentage points and a third of the voters indicated they were undecided.
Primaries for both parties are Aug. 1. The election will be Aug. 29.
’80s the number was reduced to an average of 82,000 households each year.
From 1979 to 1987, the number of poor Hispanic renter households receiving no federal, state or local housing assistance nearly doubled, rising from 461,000 to 897,000, according to the study.
Esteban Rodriguez, director of economic development at Chicago United Inc., a nonprofit social and economic development coalition, is working to launch a national umbrella organization to deal with Hispanic housing issues. "We need to advocate for larger units," he said. "We need to develop housing in local communities to accommodate larger families."
Adequate housing and economic development are Interdependent, said Rodriguez. "Even if there are units, if people aren’t earning any money they can’t rent them and they can’t buy them."
From 1978 to 1985, the study found, the number of poor households increased more than 25%. From 1970 to 1985, low-rent units decreased by 20%. In 1970 the number of low-rent units exceeded the number of low-income households, but by 1985 there were 3.7 million fewer low-rent units than there were households with incomes of $10,000 or less.
Hundreds in LA. Protest Poor Housing Conditions
By Karen Zacarfas
More than 400 angry Latino tenants packed the Our Lady Queen of Angels Catholic church in Los Angeles July 9 to voice their distress with improper rent increases and unsafe living conditions.
Milford Bliss, head of the Community Safety Bureau of the Department of Building and Safety, assured the group that all reports would be treated confidentially. He said his staff would investigate and report back to tenants "three or four days" after the complaint.
City Council members Gloria Molina and Richard Alatorre pledged to work with other council members to extend rent control to single-house families and to upgrade buildings to meet earthquake safety standards. They also promised to investigate 15 buildings for "unsafe, unhealthful conditions."
The meeting was arranged by the primarily Hispanic United Neighborhoods Organization.
Many tenants do not report landlord refusals to fumigate roach- and rat-infested buildings or illegal increases in rent for fear of being evicted or being reported to immigration officials.
Father Richard Estrada, a UNO official from Our Lady Queen of Angels, told Weekly Report, "We need to strengthen the faith of the people to not be afraid. They have rights even if they are undocumented. As long as they are paying rent and being good tenants, they have the rights to clean, safe housing."
Whites Seek Own District
Unrepresented on the town’s board of aldermen, a group of white citizens in Friars Point, Miss., have sought legal counsel to determine whether a voting plan can be implemented to give them a majority district.
Friars Point, which has 1,400 citizens, is 85% black and 15% white. All five members on the board of aldermen are elected at-large. James Washington, the town’s black mayor, said he is in favor of a predominantly white district.
Report Points to Federal Housing Cuts
continued from page 1
2
July 17,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Danilo Alfaro
The Faceless Legacy
The woman had crumpled Into a small pile that partially blocked the entrance to my neighborhood grocery store. She appeared to be in her 40s but could have been much younger. She wore purple polyester trousers and a yellow and white striped tank top. Beside her was an open can of beer. She did not stir. I stepped over her and into the store. The Dupont Circle section of Washington, D.C., becomes rather lively after 9 o’clock on a Saturday night, particularly during the summer. An interesting synergy takes place, with young professionals vying with panhandlers and other street people for the run of the neighborhood.
The storekeeper, round and bedraggled, was on the phone. I said hello and he nodded his reply. The store was owned by Lebanese and smelled of incense and tobacco. Middle Eastern music was barely audible from a small radio behind the counter. "Yeah," the round man said into the phone. "Yeah, she’s right in front of my business." I walked toward the rear of the store.
A thin man with a bemused expression walked past me carrying a load of flattened cardboard boxes. He looked inquiringly at his co-worker on his way out the door. His co-worker merely shrugged and continued his phone conversation. The thin man, with his load of cardboard, stepped over the woman as if she were a baby he did not want to disturb. I considered ice cream and debated between butter pecan and coffee.
SHE SEEMED ASLEEP
"I tried to shake her but she didn’t move," said the round man into the telephone. I pulled a six pack of beer from the cooler and decided on a pint of butter pecan. "No," said the round man. "No, I don’t think she’s breathing. I tried to shake her but she just lays there." I glanced at the motionless woman. How many unconscious derelicts did I pass every day without checking for a pulse or other signs of life?
If she had sustained any injuries, they were not visible. She seemed more asleep than anything, curled somewhat fetally. I wondered whether, weary and destitute, she might have simply laid down on that spot and died. I imagined her giving up her last breath with a sigh of resignation.
I tried to picture what she might have been like as a child, full of dreams, her hair combed and her eyes new and bright. I thought of her mother and the dreams she must have had for her child. I thought of any children she might have.
The thin man reappeared in the doorway. He looked down at the woman briefly and then gazed up and down the street as if expecting someone to come claim her. He bent over, picked up the beer can and tossed it into the dumpster where it clattered emptily.
I HATED MYSELF FOR NOT CRYING "Six nineteen," the round man said to me when he had rung up my items. Into the phone he continued, "Yeah, right out front. I just want someone to come take it away." I handed him a $10 bill and he made my change.
I struggled to place the woman into a life, to picture those that she had touched during her days. Would they ever know what had happened? I thought of her existence being summed up with one phone call, "I just want someone to come take it away." Someday could I end my existence that way, nameless, with strangers stepping over me like a crack in the pavement?
I wanted to scream or cry, and I hated myself for not being able to. Flushed, I grabbed my bag and left the store, stepping over the woman without breaking my stride. I didn’t look down. I felt ashamed. On the sidewalk the crowd pulsated and moved along.
I turned the corner and climbed the steps into my apartment. I collapsed onto the couch. Soon I heard the wail of the ambulance sirens, growing louder as they approached and finally coming to a stop. I knew, of course, help had arrived too late.
(Danilo Alfaro is a reporter with Hispanic Link Weekly Report.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
SPEEDY GONZALES: Bugs Bunny and Porky Pig got top billing in the obituary columns, but when Mel Blanc died at age 81 last week, with him also went the distinctive "Arriba, arriba" of Speedy Gonzales.
In Speedy, Blanc created one of Hollywood’s less offensive Latino stereotypes. To his credit, Speedy the mouse and his sombrero-decked amigos did come to the rescue of a lot of characters who were under siege by Sylvester the Cat.
Through Blanc’s son Noel, other sound animators and endless reruns, Speedy, Pepe Le Pew and the other animals in Blanc's menagerie will of course live on until the public tires of their antics and accents.
SLIPPERY SAM: Public statements, like chile Colorado, can come back to haunt you.
Three years ago, then-Housing & Urban Development Secretary Samuel Pierce was proclaiming from his high horse that anyone living in his public housing who lacked immigration papers should not only be booted out of the building, "We should kick them out of the country, too."
Public housing goodies are only for real Americans, Slippery Sam explained. "These people we should take care of—first and foremost," he proclaimed to The Chicago Tribune’s George Curry.
Take care of them, he and his cronies did indeed.
OUTSPOKEN MILIAN: Thirteen years after a terrorist blew off his legs with a car bomb, Emilio Milian returned July 5 to Miami’s Spanish-language radio fraternity as owner of WWFE-AM. The 1976 attack came in response to a series of editorials by Milian, then news director of WQBA- La Cubanisima, denouncing terrorist activity in South Florida.
So on his first night back on the air, Milian broke ranks with other Miami commentators on the issue of punishment for anti-Castro militant Dr. Orlando Bosch, a past member of the terrorist group CORU.
While other stations were vigorously protesting the U.S. Justice Department’s recent deportation order against Bosch, who has been sentenced to death by a Cuba court for allegedly bombing a Cuban jetliner in 1973, Milian repeated, "I am 100% against terrorism" and said Bosch should be dealt with according to law.
FORGETFUL JOSE: A Canadian court recently found Jos6Mar-tins guilty of counterfeiting U.S. and Canadian dollars. He was, you might say, caught in the act.
Jose failed to make a monthly payment or two on his Canon color copier. When the company repossessed the machine, it found samples of his handiwork inside.
THE VANISHING CHICANO: The Chicano/Hispano Caucus of the National Education Association, with hundreds of members spread from California to Puerto Rico, voted at the NEA’s June 30-July 5 convention in Washington, D.C., to rename themselves the "Hispanic Caucus."
It occurred not without lengthy and lively debate, according to President Awilda Saldana, a teacher on the island, but in the end, pleas to make the body one big happy familia hispana prevailed. Will the California Chicano News Media Association, with its growing number of non-Chicano members, be next to adopt a more inclusive name?
PANCHO’S CAVALRY: We all know that Mexican M&Ms are Mariachis and Margaritas. Roberto El Indio Ramirez of East Los Angeles sends another ethnic riddle:
"Why did God make Shetland ponies?"
His answer: "So Pancho Villa's cavalry could have low riders." Arriba, arriba.
