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Hispanic link weekly report, August 14, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, August 14, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This
President Bush schedules a Miami visit for Aug. 16 to campaign for lleana Ros-Lehtinen, the former state senator seeking the vacant 18th Congressional District seat. She is the wife of U.S. Attorney Dexter Lehtinen. Bush’s son Jeb serves as Ros-Lehtinen’s campaign manager...The U.S. Senate confirms Stella Guerra as an assistant secretary in Manuel Luj4n’s Department of Interior...California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Robert Castaneda, 36, as the governor’s liaison for the Hispanic community... Ray Siehndel, acting secretary for the Kansas Department of Human Resources, names Celso Ramirez
as director of the Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs...Expelled N.Y. state Sen. Israel Ruiz, 45, emerges as the front-runner to win his old seat in November. Only one person, a fellow Democrat, has filed papers to run against Rufz. The senator is appealing a six-month jail sentence, handed down in February, for overstating his assets on a bank-loan application...New York Board of Education officials say Dade County, Fla., schools Superintendent Joseph Fernandez, 53, is among the three top contenders for New York City schools chancellor. Selection is expected this fall... Jorge Velasquez, 42, riding at Arlington International in Illinois, becomes Aug. 3 the fifth jockey ever to ride 6,000 winners. Among others are Laffit Plncay and Angel Cordero...
voi^^CHISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT~(to)Aug.,4.l3W
Report Reveals Education Disparity
Pointing to a more educated Hispanic population in the future, 62% of Latinos 25 to 34 years old in 1988 had finished at least four years of high school compared with 44% of Latinos 35 years and older, concluded a Census Bureau report released Aug. 9.
Despite these higher levels of education, Hispanic educational attainment as a whole continued to lag behind that of non-Hispanics. Twenty-one percent of non-Hispanics 25 years and over had four or more years of college. Among Hispanics, less than half of that, 10%, did so.
And while Hispanic high school completion was at its highest level — 51 % — since such data were first collected in 1970, it trailed the non-Hispanic rate — 78% — by more than 25 percentage points.
Measuring a wide array of educational, economic and social indices, "The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1988" presents the most complete and detailed assessment of Hispanics to date.
Looking at subgroups according to age, the report found that nearly 63% of the 12.1 million Mexican Americans were 29 years or younger, the highest proportion among all Latino origin groups. Only 4% of Mexican Americans were older than 64. On the other end of the scale were the 1.04 million Cuban Americans. Approximately 39% were younger than 30, and 13% were 65 years and over.
There were 19.4 million Hispanics living in the continental United States last year, 26% more than 1982 . Since 1982, the Hispanic population has grown at a yearly average of 4.2%. The following figures chart Hispanic growth: 1987 18.8 million 1984 16.6 million
1986 18.1 million 1983 16.0 million
1985 16.9 million 1982 15.4 million
As is the pattern with non-Hispanics, the nuclear Hispanic family is on the decline. From 1982 to 1988, the proportion of Latino families headed by married couples decreased from 74% to 70%. The rate for non-Hispanics went from 82% to 80%.
SELECTED HISPANIC AGE GROUPS, TOTALS: MARCH 1988
Cent., South Other Puerto Total Non-
29 Years American Cuban Mexican Hisp. Rican Hisp. Hisp.
& Younger 65 Years 56.0% 38.7% 62.6% 50.5% 60.8% 59.3% 44.7%
& Older 2.4 12.8 4.0 9.2 4.0 4.7 12.4
Total* 2,242 * Numbers in thousands 1,035 12,110 1,573 2,471 19,431 221,724
Source:"The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1988" by the U.S. Census Bureau
Rights Advocates Voice Concerns Over INS Pick
ByF6lixPerez
While taking no formal stances, two national rights advocacy groups expressed uneasiness with President Bush’s Aug. 4 announcement that he intends to nominate George McNary to head the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
The groups, the National Council of La Raza and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, cited McNary’s lack of experience with the Hispanic and Asian American immigrant communities—the communities the INS deals with the most — and his inexperience in immigration matters.
Chief executive officer of St. Louis County, Mo., the 53-year-old McNary would succeed Alan Nelson.
"He has a challenge to prove he can overcome the issue of unfamiliarity" with immigration law and the communities the agency serves, said Charles Kamasaki, a senior analyst at La Raza.
A statement released by MALDEF pointed out several areas of concern, including the importance of the 1986 immigration act’s second stage of legalization and its employer sanctions.
"McNary’s nomination comes at a time when the U.S. immigration system is undergoing its most radical changes since 1965," read the two-page statement. Also noted was the unresolved status of a proposed INS ditch along the U.S.-Mexico border near San Diego.
Marta Jimenez, staff attorney with MALDEF’s Washington, D.C., office, said: "We need someone who can hit the ground running. We can’t afford on-the-job training."
Joblessness Jumps to 9%
The Hispanic unemployment rate jumped to 9.0% last month from 8.1 % in June despite the overall unemployment picture remaining virtually the same, according to an Aug. 4 report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The number of Latinos without jobs last month was 846,000 compared with 748,000 in June.
The overall jobless rate decreased slightly, from 5.3% to 5.2%. Blacks continued to have the highest unemployment rate, 10.9%.
Survey Finds N.Y.C.
New York City Latinos, increasingly dissatisfied with Mayor Ed Koch, will decisively support Manhattan Borough President David Dinkins in next month’s Democratic mayoral primary, according to a survey of Puerto Rican community activists released Aug. 1.
The survey, "Puerto Ricans and the 1989 Mayoral Race in New York City," was conducted by the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy. It was based on the responses of 242 Puerto Rican opinion leaders in New York City. The survey was mailed to 654 people, giving it a response rate of 37%.
Mayor Koch Trailing
Sixty-one percent of the activists surveyed said Dinkins would receive the majority of the Puerto Rican vote while only 20% said Koch would. In 1985 Koch received 70% of the Latino vote in the general election. In the Republican primary, an overwhelming 83% felt former U.S. Attorney Rudolph Giuliani would attract the Puerto Rican vote. Respondents felt Giuliani had an edge over Dinkins in the general election, 33%-28%.
According to IPRP, New York City’s Latino voting-age population in 1988 was 1.2 million. Latinos were 13-15% of the city’s voters.


N.Y.C. Government Reform Proposal Elicits Dissatisfaction
By Rhonda Smith
After 21/2 years of debate, New York City’s Charter Revision Commission offered a proposal for a revised city government Aug. 2 that a contingent of Latinos, blacks and Asian Americans say they will not endorse.
The proposal went to the U.S. Justice Department late last week. The department has 60 days to determine if, under the Federal Voting Rights Act, it dilutes minority representation. If the department approves the proposal, it will appear on the city’s ballot Nov. 7 as a referendum.
Fernando Ferrer, Bronx borough president, has announced he will challenge the charter with the Justice Department. "The issue is regression. This proposed plan takes the major elements of government power out of
the public domain and gives them to appointed, rather than elected, officials," Ferrer told Weekly Report.
Currently, the New York City Council is composed of 35 members, three of whom are Hispanic and six black. The proposed charter would expand the City Council to 51 members. Estimates on how many minorities could be elected to the City Council under it reach as high as 20.
New York is 26% Hispanic and 29% black.
Ferrer said, "The proposal was supposed to enhance minority power. Despite vigorous warnings, they have intentionally done just the opposite."
Gretchen Dykstra, communications director of the commission, responded: "By eliminating the Board of Estimate and enlarging the
City Council, we greatly enhanced the minority opportunity to elect their own."
In a March 22 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court found the city’s practice of giving each of its five boroughs one vote on the Board of Estimate unconstitutional, saying it violated the principle of one person one vote. Aida Alvarez, one of four commission members who opposed the plan, said the proposal was "seriously flawed...and offered nothing more than a patchwork of political accommodations." The 15-member commission included three Hispanics.
