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Hispanic link weekly report, August 21, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, August 21, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This
President Bush, Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos and federal drug czar William Bennett meet with 15 drug abuse professionals at the White House to discuss Bennett’s anti-drug abuse plan. Paul C&rdenas, alcohol and drug abuse project director at the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, and Philip Diaz, associate director of Rockland Community Health Center in New York, attended...Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) includes Phoenix Superior Court Judge Gloria Ybarra, 36, on a list of four people sent to President Bush to fill a vacant U.S. District Court seat...Boston University offers the superintendent of schools post in Chelsea to Boston school
administrator Diana Lam. The Chelsea school district, 65% Hispanic, was ceded to the university because of poor management...News reports list U.S. District Judge Raul Ramirez of Sacramento as a contender to become the National Football League commissioner...Former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros agrees to serve as co-chair of state Rep. Dan Morales’ campaign for Texas attorney general... Dade County, Fla., schools Superintendent Joseph Fernandez says no to offers to become chancellor for New York City public schools...New York Mayor Ed Koch and mayoral candidate David Dinkins join hundreds of people in a funeral procession for Maria Hern&ndez, 34-year-old mother of three. She was presumably slain in her Brooklyn apartment by drug dealers retaliating for her husband’s efforts to make the neighborhood drug free...

Ed Lujan Enters Hospital After Heart Attack Strikes
Edward Lujan, brother of Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan and a prospective candidate for New Mexico governor in 1990, was transferred by helicopter Aug. 15 from a Colorado hospital to one in Albuquerque, N.M., after suffering a heart attack Aug.
10.
Lujan was vacation-ing in Glenwood Springs, Colo., when the attack occurred one day before his 57th birthday. The chairman of the New Mexico Republican Party from May 1983 to January 1988,
Lujan was in stable condition, according to a spokeswoman for Presbyterian Hospital.
He was to undergo tests beginning late last week to determine the extent of the damage. Lujan works at his family’s insurance business in Albuquerque.
Secretary Lujan, who visited his younger brother in Colorado immediately following the attack, underwent triple bypass heart surgery in 1986.
By Danilo Alfaro
While Hispanic participation in various aspects of the country’s political process is significantly lower than that of non-Hispanics, the right issues, candidates or mobilization efforts can and do spur Hispanics to action, according to a study scheduled for release this week by the Southwest Voter Research Institute in San Antonio.
The study, "Hispanic Political Participation," examined rates of Hispanic involvement in the political process. Among its findings:
• 5.4% of Hispanics attended political meetings or rallies, compared to 8.4% of non-Hispanics.
During election time, 22.3% of Hispanics reported attempting to influence the votes of others, compared to 28.7% of non-Hispanics.
"Given the low economic conditions! with approximately 25% of Hispanics at or below the poverty level, it is not surprising that we do lag behind in the traditional forms of political expression in the United States," Harry Pachon, director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officals, told Weekly Report.
Among Hispanics, mobilization efforts are likely to have the greatest impact on the most disenfranchised individuals, those who have
continued on page 2
Richman Bests Kennedy in Dem. Runoff
Attorney Gerald Richman captured the Democratic nomination for the Miami- based 18th Congressional District seat by convincingly defeating Cuba-born Rosario Kennedy in a runoff Aug. 15, 61%-39%. He will face Cuban lleana Ros-Lehtinen, former Florida state senator, in an Aug. 29 general election.
President Bush, Vice President Quayle and Republican National Committee Chairman Lee Atwater all have visited Miami to campaign for Ros-Lehtinen. Atwater stirred much negative reaction in the community by stat-
ing that the seat should go to a Cuban-American.
Richman, a former Florida State Bar Association president who had said repeatedly he was running for "an American seat," received 14,414 votes to Kennedy’s 9,226.
In a Republican runoff between two Cuban-Americans for Florida House District 110 in Miami, Miguel De Grandy defeated Justo Pozo, 61%-39%. De Grandy will face Democrat John Walters in the Aug. 29 general election.
LUJAN
listed in stable condition
Voter Participation Hinges on Issues
Latino Catholic School Students Shine in Reading Tests
Hispanic students in Catholic schools outperform their Latino peers Although Hispanics, blacks and whites in Catholic schools consistent-in public schools on reading proficiency tests and by the 11th grade |y outscored students from those groups in public schools, the report outscore Anglos enrolled in public schools, according a report released found the greatest differences among Latinos.
Aug. 9.
The report, by the National Catholic Education Association, compared the average reading scores of third, seventh and 11th graders in public and Catholic schools. It found that Latino Catholic students in the third grade scored 7% higher than their counterparts in public schools while those in the seventh grade scored roughly 15% higher. By the time the students were measured in the 11th grade, the ones attending Catholic schools scored 16% higher.
The report, based on National Assessment of Educational Progress test scores, stated that the results could not be based entirely on the quality of education at Catholic schools. It pointed out that Catholic school students traditionally come from families with higher socioeconomic and education levels, factors linked with greater academic achievement among students.
AVERAGE READING PROFICIENCY SCORES: 1985-1986
3rd Grade
7th Grade
Cath. Public
Schools Schools 50.2 43.8
48.8 44.9
54.1 49.9
Source: National Catholic Education Association’s"National Assessment of Education Progress Proficiency in Reading: 1985-86 — Catholic and Public Schools Compared*
Cath. Schools Hispanics 35.4 Blacks 35.1
Whites 41.2
Public
Schools
33.1
33.1 39.6
11th Grade
Cath.
Schools 59.0 55.2 60.5
Public
Schools
50.9 51.0
56.9


Phone Co. Over Bilingual Skills Pay
Workers Sue Calif.
By Rhonda Smith
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a class-action lawsuit against a California telephone service company Aug. 3 after receiving a complaint from an employee there that she was not being compensated for her bilingual skills.
According to the EEOC, if they win the suit, the ruling could potentially benefit thousands of bilingual workers nationwide.
The suit stems from Paula Soriano’s allegation that as a customer service representative in Fresno for the Contel Service Corporation, she is routinely given incoming calls from Spanish-speaking customers. Contel is the
third largest phone service provider in the California region.
According to Jim Hernandez, an EEOC investigator, "Contel measures its employees’ productivity by tallying the number of original calls each receives daily. Because the majority of the calls routed to Soriano do not originate with her, she did not receive credit for them." The end result for Soriano has been less than satisfactory job evaluations and threats of losing her job if she did not provide bilingual service for customers, charges the lawsuit.
The EEOC is seeking back pay and new job classifications for bilingual employees.
Douglas Farmer, EEOC trial attorney, said: "Contel is running a white-collar sweatshop by placing the obligation (of providing additional services) on the back of its bilingual employees."
Farmer said that the going rate for interpreters in the region is $60 to $70 per hour. "Contel is essentially searching for bilingual employees who can provide those services for free."
Gary Siniskalco, Contel’s attorney, responded: "The lawsuit is in error. Contel makes every effort to service its customers. Part of that service is for the employee to assist in whatever capacity necessary."
Dallas Group Confident Despite Remap
By Rhonda Smith
Undaunted by a 41,456 to 20,823 vote Aug. 12 in which Dallas voters chose to back a 10-4-1 City Council redistricting plan, a group of Hispanic and black community members remain hopeful that a lawsuit opposing the present plan will give them the final victory.
The 10-4-1 plan calls for 10 members to be elected in single-member districts and four others and the mayor to be elected at large. Under the present plan, eight council members are elected in single-member districts and three are elected at large.
The lawsuit stems from allegations by two black former City Council members that the city’s 8-3 charter system is discriminatory. According to Larry Duncan, co-chair of the Dallas
become alienated from the political process, study authors Maria Calvo and Steven Rosenstone, political scientists at the University of Michigan, found. They added that mobilization forces have an even greater effect on Hispanics than on non-Hispanics.
