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Hispanic link weekly report, August 28, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, August 28, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News
Daniel Silva, 42-year-old chief investigator for San Francisco’s Office of Citizen Complaints, quits his $56,000-a-year position after admitting he leaked to the press portions of an internal report implicating three high-ranking city police officials in hiding a report on the officer who allegedly beat United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta during a demonstration last September. He did so, he said, out of "outrage," adding, "I wanted to bring to an end the numerous violations that have been perpetrated on Dolores Huerta and her family by entities of the city and county of San Francisco."...Western New Mexico Univer-
sity President RudolphG6mez announces he will resign effective June 1990, citing pressures of the job...Republican Nllo Jurl announces he will give up his seat in the Florida House of Representatives to challenge incumbent Hialeah Mayor Raui Martinez this fall. He lost to Martinez in 1987...In a race candidates agree could well be decided by the Hispanic vote, Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer, New York City’s top Latino official, announces his endorsement of Manhattan Borough President David Dinkins for mayor...Earlier, incumbent Ed Koch gains endorsements from state Senator Olga Mendez and Assemblymen Angelo Del Toro of Manhattan, Israel Martinez of the Bronx, and Brooklyn Councilman Victor Robles...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
Health Foundation
By Felix P^naz
A recently formed health foundation targeting Hispanic children will not begin the first leg of its two-year campaign to raise $10 million until March 1990, but already it has encountered a healthy dose of skepticism from established Latino community health and children’s organizations.
The Milwaukee-based Hispanic Children’s Foundation of America, say wary organization leaders and officials, is unfamiliar with the existing network of service groups, does not have a Hispanic health professional on its board of directors or anyone from California—the state with the greatest number of Hispanic children — and has yet to establish a service-delivery system. That the foundation’s organizers are not in the health field also raises doubts, they point out.
Encounters Widespread Skepticism
"They (the foundation’s creators) are doing it backwards. They’re dealing only with raising funds and not how to provide services," says Jane Delgado, president of the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations.
Delgado, just as all the other sources contacted, applauds the foundation’s mission but questions whether its lack of knowledge will cause it to duplicate already existing services and hinder DELGADO
the fund-raising ef- questions group’s health exforts of similar and perience proven Latino organizations.
The foundation was organized within the last year by Milwaukee residents Darryl Hanson, a fund-raising management executive, and James Parks, an attorney. It grew out of Parks’ family involvement with children in Ecuador and Hanson’s belief that there is a sizable market willing to contribute to the improved health of Hispanic children.
Among the services the foundation hopes to provide are building pediatric clinics to be staffed by different children’s hospitals, educating parents about nutrition, providing funds for emergency operations, promoting and supporting vaccinations, and funding research programs.
"If these people are going to assimilate into this nation, they have to have healthy bodies," explains Hanson, a 24-year veteran of the fundraising business.
Tougher Fla. College Tests Raise Concern
By Danilo Alfaro
The Florida Board of Education approved a plan Aug. 8 to raise the minimum passing scores of state college achievement exams, a move that critics say will deny many Hispanic and black test takers opportunities to continue higher education.
Because of the concerns, the board agreed to phase in the changes instead of imposing them immediately.
Students must pass the College Level Academic Skills Test, mandated in 1984 by the state legislature, to graduate from a two-year community college or to enter the upper division of a four-year state university.
Of Florida’s 262,829 community college students during the fall 1988 semester, 31,548 (12%) were Hispanic.
The compromise was put forth by Commissioner of Education Betty Castor. It allowed the language skills and reading standards to be boosted this October while delaying the change in the essay section one year; The math standard will be raised halfway this fall and the rest of the way in 1990.
"We were pleased that a compromise was reached," Miami-Dade Community College spokesperson Betty Semet told Weekly
Report. "But we are very distressed because we feel the problem is still going to be there."
According to an analysis by the state Board of Education, among first-time test takers in March 1986, 71% of the Hispanics and 64% of the blacks passed ail four sections. If they had to meet the new standard, only 30% of the Hispanics and 21 % of the blacks would have passed.
The foundation will use a multifaceted fundraising campaign to raise between $50 million-$100 million in 10 years. HCFA will begin with a two-hour "radiothon" March 10 emanating from San Antonio. The show will be broadcast to the top 30 Hispanic markets, says Chris Lange, the foundation’s development director.