Angelo Falcon, a member of the Coalition of African American, Asian American and Latinos for a Just City Government, said, "We are unhappy with the entire process. There was little serious outreach to get us involved."
Calif. Judge Reopens Legalization Door
By Rhonda Smith
A federal judge in California has ruled that undocumented immigrants who were receiving public assistance and did not apply for legalization because they heard they were ineligible, may do so between Aug. 14 and Dec. 31.
In his Aug. 1 decision against the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, U.S. District Judge Edward Garcfa in Sacramento broadened the definition of groups he identified last year as eligible for legalization. In last year’s ruling, Garcia said it was unconstitutional for the INS to enforce regulations that prevented undocumented immigrants who had received public assistance from being eligible to apply for legalization. Garcfa’s recent ruling
By Danilo Alfaro
A group of Philadelphia Hispanic leaders met with the district attorney Aug. 3 to voice concerns about what they called a "double standard" of justice for Puerto Ricans and Anglos. The meeting with the Puerto Rican Defense Coalition came after charges from the Latino community that the police and district attorney had more diligently investigated the May 20 murder of Sean Daily, 17, a white allegedly killed by Puerto Ricans, than they had the July 4 murder of Stephen Crespo, 15, a Puerto Rican allegedly killed by whites.
The coalition complained that the two white defendants in the Crespo case were free on bail while all but one of the 11 defendants in the Daily case were being held without bail. Coalition spokesman Ben Ramos called for the district attorney to "look at the level of participation for each individual."
A spokesperson for District Attorney Ronald Castille said that the coalition’s concerns would be reviewed and addressed. A formal response had not yet been issued.
"We have to wait and see what he’s willing to do," said Ramos.
covers those individuals who may have heard or believed that they were not eligible.
Immigrant rights advocates estimate that as many as 50,000 people may be eligible under this ruling.
States and territories affected are California, Arizona, New Mexico, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Hawaii, Guam and Alaska.
According to Vibiana Andrade of the National Center for Immigrants Rights in Los Angeles, "This decision reopens the door for the poorest of the poor. The most disadvantaged households, many headed by single women, will now be eligible to apply."
The hotline number for further information is (800) 346-2536.
Approximately 60 Puerto Ricans, most of them friends or relatives of the defendants in the Daily case, demonstrated July 28 outside city hall and marched to the district attorney’s office protesting the court’s action and what they called a pattern of mistreatment of Puerto Ricans by police. They cited a July 15 fatal police shooting of a 27-year-old Latino.
One of the Crespo defendants has since been arrested on an unrelated assault charge and is now being held without bail.
Island Status Bill Moves Through Sen. Committee
A U.S. Senate committee completed markup on a bill Aug. 2 regarding the future political status of Puerto Rico. It did so after settling differences over a provision giving Senate repre-sentation to the island in the event com monwealth status is retained. The Senate Energy and Natural Resour-ces Committee agreed to a non-voting repre-sentative, without access to the Senate GARCIA-PASSALACQUA floor, who would be action aâ– historic step* known as a "liaison."
Under the measure Puerto Rico would hold a 1991 plebiscite to choose independence, statehood or enhanced commonwealth.
Island political analyst Juan Garcfa-Passalac-qua told Weekly Report that the measure was a "historic step," and added, "It’s the first time since Americans invaded in 1898 that the U.S. has made a formal offer of independence." The bill next moves to the Senate Finance Committee to determine what the island’s tax status will be if voters opt for statehood. Island residents do not pay federal income tax.
Six Florida Dentists Come Out Smiling
By Suzanne Hollander The Florida Supreme Court ruled July 27 in favor of six Cuban dentists who sued to be permitted to practice dentistry without supervision.
In January the dentists, all of whom had been licensed in Cuba, passed the state exam, but were issued restricted licenses allowing them to practice only under the supervision of another dentist for the first year.
Representing the dentists was attorney Olga Ramfrez, daughter of one of the plaintiffs. Her father, Ignacio Ramfrez, working for 20 years at the photocopying center at Florida International University, had put two of his children through medical school, one through law school and one through nursing school.
"It’s a great feeling to know that I did something for him," Ramfrez told Weekly Report.
Phila. Puerto Ricans Protest Treatment
2
Aug. 14,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


U.S. Sen. Paul Simon
Pro-Family Immigration Reform
The U.S. Senate recently passed sweeping reforms in our legal immigration system. Because of the sustained efforts of Hispanic and other immigrant advocacy organizations, several other senators and I were able to contribute to the bill to make it sensitive to Hispanics and the fundamental principle of family reunification.
As a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Immigration Subcommittee, I introduced a legal immigration reform bill earlier this year. My bill would have increased overall immigration to approximately 700,000, expanded the family reunification preferences, and provided for the stay of deportation and work authorization for the immediate family members of legalized aliens.
My colleagues on the immigration subcommittee, Sens. Edward Kennedy (D- Mass.) and Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.), had their own legislation that I felt at the time made many positive contributions to our immigration policy but tended to do so at the expense of Hispanic and other immigrants.
Hispanic organizations, including the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, and the National Council of La Raza, also opposed those reforms and worked with me in support of more family preference visas.
BILL IS NOT PERFECT
The bill the Senate passed in July is not a perfect one. It contains provisions I fought against, including one—to bar undocumented aliens in the 1990 census — that is plainly unconstitutional.
Nonetheless, it is a great improvement over the bill the Senate passed in 1988.
The new bill more than doubles the number of second-preference visas available for the spouse or child of a permanent resident. Under the current system, a Mexican parent who petitions for his or her first-grade child to enter the United States will not be able to obtain a visa until that child is a 12th grader! There is an 11 -year wait for a second-preference visa. In addition to doubling the number of visas for these individuals, the bill also raises the number of visas that go to any one country by 25%.
Another positive feature of the new bill restores the fifth immigration preference for the brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens. Previous immigration reform proposals would have drastically reduced these visas and required people to wait up to 75 years to be reunited with a sibling in the United States.
ENGUSH-SPEAKING REQUIREMENT STRUCK One of the most important parts of the new bill to the Hispanic community was the family unity provision offered by my colleague Sen. John Chafee (R-R.l.). This provision will keep the immediate families of persons legalized under the amnesty program safe from deportation.
I am pleased to have been able to strike from the immigration bill a provision giving an unprecedented advantage in obtaining a visa to English speakers. While this advantage would have applied only to a limited number of visas each year, I felt it would violate our nation’s heritage to require newcomers to learn English even before they arrived.
There is no question that in order to succeed in the United States, one has to be proficient in English. The way to advance English proficiency is not to bar non-English speakers at the door but to make sure we are providing the opportunities for newcomers to learn English.
A special bonus for English speakers would have made it more difficult for some of my ancestors to come to the United States. I was heartened that, after a long and emotional debate, the Senate supported me in defeating this provision.
(Paul Simon, an Illinois Democrat, is a member of the U.S. Senate.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en /a lengua
BUENAS NOTICIAS: Los Angeles policeman Robert Arellano and 10 other area law enforcement officers were honored at a July Los Angeles County Medical Association luncheon — for delivering babies in strange places under less than ideal circumstances.
Arellano delivered a son to Morena Rodriguez in the middle of a downtown intersection last October. He was rewarded by having the nene named Roberto, after him.
Nl saw the baby’s head coming out," he recounted modestly to his hosts. "At first, I didn’t know what it was."
MALAS NOTICIAS: A couple of weeks ago Frank Padilla of Carlstadt, N.J., was stopped by police in nearby River Edge at 3 am. on his planned wedding day because his car had a busted taillight. Then the cops ran a check on his driver’s license. They matched his Aug. 15, 1962, birthdate with that of a Frank Padilla wanted for parole violation following 1981 and 1986 narcotics convictions. So el fuzz found a cozy cell for the prospective groom to contemplate matrimony.