— KayBarbaro
Alfaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
July 17,1989
3


COLLECTING
HOUSING CRISIS: "The Crisis in Housing for the Poor: A Special Report on Hispanics and Blacks" is a 39-page report by the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities. For a copy send $6 to CBPP, 236 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Suite 305, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 544-0591.
ENGUSH ONLY INFORMATION: "English Only: The Threat of Language Restrictions" is a 21 -page booklet by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials that includes sections on language usage history in the United States, the group U.S. English and legislative targets of the official-language movement. For a copy send $1 Oto NALEO, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536.
LAWYERS’ NEWSLETTER: The California La Raza Lawyers Association Newsletter is a monthly publication with the latest news on organization activities and members, editorials and information from other Hispanic organizations. While subscriptions are free, people who would like it delivered promptly via first-class mail should send $20 for a one-year subscription to California La Raza Lawyers Association Newsletter, P.O. Box 71, San Jose, Calif. 95103 (408) 292-6561.
HERITAGE MONTH BROCHURE: Rod Enterprises Inc. is offering a free brochure of products for Hispanic heritage month. Included are things such as posters, buttons, banners and pins. For a copy contact Rod Enterprises, P.O. Box 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 91005 (818) 799-1795.
IMMIGRATION ACT HISTORY: "Selected Legislative History of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986," a 287-page book, includes the act’s conference report, the president’s signing statement and the Senate and House Judiciary reports. For a copy send $30 to American Immigration Lawyers Association, 100 16th St. NW, Suite 604, Washington, D.C. 20036.
IMMIGRANT STUDENT RIGHTS: "Immigrant Students: Their Legal Right of Access to Public Schools" is a 63-page manual by the National Coalition of Advocates for Students. It offers a detailed explanation of law at the federal and school-district level. For a copy send $12 to NCAS, 100 Boylston St., Suite 737, Boston, Mass. 02116 (617) 357-8507.
FEMINIZATION OF POVERTY: "The Effect of the Feminization of Poverty on the Health and Mental Health Status of Hispanic Women and Children" is a report that finds there exists a high correlation between emotional disturbance, physical health problems and receiving public aid. The report also examines the increasing number of Latinas who head impoverished households. For a copy send $2 to the Center for Cross-Cultural Research, 715 Stadium Drive, Trinity University, San Antonio, Texas 78284.
CONNECTING
BUSINESS PROGRAM LURES STUDENTS Twelve Hispanic and 23 black high school seniors began July 2 a four-week program at the University of Texas at Austin that seeks to lure minority students into pursuing business as their field of study in college.
Begun in 1980, the Leadership, Education and Development program introduces students to different facets of the business world such as finance, marketing, economics, accounting and management. It is sponsored by 10 universities and funded by 90 corporations. The corporations also provide guest lecturers.
Among participating universities are Columbia, Duke, Northwestern, the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Michigan.
For more information call LEAD curriculum coordinator Allen Bizzell at (512) 471-5921.
FOUNDATION HELPS SCHOLARS There were 41 Hispanics — 27 Mexican Americans and 16 Puerto Ricans — among the 102 minority scholars who won fellowships in programs funded by the Ford Foundation, it was announced July 6. Ford’s initiatives, the 4-year-old Predoctoral and Dissertation Fellowships for Minorities Program and the 10-year-old Postdoctoral Fellowships for Minorities Program, seek to increase the presence of underrepresented groups on the faculties of U.S. postsecondary institutions. The fellowships provide funds for research, stipends and tuition.
Applications for 1990 will be available after Sept. 1. Contact the Fellowship Office, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20418 (202) 334-2860.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Philip Morris Companies Inc., at a press conference in New York City last month, donates $20,000 to the fund of Antonio Garcia Hernandez, a father of five murdered in the South Bronx June 14. Established by the New York Junior Tennis League, the fund’s money will go toward continuing the education of the five Garcia children. One of the Garcia children, 12-year-old Juan, has been in the tennis league four years...Jesse Aguirre, vice president of corporate relations for Anheuser-Busch Companies Inc., announces that Sally Fernandez has been named director of corporate relations for the firm. Fernandez had been with General Motors Corp...Curtis McCray, president of California State University at Long Beach, names Rodolfo Torres as his executive assistant. Torres most recently was a visiting scholar at Stanford University’s School of Education...
Calendar_________________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Unk’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
AIDS WORKSHOP Cheverly, Md. July 21
A workshop on AIDS in the Hispanic community will be presented by the Prince George’s County, Md., Health Department and Salud Inc., a Washington, D.C.-based health services organization. The
4
program will be conducted entirely in Spanish.
Fran Preneta (301) 772-2994
HERITAGE FESTIVAL New Bedford, Mass. July 22 People Acting in Community Endeavors, a nonprofit community action agency, is sponsoring a Hispanic Heritage Festival through its Hispanic Multi-Service Center. Folkloric entertainment, including mariachi, salsa and dance groups, will be highlighted. Also featured will be arts, crafts and food. Admission is free.
Ginny Jones (508) 999-9946
COMING SOON
BUSINESS CONFERENCE
Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers
of Commerce
Austin, Texas July 27-29
Joe Morin (512) 447-9821
TARDEADA
July 17,1989
Los Angeles County Chicano Employees Association
Los Angeles July 30
Zora Ann Finnstrom (818) 848-4148
FUND-RAISING SEMINAR
Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities
San Antonio Aug. 4, 5
Pamela Salazar (512) 433-1501
SPOTLIGHT
BUSINESS CONVENTION: Thousands of Hispanic business owners from across the nation and hundreds of corporate and government representatives are expected to converge on New Orleans Sept. 6-10 for the 10th annual National Convention & International Business Exchange sponsored by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Activities will include sessions on topics of current interest to small business owners, regional and national awards ceremonies recognizing Hispanic entrepreneurs, a parade, a Mississippi River cruise and an international ball. For more information contact Maxine Weber at (816) 531 -6363.
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
CALGON CARBON CORPORATION
TECHNICAL SALES REPRESENTATIVE
CALGON CARBON CORPORATION, the world’s leading producer of granular activated carbon, has an immediate opening for an entry level Technical Sales Representative for the Houston Sales Office.
Reporting to the Houston Regional Sales Director, the incumbent will be trained by technical support, marketing and sales people for 6-12 months to become familiar with the Company’s products and services. After the initial training period, the incumbent will be responsible for the direct sale of activated carbon products, services and systems to the industrial process, municipal, industrial and wastewater markets.
A technical degree is required with a B.S. in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering preferred. The ideal candidate will have 1 -2 years direct sales or business experience. Strong oral and written communication skills are essential. Travel is required.
We offer an excellent compensation and benefits package. Qualified candidates should submit resume and salary history to:
CALGON CARBON CORPORATION PO BOX 717
PITTSBURGH, PA 15230-0717 ATTN: DEPARTMENT-S An Equal Opportunity Employer
STATISTICIAN
(ECONOMICS)
Exciting employment opportunity at the Census Bureau, Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C., for an economic statistician who speaks fluent Spanish. Position is for lead instructor of technical training courses in collection and use of economic statistics. Education must include 15 semester hours in statistics or combination of mathematics and statistics. Advanced degree in economics and field data collection experience preferable. Grasp of development economics and Latin American experience highly desirable. Position for 18 months with possibility of conversion to permanent status. U.S. citizenship required. For further information contact Tim Brown at (301) 763-4830 by July 31, 1989.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
DEVELOPMENT
PLANNING
CONSULTANT
•■ SITUATIONS** WANTED J
Recent Graduate
Dynamic recent graduate with degree in political science seeks full time position in Washington, D.C. area.
Has experience working with Hispanic organizations, coordinating special projects and conferences. Fluent Spanish/English.
Excellent computer skills. Good writer.
Contact Patricia Rodriguez, 4430 Forest Glen Court, Annandale, Va. 22003 (703) 354-4454.
Hispanic Writer
I can help you say it, find it or get it out to others.
Hispanic writer will co-write, ghostwrite columns, speeches or assist with demographic research pertaining to the Hispanic American experience. Published as an academic and regular columnist in top-20 market newspaper.
Write: Tomas Romero, P.O. Box 4632, Denver, Colo. 80204. I know the territory.
Journalism Grad
Hispanic Link intern seeks position 30-to-40 hours a week evenings and/or weekends. Have journalism degree and 5 years of progressive office experience. Am WordPerfect, MultiMate and Lotus 1-2-3 proficient, but will consider all offers. Please contact Rhonda at 234-0280, M-F between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
T-SHIRT SALES
Fight the English-Only movement by wearing a Slogan T-shirt from the National Association for Bilingual Education.
For swinging singles:
"Bilingual, Bicultural & Bimyself"
For the kids:
The Latino Museum of Art History and Culture in Los Angeles is seeking qualified applicants to formalize a short and long range planning document to guide the institution through its new phase of development.