After the show HCFA will do a mailing of one million solicitation letters. The foundation is currently negotiating with Telemundo, one of two national Spanish-language television net-
continued on page 2
Justice Weighs Martinez for Rights Post
By Danilo Alfaro
Utah attorney Michael Martinez is being considered for the nomination for Assistant U.S. Attorney General for Civil Rights, a Justice Department source confirmed Aug. 21.
The nomination of Detroit lawyer William Lucas was killed Aug. 1 by a Senate committee.
The Hispanic National Bar Association has endorsed the Republican Martinez, who served as its president from 1987-88.
Martinez met for three hours with Justice Department officials Aug. 19, according to the source. Reached at home, Martinez, 39, would not comment.
Martinez was deputy general counsel with
the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from 1982-83.
In 1986 Martinez was appointed by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights as a member of its Utah Civil Rights Advisory Committee.
The National Council of La Raza has announced its support for Martinez. "He has demonstrated an understanding and an ability to work with Hispanic organizations. We are confident he would make a terrific assistant attorney general," La Raza Vice President Charles Kamasaki told Weekly Report.
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the League of United Latin American Citizens, while both generally positive, have not taken a stance.


SBA Overhauls Contract Set-Aside Program Amid Abuse
By Danilo Alfaro
The U.S. Small Business Administration announced Aug. 15 a new set of regulations aimed at averting abuse in its 8(a) set-aside program. The program for helping minority business owners came under sharp attack most recently because of the Wedtech scandal.
The new rules are designed to ensure companies that participate are prepared to survive in the marketplace when they leave the program and to discourage "fraudulent and
abusive activities," said SBA Administrator Susan Engeleiter.
The SBA set stringent new guidelines to determine who can qualify for the program, which assists firms for up to nine years. A business owner’s net worth, excluding home and business equity, cannot exceed $250,000 to enter the program. That net worth may grow to $500,000 over the first four years of the program and may reach $750,000 during the last five years.
Veronica Gouabault, eastern regional manager of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of
Commerce, told Weekly Report she was generally encouraged by the major provisions of the SBA plan. "We’re positive as to the new regulations," she said, adding that "some provisions are yet to be worked out."
The rules also require 8(a) firms to compete among themselves for manufacturing contracts worth more than $5 million and all other contracts worth more than $3 million.
Minority businessmen have complained that this provision may deter federal agencies from participating in the program.
L.A. Remap Suit Seeks Release of Talks
By Rhonda Smith
A U.S. District Judge was scheduled to decide late last week if the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors must adhere to a federal magistrate’s Aug. 4 ruling that their private conversations concerning reapportionment be made public.
The five-member board met in groups of two in 1981 to discuss the county’s reapportionment. By doing this, charges a complaint, they sidestepped the state’s open meetings law,
works, to put on a telethon either in the winter of 1990 or spring of 1991.
HCFA will contract with credit card institutions to receive a percentage for every card issued under its name. The foundation will also ask the roughly 42,000 Hispanic physicians in the United States to contribute $1,000 yearly for five years into life insurance policies that list the foundation as beneficiary and pay off after the five years.
"I would be amenable to anyone raising money for Hispanic children, but that much money may be the same money we will be tapping into," says Gloria Rodriguez. She is president and founder of Avance, a nationally recognized family support group serving Hispanic youth and parents in the San Antonio area.
Dr. Cynthia Tellez, director of the Spanish-Speaking Clinic at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a key individual with the Hispanic Health Foundation, says she is not concerned with the amount of money HCFA raises. "The relevant questions are: Who’s involved? Are its goals consistent with the needs of the Hispanic community? And does it have an effective network?"
HCFA has one Latino on its board of directors, Ricardo Dfaz, who as commissioner of the Department of City Development is the highest ranking Latino in the Milwaukee city government. Congressman Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) is chairman of HCFA’s advisory board. He accepted the position, says a Bustamante aide, because he supports HCFA’s goals, but he has yet to become involved.
which stipulates that while a majority of a local government board can meet in private to discuss personnel or litigation matters, they cannot meet privately to act on public business.
A federal lawsuit alleges that the supervisors redrew county political boundaries in a way that precludes Hispanics from gaining seats on the board. The American Civil Liberties Union and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund have also filed suits against the county.
Hanson acknowledges the lack of outreach to Hispanic health organizations, but he says the foundation is in its formative stages and plans more extensive networking. He also says part of Bustamante’s role is to recruit Latino experts and health organizations.