BUENAS NOTICIAS: The Rev. Tom Mahairas, who was to officiate at Padilla’s wedding, managed to convince the cops that they had the wrong man in time for Pancho to make it to the altar that afternoon.
MALAS NOTICIAS: Out of nearly 200 candidates listed in USA Today Aug. 7 as planning to compete in 36 gubernatorial races next year, only two are Hispanic: Incumbent Republican Bob Martinez in Florida and, in New Mexico, insurance broker EdLujin, who like his Cabinet-member brother Manuel is a Republican.
With Henry Cisneros out of the picture for now, there wasn’t a single Latino among seven likely candidates in Texas. Nor was the name Mario Obledo mentioned this time around in Califas.
BUENAS NOTICIAS: With the dismissal of Harold Ezell as Western regional commissioner for the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the region's temporary boss, 25-year INS veteran Robert Moschorak, launched a campaign to clean up the region’s image as the nastiest bunch of burrocrais around. He ordered agency personnel to treat clients like real people and promised thorough investigations of any charges involving unnecessary delays or bad manners.
MALAS NOTICIAS: Some of the hottest new imports from Latin America — to replace "intimidating and materialistic American women" — are "marriage-minded Latin ladies...from good families where respect for...husband and marriage are taught at an early age," the Aug. 7 Washington Times quotes a pitch by a cupid firm called Latin Connections.
The women advertised in "introduction catalogs" are for the most part college graduates, says the Times.
It quotes a satisfied customer who got himself a 34-year-old Colombian: "I found a girl who’s treated me fantastic. Or, as my ex-wife would say, a subservient type of girl."
Y MAS MALAS NOTICIAS: At a sex discrimination trial against Miami Beach and Its police department, attorneys for plaintiff Sunday Sanchez dragged Mayor Alex Daoud to the stand to recall a 1986 city commission meeting where the commissioners suggested that Sunday, a police officer, should receive a key to the city for a gold medal she earned in a local athletic competition.
Daoud responded — and is living to regret it — "The key to the city would be fine, but I’d like to give her a key to my apartment." ___________________________________________— KayB&tano
Quoting...
TIMOTHY DYER, the new executive director of the National Association of Secondary School Principals, talking Aug. 8 to Hispanic Link on the growing shortage of minority teachers and principals:
"We are in a disastrous state with Hispanics. The shortage of blacks pales into insignificance when compared to Hispanics."
Aug. 14,1989
SIMON
3


COLLECTING
PUERTO RICO FUNDING: MA Guide to Funding in Puerto Rico" is a 20-page booklet that answers some myths about political, economic and social life on the island to increase interest from philanthropic organizations and grant-making to the island. For a free copy, contact Puerto Rico Funders’ Group, Funding Exchange, 666 Broadway, Suite 500, New York, N.Y. 10012 (212) 529-5300.
HISPANIC POPULATION: "The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1988," a 70-page report by the Census Bureau, contains information on fertility, school enrollment and voting not included in the agency’s advance report of September 1988. For a copy (specify Series P-20, No. 438) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
HELP FOR COLLEGE FRESHMEN: "How to Survive Freshman Year" is a free booklet that gives tips on how to cope with common pit-falls In the first year of college. For a copy write Loyola University, 820 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1500, Chicago, III. 60611.
TEXAS EDUCATORS: The newly formed Council of Hispanic Educators and Support Systems, an organization dedicated to the reform of the education of Hispanic children, has a newsletter. For more information contact CHESS, P.O. Box 3441, Pasadena, Texas 77501-3441 (713) 920-2160. Membership costs $10.
INVESTING IN EDUCATION: "The Common Good: Social Welfare and the American Future" is a 91-page report that recommends social welfare programs be given an additional $29 billion. It recommends the money go to programs that serve poor children, teen-agers, pregnant women, the unemployed, working parents and the elderly. Copies are free from the Ford Foundation, Office of Communications, 320 E. 43rd St., New York, N.Y. 10017 (212) 573-5141.
U.S. POPULATION GROWTH: "Patterns of Metropolitan Area and County Population Growth: 1980 to 1987," a 137-page report by the Census Bureau, charts U.S. growth. To order (specify Series P-20, No. 1039) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
N.Y. MAYORAL RACE POLL: According to a poll of Puerto Rican opinion leaders in New York City, Mayor Ed Koch ranks third (15%) in popularity among mayoral candidates in the Puerto Rican community, behind Rudolph Giuliani (33%), a Republican, and David Dinkins (28%), like Koch, a Democrat. For a copy of the 18-page "Puerto Ricans and the 1989 Mayoral Race in New York City," send $2.50 to Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, 286 Fifth Ave., Suite 804-5, New York, N.Y. 10001-4512 (212) 564-1075._______________________________________________
CONNECTING
GRANT HELPS PREGNANT MIGRANTS
The Valley Health Center of Sumerton, Ariz., will begin offering late this summer health services for pregnant migrant and seasonal farm workers thanks to a four-year, $599,257 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.
The Vida y Salud Project will provide services ranging from care during and after pregnancy to transportation. The center’s executive director said he anticipates the program serving 1,000 women each year, with 85% being Hispanic.
UNIVERSITY PRESERVES BOOKS
The General Libraries of the University of Texas, Austin, has received a $142,947 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to preserve on microfilm several thousand books on Mexican history.
The material being preserved, including 2,300 books, was published from the mid-1800s to the 1970s worldwide on paper that becomes brittle easily due to its high acid content. The General Libraries, which will contribute an additional $67,798 for the effort, will also encase 4,000 Mexican history pamphlets and monographs in chemically neutral binders.
Preservation of the materials, contained in the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection, will begin in October and take a year.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
National Labor Relations Board acting General Counsel Joseph DeSio announces the appointment of Celeste Mattina as deputy assistant general counsel in operations management...The Mexican American Bar Association selects Carmen Perez, a vice chair of the Democratic National Committee, as its Hispanic Woman of the Year...Chicago Mayor Richard Daley appoints Raymond Arias, Philip Ayala, Joseph Berrios, Armando G6mez, Juan M6ndez, Virginia Ojeda, Kathy Ortiz, Tom&s Revollo, Marina Rey, Sylvia Rodriguez, Helen Valdez, Joe Valgera, Jesse Rios, Margarita Martinez and Gennaro Rodriguez to the city’s Commission on Latino Affairs...Tom^s Ybarra-Frausto, an associate professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Stanford University in California, joins the Ford Foundation as an associate director for arts and humanities...The Community Redevelopment Agency of the City of Los Angeles appoints Steven Valenzuela as project manager for its downtown Los Angeles revitalization center-piece, the Bunker Hill Redevelopment Project...Louis Leo, vice chancellor for student services at the University of California, Riverside, announces the appointment of Alfredo Figueroa as director of Chicano/Latino Student Programs...
Calendar'_________________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Unk's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
AIDS INFECTION
Washington, D.C. Aug. 14-17
The U.S. Public Health Service is sponsoring the
National Conference on HIV Infection and AIDS
Among Racial and Ethnic Populations. Five topic areas have been selected: prevention of AIDS infection; services and the continuum of care for AIDS patients; advocacy and networking; financing; and research.
Betty Eger (202) 245-6268
MALDEF SYMPOSIUM Los Angeles Aug. 18,19
"Leadership Symposium 1989" celebrates a decade of MALDEF’s Leadership Development Programs held throughout the country. Topics include public institutions and community-based organizations; local, state and federal government; political access and Hispanic representation; and succeeding in the corporate and philanthropic sectors. Former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will be the keynote speaker at the opening luncheon. Magdalena Duran (213) 629-2512 CHURCH STATUS
Immaculata, Pa. Aug. 18-20 "The Awakened Hispanic and the Future Church" will be the theme of a symposium sponsored by the Center for the Teaching of the Americas at Immaculata College. The symposium will examine three phases of Hispanic life in 1989: The Reality of the Present Situation,The Response to the Contemporary Situation, and Direction Toward 1992 — The Quincentenary of Christianity in America.