POLITICAL PARTICIPATION %
Activity Hisp. Non-Hisp.
Sign a petition 26.6 39.2
Attend a public meeting 18.9 19.9
Write a congressman 7.5 15.4
Give money to a party/candidate 3.3 9.3
Work for political party/candidate 2.1 4.8
Belong to a political club 2.4 3.2
Give money to a PAC 1.6 4.3
"In order to ensure greater Hispanic participation, various parties’ and non-partisan mobilization efforts should be concentrated in the areas where Hispanics can affect the outcome of elections," said Robert Brischetto, director of SVRI and editor of the study.
Some Latino elected officials questioned the low degree of Hispanic political involvement found in the survey. Among them was U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.), whose Los An-
Citizens for Democracy, a group opposed to both plans, "The judge has indicated he will review all plans that have been mentioned as possible options." This will most likely also include a 12-1 plan, which many Hispanics and blacks favor. The U.S. Justice Department must review any election system plans to ensure they do not dilute minority representation.
Eighteen percent of the Dallas population is Hispanic and 30% is black. Because of these percentages and how the city’s district lines are drawn, many Hispanics and blacks argued that their representation on the City Council was diluted. Nine whites, two blacks and no Hispanics presently serve on the council.
U.S. District Judge Jerry Buchmeyer has scheduled a Sept. 5 hearing date for the redistricting suit.
geles district is 68% Latino. "That sure doesn’t hold up in my district," he argued. "If it wasn’t for Hispanics voting, we wouldn’t be in office."
Lorraine Lee, vice president of Chicanos For La Causa, a Tucson, Ariz.-based affiliate of the National Council of La Raza, observed, "Large numbers of Hispanics are struggling economically and are not necessarily out there organizing things." She added that issues involving home and family tend to draw the most participation from Hispanics.
The study pointed to the number of noncitizen Latinos in the United States as a factor that stunts Hispanic political growth. The number of U.S. Hispanics of voting age in 1984 was 9.5 million, or 5.7% of the voting-age population. But only 6.2 million, or 4.0% of potential voters, were citizens.
The relative youth of the U.S. Hispanic population also contributes to its lower rates of political participation, according to the study. The proportion of voting-age Hispanics less than 30 years old was 38% in 1984, compared to 28% for non-Hispanics.
Pachon warned against comparing Hispanics with "a mythical, fully participating population. We mirror what is going on in society overall."
Chicago Latinos Register to Vote at Lowest Rates
The four Chicago council wards with the largest number of Hispanics had the highest percentage of unregistered voters, concluded a study released Aug. 9 by the Chicago Urban League.
Overall, the report found that 45,095 Hispanics of voting age in the 22nd, 25th, 26th and 31st wards were not registered. The wards, said the study, were a little more than half Latino. The 22nd and 25th wards were classified as Mexican and the 26th and 31 st as Puerto Rican. ANDRADE Together, the four interpret findings with caution wards had a VOting-age population of 115,691. Sixty-one percent of the people in these wards were registered. The rates of unregistered voters in the wards were:
25th — 43.1 % 22nd — 39.0%
31 st — 37.7% 26th — 37.3%
The city’s only Latino council members are in those wards—Jesus Garcia, 22nd, Juan Soliz, 25th, Luis Gutierrez, 26th, and Raymond Figueroa, 31st.
"For the first time, we are able to tell where registration efforts are to be targeted," said Marc Allen, voter registration specialist with the Chicago Urban League.
Despite the Latino figures, the report found that voter registration levels in Chicago are higher than the rest of the nation.
Juan Andrade, director of the Midwest/North-east Voter Registration Education Project, said the report’s findings for Hispanics must be interpreted with caution because they did not exclude ineligible undocumented immigrants. Andrade also pointed out that using the four wards as a benchmark presents an incomplete picture, because they comprise only 33% of the city’s Hispanic voters.
Family, Home Issues Draw Involvement
continued from page 1
2
Aug. 21,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Rhonda Smith
The Difference Between Hispanics and Blacks
SMITH
There’s a sweatshirt slogan floating the streets of Washington, D.C., that reads: "It’s a black thing, you wouldn’t understand.” For the wearer, I suspect it instills a sense of pride and exclusivity.
When I began working for a Hispanic news organization recently, I was unprepared for a question that has since become routine. And like that slogan, it disturbs me.
As a black reporter, I am periodically asked:
Why did you choose to work for a Hispanic news service? The implication and my muddled responses were a tremendous source of frustration until recently.
I attended the League of United Latin American Citizens’ 60th annual convention last month. It was while covering a workshop on AIDS — a disease that ties Hispanic and black concerns — that I found my answer.
A seemingly healthy Latino in the workshop matter of factly announced that he is dying of the disease. In his commentary about being gay, having AIDS and coming to grips with death, he explained that on his last birthday he returned home to Puerto Rico to tell his parents he had SI DA. He described how their refusal to accept this has caused him added pain. Without seeking pity, he also described how he has lost sight in his right eye as the disease slowly consumes him and how he will most likely go blind before he succumbs.
"To fight AIDS," he admonished, "we must also fight homophobia, sexism and classism." He acknowledged that because of the Hispanic community’s ties to the Catholic church, this wouldn’t be easy.
Black gays and lesbians have a parallel problem. To suggest that the Bible and homosexuality present blacks with a dilemma is a lot like calling Jesse Jackson soft-spoken.
Another panelist explained that in her work with Latino farm workers, she found that many are diagnosed with AIDS when the disease is in its final stages because they are not adequately informed about its symptoms and what preventive measures to take.
Alex Compagnet, president of SALUD, a Latino health organization in Washington, D.C., agreed: "Language is the Latino’s biggest problem. Sometimes there are no bilingual services or health materials for Latinos at risk."
Economics was cited as another factor. "Because many Hispanics and blacks cannot afford health insurance, they don’t go to see doctors regularly. Whites go once a year for a check up, blacks go when they’re sick and Latinos go when they’re almost dead," Compagnet said.
The statistics have become rote. As of June 1989, 15,271 Latino AIDS cases had been diagnosed. For blacks, it was 26,916. Latinos make up roughly 8% of this country and account for 15% of the AIDS cases. Blacks make up some 14% and account for 24% of the AIDS cases. Puerto Ricans, who comprise 12.7% of the Latino population in the continental United States, account for 50% of its Hispanic AIDS cases.
Employment discrimination is another area that blacks do not monopolize. At the convention, another panel discussed repercussions of the successful lawsuit Hispanic FBI agents filed against their employer. A black agent currently has a suit pending against the FBI. As with members of the black community, each panelist had developed coping mechanisms to deal with discrimination.
FBI AGENT BELIEVED IN TOOTH FAIRY
Matt Perez, who led and won the Latinos’ class-action suit, was angry that many fellow agents had lost the will to fight for their rights. "Three hundred and eleven out of 452 Latinos in the FBI stood with us initially. Today, the few here is all we have left," he said. The few there were less than 20.
Another Latino agent, who has a law degree, was disappointed in himself for believing in the tooth fairy. "I came to the FBI 17 years ago full of hope...with ideas that all agents would be treated equally." That, he added, was before his supervisor sat him down to explain that he had been reprimanded — off the record — for recommending a Hispanic agent for a promotion.
To the inquisitive who wonder why a black person would want to report for a news organization that pursues the Hispanic angle, I answer that journalism is a profession where good practitioners never stop learning or caring. I am learning about this country’s other major "minority” group — a growing population that when combined with blacks already makes up the majority in many of our largest metropolitan areas. I am learning every day that the differences between being black and being Hispanic, while distinct, are too minute to ask why.
(Rhonda Smith is a reporter with Hispanic News Link Service.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
WILLIE LIVES: The late Willie Velasquez taught his disciples well.
While Southwest Voter Research Institute staffers were busy in San Antonio last week readying their groundbreaking Hispanic political participation study for release, two key players on the Southwest Voter Registration Project’s California team were co-penning a provocative piece on reapportionment in the Aug. 14 Los Angeles Times.