In response to some veiled criticism that the foundation was set up to cash in on the current popularity of Hispanics, Hanson replies that HCFA will receive 6.4% of the money raised during its first two-year period to cover expenes, a rate lower than most fund-raisers, says Hanson. He also says foundation officers will not receive salaries.
UFW Will Appeal Ruling Finding Boycott Unlawful
By Rhonda Smith
The United Farm Workers will appeal an Aug. 7 decision in which the California Agricultural Labor Relations Board ruled that the UFW violated a state law three years ago in boycotting retail stores, restaurants and wholesalers that sold or used products bought from a Ventura County egg distributor.
The ALRB said the union broke a state law by not fully identifying its relationship to the distributor or what it was boycotting.
The UFW has boycotted retailers that sell or use farm products in the past, a practice known as a secondary boycott, to bring attention to union concerns.
The boycott stemmed from a 1986 decision by the Egg City chicken ranch in Moorpark to cut employee salaries by up to 30% to help contain mounting debts. Employees, represented by the UFW up until that point, walked out and the UFW subsequently called a boycott of stores that did business with the ranch.
Dianna Lyons, an attorney for the UFW, said the ALRB "usurped their authority" with the ruling.
Va. City's Police Tallies Draw Questions
By Danilo Alfaro
Police in Manassas, Va., have begun routine investigations into overcrowding, conducting house-by-house head counts in poor neighborhoods. A reporter there charges that the practice is targeted against Hispanics.
Two officers, one of them bilingual, went door to door Aug. 20 tallying the number of persons in each home and apprising the families of the city’s overcrowding ordinances, according to Police Chief Sam Ellis. Manassas, 15 miles east of Washington, D.C., with a population of roughly 28,000, has experienced a recent influx of Latinos.
Ellis told Weekly Report police had received numerous complaints from local residents and community groups about over-crowding in the area According to Council-
man Maury Gerson, "The concern was that Hispanic people were not familiar with the regulations."
Gerson said the families visited by police were "predominantly" Latino, although Ellis denied that Hispanics were targeted in the operation. He said the officers "just went up one side of the street and down the other."
The reporter, Barry Hall of the Manassas Journal Messenger, questioned several of the families and claimed that the operation had been aimed exclusively at Latino households.
When questioned by Hall, the officers stated that they were acting at the behest of Gerson. Both Gerson and Ellis told Weekly Report that the officers were acting on their own. The officers could not be reached for comment.
Group Admits to Lack of Hispanic Input
continued from page 1
2
Aug. 28,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Luis Rodriguez
Rhonda Smith
The Chicano Moratorium and Me
On Aug. 29, 1970,1 stepped off a bus on the Atlantic Boulevard line and into a moment of destiny — one of those moments in which anger from generations of indignities rises up in a fiery cry for justice.
A 16-year-old street kid, I had come to participate in the Chicano Moratorium Against the Vietnam War, a protest involving some 30,000 people from throughout the Southwest. We marched through the heart of East Los Angeles — the largest Mexican community in the country.
At Laguna Park, speakers, dancers and musicians greeted the marchers.
Yet the protest was far from a celebration. Some 25% of the Vietnam War casualties were from Spanish-speaking communities, although this population consisted of less than 6% of the United States total at the time.
Like other young people from working-class communities, Mexican and Puerto Rican youth were carrying the brunt of the fighting. Yet at home they were treated as second-class citizens. +
We snaked through streets past countless furniture stores, used car lots and cemeteries. Around me were young mothers with babies in strollers, factory hands, cholos, uniformed Brown Berets in cadence, a newlywed couple still in tuxedo and wedding gown.
At the park, the multitude spread out on the grass. Speeches, music and street theater filled the air.
BLOOD GLISTENED IN THE SUN I walked toward a nearby liquor store. It had closed early. A number of us wanted to get more to drink. A shotgun, pushed up against my head, caused me to jerk backward. "Move, or I’ll blow your head off," a sheriffs deputy demanded. I left, wandering through feet and bodies, coolers and blankets.
At the edge of the park, a brown line of deputies — with high-powered rifles, billyclubs and tear gas launchers — began to swagger toward the crowd. Those who hesitated were cut down by swinging clubs.