Individual will be responsible for working to produce a comprehensive planning document that will include consideration for the following:
1) board and staff organizational development and structure
"I’m Blessed with Bilingual Parents" 2) and a short and long range development Six slogans in all...many sizes and plan
colors. Prices from $7 to $9. Includes postage and handling.
Write or call for a complete order form: NABE
Union Center Plaza 8120 First St. NE- 3rd floor Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 289-1380
Send resume and letter of introduction to:
Antonia Hernandez Chair of the Board Latino Museum c/o MALDEF
634 S. Spring St., 11th Floor Los Angeles, Calif. 90014. Consulting fee is commensurate with experience.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Ordered by_______________________
CLASSIFIED AD RATES: Q .
90 cents per word (city, state & zip code r9an,za |on-------------------
count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 street
word). Multiple use rates on request. -----------------------------
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(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 A ~ a
per column inch. Area Code & Phone------------------
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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July 17,1989


LUO)
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER
800 West Main Street, Whitewater, Wisconsin 53190-1790
University Center
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR DINING & BUSINESS SERVICES
This is a twelve month, academic staff position with the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. The Associate Director reports to the Executive Director of Auxiliary Services and University Center. Responsibilities include:
1. Administers the terms and provisions, both cash services and residential dining of the University Dining Services contract and supervises the Dining Services contract management to ensure compliances with contract specifications.
2. Develops budgets annually for University Center and residential dining service programs and facilities.
3. Develops new major capital budget projects for dining service remodeling/refurbishing.
4. Administers (with staff) the campus-wide electronically controlled photo identification card program and coordinates efforts with the University Computer Center for data base and telecommunications requirements.
5. Administers (with staff) the Student Service Center consisting of information, ticket, and cash handling services.
6. Maintains liaison responsibilities for lease space operators in the University Center.
7. Performs special projects as assigned by the Executive Director of Auxiliary Services and University Center.
QUALIFICATIONS: Master’s Degree required in Business, Student Personnel, Hotel and Restaurant Management, or related academic field. Two years experience in related position required.
SALARY: Commensurate with experience.
UNIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY: The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater is located in the southeastern Wisconsin community of Whitewater with a population of 12,000. Whitewater is located near three major metropolitan areas (Milwaukee, Madison, Chicago). The University enrollment for the spring semester of 1989 was 10,000.
APPLICATION: Interested persons should apply in writing to:
Mr. Ron Buchholz University Center 264 800 W. Main UW-Whitwater Whitewater,Wl 3190 (414) 472-3191
A completed application consists of: Letter of application, resume, three current letters of reference, official transcripts from Master Degree’s coursework.
APPLICATION DEADUNE: August 14, 1989
STARTING DATE: October 1, 1989
UW-Whitewater is an equal opportunity employer with an affirmative action plan. Women, members of minority groups, persons with disabilities, and Vietnam-era veterans are encouraged to apply.
ANNOUNCEMENT OF ACADEMIC STAFF POSITION (FOR ACADEMIC YEAR 1989-90)
The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater invites applications for the position of Minority Pre-College Coordinator/Counselor.
QUALIFICATIONS: Master’s degree and experience working with ethnic minority youths in pre-college type program required. Teaching experience in higher education desirable. Ability to plan, implement and evaluate program results. Demonstrated talent in the area of working with the public.
RESPONSIBILITIES: Plan and implement a comprehensive pre-college program for ethnic minority students. Work closely with feeder secondary institutions to identify high potential minority students who would qualify to be participants in both academic year outreach activities as well as summer skills development programs. Coordinate pre-college scholarship program with Department of Public Instruction. Serve as academic counselor to on-campus minority freshman students. Collect data and write reports on academic performance of ail minority students at the University. Serve as liaison between Assistant Vice Chancellor’s Office and various support service programs in program evaluation activities.
SALARY: Commensurate with academic background and professional experience.
APPLICATION: Send letter of application, vita, undergraduate and graduate transcripts, and three (3) letters of reference to:
Dr. Roger Pulliam
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Support Services 226 McCutchan Hall University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Whitewater, Wl 53190
Deadline for application is August 15, 1989, or until position is filled.
Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer
THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO
POSITION: Director of Special Collections, University of New Mexico General Library.
TYPE: Permanent, 12 months, tenure track.
SALARY: $35,000 minimum.
MINIMUM RANK: Negotiable from Assistant Professor.
RESPONSIBLE TO: Dean of Library Services.
EDUCATION: Master’s degree from an ALA accredited program and/or Ph.D. or other doctoral degree.
APPLICATIONS: Submit a resume (including names, addresses, and phone numbers for at least three references) and a letter of application to Rita Critchfield, Personnel Office, General Library, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131. Applications received by 9/1/89 will be given first consideration. Position contingent on available funds. Recruitment will continue until position is filled.
UNM is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
6
July 17,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report



s
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
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FLINT
The University of Michigan - Hint
CHIEF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT OFFICER DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT
The University of Texas at El Paso invites applications & | nominations for the position of Chief Institutional Advancement Officer/Director of Development, which is a senior staff j. position reporting directly to the President.
Assisted by a staff of three professional & seven clerical employees, the director is responsible for the planning & implementation of all aspects of the institution’s private fund-1 raising program, including alumni activities, the annual fund, corporate giving, special gifts, planned giving & capital campaigns. The director further advises the President on community & institutional matters which affect the development program.
The University is seeking an innovative, self-starting manager with good communication & interpersonal skills & a history of demonstrated leadership & organizational abilities. | Although five to seven years or more of successful profes-I sional university or educational fund-raising experience is preferred, individuals from the local area with exceptionally | strong involvement in non-profit organizational fund-raising &
I* equivalent executive-level management experience are also encouraged to apply. A minimum of a bachelor’s degree is required.
With over 14,000 students, U.T. El Paso is the second oldest academic component of the U.T. System and the largest public institution on the United States-Mexico border.
The bicultural region of El Paso & Juarez offers unique cul-I tural, business, research, & educational opportunities & has a mild southwestern climate.
| The University is seeking to continue its commitment to en-I hance these opportunities and to provide expanded educa-[ tional programs to its culturally diverse constituency.
Serving a metropolitan population of 1.5 million people,
! UTEP offers a wide variety of both baccalaureate & master’s [ programs in its six colleges (Business, Education, Engineer-! ing, Liberal Arts, Nursing & Allied Health, & Science) & Graduate School.
Position available 09-01-89; applications & nominations will | be accepted until 08-15-89.
Send a letter of application, curriculum vitae & the names of five references to:
Office of the President
Director of Development Search Committee
The University of Texas at El Paso
El Paso, Texas 79968-0500
Women & minorities are encouraged to apply. The University is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer.
The University of Michigan-Flint
The University of Michigan-Flint is a growing liberal arts commuter institution on 42 acres along the Flint River in downtown Flint, Michigan. Over 70 undergraduate programs and four graduate majors involve more than 6,300 students. A $26 million science building was added to the campus last fall, and a new library is under development.
ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR STUDENT SERVICES
Coordinates the minority initiatives of student services units, represents student services minority efforts to campus and community, manages the Student Development Center, and represents the Dean in his absence. The Center includes counseling, health, tutoring, handicap services, minority services, an alternative admission program, a college prep program and selected developmental programming. Requires master’s in student personnel, counseling, higher ed or related area; doctorate desirable. Minimum five years supervisory experience in student services or related area. Salary $38,600 minimum.
REGISTRAR
Plans and manages the registration of students, scheduling of classes, and maintenance of academic records. The campus employs the Colleague administrative system on the Prime computer. The office also supports Macintosh work stations. Requires bachelor’s degree; advanced degree preferred. Minimum three years supervisory experience in academic registration or related process. Salary $32,600 minimum.
Positions report to the Dean for Student Services. Applicants should submit letter of application, resume, and contact for three references to:
Personnel Office 281 UCEN
The University of Michigan-Flint Flint, Mich. 48502-2186
The University is a nondiscriminatory, affirmative action employer.
The following positions are with
RIO HONDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE
NURSING: Position available for ADN instructor. Master's required.
TEACHING: Women’s Tennis Coach — Part-time, beginning February 1990.
LIBRARY: Full-time position, tenure track. Also part-time position. Provide reference service in college library. Familiarity with OCLC, library automative systems necessary. MSLS required. For additional information and application for these positions, call Jean at (213) 629-0921 ext 309.
RIO HONDO COLLEGE Whittier, Calif. 90608 AA/EOE
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
July 17,1989
7


Arts & Enteiiamment
FROM THE CALIFORNIA STAGE: Three new Latino plays have been chosen for the fourth annual Hispanic Playwrights Project.
The plays — Edith Villareal’s My Visits With MGM (My Grandmother Marta), Cherrie Moraga’sA Shadow of a Man and Octavio Solis’ Man of the Flesh — were selected from among 70 scripts submitted to the project housed at Costa Mesa’s South Coast Repertory company.