Richard Martinez and Antonio Gonzalez updated Willie’s favorite "pave my streets first" theme adapted for the Golden State:
"The problem is that without local electoral victories, the 2.3-million-strong Latino adults eligible to vote (1.4 million are registered) will continue to look down their noses at state and federal elections.
"Simply put, when Latinos win local offices in proportion to their numbers, they develop a political infrastructure that turns out the Latino vote, nurtures new leaders, and allows Latinos to learn from and have an effect on the political process..."
The duo rekindled a battle that Velasquez was engaged in, when cancer took his life in June of 1988, with California Sen. Alan Cranston. Speaking to the National Association of Hispanic Journalists convention in Dallas in April ’88, Velasquez complained about a Cranston move to divert support funds from the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project to a new voter registration group, Citizens for Participation in Democracy, then headed by the senator’s son Kim.
"There is a battle building over who is going to deliver the Hispanic vote and for what reason," Velasquez had told the journalists. "It is unwise to have your political fate in someone else’s hands."
Andy Hernandez, who succeeded Velasquez as SVREP director, told Weekly Report after Willie’s death: "This is not a turf fight. It’s a question of whether or not (Hispanic political progress) is going to rest in its own institutions, in its own leadership, or in someone else’s good intentions."
In their article, Martinez and Gonzalez defined the difference:
"Unfortunately, the state Democratic Party and groups like Citizens for.Participation in Democracy continue to oppose, in practice, Latino empowerment. For example, the CPD, financially supported by Sen. Alan Cranston, competes directly with Latino leaders and organizations over the direction and scope of Latino politics.
"The Cranston-type approach sees Latinos as numbers to be cattle-called during state and federal elections and ignored the rest of the time. For them, voter registration means standing at a supermarket with a clipboard.
"In contrast, Latino organizations like the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project seek empowerment through door-to-door voter registration and education around an agenda defined by the community..."
No one gives up power willingly, particularly now that the public trust has become the public trough.
— KayBarbaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Aug. 21.1989


COLLECTING
CHICAGO VOTER REGISTRATION: "Who's Registered and Who’s Not: Targeting Voter Registration in Chicago" is a 17-page report that finds that while registration in Chicago is higher than elsewhere in the nation, four of the eight City Council wards with the lowest registration are primarily Hispanic. For a free copy, contact the Chicago Urban League, 4510 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60653 (312) 285-5800.
POLITICAL PARTICIPATION: "Hispanic Political Participation" is a 27-page report that examines political involvement among Hispanic subgroups. In addition to comparing the subgroups by education, gender, employment status and income, the report compares Hispanics with non-Hispanics. For a copy send $5 to the Southwest Voter Research Institute, 430 E. Commerce, Suite 260, San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 222-8014.
CATHOLIC SCHOOLS READING SCORES: "National Assessment of Educational Progress Proficiency in Reading: 1985-86 — Catholic and Public Schools Compared" finds that the most pronounced differences in reading scores between public and Catholic school students occur among Hispanics. For a copy of the 36-page publication, send $5 to the National Catholic Education Association, 1077 30th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 337-6232.
HISPANICS IN JTPA: "Services to Hispanics in JTPA: Implications for the System," a 31-page report by the National Commission for Employment Policy’s Carol Jusenius Romero, looks at Hispanic participation in the Job Training Partnership Act and reasons for their underrepresentation. For a free copy, contact NCEP at 1522 K St. NW, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 393-7415.
HISPANIC MIGRATION: "Hispanic Migration and Population Redistribution in the United States" finds that internal Hispanic migration from states such as California and New York is offset by Latino immigrants from abroad going into these states. For a free copy of the 19-page report by Arizona State University geography professor Kevin McHugh, contact McHugh at ASU, Geography Department, Tempe, Ariz. 85287-0104 (602) 965-7533.
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES: The spring/summer issue of California Tomorrow examines the problems incurred by a multiracial population in receiving culturally sensitive mental health services. The 45-page issue also includes a pictorial essay on recurring nightmares among Salvadoran immigrants about their war-torn country. To subscribe make a contribution of $25 or more to California Tomorrow, Fort Mason Center, Building B, San Francisco, Calif. 94123 (415) 441-7631.
CONNECTING
GROUP RECEIVES $9.6 MILLION The Asociacidn NacionalPro Personas Mayores received a $9.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor to develop about 2,000 part-time community service jobs, Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole has announced.
The money, part of $343.8 million in grants distributed nationally, will support jobs for low-income workers 55 years and older. Some 66,000 jobs will be created across the country in activities such as day care, hospital care, programs for the handicapped, literacy and conservation projects.
Clients placed will be given annual physical examinations, personal and job-related counseling, and job training.
FUND-RAISER PROVES SUCCESSFUL Two concerts held Aug. 2 in Los Angeles’ Biltmore Bowl raised more than $80,000 for programs to combat the high Hispanic high school dropout rate.
Participating in the concerts were Ruben Blades and Son de Solar, Celia Cruz, Jerry Garcia, Esteban ‘Steve’ Jordan, Los Camperos, Millie P., Tito Puente, Linda Ronstadt, Poncho Sanchez, Carlos Santana and Daniel Valdez. The event was sponsored by the National Hispanic Arts, Education and Media Institute.
The concerts will be broadcast this November by the pay-cable network Cinemax.
SUGGESTION BOX SET UP
Detroit’s Wayne State University will award at least $20,000 for four ideas that make the university more attractive to Hispanics, blacks and other minorities and women.
The effort, called the President’s Award for Affirmative Action Program, is open to students, faculty and staff.
INS AND OUTS
The Latino Rights Project, a non-profit, civil rights group, is seeking information about police brutality and racial violence against Hispanics in the United States. To report instances of abuse or violence or to seek assistance, contact the Latino Rights Project at P.O. Box 3295, Church Street Station, New York, N.Y. 10008-3295 (212) 614-5396...The Entertainment Industries Council extends the deadline for its Sing Out Against AIDS song contest to Sept. 1. The contest, open to Spanish- and English-language entries, is designed to warn youth about the dangers of intravenous drug use and its link to AIDS. For more information contact the council at 444 Riverside Drive, Suite 203, Burbank, Calif. 91505 (818) 841-9933...
Calendar_______________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
MARCH ANNIVERSARY San Diego Aug. 18-26
A host of organizations, including Centro Aztian, Par-tido Nacional La Raza Unida and East County Latino Association, will be hosting activities com-
memorating the 19th anniversary of the Chicano Moratorium March in Los Angeles. Among the events are film screenings, a tardeada and a rally. Carlos Pelayo (619) 422-4520
COMING SOON
GOLF/TENNIS TOURNAMENT Latin Business Association City of Industry, Calif. Aug. 28 Dianne Pasillas (213) 721-4000 BUSINESS CONVENTION U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce New Orleans Sept. 6-10 Maxine Weber (816) 531-6363 PRESIDENTIAL TRIBUTE National Hispanic Presidential Tribute Gala Committee
Washington, D.C. Sept. 12 Susan Gonzales (202) 662-1355
MARKETING CONFERENCE Hispanic Business magazine Los Angeles Sept. 12-14 Lysa Kessman (805) 682-5843 FUND-RAISER
Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Washington, D.C. Sept. 13 Uliana Navia (202) 543-1771 RECEPTION
Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey Basking Ridge, N.J. Sept. 13 Wanda Garcia (609) 757-6346 FASHION SHOW Hispanic Designers Inc.