A deputy ordered me to move. I told him, "Chale (no), this is my park." Before I knew it, my face was being smeared into the grass and dirt, a throbbing in my head. Drops of blood glistened in the sun.
By then the battle of Laguna Park had burst open. People scurried in all directions. Through the tear gas mist could be seen shadows of children crying, mothers yelling, bodies on the ground, kicking and gouging as officers thrust blackjacks into ribs and spines.
A deputy pushed me into the back of a squad car. Somebody lay next to me, his hair oiled with blood. I didn’t want to look for fear his brains were coming out. I gave him a piece of my blue shirt, my favorite. We were transferred to a county jail bus and chained to one another.
RUBEN SALAZAR WAS SILENCED That night, we were driven to the East L.A. jail, the county jail, juvenile hall, and finally locked up with hardcore youth offenders in the Hall of Justice. There we heard that the "East L.A. riot" had escalated. Stores were being burned and looted. Police had killed people. Fires flared in other communities such as Wilmington and Venice.
A radio announcer reported that KM EX news director Ruben Salazar had been killed in a bar by sheriffs deputies. Salazar had been a lone voice in the media for the Mexican people’s struggle. Now he was silenced.
For five days, I did not exist. My parents searched for me throughout the criminal justice system.
At last, in the middle of night, a guard awakened me, pulling me out of the cell and down some brightly lit corridors. Through a small, thick, glass window I saw my mother’s weary face.
I remember telling her, "I ain’t no criminal, Ma." She looked at me and replied, "I know, mijo, I know."
(Luis Rodriguez, a free-lance writer, now resides in Chicago.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Being Bilingual Doesn’t Pay
While working as a customer service representative at Contel Service Corp. 17 years ago, Paula Soriano watched intently as a Mexican American customer tried in vain to explain what type of telephone service he needed. No one on the staff could speak Spanish. Soriano, who speaks it fluently, walked over to the counter and helped diffuse the situation, to everyone’s relief.
The 58-year-old mother of four explained recently how she had just joined the work force, following the death of her husband, and was pleased to be getting off to such a good start.
After the customer left, Soriano’s supervisor pulled her aside and said, "it was rude of you to speak Spanish in front of people who don’t understand it. Don’t ever do that again."
Today, supervisors and procedures at Contel are somewhat different.
Changing demographics have forced this telephone company, the third largest in the California region, and the other two major ones there, to find personnel who can service bilingual customers. In 1986, Contel, General Telephone and Pacific Telesis, along with a coalition of Hispanic and Asian American community groups, issued a joint report containing two major recommendations.
SKILLS NOT RECOGNIZED
First, the report said the telephone companies should consider establishing new job classifications with pay differentials for employees who use extra language skills. It also said employers should recognize the special efforts and skills used on the job in annual employee evaluations and make accommodations for this extra work in establishing worker responsibilities.
According to Soriano, "Contel told me they would lose too much money by paying the bilingual workers for our skill." She also said the skills are not recognized on her employee evaluations.
"At Contel," Soriano explained, "they rotate three of us weekly to handle Spanish-speaking customers. Some employees who can speak Spanish deny it to avoid having to handle the excessive work load. But they say, ‘If you don’t speak It, you don’t have a job.’"
On Jan. 7, 1987, a call from a Hispanic customer came in and was transferred to Soriano. She refused to take it. Her explanation: "I had handled so many calls from bilingual customers that day, I was just tired of it." She was escorted out of the building and told not to return. Soriano contacted her union and the next day received a call from her manager cordially inviting her to return to work. She returned and again became responsible for fielding calls from Spanish-speaking customers.
PAY US OR LEAVE US ALONE
Soriano sensed that all was not well when one Contel supervisor told her that her actions that day would be "a scar you wear for the rest of your employment here."
Soriano went to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which filed a lawsuit Aug. 3. The suit contends that the company is discriminating on the basis of national origin. The EEOC is seeking to recover the pay differential from the time employees began using their bilingual skills, plus a new job classification for those with extra language skills. Soriano said the consensus among bilingual employees is that Contel should "pay us the differential or leave us alone."
Legal experts are watching this case closely because it is the first in which an employee has filed a complaint to receive compensation for an extra language skill, something many employers take for granted. The EEOC trial attorney, Douglas Farmer, says it could take a year or longer before the case actually goes to court. To Soriano, It’s more a matter of fairness and respect than time or monetary gain.