Three other plays — by Oliver Mayer, Roberto Athayde and Edwin Sanchez—will have workshops and be read publicly during the Aug. 1-13 event.
The 1989 HPP is funded partially by various grants and by a fundraising event. This year’s fund-raiser — Una noche '89 with Lalo Guerrero — will be held Aug. 10.
Two other "mainstream" regional theaters in Southern California offer Hispanic fare this season.
At San Diego’s La Jolla Playhouse, the West Coast premiere of Graciela Daniele’s Dangerous Games — Two Tango Pieces con-
tinues through Aug. 6. Daniele, a native of Argehtina, conceived, choreographed and directed the production. Argentine composer Astor Piazzolla provides the music for Dangerous Games.
Across town, the San Diego Repertory continues its bilingual production of Emilio Carballido’s Orinoco through July 30. Directed by Jorge Huerta, it is part of the Repertory’s Teatro Sin Fronteras.
Across the nation, Hispanic theater continues to flourish.
Miami’s Teatro Avante continues its 1989 season this week with JoseTriana’s La noche de los asesinos, at the Minorca Playhouse through July 23. The season continues with Susan Westfall’s 1962 (Aug. 12-20) and Mario Vargas Llosa’s La chunga (Aug. 26 to Sept. 10).
In the Big Apple, the New York Theatre Festival organization recently announced the schedule for this year’s Festival Latino to be held Aug. 1-30.
The event will include six fully-staged theater productions plus several readings and more than 100 film and TV selections from the United States, Spain and Latin America.
Theater highlights include a new play by Puerto Rico’s Myrna Casas and the New York premiere of Dangerous Games.
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
ASNE CHIEF MAKES ROUNDS: Loren Ghiglione, president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, has embarked on a three-week, cross-country tour to emphasize the need for daily newspapers to recruit and hire more minorities.
He began July 3 in Maine and is scheduled to meet with about 50 editors and publishers at two dozen newspapers before completing his trip July 23 in Southern California.
"I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that the industry faces a crisis," he told reporters July 10 in Washington, D.C. "It is time to ask editors — and their newspapers — to commit to doing more, not just for themselves but for the nation."
Mervin Aubespin, ASNE’s Minorities Committee chairman and editor of The Courier-Journal in Louisville, Ky., cited figures released in April showing that of 56,218 total daily newsroom staffers, 2,310 are black,
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina, Karen Zacarfas. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
1,160 are Hispanic, 620 are Asian Americans and 146 are Native Americans. "It is embarrassing," he said.
Ghiglione, editor of The News i n Southbridge, Mass., is also asking editors of every daily newspaper with less than 50,000 circulation to increase minority employment by at least one person during the next nine months. Newspapers with higher circulations are being asked to step up their minority representation even more.
Ghiglione met with Evelyn Hernandez, president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and a reporter with New York Newsday, July 6. "Overall, his trip across the country is positive," she said. "He has expressed a personal commitment to bringing more Hispanics, blacks, Asians and Native Americans into newsrooms."
Responding to challenges to the feasibility of ASNE’s goal for the proportion of minorities in U.S. newsrooms to reflect that of the total population by the year 2000, Ghiglione said, "The goal is important even though judging by
our performance we’re not going to achieve it."
But, said Hernandez, "We’re not letting the industry off the hook regarding the 2000 goal. We’re still committed to it.”
By the year 2000, minorities are expected to account for more than 25% of the U.S. population.
ON THE MOVE: Michael Quintanilla, former features writer with The Dallas Morning News, started as a staff writer with the Los Angeles Times July 3...Alan Acosta, former assistant metro editor of The Orange County Register, also joined the Los Angeles Times July 3 as assistant section editor of the San Gabriel Valley section...David Sedeno, former correspondent at the Associated Press’ San Antonio bureau, will become head of its San Diego bureau July 17...Former Hispanic Link News Service reporter Darryl Lynette Figueroa started June 26 as a reporter at the Philadelphia Daily News...
— Danilo Alfaro


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! Making The News This Week I U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Elizabeth Dole announces the 1 appointment of Cari Dominguez as director of the Office of Federal 1 Contract Compliance Programs ... California Gov. George Deukmejian sian in August 1990 ... Former U.S. Drug Enforcement agent Darnell Garcia, 42, who fled federal charges of creat1ng a. nation wide drug distribution network, is caught in Luxembourg ... Gu1llermo Belt, 83, former Cuban ambassador to the United States, dies July 2 in Arlington, Va., aftei abdominal surgery ... Talk-show host Geraldo Rivera gives $20,000 to his alma mater, Brooklyn Law School, to a Hispanic student scholarship fund in his name ... of pitcher Alex Fernandez is named as Baseball Amenca magaz1ne s freshman of the year ... USA Today's list of top high school athletes, all of whom participated in at least two varsity sports, includes Ver6rlca Trujillo, from Roswell, N. M., for track and basketball, and Lisa Fern8ndez from Lakewood, Calif., for softball and basketball ... appoints John Molina, principal in the Coachella Valley Unified School 1 District, as chief deputy director for the Department of Economic Opportunity ... Chicago Mayor Richard Daley names Ambrosio Medrano ; as the new executive director of the Mayor's Advisory Commission on i Latino Affairs ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration an ; nounces Air Force Maj. Sidney Gutierrez as the pilot for a shuttle mis, -Vol. 7 No. 28 There are five Hispanic nominees for Cabinet-level posts among the 198 such positions at the assistant secretary level or higher in the Bush administration, accord ing to a list compiled and published July 7 by The Washington Post. Of the non Hispanic nominees, only 28 still await Senate confirmation. While President Bush made history by naming two Hispanics as department heads -Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos and Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Latinos account for 2. 5% of the positions that are assistant secretary or higher. Four Hispanic nominees at the assistant . secretary level are Robert Davila, Educa tion, Lou Gallegos and Stella Guerra, Inter ior, and Diane Morales, Energy. Catalina Villalpando is the nominee for U.S. treasurer. Housing Crisis Continues Unabated By Danilo Alfaro ment and Research. The data describe . . . . . . tions in 1985. The study noted that hous1ng H1span1cs pay. port1ons of their 1nt b d re unlikel to have eased since comes for hous1ng that IS Inadequate and overcos ur ens we Y . crowded and are less likely to be home owners then because rental costs and average Inthan non-Hispanics according to a study come for poor households have nsen at about released July 1 0 by the Center on Budget and the same rate. , . Policy Priorities in washington, D.C. U.S. Rep. Henry Gonzalez chairThe report, liThe Crisis in Housing for the man of t.he Subcommittee on Housmg and Poor: A Special Report on Hispanics and Commumty who fought .unsuc Biacks, II found that 40% of the nation's poor cessfully for r.eforms dunng the Hispanic households paid more than 70% of Reagan has Introduced a their income for housing in 198 5 . Fifty-nine perb1ll that would substantial cent of those households paid at least half of ly ex1st1ng federal rams as their incomes, while 79% paid more than 30%, as Introduce new ones. One on the bill the report stated . Under standards established was held before the subcommittee last month by the u . s . Department of Housing and Urban and more are expected later this summer. Development, housing is considered afforAccording to the report, one out of every four dable if it consumes no more than 30% of a poor Hispanic households lived in substandard household's income. housing in 1985 and one out of every seven The report was based on data from the U .S. non-poor Hispanic households also ex Census and the u.S. Office of Policy Developperienced substandard conditions. Among poor households, Hispanics were Court Panel Gives Students Right to Sue more than twice as likely as blacks and four times as likely as whites to live in overcrowded housing . The proportion of all Hispanics-in cluding poor and non-poor living in overcrowded conditions exceeded both the proportion of poor blacks and poor whites living in such conditions. By Adrienne Urbina A three-judge panel of the U.S. Circuit Court I of Appeals for the D.istrict of Columbia ruled , July 7 that students may sue the Depart ment of Education to seek stricter enforcement of civil rights statutes. The decision was reached after years of re lated litigation. Judge John Pratt of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia first addressed the issue in 1977 when he an nounced a consent decree that required timetables for the Education Department to review discrimination complaints and desegregation plans. The decree was chal lenged by the Reagan administration in 1982 and upheld by Pratt. It is now being contested before the appeals court. Despite the fact that the Education Depart ment continued to abide voluntarily by the timetables, the civil rights issue arose again wben_pratL w-asaskeEHe--revievvwhether the plaintiffs had legal standing in light of a 1984 U.S. Supreme Court ruling. That ruling stated that parents of public school children could not sue the Internal Revenue Service for not I revoking tax exemptions for private schools that discriminate. Pratt concluded that the stu dents in his case also lacked standing to sue. The appellate court panel, however, said the case before Pratt was different because plain tiffs were actually students in school districts af fected by the lack of federal enforcement. In the Supreme Court case, students did not at tend or attempt to attend the private schools. Reacting to the study, Judy Canales, senior housing policy fellow at t h a National Council of continued on page 2 DNC Picks Apodaca as Senior Adviser By Karen Zacarias Clara Apodaca has been appointed a senior adviser to Democratic National Committee Chairman Ron Brown, Brown announced July 7 in Washington, D.C., at the annual convention of the League of United Latin American Citizens. Apodaca, who will assume her posi-Apodaca tion July 1 0, will be the highest ranking Hispaniq in the DNC. Apodaca was assistant national field direc tor for the Dukakis presidential campaign. The wife of former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca, she was director of the office of cultural affairs in New Mexico under former Gov. Toney Anaya and Gov. Garey Car ruthers until September 1987. In her new capacity, Apodaca will work directly with the DNC's three directors in the areas of communication, politics and finance. liThe committee realizes that Hispanics are needed in the mainstream of the party and the nation, II Apodaca told Weeki Re ort.