Emily Kirsch (215) 647-4400, ext. 339
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE McAfee, N.J. Aug. 18-20
The Estamos Unidos Hispanic Leadership Conference will be sponsored by Solo International Management. The focus will be means of addressing the social and economic problems facing the U.S. Latino community. La Marqueta, Hispanic Market Expo ’89, a forum in which products and services in the Hispanic market will be given exposure, will also take place.
Ed Perez (212)931-7656
4
Aug. 14,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Compliance Officer
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University is seeking an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action compliance officer who will work with administrators, faculty, students and staff in developing and implementing affirmative action programs and ensuring equal opportunity.
Duties will include investigating and resolving discrimination disputes, monitoring compliance, coordinating the E.O. 11246 AAP update, serving as Title IX Coordinator, preparing required annual reports such as EEO-6 and VETS 100, and assisting the affirmative action director. The individual will report to the Assistant to the President and Director of Affirmative Action.
Required qualifications include a Master’s degree; relevant experience preferably in higher education; experience in interpreting and implementing EO/AA regulations; experience implementing Title IX and conducting training programs; excellent communication, interpersonal and analytical skills.
Professional faculty position at the rank of lecturer, full-time, twelve-month, nontenure track. Nominations and applications will be accepted until a candidate is appointed; letters of application should include a curriculum vitae and the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of at least three references. Dossier review will begin September 8, 1989.
Correspondence should be addressed to:
Dr. Cornel Morton
Assistant to the President & Director of Affirmative Action Smith House
Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University Blacksburg, VA 24061
VPI & SU is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution. Women and Minorities are encouraged to apply.
IN TR O DU C IN6...
Planning
Ti*s* Stc&fwt
Sc> improve
anti Malniam
HISPANIC STUDENT — USA™
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Hispanic Student — USA will deliver your recruitment message to these students in their classrooms, in the career centers, and in the privacy of their own homes — during key decision-making periods.
We i nvite you to tal k with us. For complete advertisi ng information, contact Marty Muguira at (804) 723-4499 or write: Tinsley Communications, 101 N. Armistead Ave., Suite 208, Hampton, VA 23669.
T-SHIRT SALES
Fight the English-Only movement by wearing a Slogan T-Shirt from the National Association for Bilingual Education.
For swinging singles:
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Write or call for a complete order form: NABE
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MARKETING
THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER is accepting applications for tenure track position in Marketing for fall 1990. A doctorate or ABD from an AACSB school is required for assistant, associate, and full professor position. Submit letter of application, all transcripts, three current references, and complete resume by October 15,1989, to: Chairman, Department of Marketing, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, Wis. 53190.
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
NAHJ
JOB EXCHANGE
Employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media
Opportunities for internships, entry level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English or Spanish language.
Contact: Jocelyn Cdrdova, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Washington, D.C. (202) 783-6228.
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
MALDEF
Administrative Assistant sought for national civil rights organization.
Excellent organizational skills, 70 wpm, knowledge of legislative process, OC/WP required. 20K plus benefits.
Call Ann at MALDEF (202) 628-4074.

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Hispanic Unk Weekly Report
Aug. 14,1989
5


Arts & Entertainment
EMMY REPEATS ITSELF: Actor Jimmy Smits has picked up his third consecutive Emmy nomination, in the "supporting actor in a drama series" category, for his role as attorney Victor Sifuentes on NBC’s LA Law.
Smits was one of two Latino performers given the nod when the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences announced its nominees for the 41st annual prime-time Emmy Awards in Los Angeles Aug. 3.
Smits, who has never won an Emmy, is the first Latino nominated more than two times for the same role. His nomination also marked the fifth consecutive year that a Hispanic actor is nominated in the "supporting actor, drama" category. Prior to Smits, Edward James Olmos was nominated twice in a row for his role as Lieutenant Castillo on NBC’s Miami Vice. He won In 1985.
Also nominated this year is singer Linda Ronstadt in the "performance, variety or music program" category. She is up for her PBS special Can-
ciones de mi padre, in which she performed songs from the Spanish-language album of the same title.
Another Latino, Bill Melendez, is nominated as producer of two programs up for the "animated program, one hour or less" Emmy. The programs, competing in the same category, are Garfield: Babes and Bullets and Garfield: His 9 Lives.
The Academy announces Emmy winners Sept. 17 in a ceremony to be televised by the Fox Network.
FEST ON: New York’s 13-year-old Festival Latino announces its newly instituted Premio Latino film awards at a ceremony this week.
Winners will be announced in four categories from among dozens of films screening at the city’s Biograph theater. Entries screening this week include Cuba’s jjPlaff!! (Aug. 16), the United States’ La ofrenda and Mexico’s Barroco (both Aug. 19).
Winners at the awards ceremony, on Aug. 19, will receive awards sculpted by Colombian artist Enrique Grau.
Theater and cable television components of Festival Latino continue through the end of the month.
______________________________________— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
was launched by the Coca-Cola Co. Aug. 2 in New York. Created by the San Antonio-based advertising firm Sosa & Associates, the ads will focus on Hispanic contributions to U.S. culture and will feature prominent Latinos. The campaign is tied to the 1992 quincentenary celebration. The ads are in English and Spanish, and some are bilingual. Ads directed at California, Chicago, Miami and Texas markets will appear next year. Coca-Cola officials declined to say how much would be spent on the three-year campaign. According to Hispanic Business magazine’s 1988 survey of the top 50 Hispanic market advertisers, Coke ranked 25th with $1.6 million spent. PepsiCo Inc. ranked 15th with $2.9 million.
Coca-Cola Co. is headed by Cuban American Roberto Goizueta NOTABLE: Jesus Rangel, a reporter with The New York Times, was selected to the newspaper’s management training program. After a year in the intensive program he will be named to a position in management.
— Danilo Alfaro
Media Report
NIELSEN TACKLES LATINO TV: Nielsen Media Research announced Aug. 8 that it has signed with Univision and Telemundo, the two largest Spanish-language U.S. television networks, to implement what they hope will be a definitive system for measuring the viewing habits of Spanish-speaking audiences in the United States. They expect the system to bring Spanish-language television millions of advertising dollars they claim are lost due to faulty measurements of their viewers.
State-of-the-art people-meters, devices that record the viewing habits of individual household members, will be tested in 200 Los Angeles Hispanic households later this year. A national survey will follow, polling 30,000 homes regarding demographics, country of origin and language. The survey results will be used to launch the full ratings system, known as Nielsen National Hispanic Television, in 1990. It will sample the viewing habits of 800 Latino households nationwide.
"We anticipate this will prove that Spanish-language television needs to be a part of every ad budget," said Telemundo marketing director Peter Roslow.
U.S. ENGLISH IN SPANISH: When U.S. English’s full-page ad attacking the New York State Regents’ bilingual education plan appeared July 25 in The New York Times, Spanish-language CNN/Telemundo sought an interview with a representative of the group.
U.S. English Executive Director Kathryn Bricker consented to the interview on the show Noticiero. When she learned that the interview would be interpreted into Spanish, however, she called it off.
The next day Bricker phoned CNN reporter Manuel Teodoro and explained that she felt a Spanish-speaking representative would have been better suited to do the interview. She offered to send a Spanish speaker who worked for U.S. English for any future Telemundo interviews.