"I’m too old for this suit to do me any good," she concludes, "but maybe it will help our children."
(Rhonda Smith is a reporter with the Hispanic Link News Service.)
Aug. 28,1989
RODRIGUEZ
SMITH
3


COLLECTING
CONGRESSIONAL FELLOWSHIPS: The American Political Science Association is offering fellowships to scholars who have just completed their Ph.D.s or have done so within the last 15 years. The program, which offers a $20,000 stipend and a travel allowance, starts November 1990 and ends April 1991. Deadline is Dec. 15. For applications contact APSA at 1527 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 483-2512.
ENCOURAGING READING: The Reading Is Fundamental group has developed Spanish- and English-language brochures to help parents encourage reading in the home. Illustrations are multicultural. To obtain both send $5 to RIF, Publications Department, P.O. Box 23444, Washington, D.C. 20026 (202) 287-3530.
HANDLING HAZARDOUS MATERIALS: The University of California at Berkeley has just published its 40-page bilingual safety pamphlet for workers handling hazardous materials. Single copies to workers are free; copies to organizations are $2.50 each. To order contact the Labor Occupational Health Program, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, Calif. 94720 (415) 642-5507.
TIPS FOR THE COLLEGE BOUND: "Off to College" and "What to Take to College" are free pamphlets offering packing tips for the college-bound student. Send a self-addressed envelope with 250 postage to Pro-Pak Inc., 527 Dundee Road, Northbrook, III. 60002.
TRANSITIONING TO COLLEGE: "School-College Collaborations: A Strategy for Helping Low-Income Minorities" is a 34-page monograph that looks at collaborative efforts between high schools and colleges across the country to make the transition easier for disadvantaged students. Also included is a reference list, pitfalls and successes. For a copy (specify Urban Series No. 98) send $8 to ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y. 10027 (212) 678- 3433.
MEDIA DIRECTORY: "Burrelle’s 1989 Hispanic Media Directory" is a guide to media serving the U.S. Hispanic population, including radio and TV stations, daily and weekly newspapers, magazines, newsletters and college publications. For a copy of the 245-page publication, send $80 to Burrelle’s Media Directories, 75 E. Northfield Road, Livingston, N.J. 07039 1-800-631-1160.
MUSEUM RESOURCES: The Smithsonian Institution has a new publication that features programs it has on Hispanic and Latin American issues and resources. For a free copy of the 40-page brochure, contact the Smithsonian Information Center, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560 (202) 357-2700.
CONNECTING
GROUP SEEKS AIDS PROPOSALS
The U.S. Conference of Mayors has set Oct. 12 as the deadline for its eighth round of funding for community-based AIDS/HIV education programs. The group will award approximately 20 grants ranging from $20,000 to $50,000 each.
Among the populations the proposal should target are racial and ethnic minorities, substance abusers and individuals who have tested positive for HIV. The grants will be awarded to non-profit, community-based organizations only. Programs are anticipated to begin November 1990.
For more information contact Matthew Murguia, B. J. Harris or Miriam Fields at the Conference of Mayors, 1620 V St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 293-7330.
KELLOGG PROMOTES LEADERSHIP
Dec. 15 is the deadline for applications to the W.K Kellogg National Fellowship Program, an initiative for professionals in the early part of their careers who want to improve their leadership skills.
Begun in 1980, KNFP will select about 50 people for its 11th group. Fellows receive a grant of $35,000 over three years to follow an individualized learning plan outside their area of expertise and to take part in two seminars yearly, one in Latin America. Eligible employers are reimbursed for one-half of employee release time at 12.5% of the fellow’s salary.
Some 440 people have participated in the fellowship program since its inception.
To request an application, contact the Fellowship Office, W.K Kellogg Foundation, 400 North Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 49107-3398 (616) 969-2005.
NAME DROPPING
U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos and federal drug czar William Bennett appoint Camerino Lopez, principal of Garfield Elementary School in Phoenix, Ariz., to the 16-member National Commission on Drug-Free Schools. The commission will recommend ways for school districts to judge if its schools are free from drugs and what they can do to achieve a drug-free environment. It will also study whether denying federal aid to students is an effective deterrent against drugs...The William C. Norris Institute announces that former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros has been elected to its board of directors. The institute links private and public cooperation to address societal needs...Joseph DeSio, acting general counsel of the National Labor Relations Board, announces Roberto Chavarry as the new assistant general counsel in the Division of Operations Management. Chavarry, 45, is a native of Havana, Cuba..