Washington, D.C. Sept. 14
Ivette Ruiz (202) 452-0092
RECEPTION
Latino Institute
Chicago Sept. 21
Ada Gonz&lez (312) 663- 3603
4
Aug. 21,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
ARLINGTON COUNTY VIRGINIA
BUDGET DIRECTOR
Ann. No. 0442-0A-DMF Salary: Negotiable from $55,000
Arlington County is looking for a results-oriented manager to provide creative, technical leadership for the Management and Budget Section of the Department of Management and Finance. Functions of the Section include preparation of the County’s annual operating budget (currently $380 million) and the six-year capital improvement program (currently $305.8 million); monitoring budget execution; analyzing line-agency program efficiency and effectiveness; tax policy analysis; in-terjurisdictional liaison and managing capital financing programs. Will supervise nine professional budget analysts in a complex computerized environment. Position requires frequent interaction with other County agencies, the County Manager, the elected County Board, and press, civic, and business groups. This is a busy, fast paced environment which will require the Director to balance numerous priorities and complete assignments within established time frames.
Requires BS in related field and five years highly responsible experience in federal, state or local government budgeting including two years experience as a supervisor, team leader, or project leader.
See official announcement for more information and desirable qualifications.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. RESUMES SUBMITTED WITHOUT A COMPLETED OFFICIAL ARLINGTON COUNTY APPLICATION FORM WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Applications must be received in the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 pm on SEPTEMBER 14,1989. To request application material please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE/MFH
WRITER
Information Editor III
News writer/editor at Stanford News Service. Function as general assignment reporter, writing news and feature stories about Stanford. Answer press queries. Help in editorial production of news-oriented publications.
QUALIFICATIONS: Proven journalistic ability in writing, editing. Newspaper experience helpful. Excellent command of English grammar and spelling. Ability to work under extreme deadline pressure.
To apply, send resume, including names of three people familiar with your qualifications and willing to act as references, along with a letter describing the basis of your interest and approximately six samples of original news-related writing to: Enelda Wade, #52829-HL, Stanford News Service, Press Courtyard, Santa Teresa St., Stanford, Calif. 94305-2245.
DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 11, 1989.
Stanford has a strong institutional commitment to the principle of diversity. We are interested in receiving applications from a broad spectrum of people, including women, members of ethnic minorities and individuals with disabilities.

MALDEF
EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM DIRECTOR (ATTORNEY)
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Small federal commission is searching for an Executive with experience in migrant education. Advanced degree in education preferred.
Salary to GS-18, $75,500.
To apply send resume no later than Sept. 8, 1989 to:
National Commission on Migrant Education GSA-WBBE 7th and D Streets NW _______Washington, D.C. 20407____
Stanford
________University________
NAHJJOB EXCHANGE
Employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media. Opportunities for internships, entry level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English or Spanish language. Contact: Jocelyn Cordova, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Washington, D.C. (202) 783-6228.
National civil rights organization seeks attorney with 5 years employment litigation and management experience to head Employment Program. Active bar membership. Will be required to pass California Bar. Resume, salary requirements and writing sample to:
Anita Vigil
MALDEF 634 S. Spring St.
11th Floor
Los Angeles, Calif. 90014
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES:
90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Ordered by'________
Organization_______
Street_____________
City, State & Zip__
Area Code & Phone
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report
Aug. 21.1989


Arts & Entertainment
WRITERS UNITE: The formation of a Latino Writers Group was announced in Hollywood earlier this month to help increase the wage and scale opportunities for Hispanic authors within the film and television industries.
The LWG is a joint project of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences and the Nosotros actors group, created in response to a study on minority writers by Writers Guild of America, West.
At an Aug. 9 press briefing, LWG leadership announced a three-point plan to address the inequities found in the study. The group intends to provide workshops and seminars, form a lobbying Latino writers caucus and utilize Hispanic capital to develop and fund Latino entertainment projects.
The LWG is co-chaired by Jose Tirado and Kurt Mac Karley.
IT’S THE PITS: Three of this year’s recipients of the Golden Pit Awards were cited for insulting and offensive treatment of Latinos in the media.
Each was given a gold spray-painted peach pit attached to a ribbon draped over a Styrofoam head. Among the 12 winners:
• WAVA Radio in Washington, D.C., for its Morning Zoo hosts Don Geronimo and Mike O’Meara’s references to a "greasy" Gloria Estefan,
• the film Spike of Bensonhurst for Italian and Puerto Rican stereotypes, and
• the film Licence to Kill for portrayals of a Hispanic drug kingpin (played by Robert Davi) and his Latina girlfriend (Talisa Soto).
The awards were announced in New York Aug. 9 by the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations.
ON THE NATIONAL STAGE: Following is a selection of theater offerings by Latino companies coast to coast:
In California the Los Angeles Theater Center continues its New Voices in Latino Theatre series with a reading of The Inheritance, by Eulalia Cervantes, on Aug. 24 and 25. El Teatro Campesino in San Juan Bautista continues its presentation of the musical The Rose of the Rancho, by David Belasco and Richard Walton Tully, through Sept. 23.
Miami’s Teatro Avance begins previews of Mario Vargas Llosa’s La Chunga Aug. 24, at the city’s Minorca Playhouse.
New York’s RepertorioEspahol company continues its summer run of Spanish-language comedies at the Gramercy Theater with La nonna, Padre Gomez y Santa Cecilia and Cafe con leche.
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
AD FIRM ANNOUNCES MERGER: San Antonio-based Sosa & Associates, the nation’s largest Hispanic-owned advertising firm, agreed Aug. 3 to merge with advertising firm D’Arcy, Macius, Benton & Bowles USA.
The New York-based firm, which billed $1.6 billion in 1988, acquired 49% of Sosa’s corporate interests for an undisclosed sum and brings a client list that includes Anheuser-Busch, Burger King, General Motors, NBC and Paramount. Founded in 1981 by Lionel Sosa, Sosa & Associates currently bills $40 million yearly and serves such clients as Coca-Cola USA, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, GTE and Westinghouse.
EXPLORING NEEDS OF YOUTH: California-based network Radio Bilingue will present a series titled Immigrant Children in the Public Schools. It will explore the challenges faced by students, parents, schools and communities as a result of the growing presence
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina.
Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
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of immigrant children in the public school system.
The series consists of eight 60-minute panel discussions, four in English and four in Spanish, with call-in questions from throughout the nation. The programs will be available for national distribution on the public radio satellite system as well as on tape. Broadcast dates are Aug. 26, Sept. 30, Oct. 28 and Nov. 25.
For more information contact Samuel Orozco at 1111 Fulton Mall, Suite 700, Fresno, Calif., 93721 (209) 486-5174.
EXPLORING NEEDS OF AGED: The American Association of Retired Persons recently introduced Jubilacidn, a Spanish-language news and information radio program. Topics will include health, retirement planning and Social Security. The show will air weekdays in 90-second segments over 40 Spanish-language stations across the U.S. mainland and Puerto Rico.
CPB BOOSTS DIVERSITY: As a result of federal legislation passed last year, the Cor-
poration for Public Broadcasting will allocate an additional $3 million for minority television programming for each of the next three years.
The National Alliance for Programming Diversity, a group of five public broadcasting consortia representing Hispanic, black, Asian American, Pacific Islander and Native American groups, will assist in directing the funds toward generating national prime-time programming by and about minorities.
NOTABLE: Chicago-based Burrell Public Relations Inc., the country’s largest minority-owned public relations agency, has established a Hispanic marketing division. It will be headed by Myrna Gutierrez...Greater Media Inc., a nationwide radio, publishing and cable TV company based in East Brunswick, N.J., has announced the selection of Caroline Banez of Yonkers, N.Y., as its 1989-90 Minority Intern in Media Careers. Banez will receive from the company a $5,000 cash stipend as well as a one-year salaried employment contract.