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De Lara Wins Race for 2nd Term as LULAC President By Rhonda Smith Jose Garcfa De Lara retained his seat as na tional president of the League of United Latin American Citizens during elections held July 9 at its 60th annual convention in Washington, D.C. De Lara, the owner of an architectural firm in San Antonio, defeated his closest com petitor, Jose Velez, by a 333-250 delegate vote. Velez, an entrepreneur, has been affiliated with LULAC since 1970, most recently as the board chairman of its National Economic Development division. During the July 5-9 convention, attended by approximately 1 ,500, De Lara said his agenda for the coming year will include addressing the Hispanic student dropout rate, immigrant rights, drug awareness issues and civil rights. In a strongly worded letter to the U.S. Supreme Court July 3, De Lara expressed LULAC's dissatisfaction with what he called the court's hostility toward minorities. "There is a growing outcry among this nation's more than 20 million Hispanics, as well as among blacks, regarding what is now described as the anti-civil rights Rehnquist court," he wrote. LULAC also announced that it will form a fact-finding committee to conduct a survey regarding the impact of abortion on the Latinas Set Pace for Congressional Seat A poll conducted by a Miami television station the week of July 3 showed that Republican state Sen. Ileana Ros Lehtinen and former Miami City Commis sioner Rosario Ken nedy, a Democrat, are the top contenders for the vacant 18th Con gressional District seat in Florida. The WSCV-Channel 51 poll revealed that Ros-Lehtinen pos-Ros-Lehtinen sessed a large lead over her closest com petitor, Miami businessman Carlos Perez, 59%-14%. The senator is favored to win the seat. Kennedy, who had to relinquish her commis sionership to enter the race, led JoAnn Pepper 22%-19% in the poll of 222 registered voters. Pepper is the daughter of the late Claude Pepper, who held the post since 1962 until his death in May. Banker Raul Masvidal withdrew from the race the week before the poll results were released. He was running fourth. While showing Kennedy ahead in the large Democratic field, the poll failed to offer a clear picture. Its margin of error was six percentage points and a third of the voters indicated they were undecided. Primaries for both parties are Aug. 1. The election will be Aug. 29. Report Points to Federal Housing Cuts continued from page 1 La Raza in Washington, D.C., said, "Housing for Hispanics in the United States has reached crisis conditions and is continuing to worsen." Jose Garza, former president of the National Hispanic Housing Coalition, which lost its federal support and folded shortly after Ronald Reagan became president, attributed most of the present problems to the Reagan administration's massive cutbacks in federal HOME OWNERSHIP RATES Poor Households All Households Hispanic Black White 22% 30 46 40% 44 68 housing assistance. He also pointed out that older buildings have deteriorated and the Latino population has increased. "Hispanics are still almost at the bottom of the barrel," he said, adding that only Native Americans ex perience more severe housing problems. The report found that deep cutbacks in federal housing programs have added to the problems. In the late '70s, it stated, H UD provided rental assistance to an average of 316,000 low-income households yearly. In the 2 '80s the number was reduced to an average of 82,000 households each year. From 1979 to 1987, the number of poor Hispanic renter households receiving no federal, state or local housing assistance nearly doubled, rising from 461,000 to 897,000, ac cording to the study. Esteban Rodriguez, director of economic development at Chicago United Inc., a non profit social and economic development coali tion, is working to launch a national umbrella organization to deal with Hispanic housing is sues. "We need to advocate for larger units," he said. "We need to develop housing in local communities to accommodate larger families." Adequate housing and economic develop ment are interdependent, said Rodriguez. "Even if there are units, if people aren't earning any money they can't rent them and they can't buy them." From 1978 to 1985, the study found, the num ber of poor households increased more than 25%. From 1970 to 1985, low-rent units decreased by 20%. In 1970 the number of low rent units exceeded the number of low-income households, but by 1985 there were 3. 7 million fewer low-rent units than there were households with incomes of $1 0, 000 or less. July 17, 1989 Hispanic community. This follows the Supreme Court's recent decision giving states more latitude on this issue. The com mittee will be composed of physicians, com munity leaders and other LULAC members. It is expected to issue its findings this fall. In addition to De Lara, other victors in the elections were Jose Botello, re-elected nation al treasurer; Sally Martinez, re-elected nation al vice president for women; and Paula Plascencia, elected national vice president for youth. The five regional vice presidents elected were Margaret Gonzalez (South west), Anita Del Rio (Far West), Rafael Alcala (Midwest), Jess Quintero (Northeast) and Roberto Canine (Southeast). Hundreds in LA. Protest Poor Housing Conditions By Karen Zacarias More than 400 angry Latino tenants packed the Our Lady Queen of Angels Catholic church in Los Angeles July 9 to voice their distress with improper rent increases and unsafe living conditions. Milford Bliss, head of the Community Safety Bureau of the Department of Building and Safety, assured the group that all reports would be treated confidentially. He said his staff would investigate and report back to tenants "three or four days" after the complaint. City Council members Gloria Molina and Richard Alatorre pledged to work with other council members to extend rent control to single-house families and to upgrade buildings to meet earthquake safety standards. They also promised to investigate 15 buildings for "unsafe, unhealthful conditions." The meeting was arranged by the primarily Hispanic United Neighborhoods Organization. Many tenants do not report landlord refusals to fumigate roachand rat-infested buildings or illegal increases in rent for fear of being evicted or being reported to immigration officials. Father Richard Estrada, a UNO official from Our Lady Queen of Angels, told Weekly Report, "We need to strengthen the faith of the people to not be afraid. They have rights even if they are undocumented. As long as they are paying rent and being good tenants, they have the rights to clean, safe housing." Whites Seek Own District Unrepresented on the town's board of aldermen, a group of white citizens in Friars Point, Miss., have sought legal counsel to determine whether a voting plan can be im plemented to give them a majority district. Friars Point, which has 1 ,400 citizens, is 85% black and 15% white. All five members on the board of aldermen are elected atlarge. James Washington, the town's black mayor, said he is in favor of a predominantly white district. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Danilo Alfaro The Faceless Legacy The woman had crumpled into a small pile that partially blocked the entrance to my neighborhood grocery store. She appeared to be in her 40s but could have been much younger. She wore purple polyester trousers and a yellow and white striped tank top. Beside her was an open can of beer. She did not stir. I stepped over her and into the store. The Dupont Circle section of Washington, D.C., becomes rather live ly after 9u'clock on a Saturday night, particular ly during the summer. An interesting synergy takes place, with young professionals vying with panhandlers and other street people for the run of the neighborhood. The storekeeper, round and bedraggled, was on the phone. I said hello and he nodded his reply. The store was owned by Lebanese and smelled of incense and tobacco. Middle Eastern music was barely audible from a small radio be hind the counter. "Yeah," the round man said into the phone. "Yeah, she's right in front of my business.'' I walked toward the rear of the store. Alfaro A thin man with a bemused expression walked past me carrying a load of flattened cardboard boxes. He looked inquiringly at his co-worker on his way out the door. His co-worker merely shrugged and continued his phone conversation. The thin man, with his load of cardboard, stepped over the woman as if she were a baby he did not want to disturb. I con sidered ice cream and debated between butter pecan and coffee. SHE SEEMED ASLEEP "I tried to shake her but she didn't move," said the round man into the telephone. I pulled a six pack of beer from the cooler and decided on a pint of butter pecan. "No," said the round man. "No, I don't think she's breathing. I tried to shake her but she just lays there." I glanced at the motionless woman. How many unconscious derelicts did I pass every day without checking for a pulse or other signs of life? If she had sustained any injuries, they were not visible. She seemed more asleep than anything, curled somewhat fetally. I wondered whether, weary and destitute, she might have simply laid down on that spot and died. I imagined her giving up her last breath with a sigh of resignation. 1 tried to picture what she might have been like as a child, full of dreams, her hair combed and her eyes new and bright. I thought of her mother and the dreams she must have had for her child. I thought of any children she might have. The thin man reappeared in the doorway . He looked down at the woman briefly and then gazed up and down the street as if expecting someone to come claim her. He bent over, picked up the beer can and tossed it into the dumpster where it clattered emptily. I HATED MYSELF FOR NOT CRYING "Six nineteen," the round man said to me when he had rung up my items. 1 nto the phone he continued, "Yeah, right out front. I just want someone to come take it away." I handed him a $10 bill and he made my change. 1 struggled to place the woman into a life, to picture those that she had touched during her days. Would they ever know what had happened? I thought of her existence being summed up with one phone call, "I want someone to come take it away." Someday could I end my exist ence that way, nameless, with strangers stepping over me like a crack in the pavement? 