Calendar_______________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Unk's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
GOLF/TENNIS TOURNAMENT City of Industry, Calif. Aug. 28 The Latin American Business Association is holding its seventh annual Golf and Tennis Invitational Tournament. Numerous sports and entertainment celebrities will take part in the fund-raising tourna-
ment and the evening’s banquet festivities. Proceeds from the event will provide scholarships for disadvantaged Latino students pursuing degrees in business and related fields.
Albert Canong (213) 721-4000
SALSA FESTIVAL New York Aug. 28-Sept. 4 Ralph Mercado Management is presenting the 14th annual New York Salsa Festival. Dozens of performances by bands from around the world will take place at various New York venues. Two major concerts, featuring performers such as Celia Cruz and Ruben Blades, will be presented.
Harriet Wasser (212) 570-7037
MARIACHI FESTIVAL San Diego Sept. 2
Mariachi Festival ’89, presented by the Alba 80 Society, will feature Vikki Carr and Lola Beltr&n along with four other mariachi groups in the city’s first mariachi festival. Also included in the program will
be Aztec ceremonial dancing and Ballet Folkbrico. Fred Thompson (619) 299-2190
COMING SOON
BUSINESS CONVENTION U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce New Orleans Sept. 6-10 Maxine Weber (816) 531-6363 PRESIDENTIAL TRIBUTE National Hispanic Presidential Tribute Gala Committee
Washington, D.C. Sept. 12 Susan Gonzalez (202) 662-1355
MARKETING CONFERENCE Hispanic Business magazine Los Angeles Sept. 12-14 Lysa Kessman (805) 682-5843 FUND-RAISER
Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Washington, D.C. Sept. 13 Uliana Navia (202) 543-1771
4
Aug. 28,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
EDITORIAL
PUBUSHING DIRECTOR
To direct and administer the daily operation of professional membership association’s publishing operation.
BA degree plus 10 years prior related work experience, at least six years must be in publications management. Experience in books and journals publishing, budgeting, long-range planning and financial analysis. Extensive managerial/administrative experience essential. Knowledge of database technology.
Starting salary to $46,500 plus excellent benefits. Resum6to:
Director
Office of Personnel Management NASW
7981 Eastern Ave.
Silver Spring, Md. 20910 EOE
ALLIED HEALTH INSTRUCTOR
Requires bachelor’s degree in health-related field/education, California RN or EMT-P.
For application and complete position announcement call Human Resources, Palo-mar College (619) 744-1150, ext. 2201. Closing date: 4:30 p.m. PST 9/13/89. EO/AAE
JS
%
MALDEF
EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM DIRECTOR (ATTORNEY)
National civl rights organization seeks attorney with 5 years employment litigation and management experience to head Employment Program. Active bar membership. Will be required to pass California Bar. Resume, salary requirements and Writing sample to:
Anita Vigil MALDEF 634 S. Spring St,
11th Floor
Los Angeles, Calif, 90014
%
w
Arlington County Personnel Office 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, VA 22201
Employment Information Job Line
TDD (hearing impaired only)
Equal Opportunity Employer
703-358-3500
703-538-3363
703-284-5521
CITY OF PARAMOUNT
FAMILY COUNSELOR - City of Paramount, Calif. (Salary: $2,820-$3,428 per month, plus City pays employee’s 7% share of PERS).
Requires Bachelor’s Degree in social science, psychology, or related field. Master’s Degree desirable. MFCC or LCSW preferred.
Experience working with gang-related youth in a preventative counseling capacity desirable.
Will establish and maintain counseling contact with youth who are prone to gang involvement and their families, plan and organize innovative counseling activities which will discourage gang involvement, maintain close contact with resource and referral agencies and other duties. APPLY BY: Open.
NEIGHBORHOOD COUNSELOR -City of Paramount, Calif. (Salary: $2,266-$2,754 per month, plus City pays employee’s 7% share of PERS).
Requires Bachelor’s Degree with specialization in social science, psychology, or related field. One year experience working with youth and parents in a community setting, and familiarity with youth gang membership also required.
Will implement programs for early elementary age youth which will discourage gang membership in the community. Will conduct classroom presentations and community meetings, maintain contact with youth and their parents, prepare written reports and oral presentations, and other duties.