— Danilo Alfaro


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Making The News This Week President Bush, Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos and federal drug czar William Bennett meet with 15 drug abuse professionals at the White House to discuss Bennett's anti-drug abuse plan. Paul i cardenas, alcohol and drug abuse project director at the National Coali tion of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, and Philip Diaz, associate director of Rockland Community Health Center in New York, attended ... Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) includes Phoenix Superior Court Judge Gloria Ybarra, 36, on a list of four people sent to Presi dent Bush to fill a vacant U.S. District Court seat ... Boston University offers the superintendent of schools post in Chelsea to Boston school administrator Diana Lam. The Chelsea school district, 65% Hispanic, was ceded to the university because of poor management ... News reports l ist U .S. District Judge Raul Ramirez of as a con tender to become the National Football League commtsstoner ... Former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros agrees to serve as co-chair of state Rep . Dan Morales' campaign for Texas attorney general ... Dade County, Fla., schools Superintendent Joseph Fernandez says no to offers to become chancellor for New York City public schools ... New York Mayor Ed Koch and mayoral candidate David Dinkins join hundreds of people in a funeral procession for Maria Hernandez, 34-year-old mother of three. She was presumably slain in her Brooklyn apartment by drug dealers retaliating for her husband's efforts to make the neighborhood drug free ... Vol. 7 No. 33 I PORT1 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Ed Lujan Enters Hospital After Heart Attack Strikes Voter Participation Hinges on Issues Edward Lujan, brother of Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan and a prospective candidate for New Mexico governor in 1990, was transferred by helicopter Aug. 15 from a Colorado hospi tal to one in Albuquerque, N.M., after suffering a heart attack Aug. 1 o . . By Danilo Alfaro While Hispanic participation in various aspects of the country ' s political process is sig nificantly lower than that of nonHispanics , the right issues, candidates or mobilization efforts can and do spur Hispanics to action , according to a study scheduled for release this week by the Southwest Voter Research Institute in San Antonio. The study, " Hispanic Political Participation," examined rates of Hispanic involvement in the political process . Among its findings : • 5.4% of Hispanics attended political meet ings or rallies, compared to 8.4% of non Hispanics. • During election time, 22.3% of Hispanics reported attempting to influence the votes of others , compared to 28.7% of non Hispanics. "Given the low economic conditions ; with ap proximately 25% of Hispanics at or below the poverty level, it is not surprising that we do lag behind in the traditional forms of political ex pression in the United States," Harry Pach6n, director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officals, told Weekly Report. Among Hispanics, mobilization efforts are likely to have the greatest inipact on the most disenfranchised individuals, those who have cont i nued on page 2 Lujan was vacation ing in Glenwood Springs, Colo., when the attack occurred one day before his 57th birthday. The chairman of the New Mexico Republican Party from May 1983 to January 1988, Lujan was in stable LUJAN Richman Bests Kennedy in Runoff condition, according listed in stable condition to a spokeswoman for Presbyterian Hospital. He was to undergo tests beginning late last week to determine the extent of the damage. Lujan works at his family's insurance business in Albuquerque. Secretary Lujan, who visited his younger brother in Colorado immediately following the attack, underwent triple bypass heart surgery in 1986 . Attorney Gerald Richman captured the Democratic nomination for the Miamibased 18th Congressional District seat by convinc ingly defeating Cuba-born Rosario Kennedy in a runoff Aug. 15, 61%-39%. He will face Cuban Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, former Florida state senator, in an Aug. 29 general election. President Bush, Vice President Quayle and Republican National Committee Chairman Lee Atwater all have visited Miami to cam paign for Ros-Lehtinen. Atwater stirred much negative reaction in the community b'y stat-ing that the seat should go to a Cuban American. Richman, a former Florida State Bar As sociation president who had said repeatedly he was running for "an American seat, .. received 14,414 votes to Kennedy's 9,226 . In a Republican runoff between two Cuban Americans for Florida House District 110 in Miami, Miguel De Grandy defeated Justo Pozo, 61%-39%. De Grandy will face Democrat John Walters in the Aug. 29 general election. Latino Catholic School Students Shine in Reading Tests Hispanic students in Catholic schools outperform their Latino peers in public schools on reading proficiency tests and by the 11th grade outscore Anglos enrolled in public schools, accoLding a report released Aug. 9. The report, by the National Catholic Education Association, compared the average reading scores of third, seventh and 11th graders in public and Catholic schools. It found that Latino Catholic students in the third grade . scored 7% higher than their counterparts in public schools while those in the seventh grade scored roughly 15% higher. By the time the students were measured in the 11th grade, the ones attending Catholic schools scored 16% higher. The report, based on National Assessment of Educational Progress test scores, stated that the results could not be based entirely on the quality of education at Catholic schools. It pointed out that Catholic school students traditionally come from families with higher socioeconomic and education levels, factors linked with greater academic achievement among students. Although Hispanics, blacks and whites in Catholic schools consistently outscored students from . those groups in public schools, the report found the greatest differences among Latinos. AVERAGE READING PROFICIENCY SCORES: 1985-1986 3rd Grade 7th Grade 11th Grade Cat h. Public Cat h. Public Cat h. Public Schools Schools Schools Schools Schools Schools Hispanics 35.4 33. 1 50.2 43.8 59.0 50.9 Blacks 35.1 33. 1 48.8 44.9 55.2 51.0 Whites 41.2 39.6 54. 1 49.9 60.5 56 . 9 Source: National Catholic Education Association's "National Assessment of Education Progress Proficiency in Reading: 1985-86 Catholic and Public Schools Compared"

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Workers Sue Calif. Phone Co. Over Bilingual Skills Pay By Rhonda Smith third largest phone service provider in the Douglas Farmer, EEOC trial attorney, said: The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity California region. "Contel is running a white-collar sweatshop Commission filed a class-action lawsuit According to Jim Hernandez, an EEOC in-by placing the obligation (of providing addi against a California telephone service comvestigator, "Contel measures its employees' tional services) on the back of its bilingual pany Aug. 3 after receiving a complaint from productivity by tallying the number of original employees . " an employee there that she was not being calls each receives daily. Because the Farmer said that the going rate for inter compensated for her bilingual skills. majority of the calls routed to Soriano do not preters in the region is $60 to $70 per hour. According to the EEOC, if they win the suit, originate with her, she did not receive credit "Contel is essentially searching for bilingual the ruling could potentially benefit thousands for them." The end result for Soriano has employees who can provide those services of bilingual workers nationwide. been less than satisfactory job evaluations for free." The suit stems from Paula Soriano's allegaand of losing. her job if she did not Gary Siniskalco, Contel's attorney, tion that as a customer service representative provide service for customers, charresponded: "The lawsuit is in error. Contel in Fresno for the Contel Service Corporation, ges the lawsuit. makes every effort to service its customers. she routinely given incoming calls. from is back pay and new job Part of that service is for the employee to asSpanish-speaking customers. Contel 1s the class1f1cat1ons for b1l1ngual employees. sist in whatever capacity necessary." Dallas Group Confident Despite Remap By Rhonda Smith Undaunted by a 41 ,456 to 20,823 vote Aug. 12 in which Dallas voters chose to back a 1 04-1 City Council redistricting plan , a group of Hispanic and black community members remain hopeful that a lawsuit opposing the present plan will give them the final victory. The 10-4-1 plan calls for 10 members to be elected in single-member districts and four others and the mayor to be elected at large . Under the present plan, eight council members are elected in single-member districts and three are elected at large. The lawsuit stems from allegations by two black former City Council members that the city's 8-3 charter system is discriminatory. Ac cording to Larry Duncan, co-chair of the Dallas Citizens for Democracy , a group opposed to both plans, "The judge has indicated he will review all plans that have been mentioned as possible options . " This will most likely also in clude a 12 1 plan, which many Hispanics and blacks favor. The U. S . Justice Department must review any election system plans to en sure they do not dilute minority representation . Eighteen percent of the Dallas population is Hispanic and 30% is black. Because of these percentages and how the city ' s district lines are drawn, many Hispanics and blacks argued that their representation on the City Council was diluted . Nine whites, two blacks and no Hispanics presently serve on the council. U .S. District Judge Jerry Buchmeyer has scheduled a Sept. 5 hearing date for the redistricting suit. Family, Home Issues Draw Involvement continued from page 1 become alienated from the political process, study authors Marfa Calvo and Steven Rosenstone, political scientists at the Univer sity of Michigan, found. They added that mobilization forces have an even greater effect on Hispanics than on non-Hispanics. POLITICAL PARTICIPATION% Activity Hisp. Non-Hisp. Sign a petition 26.6 39.2 Attend a public meeting 18.9 19.9 Write a congressman 7.5 15.4 Give money to a party/candidate 3.3 9.3 Work for political party/candidate 2.1 4.8 Belong to a political club 2.4 3 . 