1 wanted to scream or cry, and I hated myself for not being able to. Flushed, I grabbed my bag and left the store, stepping over the woman without breaking my stride. I didn't look down. I felt ashamed. On the sidewalk the crowd pulsated and moved along. 1 turned the corner and climbed the steps into my apartment. I col lapsed onto the couch. Soon I heard the wail of th? ambulance sirens, growing louder as they approached and finally commg to a stop. I knew, of course, help had arrived too late. (Danilo Alfaro is a reporter with Hispanic Unk Weekly Report.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua SPEEDY GONZALES: Bugs Bunny and Porky Pig got top bill ing in the obituary columns, but at 81 last week, with him also went the d1stmct1ve Arnba, arnba of Speedy Gonzales. . In Speedy, Blanc created one of Hollywood's less Latino stereotypes. To his credit, Speedy the mouse and h1s sombrero-decked amigos did come to the rescue of a lot of charac ters who were under siege by Sylvester the Cat. Through Blanc's son Noel, other sound animators and endless reruns, Speedy, Pepe Le Pew and the other animals in menagerie will of course live on until the public tires of the1r ant1cs and accents. SLIPPERY SAM: Public statements, like chile colorado, can come back to haunt you. Three years ago, then-Housing & Urban Development Secretary Samuel Pierce was proclaiming from his high horse that anyone living in his public housing who lacked immigration papers should not only be booted out of the building, "We should kick them out of the country, too . " . . Public housing goodies are only for real Amencans, Sam explained. "These people we should take care off1rst and foremost," he proclaimed to The Chicago Tribune's George Curry. Take care of them, he and his cronies did indeed. OUTSPOKEN MILIAN: Thirteen years after a terrorist blew off his legs with a car bomb, Emilio Milian returned July 5 to Miami's Spanish-language radio fraternity as of '!""'!FE-AM .. :ne 1976 attack came in response to a senes of ed1tonals by M1han, then news director of WQBA-La Cubanisima, denouncing terrorist activity in South Florida. So on his first night back on the air, Milian broke ranks with other Miami commentators on the issue of punishment for anti-Castro militant Dr. Orlando Bosch, a past member of the terrorist group CORU. While other stations were vigorously protesting the U.S. Justice Department's recent deportation order against Bosch, who has been sentenced to death by a Cuba court for allegedly bombing a Cuban jetliner in 1973, Milian repeated, "I am 1 00% against ter rorism" and said Bosch should be dealt with according to law. FORGETFUL JOSE: A Canadian court recently found Jose Martins guilty of counterfeiting U.S. and Canadian dollars. He was, you might say, caught in the act. Jose failed to make a monthly payment or two on his Canon color copier . When the company repossessed the machine, it found samples of his handiwork inside. THE VANISHING CHICANO: The Chicano/Hispano Caucus of the National Education Association, with hundreds of members spread from California to Puerto Rico, voted at the NEA's June 30-July 5 convention in Washington, D.C., to rename themselves the "Hispanic Caucus." It occurred not without lengthy and lively debate, according to President Awilda Saldana, a teacher on the island, but in the end, pleas to make the body one big happy familia hispana prevailed. Will the California Chicano News Media Association, with its growing number of non-Chicano members, be next to adopt a more inclusive name? PANCHO'S CAVALRY: We all know that Mexican M&Ms are Mariachis and Margaritas. Roberto Ellndio Ramirez of East Los Angeles sends another ethnic riddle: "Why did God make Shetland ponies?" His answer: "So Pancho Villa's cavalry could have low riders." Arriba, arriba. -Kay Barbaro Hispanic Link Weekly Report July 17, 1989 3

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COLLECTING HOUSING CRISIS: "The Crisis in Housing for the Poor: A Special Report on Hispanics and Blacks" is a 39-page report by the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities. For a copy send $6 to CBPP, 236 Mas sachusetts Ave. NE, Suite 305, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 5440591. I CONNECTING I ENGUSH ONLY INFORMATION: "English Only: The Threat of Lan guage Restrictions .. is a 21-page booklet by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials that includes sections on lan guage usage history in the United States, the group U.S. English and legislative targets of the official-language movement. For a copy send $10 to NALEO, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536. LAWYERS' NEWSLETTER: The California La Raza Lawyers As sociation Newsletter is a monthly publication with the latest news on or ganization activities and members, editorials and information from other Hispanic organizations. While subscriptions are free, people who would like it delivered promptly via first-class mail should send $20 for a one year subscription to California La Raza Lawyers Association Newslet ter, P.O. Box 71, San Jose, Calif. 95103 (408) 292-6561. HERITAGE MONTH BROCHURE: Rod Enterprises Inc. is offering a free brochure of products for Hispanic heritage month. Included are things such as posters, buttons, banners and pins. For a copy contact Rod Enterprises, P.O. Box 50472, Pasadena, Calif. 91005 (818) 7991795. IMMIGRATION ACT HISTORY: "Selected Legislative History of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986," a 287-page book, in cludes the act's conference report, the president's signing statement and the Senate and House Judiciary reports. For a copy send $30 to American Immigration Lawyers Association, 1 00 16th St. NW, Suite 604, Washington, D.C. 20036. IMMIGRANT STUDENT RIGHTS: "Immigrant Students: Their Legal Right of Access to Public Schools" is a 63-page manual by the Nation al Coalition of Advocates for Students. It offers a detailed explanation of law at the federal and school-district level. For a copy send $12 to NCAS, 100 Boylston St., Suite 737, Boston, Mass. 02116 (617) 3578507. FEMINIZATION OF POVERTY: "The Effect of the Feminization of Poverty on the Health and Mental Health Status of Hispanic Women and Children" is a report that finds there exists a high correlation be tween emotional disturbance, physical health problems and receiving public aid. The report also examines the increasing number of Latinas who head impoverished households. For a copy send $2 to the Center for Cross-Cultural Research, 715 Stadium Drive, Trinity University, San Antonio, Texas 78284. BUSIN ESS PROGRAM LURES STUDENTS Twelve Hispanic and 23 black high school seniors began July 2 a four-week program at the University of Texas at Austin that seeks to lure minority students into pursuing business as their field of study in college. Begun in 1980, the Leadership, Education and Development program introduces students to different facets of the business world such as finance, marketing, economics, accounting and manage ment. It is sponsored by 1 0 universities and funded by 90 corpora tions. The corporations also provide guest lecturers. Among participating universities are Columbia, Duke, Northwestern, the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Michigan. For more information call LEAD curriculum coordinator Allen Bizzell at (512) 471-5921. FOUNDATION HELPS SCHOLARS There were 41 Hispanics 27 Mexican Americans and 16 Puerto Ricans among the 1 02 minority scholars who won fellowships in programs funded by the Ford Foundation, it was announced July 6. Ford's initiatives, the 4-year-old Predoctoral and Dissertation Fellow ships for Minorities Program and the 1 0-year-old Postdoctoral Fellow ships for Minorities Program, seek to increase the presence of underrepresented groups on the faculties of U.S. postsecondary institutions. The fellowships provide funds for research, stipends and tuition. Applications for 1990 will be available after Sept. 1. Contact the Fel lowship Office, National Research Council, 21 01 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D. C. 20418 (202) 334-2860. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Philip Morris Companies Inc., at a press conference in New York City last month, donates $20,000 to the fund of Antonio Garcfa Hernandez, a father of five murdered in the South Bronx June 14. Established by the New York Junior Tennis League, the fund's money will go toward continuing the education of the five Garcfa children . One of the Garda children, 12-year-old Juan, has been in the tennis league four years ... Jesse Aguirre, vice president of corporate relations for An heuser-Busch Companies Inc., announces that Sally Fernandez has been named director of corporate relations for the firm. Fernandez had been with General Motors Corp ... Curtis McCray, president of Califor nia State University at Long Beach, names Rodolfo Torres as his ex ecutive assistant. Torres most recently was a visiting scholar at Stanford University's School of Education ... Calendar program will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Fran Preneta (301) 772-2994 Los Angeles County Chicano Employees Associa tion TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. f'NV, Washington, D.C. 20005. THIS WEEK AIDS WORKSHOP Cheverly, Md. July 21 A workshop on AIDS in the Hispanic community will be presented by the Prince George's County, Md., Health Department and Salud Inc., a Washington, D.C.-based health services organization. The 4 HERITAGE FESTIVAL New Bedford, Mass. July 22 People Acting in Community Endeavors, a non profit community action agency, is sponsoring a Hispanic Heritage Festival through its Hispanic Multi-Service Center. Folkloric entertainment, in cluding mariachi, salsa and dance groups, will be highlighted. Also featured will be arts, crafts and food. Admission is free. Ginny Jones (508) 999-9946 COMING SOON BUSINESS CONFERENCE Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce Austin, Texas July 27-29 Joe Morfn (512) 447-9821 TARDEADA July 17, 1989 Los Angeles July 30 Zora Ann Finnstrom (818) 848-4148 FUND-RAISING SEMINAR Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities San Antonio Aug. 4, 5 Pamela Salazar (512) 433-1501 SPOTLIGHT BUSINESS CONVENTION: Thousands of Hispanic business owners from across the nation and hundreds of corporate and government repre sentatives are expected to converge on New Or leans Sept. 6-1 0 for the 1Oth annual National Convention & International Business Exchange sponsored by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Com merce. Activities will include sessions on topics of current interest to small business owners, regional and national awards ceremonies recognizing Hispanic entrepreneurs, a parade, a Mississippi River cruise and an international ball. For more in formation . contact Maxine Weber at (816) 531-6363. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I CALGON CARBON CORPORATION TECHNICAL SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALGON CARBON CORPORATION, the world's leading producer of granular activated carbon, has an immediate opening for an entry level Technical Sales Representative for the Houston Sales Office. Reporting to the Houston Regional Sales Director, the incumbent will be trained by technical support, marketing and sales people for 6-12 months to become familiar with the Company's products and services. After the initial training period, the incumbent will be responsible for the direct sale of activated carbon products, services and systems to the industrial process, municipal, industrial and wastewater markets. A technical degree is required with a B.S. in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering preferred. The ideal candidate will have 1-2 years direct sales or business ex perience. Strong oral and written communication skills are essential. Travel is required. We offer an excellent compensation and benefits package. Qualified candidates should submit resume and salary history to: CALGON CARBON CORPORATION STATISTICIAN (ECONOMICS) Exciting employment opportunity at the Census Bureau, Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C., for an economic statis tician who speaks fluent Spanish. Position is for lead instructor of technical training cour ses in collection and use of economic statis tics. Education must include 15 semester hours in statistics or combination of mathe matics and statistics. Advanced degree in economics and field data collection ex perience preferable. Grasp of development economics and Latin American experience highly desirable. Position for 18 months with possibility of conversion to permanent status. U.S. citizenship required. For further informa tion contact Tim Brown at (301) 763-4830 by July 31, 1989. An Equal Opportunity Employer PO BOX717 DEVELOPMENT l PLANNING ' An Equal Opportunity Employer CONSULTANT f 1 TS H I RT SAlES pi ann 1 n g document to g u 1 de the 1 nst 1t ut 1 on f R t G d t Fight the English-Only movement by through its new phase of development. t ecen ra ua e 1 d. d 1 b 'bl f k. wearing a Slogan T-shirt from the Nan lVI ua WI e respons1 e or wor mg to f Dynamic recent graduate with degree in tional Association for Bilingual Educaproduce a comprehensive planning docu! political science seeks full time position in tion. ment that will include consideration for the foiWashington, D.C. area. For swinging singles: lowing: wo.rking Hispanic or"Bilingual, Bicultural & Bimyself" 1) board and staff organizational developgamzatlons, coord1nat1ng spec1al and For the kids : ment and structure conferences. Fluent Span1sh/Enghsh. Excellent computer skills. Good writer. Contact Patricia Rodriguez, 4430 Forest Glen Court, Annandale, Va. 22003 (703) 3544454. "I'm Blessed with Bilingual Parents" 2) and a short and long range development Six slogans in all ... many sizes and plan colors. Prices from $7 to $9. Includes postage and handling. Send resume and letter of introduction to: Write or call for a complete order form: Antonia Hernandez Hispanic Writer Union Plaza Chair of the Board I can help you say it, find it or get it out to 8120 First St. NE3rd floor Latino Museum others. Washington, D.C. 20002 c/o MALDEF Hispanic writer will co-write, ghostwrite (202) 289-1380 634 S. Spring St., 11th Floor co I u m n s, . s pee c he s o r s .s i s t wit h ,,,,,,,,,,"''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''"'''''''''''''''''"'''''''''''''"''''' 9001t 'th . research. pertaining. to the nsura e WI eXHISpaniC Amer1can expenence. Published as ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: penence. an academic and regular columnist in top-20 -----------------------------market newspaper. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target ana-Write: Tomas Romero, P.O. Box 4632, Dentional pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly ver, Colo. 80204. 1 know the territory. Report. To an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 ---------__ N St. NW, Washmgton, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Journalism Grad Ordered by ________ _ Hispanic Link intern seeks position 30-to-40 CLASSIFIED AD RATES: hours a week evenings and/or weekends. . . Organization II Have journalism degree and 5 years of 90 cents per word (c1ty, state & z1p code ----------. . . count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 St t progressive. office expenence. Am ":'?rdword). Multiple use rates on request. ree ------------Perfect, Mult1Mate and Lotus 1-2-3 prof1c1ent, but will consider all offers. Please contact DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: City, State & Zip ______ _ Rhonda at 234-0280, M-F between 9 a.m. and (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 Area Code & Phone 5 p.m. per column inch. -------Hispanic Link Weekly Report July 17, 1989 5

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6 0 p p 0 R T u N I T I E s I N E D u c A T I 0 N I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER 800 West Main Street, Whitewater, Wisconsin 53190-1790 University Center ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR DINING & BUSINESS SERVICES This is a twelve month, academic staff position with the Univer sity of Wisconsin-Whitewater. The Associate Director reports to the Executive Director of Auxiliary Services and University Center. Responsibilities include: 1. Administers the terms and provisions, both cash services and residential dining of the University Dining Services contract and supervises the Dining Services contract management to ensure compliances with contract specifications. 2. Develops budgets annually for University Center and residen tial dining service programs and facilities. 3. Develops new major capital budget projects for dining service remodeling/refurbishing. 4. Administers (with staff) the campus-wide electronically con trolled photo identification card program and coordinates efforts with the University Computer Center for data base and telecom munications requirements . 5. Administers (with staff) the Student Service Center consist ing of information, ticket, and cash handling services. 6. Maintains liaison responsibilities for lease space operators in the University Center. 7. Performs special projects as assigned by the Executive Direc tor of Auxiliary Services and University Center. QUALIFICATIONS: Master's Degree required in Business, Stu dent Personnel, Hotel and Restaurant Management, or related academic field. Two years experience in related position re quired. SALARY: Commensurate with experience. UNIVERSITY AND COMMUNilY: The University of Wisconsin Whitewater is located in the southeastern Wisconsin community of Whitewater with a population of 12,000. Whitewater is located near three major metropolitan areas (Milwaukee, Madison, Chicago). The University enrollment for the spring semester of 1989 was 1 0, 000. APPLICATION: Interested persons should apply in writing to: Mr. Ron Buchholz University Center 264 BOOW. Main UW-Whitwater Whitewater,WI 3190 (414) 472-3191 A completed application consists of: Letter of application, resume, three current letters of reference, official transcripts from Master Degree's coursework. APPLICATION DEADLINE: August 14, 1989 STARTING DATE: October 1, 1989 UW-Whitewater is an equal opportunity employer with an affirm ative action plan. Women, members of minority groups, persons with disabilities, and Vietnam-era veterans are encouraged to apply. July 17, 1989 ANNOUNCEMENT OF ACADEMIC STAFF POSITION (FOR ACADEMIC YEAR 1989-90) The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater invites applications for the position of Minority Pre-College Coordinator/Counselor. QUALIFICATIONS: Master's degree and experience working with ethnic minority youths in pre-college type program required. Teaching experience in higher education desirable. Ability to plan, implement and evaluate program results. Demonstrated talent in the area of working with the public. RESPONSIBILITIES: Plan and implement a comprehensive pre-college program for ethnic minority students. Work closely with feeder secondary institutions to identify high potential minority students who would qualify to be participants in both academic year outreach activities as well as summer skills development programs. Coordinate pre-college scholarship program with Department of Public Instruction. Serve as academic counselor to on-campus minority freshman students. Collect data and write reports on academic performance of all minority students at the University. Serve as liaison between As sistant Vice Chancellor's Office and various support service programs in program evaluation activities. SALARY: Commensurate with academic background and professional experience. APPLICATION: Send letter of application, vita, undergraduate and graduate transcripts, and three (3) letters of reference to: Dr. Roger Pulliam Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Support Services 226 McCutchan Hall University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Whitewater, WI 53190 Deadline for application is August 15, 1989, or until position is filled. Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO POSITION: Director of Special Collections, University of New Mexico General Library. TYPE: Permanent, 12 months, tenure track. SALARY: $35,000 minimum. MINIMUM RANK: Negotiable from Assistant Professor. RESPONSIBLE TO: Dean of Library Services. EDUCATION: Master's degree from an ALA accredited program and/or Ph.D. or other doctoral degree. APPLICATIONS: Submit a resume (including names, addresses, and phone numbers for at least three references) and a let ter of application to Rita Critchfield, Personnel Office, General .Library, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, 87131. Ap plications received by 9/1/89 will be given first consideration . Position contingent on available funds. Recruitment will continue until position is filled. UNM is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I CHIEF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT OFFICER DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT The University of Texas at El Paso invites applications & nominations for the position of Chief Institutional Advance ment Officer/Director of Development, which is a senior staff . position reporting directly to the President. Assisted by a staff of three professional & seven clerical employees, the director is responsible for the planning & im plementation of all aspects of the institution's private fund raising program, including alumni activities, the annual fund, corporate giving, special gifts, planned giving & capital cam paigns. The director further advises the President on com munity & institutional matters which affect the development program. The University is seeking an innovative, self-starting manager with good communication & interpersonal skills & a history of demonstrated leadership & organizational abilities. Although five to seven years or more of successful profes1 sional university or educational fund-raising experience is preferred, individuals from the local area with exceptionally r strong involvement in non-profit organizational fund-raising & ' equivalent executive-level management experience are also encouraged to apply. A minimum of a bachelor's degree is re quired. With over 14,000 students, U.T. El Paso is the second oldest academic component of the U.T. System and the largest public institution on the United States-Mexico border. The bicultural region of El Paso & Juarez offers unique cul tural, business, research, & educational opportunities & has a mild southwestern climate. The University is seeking to continue its commitment to en hance these opportunities and to provide expanded educa tional programs to its culturally diverse constituency. Serving a metropolitan population of 1.5 million people, UTEP offers a wide variety of both baccalaureate & master's programs in its six colleges (Business, Education, Engineer ing, Liberal Arts, Nursing & Allied Health, & Science) & Graduate School. Position available 09-01-89; applications & nominations will be accepted until 08-15-89. Send a letter of application, curriculum vitae & the names of five references to: Office of the President Director of Development Search Committee The University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, Texas 79968-0500 Women & minorities are encouraged to apply. The Univer sity is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report M l l.INT The University of Michigan • Flint The University of Michigan-Flint The University of Michigan-Flint is a growing liberal arts com muter institution on 42 acres along the Flint River in downtown Flint, Michigan. Over 70 undergraduate programs and four graduate majors involve more than 6,300 students. A $26 mil lion science building was added to the campus last fall, and a new library is under development. ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR STUDENT SERVICES Coordinates the minority initiatives of student services units, represents student services minority efforts to campus and community, manages the Student Development Center, and represents the Dean in his absence. The includes coun seling, health, tutoring, handicap services, minority services, an alternative admission program, a college prep program and selected developmental programming. Requires master's in student personnel, counseling, higher ed or related area; doc torate desirable. Minimum five years supervisory experience in student services or related area. Salary $38,600 minimum. REGISTRAR Plans and manages the registration of students, scheduling of classes, and maintenance of academic records. The campus employs the Colleague administrative system on the Prime computer. The office also supports Macintosh work stations. Requires bachelor's degree; advanced degree preferred. Min imum three years supervisory experience in academic registra tion or related process. Salary $32,600 minimum. Positions report to the Dean for Student Services. Applicants should submit letter of application, resume, and contact for three references to: Personnel Office 281 UCEN The University of Michigan-Flint Flint, Mich. 48502-2186 The University is a nondiscriminatory, affirmative action employer. The following positions are with RIO HONDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE NURSING: Position available for ADN instructor. Master's re quired. TEACHING: Women's Tennis CoachPart-time, beginning February 1990. LIBRARY: Full-time position, tenure track. Also part-time position. Provide reference service in college library. Familiarity with OCLC, library automative systems necessary. MSLS re quired. For additional information and application for these posi tions, call Jean at (213) 629-0921 ext 309. July 17, 1989 RIO HONDO COLLEGE Whittier, Calif. 90608 AAIEOE 0 p p 0 R T u N I T I E s I N E D u c A T I 0 N 7

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. Arts & Entertainment tinues through Aug. 6. Daniele, a native of Argentina, conceived, choreographed and directed the production. Argentine composer Astor Piazzolla provides the music for Dangerous Games. FROM THE CALIFORNIA STAGE: Three new Latino plays have been chosen for the fourth annual Hispanic Playwrights Project. Across town, the San Diego Repertory continues its bilingual production of Emilio Carballido's Orinoco through July 30. Directed by Jorge Huerta, it is part of the Repertory's Teatro Sin Fronteras. The plays Edith Villareal's My Visits With MGM (My Grandmother Marta), Cherrie Moraga's A Shadow of a Man and Oc tavia Solis' Man of the Flesh-were selected from among 70 scripts submitted to the project housed at Costa Mesa's South Coast Reper tory company. Across the nation, Hispanic theater continues to flourish. Three other plays-by Oliver Mayer, Roberto Athayde and Edwin Sanchezwill have workshops and be read publicly during the Aug. 1-13 event. Miami's Teatro Avante continues its 1989 season this week with Jose Triana's La noche de los asesinos, at the Minorca Playhouse through July 23. The season continues with Susan Westfall's 1962 (Aug. 12-20) and Mario Vargas Llosa's La chunga (Aug. 26 to Sept. 1 0). In the Big Apple, the New York Theatre Fest ivai organization recently announced the schedule for this year's Festival Latino to be held Aug. 1-30. The 1989 HPP is funded partially by various grants and by a fund raising event. This year's fund-raiser -Una noche '89 with Lalo Guerrerowill be held Aug. 1 0. Two other "mainstream" regional theaters in Southern California offer Hispanic fare this season. The event will include six fully-staged theater productions plus several readings and more than 100 film and TV selections from the United States, Spain and Latin America. At San Diego's La Jolla Playhouse, the West Coast premiere of Graciela Daniele's Dangerous Games-Two Tango Pieces conTheater highlights include a new play by Puerto Rico's Myrna Casas and the New York premiere of Dangerous Games. Antonio Mejfas-Rentas Media Report ASNE CHIEF MAKES ROUNDS: Loren Ghiglione, president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, has embarked on a three-week, cross-country tour to emphasize the need for daily newspapers to recruit and hire more minorities. He began July 3 in Maine and is scheduled to meet with about 50 editors and publishers at two dozen newspapers before completing his trip July 23 in Southern California. "I don't think it's an exaggeration to say that the industry faces a crisis," he told reporters July 10 in Washington, D.C. "It is time to ask editors-and their newspapers-to commit to doing more, not just for themselves but for the nation." Mervin Aubespin, ASNE's Minorities Com mittee chairman and editor of The Courier Journal in Louisville, Ky., cited figures released in April showing that of 56,218 total daily newsroom staffers, 2,310 are black, HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina, Karen Zacarias. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. 1,160 are Hispanic, 620 are Asian Americans and 146 are Native Americans. "It is embar rassing," he said. Ghiglione, editor of The News i n Southbridge, Mass., is also asking editors of every daily newspaper with less than 50,000 circulation to increase minority employment by at least one person during the next nine months. Newspapers with higher circulations are being asked to step up their minority rep resentation even more. Ghiglione met with Evelyn Hernandez, presi dent of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and a reporter with New York Newsday, July 6. "Overall, his trip across the country is positive," she said. "He has ex pressed a personal commitment to bringing more Hispanics, blacks, Asians and Native Americans into newsrooms." Responding to challenges to the feasibility of ASNE's goal for the proportion of minorities in U.S. newsrooms to reflect that of the total population by the year 2000, Ghiglione said, "The goal is important even though judging by No Ml CASA ES SU CASA 1\ our performance we're not going to achieve 't II I . But, said Hernandez, "We're not letting the industry off the hook regarding the 2000 goal. We're still committed to it." By the year 2000, minorities are expected to account for more than 25% of the U.S. popula tion. ON THE MOVE: Michael Quintanilla, former features writer with The Dallas Morning News, started as a staff writer with the Los Angeles Times July 3 ... Aian Acosta, former assistant metro editor of The Orange County Register, also joined the Los Angeles Times July 3 as assistant section editor of the San Gabriel Valley section ... David Sederio, former correspondent at the Associated Press' San Antonio bureau, will become head of its San Diego bureau July 17 ... Former Hispanic Link News Service reporter Darryl Lynette Figueroa started June 26 as a reporter at the Philadelphia Daily News ... Danilo Alfaro