COKE TARGETS LATINOS: A major new ad campaign aimed at the Hispanic market
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Making_ The News This Week as director of the Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs ... Ex pelled N.Y. state Sen. Israel Ruiz, 45, emerges as the front-runner to win his old seat in November. Only one person, a fellow Democrat, has filed papers to run against Rufz. The senator is a six-month jail sentence, handed down in February, for overstatm.g h1s on a bank-loan application ... New York Board of Education officials Dade County, Fla., schools Superintendent Joseph Fernandez, 53, IS among the three top contenders for New York City Selection is expected this faii. .. 42.' nd1ng at International in Illinois, becomes Aug. 3 the f1fth Jockey ever to nde 6, 000 winners. Among others are Laffit Pin cay and Angel Cordero ... President Bush schedules a Miami visit for Aug. 16 to campaign for Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, the former state senator seeking the vacant 18th Congressional District seat. She is the wife of U.S. Attorney Dexter Lehtinen. Bush's son Jeb serves as Ros-Lehtinen's campaign manager ... The U.S. Senate confirms Stella Guerra as an assistant secretary in Manuel Lujan's Department of lnterior ... California Gov. George Deukmejlan appoints Robert Castaneda, 36, as the governor's liaison for the Hispanic community ... Ray Siehndel, acting secretary for the Kansas Department of Human Resources, names Celso Ramirez Vol. 7 No. 32 HISPANIC Y REPORT Rights Advocates Voice Concems Over INS Pick By Felix P{)rez While taking no formal stances, two national rights advocacy groups expressed uneasiness with President Bush's Aug. 4 announcement that he intends to nominate George McNary to head the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. The groups, the National Council of La Raza and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, cited McNary's lack of ex perience with the Hispanic and Asian American immigrant communities-the communities the INS deals with the most and his inex perience in matters. Chief executive officer of St. Louis County, Mo., the 53-year-old McNary would succeed Alan Nelson. "He has a challenge to prove he can over come the issue of unfamiliarity" with immigra tion law and the communities the agency serves, said Charles Kamasaki, a senior analyst at La Raza. A statement released by MALDEF pointed out several areas of concern, including the impor tance of the 1986 immigration act's second stage of legalization and its employer sanc tions. "McNary's nomination comes at a time when the U.S. immigration system is undergoing its most radical changes since 1965," read the two-page statement. Alsc;> noted was the un resolved status of a proposed INS ditch along the U.S.-Mexico border near San Diego. Report Reveals Education Disparity Pointing to a more educated Hispanic population in the future, 62% of Latinos 25 to 34 years old in 1988 had finished at least four years of high school compared with 44% of Latinos 35 years and older, concluded a Cen sus Bureau report released Aug. 9. Despite these higher levels of education, Hispanic educational attainment as a whole continued to lag behind that of non-Hispanics. Twenty-one percent of non-Hispanics 25 years and over had four or more years of col lege. Among Hispanics, less than half of that, 10%, did so. And while Hispanic high school completion was at its highest level-51%-since such data were first collected in 1970, it trailed the non-Hispanic rate-78% -by more than 25 percentage points. Measuring a wide array of educational, economic and social indices, "The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1988" presents the most complete and detailed as sessment of Hispanics to date. Looking at subgroups according to age, the report found that nearly 63% of the 12.1 million Mexican Americans were 29 years or younger, the highest proportion among all Latino origin groups. Only 4% of Mexican Americans were older than 64. On the other end of the scale were the 1.04 million Cuban Americans. Ap proximately 39% were younger than 30, and 13% were 65 years and over. There were 19.4 million Hispanics living in the continental United States last year, 26% more than 1982 . Since 1982, the Hispanic popula tion has grown at a yearly average of 4.2%. The following figures chart Hispanic growth: 1987 18.8million 1984 16.6million 1986 18.1 million 1983 16.0million 1985 16.9 million 1982 15.4 million As is the pattern with non-Hispanics, the nuclear Hispanic family is on the decline. From 1982 to 1988, the proportion of Latino families headed by married couples decreased from 74% to 70%. The rate for non-Hispanics went from 82% to 80%. SELECTED GROUPS, TOTALS: MARCH 1988 Cent., South Other Puerto Total NonAmerican Cuban Mexican Hisp. Rican Hisp. Hisp. 29 Years & Younger 56.0% 38.7% 62.6% 50.5% 60.8% 59.3% 44.7% 65 Years & Older 2.4 12.8 4.0 9.2 4.0 4.7 12.4 Total* 2,242 1,035 12,110 1,573 2,471 19,431 221,724 Marta Jimenez, staff attorney with MALDEF's • Numbers in thousands Washington, D.C., office, said: 11We need Source: •The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1988• by the U.S. Census Bureau someone who can hit the ground running. We can'tattardan-the-jabtraining." Survey Finds N.Y.C. Mayor Koch Trailing Joblessness Jumps to 9% The Hispanic unemployment rate jumped to 9.0% last month from 8.1% in June despite the overall unemployment picture remaining vir tually the same, according to an Aug. 4 report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The number of Latinos without jobs last month was 846,000 compared with 748,000 in June. The overall jobless rate decreased slightly, from 5.3% to 5.2%. Blacks continued to have the highest unemployment rate, 1 0. 9%. New York City Latinos, increasingly dissatis fied with Mayor Ed Koch, will decisively sup port Manhattan Borough President David Dinkins in next month's Democratic mayoral primary, according to a survey of Puerto Rican community activists released Aug. 1. The survey, ,.Puerto Ricans and the 1989 Mayoral Race in New York City," was con ducted by the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy. It was based on the responses of 242 Puerto Rican opinion leaders in New York City. The survey was mailed to 654 people, giving it a response rate of 37%. Sixty-one percent of the activists surveyed said Dinkins would receive the majority of the Puerto Rican vote while only 20% said Koch would. In 1985 Koch received 70% of the Latino vote in the general election. In the Republican primary, an overwhelming 83% felt former U.S. Attorney Rudolph Giuliani would attract the Puerto Rican vote. Respondents felt Giuliani had an edge over Dinkins in the general election, 33%-28%. According to IPRP, New York City's Latino voting-age population in 1988 was 1.2 million . Latinos were 13-15% of the city's voters.