2 Give money to a PAC 1.6 4.3 "In order to ensure greater Hispanic participa tion, various parties' and non-partisan mobilization efforts should be concentrated in the areas where Hispanics can affect the out come of elections," said Robert Brischetto, director of SVRI and editor of the study. Some Latino elected officials questioned the low degree of Hispanic political involvement found in the survey. Among them was U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal (0-Calif.), whose Los An-2 geles district is 68% Latino. "That sure doesn't hold up in my d . istrict, .. he argued. "If it wasn't for Hispanics voting, we wouldn't be in office." Lorraine Lee, vice president of Chicanos Por La Causa, a Tucson, Ariz.-based affiliate of the Nationa l Council of La Raza, observed, "Large numbers of Hispanics are struggling economi cally and are not necessarily out there organizing things... She added that issues involving home and family tend to draw the most par ticipation from Hispanics. The study pointed to the number of non citizen Latinos in the United States as a factor that stunts Hispanic political growth. The num ber of U.S. Hispanics of voting age in 1984 was 9.5 million, or 5. 7% of the voting-age popula tion. But only 6.2 million, or 4.0% of potential voters, were citizens. The relative youth of the U.S. Hispanic population also contributes to its lower rates of political participation, according to the study. The proportion of voting-age Hispanics less than 30 years old was 38% in 1984, compared to 28% for non-Hispanics. Pach6n warned against comparing Hispanics with "a mythical, fully participating population. We mirror what is going on in society overall." Aug.21, 1989 Chicago Latinos Register to Vote at Lowest Rates The four Chicago council wards with the largest number of Hispanics had the highest percentage of unregistered voters, concluded a study released Aug. 9 by the Chicago Urban League . Overall, the report found that 45,095 Hispanics of voting age in the 22nd, 25th, 26th and 31st wards were not registered. The wards, said the study, were a little more than half Latino. The 22nd and 25th wards were classified as Mexican and the 26th and 31st as Puerto Rican. . ANDRADE Together, the four interpret findings with caution wards had a votingage population of 115,691. Sixty-one percent of the people in these wards were registered . The rates of unregistered voters in the wards were: 25th-43.1% 31st-37.7% 22nd39.0% 26th-37.3% The city's only Latino council members are in those wardsJesus Garda, 22nd, Juan Soliz, 25th, Luis Gutierrez, 26th, and Raymond Figueroa, 31st. "For the first time, we are able to tell where registration efforts are to be targeted, .. said Marc Allen, voter registration specialist with the Chicago Urban League. Despite the Latino figures, the report found that voter registration levels in Chicago are higher than the rest of the nation. Juan Andrade, director of the Midwest/North east Voter Registration Education Project, said the report's findings for Hispanics must be interpreted with caution because they did not exclude ineligible undocumented immigrants. Andrade also pointed out that using the four wards as a benchmark presents an incomplete picture, because they comprise only 33% of the city's Hispanic voters. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Rhonda Smith The Difference Between Hispanics and Blacks There's a sweatshirt slogan floating the streets of Washington, D.C., that reads: "It's a black thing, you wouldn't understand." For the wearer, I suspect it instills a sense of pride and exclusivity. When I began working for a Hispanic news organization recently, I was unprepared for a question that has since become routine. And like that slogan, it disturbs me. As a black reporter, I am periodically asked: Why did you choose to work for a Hispanic news service? The implication and my muddled responses were a tremendous source of frustra tion until recently. I attended the League of United Latin American Citizens' 60th annual convention last month. It was while covering a workshop on AI OS -a disease that ties Hispanic and black concerns-that I found my answer. A seemingly healthy Latino in the workshop SMITH matter of factly announced that he is dying of the disease. In his com mentary about being gay, having AIDS and coming to grips with death, he explained that on his last birthday he returned home to Puerto Rico to tell his parents he had SIDA. He described how their refusal to ac cept t.his has caused him added pain. Without seeking pity, he also descnbed how he has lost sight in his right eye as the disease slowly consumes him and how he will most likely go blind before he suc cumbs. "To fight AIDS," he admonished, "we must also fight homophobia, sexism and classism." He acknowledged that because of the Hispanic community's ties to the Catholic church, this wouldn't be easy. Black gays and lesbians have a parallel problem. To suggest that the Bible and homosexuality present blacks with a dilemma is a lot like call ing Jesse Jackson soft-spoken. Another panelist explained that in her work with Latino farm workers, she found that many are diagnosed with AIDS when the disease is in its final stages because they are not adequately informed about its symptoms and what preventive measures to take. Alex Compagnet, president of SALUD, a Latino health organization in Washington, D. C., agreed: "Language is the Latino's biggest problem. Sometimes there are no bilingual services or health materials for Latinos at risk." Sin pelos en Ia lengua WILLIE LIVES: The late Willie Velasquez taught his disciples well. While Southwest Voter Research Institute staffers were busy in San Antonio last week readying their groundbreaking Hispanic political participation study for release, two key players on the Southwest Voter Registration Project's California team were co-penning a provocative piece on reapportionment in the Aug. 14 Los Angeles Times. Richard Martinez and Antonio Gonzalez updated Willie's favorite "pave my streets first" theme adapted for the Golden State: "The problem is that without local electoral victories, the 2.3-million strong Latino adults eligible to vote (1.4 million are registered} will con tinue to look down their noses at state and federal elections. "Simply put, when Latinos win local offices in proportion to their num bers, they develop a political infrastructure that turns out the Latino vote, nurtures new leaders, and allows Latinos to learn from and have an effect on the political process ... " The duo rekindled a battle that Velasquez was engaged in, when can cer took his life in June of 1988, with California Sen. Alan Cranston. Speaking to the National Association of Hispanic Journalists conven tion in Dallas in April '88, Velasquez complained about a Cranston move to divert support funds from the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project to a new voter registration group, Citizens for Par ticipation in Democracy, then headed by the senator's son Kim. Economics was cited as another factor. "Because many Hispanics and blacks cannot afford health insurance, they don't go to see doctors regularly. Whites go once a year for a check up, blacks go when they're sick and Latinos go when they're almost dead," Compagnet said. The statistics have become rote. As of June 1989, 15,271 Latino AIDS cases had been diagnosed. For blacks, it was 26,916. Latinos make up roughly 8% of this country and account for 15% of the AI OS cases. Blacks make up some 14% and account for 24% of the AIDS cases. Puerto Ricans, who comprise 12.7% of the Latino population in the continental United States, account for 50% of its Hispanic AIDS cases. Employment discrimination is another area that blacks do not monop olize. At the convention, another panel discussed repercussions of the successful lawsuit Hispanic FBI agents filed against their employer. A black agent currently has a suit pending against the FBI. As with mem bers of the black community, each panelist had developed coping mechanisms to deal with discrimination. FBI AGENT BELIEVED IN TOOTH FAIRY Matt Perez, who led and won the Latinos' class-action suit, was angry that many fellow agents had lost the will to fight for their