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N.Y.C. Government Reform Proposal Elicits Dissatisfaction By Rhonda Smith After 2 1/2 years of debate, New York Citis Charter Revision Commission offered a proposal for a revised city government Aug. 2 that a contingent of Latinos, blacks and Asian Americans say they will not endorse. The proposal went to the U.S. Justice Department late last week. The department has 60 days to determine if, under the Federal Voting Rights Act, it dilutes minority representation. If the department approves the proposal, it will appear on the city's ballot Nov. 7 as a referendum. Fernando Ferrer, Bronx borough president, has announced he will challenge the charter with the Justice Department. "The issue is regression. This proposed plan takes the major elements of government power out of the public domain and gives them to ap pointed, rather than elected, officials," Ferrer told Weekly Report. Currently, the New York City Council is com posed of 35 members, three of whom are Hispanic and six black. The proposed charter would expand the City Council to 51 mem bers. Estimates on how many minorities could be elected to the City Council under it reach as high as 20. New York is 26% Hispanic and 29% black. Ferrer said, "The proposal was supposed to enhance minority power. Despite vigorous warnings, they have intentionally done just the opposite." Gretchen Dykstra, communications director of the commission, responded: "By eliminat ing the Board of Estimate and enlarging the City Council, we greatly enhanced the minority opportunity to elect their own." In a March 22 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court found the city's practice of giving each of its five boroughs one vote on the Board of Estimate unconstitutional, saying it violated the principle of one person one vote. Aida Al varez, one of four commission members who opposed the plan, said the proposal was "seriously flawed ... and offered nothing more than a patchwork of political accommoda tions." The 15-member commission included three Hispanics. Angelo Falcon, a member of the Coalition of African American, Asian American and Latinos for a Just City Government, said, "We are unhappy with the entire process. There was little serious outreach to get us involved." Calif. Judge Reopens Legalization Door Island Status Bill Moves Through Sen. Committee By Rhonda Smith A federal judge in California has ruled that un documented immigrants who were receiving public assistance and did not apply for legaliza tion because they heard they were ineligible, may do so between Aug. 14 and Dec. 31. In his Aug. 1 decision against the U.S. Im migration and Naturalization Service, U.S. Dis trict Judge Edward Garcfa in Sacramento broadened the definition of groups he identified last year as eligible for legalization. In last year's ruling, Garcfa said it was unconstitution al for the INS to enforce regulations that prevented undocumented immigrants who had received public assistance from being eligible to apply for legalization. Garcfa's recent ruling covers those individuals who may have heard or believed that they were not eligible . Immigrant rights advocates estimate that as many as 50,000 people may be eligible under this ruling. States and territories affected are California, Arizona, New Mexico, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Hawaii, Guam and Alaska. According to Vibiana Andrade of the Nation al Center for Immigrants Rights in Los Angeles, "This decision reopens the door for the poorest of the poor. The most disadvantaged households, many headed by single women, will now be eligible to apply." The hotline number for further information is (800) 346-2536. A U .S. Senate committee completed markup on a bill Aug. 2 regarding the future political status of Puerto Rico. It did so after settling dif ferences over a provision giving Senate repre sentation to the island in the event commonwealth status is retained. The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee agreed to a non v o t i n g r e p r e sentative, without access to the Senate GARCIA-PASSALACQUA floor, who would be Phila. Puerto Ricans Protest Treatment action a historic step• known as a "liaison." Under the measure Puerto Rico would hold a 1991 plebiscite to choose independence, statehood or enhanced commonwealth. By Danilo Alfaro A group of Philadelphia Hispanic leaders met with the district attorney Aug. 3 to voice con cerns about what they called a "double stand ard" of justice for Puerto Ricans and Anglos. The meeting with the Puerto Rican Defense Coalition came after charges from the Latino community that the police and district attorney had more diligently investigated the May 20 murder of Sean Daily, 17, a white allegedly killed by Puerto Ricans, than they had the July 4 murder of Stephen Crespo, 15, a Puerto Rican allegedly killed by whites. The coalition complained that the two white defendants in the Crespo case were free on bail while all but one of the 11 defendants in the Daily case were being held without bail. Coalition spokesman Ben Ramos called for the district attorney to "look at the level of par ticipation for each individual." A spokesperson for District Attorney Ronald Castille said that the coalition's concerns would be reviewed and addressed. A formal response had not yet been issued. "We have to wait and see what he's willing to do," said Ramos. 2 Approximately 60 Puerto Ricans, most of them friends or relatives of the defendants in the Daily case, demonstrated July 28 outside city hall and marched to the district attorney's office protesting the court's action and what they called a pattern of mistreatment of Puer to Ricans by police. They cited a July 15 fatal police shooting of a 27-year-old Latino. One of the Crespo defendants has since been arrested on an unrelated assault charge and is now being held without bail. Island political analyst Juan Garcfa-Passalac qua told Weekly Report that the measure was a "historic step," and added, "It's the first time since Americans invaded in 1898 that the U.S. has made a formal offer of independence." The bill next moves to the Senate Finance Committee to determine what the island's tax status will be if voters opt for statehood. Island residents do not pay federal income tax. Six Florida Dentists Come Out Smiling By Suzanne Hollander The Florida Supreme Court ruled July 27 in favor of six Cuban dentists who sued to be permitted to practice dentistry without super VISion. In January the dentists, all of whom had been licensed in Cuba, passed the state exam, but were issued restricted licenses alRepresenting the dentists was attorney Olga Ramirez, daughter of one of the plain tiffs. Her father, Ignacio Ramirez, working for 20 years at the photocopying center at Florida International University, had put two of his children through medical school, one through law school and one through nursing school. lowing them to practice only under the super"It's a great feeling to know that I did somevision of another dentist for the first year. thing for him," Ramirez told Weekly Report. Aug. 14, 1989 Hispanic Unk Weekty Report

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U.S. Sen. Paul Simon Pro-Family Immigration Reform The U.S. Senate recently passed sweeping reforms in our legal im migration system. Because of the sustained efforts of Hispanic and other immigrant advocacy organizations, several other senators and I were able to contribute to the bill to make it sensitive to Hispanics and the fundamental principle of family reunification. As a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee's Immigration Subcommittee, I intraduced a legal immigration reform bill earlier this year. My bill would have increased overall im migration to approximately 700,000, expanded :: the family reunification preferences, and provided for the stay of deportation and work authorization for the immediate family members of legalized aliens. My colleagues on the immigration subcommit:, tee, Sans. Edward Kennedy (0Mass.) and Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.), had their own legislation that SIMON I felt at the time made many positive contributions to our immigration policy but tended to do so at the expense of Hispanic and other immigrants. Hispanic organizations, including the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, and the National Council of La Raza, also opposed those reforms and worked with me in support of more family preference visas. BILL IS NOT PERFECT The bill the Senate passed in July is not a perfect one . It contains provisions I fought against, including one-to bar undocumented aliens in the 1990 census that is plainly unconstitutional. Nonetheless, it is a great improvement over the bill the Senate passed in 1988. The new bill more than doubles the number of second-preference visas available for the spouse or child of a permanent resident. Under the current system, a Mexican parent who petitions for his or her first grade child to enter the United States will not be able to obtain a visa until that child is a 12th grader! There is an 11-year wait for a second preference visa. In addition to doubling the number of visas for these individuals, the bill also raises the number of visas that go to any one country by 25%. Another positive feature of the new bill restores the fifth immigration preference for the brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens. Previous im migration reform proposals would have drastically reduced these visas and required people to wait up to 75 years to be reunited with a sibling in the United States. ENGUSH-SPEAKING REQUIREMENT STRUCK One of the most important parts of the new bill to the Hispanic com munity was the family unity provision offered by my colleague Sen. John Chafee (A-R.I.). This provision will keep the immediate families of persons legalized under the amnesty program safe from deportation. I am pleased to have been able to strike from the immigration bill a provision giving an unprecedented advantage in obtaining a visa to English speakers. While this advantage would have applied only to a limited number of visas each year, I felt it would violate our nation's heritage to require newcomers to learn Eng I ish even before they ar rived. There is no question that in order to succeed in the United States, one has to be proficient in English. The way to advance English proficiency is not to bar non-English speakers at the door but to make sure we are providing the opportunities for newcomers to learn English. A special bonus for English speakers would have made it more dif ficult for some of my ancestors to come to the United States. I was heartened that, after a long and emotional debate, the Senate supported me in defeating this provision. (Paul Simon, an Illinois Democrat, is a member of the U.S. Senate.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua BUENAS NOTICIAS: Los Angeles policeman Robert Arellano and 1 0 other area law enforcement officers were honored at a July Los Angeles County Medical Association luncheon for delivering babies in strange places under less than ideal circumstances. Arellano delivered a son to Morena Rodriguez in the middle of a downtown intersection last October. He was rewarded by having the nene named Roberto, after him. "I saw the baby's head coming out," he recounted modestly to his hosts. "At first, I didn't know what it was." MALAS NOTICIAS: A couple of weeks ago Frank Padilla of Carlstadt, N.J., was stopped by police in nearby River Edge at 3 am. on his planned wedding day because his car had a busted taillight. Then the cops ran a check on his driver's license. They matched his Aug. 15, 1962, birthdate with that of a Frank Padilla wanted for parole violation following 1981 and 1986 narcotics convictions. So el fuzz found a cozy cell for the prospective groom to contemplate matrimony. BUENAS NOTICIAS: The Rev. Tom Mahairas, who was to of ficiate at Padilla's wedding, managed to convince the cops that they had the wrong man in time for Pancho to make it to the altar that afternoon. MALAS NOT/CIAS: Out of nearly 200 candidates listed in USA Today Aug. 7 as planning to compete in 36 gubernatorial races next year, only two are Hispanic: Incumbent Republican Bob Martinez in Florida and, in New Mexico, insurance broker Ed l.J.Jjan, who like his Cabinet-member brother Manuel is a Republican. With Henry Cisneros out of the picture for now, there wasn't a single Latino among seven likely candidates in Texas. Nor was the name Mario Obledo mentioned this time around in Califas. BUENAS NOT/CIAS: With the dismissal of Harold Ezell as Western regional commissioner for the Immigration and Naturaliza tion Service, the region's temporary boss, 25-year INS veteran Robert Moschorak, launched a campaign to clean up the region's image as the nastiest bunch of burrocrats around. He ordered agency personnel to treat clients like real people and promised thorough investigations of any charges involving unnecessary delays or bad manners. MALAS NOTICIAS: Some of the hottest new imports from Latin America to replace "intimidating and materialistic American women"-are "marriage-minded Latin ladies ... from good families where respect for ... husband and marriage are taught at an early age," the Aug. 7 Washington Times quotes a pitch by a cupid firm called Latin Connections. The women advertised in "introduction catalogs" are for the most part college graduates, says the Times. It quotes a satisfied customer who got himself a 34-year-old Colom bian: "I found a girl who's treated me fantastic. Or, as my ex-wife would say, a subservient type of girl." Y MAS MALAS NOTICIAS: At a sex discrimination trial against Miami Beach and its police department, attorneys for plaintiff Sun day sanchez dragged Mayor Alex Daoud to the stand to recall a 1986 city commission meeting where the commissioners suggested that Sunday, a police officer, should receive a key to the City for a gold medal she earned in a local athletic competition. Daoud responded-and is living to regret it"The key to the city would be fine, but I'd like to give her a key to my apartment." -Kay Barbaro Quoting ... TIMOTHY DYER, the new executive director of the National Associa tion of Secondary School Principals, talking Aug. 8 to Hispanic Link on the growing shortage of minority teachers and principals: "We are in a disastrous state with Hispanics. The shortage of blacks pales into insignificance when compared to Hispanics." Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Aug. 14. 1989 3

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COLLECTING PUERTO RICO FUNDING: "A Guide to Funding in Puerto Rico" is a 20-page booklet that answers some myths about political, economic and social life on the island to increase interest from philanthropic or ganizations and grant-making to the island. For a free copy, contact Puerto Rico Funders' Group, Funding Exchange, 666 Broadway, Suite 500, New York, N.Y. 10012 (212) 529-5300. HISPANIC POPULATION: "The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1988," a 70-page report by the Census Bureau, contains information on fertility, school enrollment and voting not included in the agency's advance report of September 1988. For a copy (specify Series P-20, No. 438) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Govern ment Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) HELP FOR COLLEGE FRESHMEN: "How to Survive Freshman Year" is a free booklet that gives tips on how to cope with common pit falls in the first year of college. For a copy write Loyola University, 820 . N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1500, Chicago, Ill. 60611. TEXAS EDUCATORS: The newly formed Council of Hispanic Educators and Support Systems, an organization dedicated to the reform of the education of Hispanic children, has a newsletter. For more information contact CHESS, P.O. Box 3441, Pasadena, Texas 77501-3441 (713) 920-2160. Membership costs $1 0. INVESTING IN EDUCATION: "The Common Good: Social Welfare and the American Future" is a 91-page report that recommends social welfare programs be given an additional $29 billion. It recommends the money go to programs that serve poor children, teen-agers, pregnant women, the unemployed, working parents and the elderly. Copies are free from the Ford Foundation, Office of Communications, 320 E. 43rd St., New York, N.Y. 10017 (212) 573-5141. U.S. POPULATION GROWTH: "Patterns of Metropolitan Area and County Population Growth: 1980 to 1987," a 137-page report by the Census Bureau, charts U.S. growth. To order (specify Series P-20, No. 1 039) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Print ing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) N.Y. MAYORAL RACE POLL: According to a poll of Puerto Rican opinion leaders in New York City, Mayor Ed Koch ranks third (15%) in popularity among mayoral candidates in the Puerto Rican community, behind Rudolph Giuliani (33%), a Republican, and David Dinkins (28%), like Koch, a Democrat. For a copy of the 18-page "Puerto Ricans and the 1989 Mayoral Race in New York City," send $2 . 50 to Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, 286 Fifth Ave., Suite 804-5, New York, N.Y. 100014512 (212) 564-1 075. I CONNECTING I GRANT HELPS PREGNANT MIGRANTS The Valley Health Center of Sumerton, Ariz., will begin offering late this summer health services for pregnant migrant and seasonal farm workers thanks to a four-year, $599,257 grant from the W.K Kellogg Foundation. The Vida y Salud Project will provide services ranging from care during and after pregnancy to transportation. The center's executive director said he anticipates the program serving 1, 000 women each year, with 85% being Hispanic. UNIVERSITY PRESERVES BOOKS The General Libraries of the University of Texas, Austin, has received a $142,947 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to preserve on microfilm several thousand books on Mexican history. The material being preserved, including 2,300 books, was published from the mid-1800s to the 1970s worldwide on paper that becomes brittle easily due to its high acid content. The General Libraries, which will contribute an additional $67,798 for the effort, will also encase 4,000 Mexican history pamphlets and monographs in chemically neutral binders. Preservation of the materials, contained in the Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection, will begin in October and take a year. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES National Labor Relations Board acting General Counsel Joseph DeSio announces the appointment of Celeste Mattina as deputy as sistant general counsel in operations management ... The Mexican American Bar Association selects Carmen Perez, a vice chair of the Democratic National Committee, as its Hispanic Woman of the Year ... Chicago Mayor Richard Daley appoints Raymond Arias, Philip Ayala, Joseph Berrios, Armando G6mez, Juan Mendez, Virginia Ojeda, Kathy Ortfz, Tomas Revello, Marina Rey, Sylvia Rodrfguez, Helen Val dez, Joe Valgera, Jesse Rfos, Margarita Mart . fnez and Gennaro Rodrfguez to the city's Commission on Latino Affairs ... Tomas Ybarra Frausto, an associate professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Stan ford University in California, joins the Ford Foundation as an associate director for arts and humanities ... The Community Redevelopment Agency of the City of Los Angeles appoints Steven Valenzuela as project manager for its downtown Los Angeles revitalization center piece, the Bunker Hill Redevelopment Project ... Louis Leo, vice chan cellor for student services at the University of California, Riverside, announces the appointment of Alfredo Figueroa as director of Chicana/Latino Student Programs ... Calendar TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Unk's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone num_!