rights. "Three hundred and eleven out of 452 Latinos in the FBI stood with us initial ly. Today, the few here is all we have left, .. he said. The few there were less than 20. Another Latino agent, who has a law degree, was disappointed in him self for believing in the tooth fairy. ..I came to the FBI 17 years ago full of hope ... with ideas that all agents would be treated equally." That, he added, was before his supervisor sat him down to explain that he had been reprimanded off the record for recommending a Hispanic agent for a promotion. To the inquisitive who wonder why a black person would want to report for a news organization that pursues the Hispanic angle, I answer that journalism is a profession where good practitioners never stop learning or caring. I am learning about this country's other major .. minority" group -a growing population that when combined with blacks already makes up the majority in many of our largest metropolitan areas. I am learn ing every day that the differences between being black and being Hispanic, while distinct, are too minute to ask why. (Rhonda Smith is a reporter with Hispanic News Link Service.) "There is a battle building over who is going to deliver the Hispanic vote and for what reason, .. Velasquez had told the journalists. "It is un wise to have your political fate in someone else's hands ... Andy Hernandez, who succeeded Velasquez as SVREP director, told Report after Willie's death: .. This is not a turf fight. It's a ques tion of whether or not (Hispanic political progress) is going to rest in its own institutions, in its own leadership, or in someone else's good intentions ... In their article, Martfnez and Gonzalez defined the difference: ..Unfortunately, the state Democratic Party and groups like Citizens for.Participation in Democracy continue to oppose, in practice, Latino empowerment. For example, the CPO, financially supported by Sen. Cranston, .competes directly with Latino leaders and organiza tions over the d1rect1on and scope of Latino politics. "The Cranston-type approach sees Latinos as numbers to be cattle called during state and federal elections and ignored the rest of the time. For them, voter registration means standing at a supermarket with a clipboard. "In contrast, Latino organizations like the Southwest Voter Registra tion Education Project seek empowerment through door-to-door voter registration and education around an agenda defined by the com munity ... " No one gives up power willingly, particularly now that the public trust has become the public trough. -Kay Barbaro Hispanic Link Weekly Report Aug.21, 1989 3 I

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COLLECTING CHICAGO VOTER REGISTRATION: "Who's Registered and Who's Not: Targeting Voter Registration in Chicago" is a 17-page report that finds that while registration in Chicago is higher than elsewhere in the nation, four of the eight City Council wards with the lowest registration are primarily Hispanic. For a free copy, contact the Chicago Urban League, 4510 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60653 (312) 285-5800. POLITICAL PARTICIPATION: "Hispanic Political Participation" is a 27 -page report that examines political involvement among Hispanic subgroups . In addition to comparing the subgroups by education, gender, employment status and income, the report compares Hispanics with non Hispanics . For a copy send $5 to the Southwest Voter Research Institute, 430 E. Commerce, Suite 260, San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 222-8014. CATHOLIC SCHOOLS READING SCORES: "National Assessment of Educational Progress Proficiency in Reading: 1985-86 Catholic and Public Schools Compared" finds that the most pronounced dif ferences in reading scores between public and Catholic school stu dents occur among Hispanics. For a copy of the 36-page publication, send $5 to the National Catholic Education Association, 1 077 30th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20007 (202) 337-6232. HISPANICS IN JTPA: "Services to Hispanics in JTPA: Implications for the System," a 31-page report by the National Commission for Employment Policy's Carol Jusenius Romero, looks at Hispanic par ticipation in the Job Training Partnership Act and reasons for their un derrepresentation. For a free copy, contact NCEP at 1522 K St. NW, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 393-7415. HISPANIC MIGRATION: "Hispanic Migration and Population Redistribution in the United States" finds that internal Hispanic migra tion from states such as California and New York is offset by Latino im migrants from abroad going into these states. For a free copy of 19-page report by Arizona State University geography professor Kev1n McHugh, contact McHugh at ASU, Geography Department, Tempe, Ariz. 85287-01 04 (602) 965-7533. MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES: The spring/summer issue of Califor nia Tomorrow examines the problems incurred by a multiracial popula tion in receiving culturally sensitive mental health services. The . 45-page issue also includes a pictorial essay on recurring nightmares among Salvadoran immigrants about their war-torn country . To sub scribe make a contribution of $25 or more to California Tomorrow, Fort Mason Center, Building B, San Francisco, Calif. 94123 (415) 441-7631 . I CONNECTING I GROUP RECEIVES $9.6 MILLION TheAsociaci6n Nacional Pro Personas Mayores received a $9 . 6 mil lion grant from the U .S. Department of Labor to develop . about 2, 000 part-time community service jobs, Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole has announced. The money, part of $343 . 8 million in grants distributed nationally, will support jobs for low-income workers 55 years and older. Some 66,000 jobs will be created across the country in activities such as day care, hospital care, programs for the handicapped, literacy and conserva tion projects. Clients placed will be given annual physical examinations, personal and job-related counseling, and job training. FUND-RAISER PROVES SUCCESSFUL Two concerts held Aug. 2 in Los Angeles' Biltmore Bowl raised more than $80,000 for programs to combat the high Hispanic high dropout rate. Participating in the concerts were Ruben Blades and Son de Celia Cruz, Jerry Garcfa, Esteban 'Steve' Jordan, Los Camperos, Mil lie P., Tito Puente, Linda Ronstadt, Poncho Sanchez, Carlos Santana and Daniel Valdez. The event was sponsored by the National Hispanic Arts, Education and Media Institute. The concerts will be broadcast this November by t:1e pay-cable net work Cinemax. SUGGESTION BOX SET UP Detroit's Wayne State University will award at least $20,000 for four ideas that make the university more attractive to Hispanics, blacks and other minorities and women. The effort, called the President's Award for Affirmative Action Program, is open to students, faculty and staff. INS AND OUTS The Latino Rights Project, a non-profit, civil rights group, is seeking information about police brutality and racial violence against Hispanics in the United States. To report insta . nces of abuse or violence or to seek assistance, contact the Latino Rights Project at P.O. Box 3295, Church Street Station, New York, N.Y. 10008-3295 (212) 614-5396 ... The Entertainment Industries Council extends the deadline for its Sing Out Against AIDS song contest to Sept. 1 . The contest, open to Spanishand English-language entries, is designed to warn youth about the dangers of intravenous drug use and its link to AIDS . For more information contact the council at 444 Riverside Drive, Suite 203, Burbank, Calif. 91505 (818) 841-9933 ... Calendar TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. memorating the 19th anniversary of the Chicano Moratorium March in Los Angeles. Among the events are film screenings, a tardeada and a rally. Carlos Pelayo (619) 422-4520 MARKETING CONFERENCE Hispanic Business magazine Los Angeles Sept. 12-14 Lysa Kessman (805) 682-5843 THIS WEEK MARCH ANNIVERSARY San Diego Aug. 18-26 A host of organizations, including Centro Aztlan, Par tido Nacional La Raza Unida and East County Latino Association, will be hosting activities com-4 COMING SOON GOLF/TENNIS TOURNAMENT Latin Business Association City of Industry, Calif. Aug. 28 Dianne Pasillas (213) 721-4000 BUSINESS CONVENTION U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce New Orleans Sept. 6-1 0 Maxine Weber (816) 531-6363 PRESIDENTIAL TRIBUTE National Hispanic Presidential Tribute Gala Com mittee Washington, D.C. Sept. 12 Susan Gonzales (202) 662-1355 Aug.21, 1989 FUND-RAISER Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Washington, D.C. Sept. 13 Liliana Navia (202) 543-1 771 RECEPTION Hispanic Women's Task Force of New Jersey Basking Ridge, N.J. Sept. 13 Wanda Garcia (609) 757-6346 FASHION SHOW Hispanic Designers Inc. Washington, D.C. Sept. 14 lvette Rufz (202) 452-0092 RECEPTION Latino Institute Chicago Sept. 21 Ada Gonzalez (312) 663-3603 Hispanic Link Weekly Report r

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I ARLINGTON COUNTY, VIRGINIA BUDGET DIRECTOR Ann. No. 0442-0A-DMF Salary: Negotiable from $55,000 Arlington County is looking for a results-oriented manager to provide creative, technical leadership for the Management and Budget Section of the Department of Management and Finance. Functions of the Section include preparation of the County's annual operating budget (currently $380 million) and the six-year capital improvement program (currently $305.8 million); monitoring budget execution; analyzing line-agency program efficiency and effectiveness; tax policy analysis; in terjurisdictional liaison and managing capital financing programs. Will supervise nine professional budget analysts in a complex computerized environment. Posi tion requires frequent interaction with other County agencies, the County Manager, the elected County Board, and press, civic, and business groups. This is a busy, fast paced environment which will require the Director to balance numerous priorities and complete assignments within established time frames. Requires BS in related field and five years highly responsible experience in federal, state or local government budgeting including two years experience as a supervisor, team leader, or project leader. See official announcement for more information and desirable qualifications. All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. RESUMES SUBMITTED WITHOUT A COMPLETED OFFICIAL ARLINGTON COUNTY APPLICATION FORM WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Applications must be received in the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 pm on SEPTEMBER 14, 1989. To request application material please call (703) 358-3500 or TOO (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only). ARLINGTON COUN1Y PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, Va . 22201 EOE/MFH EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM DIRECTOR (ATTORNEY) EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Small federal commission is searching for an Executive with experience in migrant education. Advanced degree in education preferred. Salary to GS-18, $75,500. To apply send resume no later than Sept. 8, 1989 to: National Commission on Migrant Education GSA-WBBE 7th and D Streets NW Washington, D.C. 20407 WRITER Information Editor Ill News writer/editor at Stanford News Service. Function as general assign ment reporter, writing news and fea ture stories about Stanford. Answer press queries. Help in editorial produc tion of news-oriented publications. QUALIFICATIONS: Proven journalistic ability in writing, editing. Newspaper experience helpful. Excel lent command of English grammar and spelling. Ability to work under extreme deadline pressure. To apply, send resume, including names of three people familiar with your qualifications and willing to act as references, along with a letter describ ing the basis of your interest and ap proximately six samples of original news-related writing to: Enelda Wade, #52829-HL, Stanford News Service, Press Courtyard, Santa Teresa St., Stanford, Calif. 94305-2245. DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 11, 1989. Stanford has a strong institutional commitment to the principle of diver sity. We are interested in receiving ap plications from a broad spectrum of people, including women, members of ethnic minorities and individuals with disabilities. Stanford Universit NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE Employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media. Opportunities for internships, entry level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English or Spanish language. Contact: Jocelyn Cordova, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Washington, D. C. (202) 783-6228. National civil rights organization seeks at torney with 5 years employment litigation and management experience to head Employment Program. Active bar member ship. Will be required to pass California Bar. Resume, salary requirements and writing sample to: DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target ana tional pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Anita Vigil MALDEF 634 S. Spring St. 11th Floor Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: Ordered by _ --------Organization _________ _ Street ----------------------City, State & Zip _______ _ (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 Area Code & Phone per column inch. -----------------Aug. 21, 1989 5

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Arts & Entertainment • WAVA Radio in Washington, D.C., for its Morning Zoo hosts Don Geronimo and Mike O'Meara's references to a Gloria Estefan, WRITERS UNITE: The formation of a Latino Writers Group was an nounced in Hollywood earlier this month to help increase the wage and scale opportunities for Hispanic authors within the film and television industries. • the film Spike of Bensonhurst for Italian and Puerto Rican stereotypes, and • the film Licence to Kill for portrayals of a Hispanic drug kingpin (played by Robert Davi) and his Latina girlfriend (Talisa Soto). The awards were announced in New York Aug. 9 by the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations. The LWG is a joint project of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences and the Nosotros actors group, created in response to a study on minority writers by Writers Guild of America, West. ON THE NATIONAL STAGE: Following is a selection of theater of-At an Aug. 9 press briefing, LWG leadership announced a three-point plan to the inequities found in the study. The group intends to provide workshops and seminars, form a lobbying Latino writers caucus and utilize Hispanic capital to develop and fund Latino entertainment projects. ferings by Latino companies coast to coast: . . . In California the Los Angeles Theater Center cont1nues 1ts New Vo1ces in Latino Theatre series with a reading of The Inheritance, by Eulalia Cervantes, on Aug. 24 and 25. El Teatro Campesino in San Juan Bautista continues its presentation of the musical The Rose of the Rancho, by David Belasco and Richard Walton Tully, through Sept. 23. The LWG is co-chaired by Jose Tirado and Kurt Mac Karley . Miami's Teatro A vance begins previews of Mario Vargas Llosa's La Chunga Aug. 24, at the city's Minorca Playhouse. IT'S THE PITS: Three of this year's recipients of the Golden Pit Awards were cited for insulting and offensive treatment of Latinos in the media. Each was given a gold spray-painted peach pit attached to a ribbon draped over a Styrofoam head. Among the 12 winners: New York's Repertorio Espana/ company continues its summer run of Spanish-language comedies at the Gramercy Theater with La nonna, Padre Gomez y Santa Cecilia and Cafe con /eche. Media Report AD FIRM ANNOUNCES MERGER: San An tonio-based Sosa & Associates, the nation's largest Hispanic-owned advertising firm, agreed Aug. 3 to merge with advertising firm D'Arcy, Macius, Benton & Bowles USA. The New York-based firm, which billed $1.6 billion in 1988, acquired 49% of Sosa's cor porate interests for an undisclosed sum and brings a client list that includes Anheuser Busch, Burger King, General Motors, NBC and Paramount. Founded in 1981 by Lionel Sosa, Sosa & Associates currently bills $40 million yearly and serves such clients as Coca-Cola USA, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, GTE and Westinghouse. EXPLORING NEEDS OF YOUTH: Califor nia-based network Radio Bilingiie will present a series titled Immigrant Children in the Public Schools. It will explore the challenges faced by students, parents, schools and com munities as a result of the growing presence HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector EricksenMendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $4? per column If placed by Tuesday, will run 1n Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. of immigrant children in the public school sys tem. The series consists of eight 60-minute panel discussions, four in English and four i.n Spanish, with call-in questions from throughout the nation. The programs will be available for national distribution on the public radio satellite system as well as on tape. Broadcast dates are Aug. 26, Sept. 30, 9ct. 28 and Nov . 25. For more information contact Samuel Oroz co at 1111 Fulton Mall , Suite 700, Fresno, Calif., 93721 (209) 486-517 4. EXPLORING NEEDS OF AGED: The American Association of Retired Persons recently introduced Jubilaci6n, a Spanish-lan guage news and information radio program. Topics will include health, retirement planning and Social Security. The show will air weekdays in 90-second segments over 40 Spanish-language stations across the U.S. mainland and Puerto Rico. CPB BOOSTS DIVERSITY: As a result of federal legislation passed last year, the Cor-Antonio Mejfas-Rentas poration for Public Broadcasting will allo cate an additional $3 million for minority television programming for each of the next three years. The National Alliance for Programming Diversity, a group of five public broadcasting consortia representing Hispanic, black, Asian American, Pacific Islander and Native American groups, will assist in directing the funds toward generating national prime-time programming by and about minorities. NOTABLE: Burrell Public Relations Inc., the country's largest minority owned public relations agency, has estab lished a Hispanic marketing division. It will be headed by Myrna Gutierrez ... Greater Media Inc., a nationwide radio, publishing and cable TV company based in East Brunswick, N.J., has announced the selection of Caroline Banez of Yonkers, N.Y., as its 1989-90 Minority In tern in Media Careers. Banez will receive from the company a $5,000 cash stipend as well as a one-year salaried employment contract. Danilo Alfaro ..Look out, Bubba, here comes another wave of illegals.••