>er. Address items to Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. tN'-1, Washington, D.C. 20005. Among Racial and Ethnic Populations. Five topic areas have been selected: prevention of AIDS in fection; services and the continuum of care for AIDS patients; advocacy and networking; financing; and research. Immaculata, Pa. Aug. 18-20 'The Awakened Hispanic and the Future Church• will be the theme of a symposium sponsored by the Center for the Teaching of the Americas at Im maculata College. The symposium will examine three phases of Hispanic life in 1989: The Reality of the Present Situation,The Response to the Contem porary Situation, and Direction Toward 1992-The Quincentenary of Christianity in America. THIS WEEK AIDS INFECTION Washington, D.C. Aug. 14-17 The U.S. Public Health Service is sponsoring the National Conference on HIV Infection and AIDS 4 Betty Eger (202) 245-6268 MALDEF SYMPOSIUM Los Angeles Aug. 18, 19 'Leadership Symposium 1989' celebrates a decade of MALDEF's Leadership Development Programs held throughout the country. Topics in clude public institutions and community-based or ganizations; local, state and federal government; political access and Hispanic representation; and succeeding in the corporate and philanthropic sec tors. Former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will be the keynote speaker at the opening luncheon. Magdalena Duran (213) 629-2512 CHURCH STATUS Aug. 14,1989 Emily Kirsch (215) 647-4400, ext. 339 LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE McAfee, N.J. Aug. 18-20 The Estamos Unidos Hispanic Leadership Con ference will be sponsored by Solo International Management. The focus will be means of address ing the social and economic problems facing the U.S. Latino community. La Marqueta, Hispanic Market Expo '89, a forum in which products and ser vices in the Hispanic market will be given exposure , will also take place. Ed Perez (212) 931-7656 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Compliance Officer Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University is seeking an Equal Oppor tunity/Affirmative Action compliance officer who will work with administrators, facul ty, students and staff in developing and implementing affirmative action programs and ensuring equal opportunity. Duties will include investigating and resolving discrimination disputes, monitoring compliance, coordinating the E.O. 11246 AAP update, serving as Title IX Coor dinator, preparing required annual reports such as EE0-6 and VETS 1 00, and as sisting the affirmative action director. The individual will report to the Assistant to the President and Director of Affirmative Action. Required qualifications include a Master's degree; relevant experience preferab ly in higher education; experience in interpreting and implementing EO/AA regula tions; experience implementing Title IX and conducting training programs; excellent communication, interpersonal and analytical skills. Professional faculty position at the rank of lecturer, full-time, twelve-month, non tenure track. Nominations and applications will be accepted until a candidate is ap pointed; letters of application should include a curriculum vitae and the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of at least three references. Dossier review will begin September 8, 1989. Correspondence should be addressed to: Dr. Cornel Morton Assistant to the President & Director of Affirmative Action Smith House Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University Blacksburg, VA 24061 VPI & SU is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution. Women and Minorities are encoura ed to a I . INTRODUCING ••• HISPANIC STUDENT USA Tlps {w :P.l!;lnriln9 .,,,. ,:,. NOTHING Reaches Hispanic Students BETTER! Introducing a new publication to help you reach an enormous new market of college bound students. Hispanic StudentUSA will deliver your recruit ment message to these students in their classrooms, in the career centers, and in the privacy oftheirown homes -during key decision-making periods. Wei nvite you to talk with us. For complete advertising information, contact Marty Mugu ira at (804) 723-4499 or write: Tinsley Communications, 101 N. Armistead Ave., Suite 208, Hampton, VA 23669. T-SHIRT SALES Fight the English-Only movement by wearing a Slogan T-Shlrt from the Nation al Association for Bilingual Education. For swinging singles: .. Bilingual, Bicultural & Bimyself' For the Kids: .. I'm Blessed with Bilingual Parents .. Six slogans in all ... many sizes and colors. Priced from $7 to $9. Includes postage and handling. Write or call for a complete order form: NABE Union Center Plaza 81 0 First St. NE, 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 289-1380 MARKETING THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSINWHITEWATER is accepting applications for tenure track position in Marketing for fall 1990. A doctorate or ABO from an AACSB school is required for assi$tant, associate, and full professor position. Submit letter of application, all transcripts, three current references, and complete resume by October 15, 1989, to: Chairman, Department of Marketing, UW Whitewater, Whitewater, Wis. 53190. AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/ EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE Employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media Opportunities for internships, entry level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English or Spanish language. Contact: Jocelyn Cordova, National As sociation of Hispanic Journalists, Washington, D. C. (202) 783-6228. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT MALDEF DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target ana tional pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Unk Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Administrative Assistant sought for na tional civil rights organization. Excellent organizational skills, 70 wpm, knowledge of legislative process, OCNJP required. 20K plus benefits. Call Ann at MALDEF (202) 628-4074. CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: Ordered by ________ _ Organization ________ _ Street ---------------------City, State & Zip --------(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 Area Code & Phone per column inch. -------Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Aug. 14, 1989 5

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Arts & Entertainment ciones de mi padre, in which she performed songs from the Spanish language album of the same title. Another Latino, Bill Melendez, is nominated as producer of two programs up for the "animated program, one hour or less" Emmy. The programs, competing in the same category, are Garfield: Babes and Bullets and Garfield: His 9 Lives. EMMY ITSELF: Actor Jimmy Smits has picked up his third consecutive Emmy nomination, in the "supporting actor in a drama series" category, for his role as attorney Victor Sifuentes on NBC's LA. Law. Smits was one of two Latino given the nod when the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences announced its nominees for the 41st annual prime-time Emmy Awards in Los Angeles Aug. 3. The Academy announces Emmy winners Sept. 17 in a ceremony to be televised by the Fox Network. FEST ON: New York's 13-year-old Festival Latino announces its newly instituted Premio Latino film awards at a ceremony this week. Smits, who has never won an Emmy, is the first Latino nominated more than two times for the same role. His nomination also marked the fifth consecutive year that a Hispanic actor is nominated in the "supporting actor, drama" category. Prior to Smits, Edward James Olmos was nominated twice in a row for his role as Lieutenant Castillo on NBC's Miami Vice. He won in 1985. Winners will be in four categories from among dozens of films screening at the city's Biograph theater. Entries screening this week include Cuba's uP/aff!! (Aug. 16), the United States' La ofrenda and Mexico's Barroco (both Aug. 19). Winners at the awards ceremony, on Aug. 19, will receive awards sculpted by Colombian artist Enrique Grau. Also nominated this year is singer Linda Ronstadt in the "performance, variety or music program" category. She is up for her PBS special Can-Theater and cable television components of Festival Latino continue through the end of the month. Media Report NIELSEN TACKLES LATINO TV: Nielsen Media Research announced Aug. 8 that it has signed with Univision and Telemundo, the two largest Spanish-language U .S. television networks, to implement what they hope will be a definitive system for measuring the viewing habits of Spanish-speaking audiences in the United States. They expect the system to bring Spanish-language television millions of advertising dollars they claim are lost due to faulty measurements of their viewers. State-of-the-art people-meters, devices that record the viewing habits of individual household members, will be tested in 200 Los Angeles Hispanic households later this year. A national survey will follow, polling 30,000 homes regarding demographics, country of origin and language. The survey results will be used to launch the full ratings system, known as Nielsen National Hispanic Television, in 1990. It will sample the viewing habits of 800 Latino households nationwide. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector EricksenMendoza Ecfrtor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina, Suzanne Hol lander. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. .. We anticipate this will prove that Spanish language television needs to be a part of every ad budget, .. said Te/emundo marketing direc tor Peter Roslow. U.S. ENGLISH IN SPANISH: When U.S. English's full-page ad attacking the New York State Regents ' bilingual education plan ap peared July 25 in The New York Times, Spanish-language CNN/Te/emundo sought an interview with a representative of the group. U.S . English Executive Director Kathryn Bricker consented to the interview on the show Noticiero. When she learned that the in terview would be interpreted into Spanish, however, she called it off. The next day Bricker phoned CNN reporter Manuel Teodoro and explained that she felt a Spanish-speaking representative would have been better suited to do the interview. She of fered to send a Spanish speaker who worked for U.S. English for any future Telemundo in terviews. COKE TARGETS LATINOS: A major new ad campaign aimed at the Hispanic market Antonio Mejfas-Rentas was launched by the Coca-Cola Co. Aug. 2 in New York. Created by the San Antonio-based advertising firm Sosa & Associates, the ads will focus on Hispanic contributions to U.S. culture and will feature prominent Latinos. The campaign is tied to the 1992 quincenten ary celebration. The ads are in English and Spanish, and some are bilingual. Ads directed at California, Chicago, Miami and Texas markets will appear next year. Coca-Cola of ficials declined to say how much would be spent on the three-year campaign. According to Hispanic Business magazine's 1988 survey of the top 50 Hispanic market advertisers, Coke ranked 25th with $1.6 million spent. Pepsico Inc. ranked 15th with $2.9 million. Coca-Cola Co. is headed by Cuban American Roberto Goizueta. NOTABLE: Jesus Rangel, a reporter with The New York Times, was selected to the newspaper's management training program. After a year in the intensive program he will be named to a position in management. Danilo Alfaro HISPANIC GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION : MARCH 1988 Arizona, Colorado, & New Mexico ------S0Io Texas 21o/o California __ _ 34k Source: •The Hispanic Population in the United States: March 1988• ------New York 11 o/o --Florida S0lo Illinois 4lo Remainder of the U.S. 11o/o