APPLY BY: Open.
APPLY AT! City of Paramount, 16400 Colorado Avenue, Paramount, Calif. 90723. Phone: (213) 531-3503 Extension 326.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Aug. 28, 1989
5


Arts & Entertainment
BICOASTAL MUSIC NOTES: Two distinct forms of Latino music are highlighted this week in separate events held at opposite ends of the nation.
In San Diego the Mariachi Festival *89, to be held Sept. 2, will feature performances by Vikki Carr and Mexico’s Lola Beltr&n. Groups from Los Angeles (Mariachi Los Camperos and Mariachi Solde Mexico), Orlando, Fla. (Mariachi Cobre), and Tucson, Ariz. (Los Changuitos Feos), will perform at the first such event in the city.
Mariachi Festival ’89 is a fund-raiser for Alba 80 Society, a non-profit organization that raises money for Hispanic college students.
Back east, Latin music lovers are already enjoying the first portion of this year’s 14th annual New York International Salsa Festival. This year
the event is held in two parts: part I, Aug. 28 to Sept. 4, and part II, Sept. 14 and 15.
This week’s attractions include a Salsa Meets Jazz concert featuring Mongo Santamarfa and Japan’s Orquesta Luz (Aug. 28 at the Village Gate), a Nite of Skins with Tito Puente and Ray Barreto (Aug. 29 at SOB’s) and a Gran Concierto with Celia Cruz, El Gran Combo, La SonoraPonceha, among others (Sept. 2, Forest Hills Tennis Stadium).
For the first time, the festival includes a merengue event, Sept. 3, with a roster of acts from the Dominican Republic. The festival concludes Sept. 15 with a Festival de los Soneros concert at Madison Square Garden.
In other music news, preliminaries for the first national talent show for U.S. Hispanics begin airing this week on the Univision television network. Sponsored by Anheuser-Busch, the program titled Buscando estrellas con Budweiser will select winners in seven categories.
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
By Carlos Sdnchez, president of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C.
A friend of mine showed me an editorial cartoon in The Daily Texan, the student newspaper at the University of Texas at Austin, where I went to school. It ran after the grisly murder of Mark Kilroy, the UT student who was killed by satan worshippers in Matamoros, Mexico. The cartoon said, SANCHEZ "Come to Mexico," and pictured a bullfighter, a Mexican woman in a shawl, a mariachi guitarist, and a flamenco dancer from Spain for some reason, all standing behind a skeleton.
I have to believe that if one Latino had been a part of that staff, the cartoon would not have run.
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When some Latino students protested the cartoon, one letter to the editor rebuked them for attempting to "make a racial/cultural issue of this" and "defend a nation that can’t defend its own people or its visitors. That’s not race, gentlemen. That is fact," the letter said.
What is also fact is that these attitudes at the college level are tougher to defend against because of a decade-long decline of minorities enrolling in colleges across the country.
Minority students must constantly choose between acceptance among their peers — or defiance. Students such as myself preferred denial of our background to confrontation. To be at once accepted by our peers and defiant of their prejudiced attitudes is hard.
I remember the lonliness I once felt when I did a summer internship at the Arizona Daily Star in Tucson. I worked. I got stories in the newspaper. But I also regretted not being part of a special minority internship program that was operating out of the newsroom that summer. I regretted missing out on the comradery that I saw among those interns.
But then I saw what they were working toward: It was a small, six-page tabloid that they ended up distributing in the newsroom.
Nobody read it. I felt that these minority students, while they may have had more fun than I that summer, had been robbed.
Ever since then I have had a bias against such minority programs. They segregate the student from a real newsroom environment. The net effect is that it teaches the student to place more emphasis on culture than accomplishment.
I am the only Latino reporter working for The Washington Post. No longer am I intimidated by being different. It gets me noticed in a newsroom with 400 reporters. No longer do I avoid confrontation with prevailing attitudes in the newsroom. Such confrontation is appreciated as a different perspective that ensures additional sensitivity.
The answer to pluralizing the college newsroom is simple: Make it a requirement. You do a disservice to minority students by treating them differently. But you also do them a disservice by ignoring their differences.
(This is a condensed version of a presentation Sanchez made Aug. 11 at the annual conference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.)


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Making The News This Week sity President Rudolph G6mez announces he will resign effective June 1990, citing pressures of the job ... Republican Nilo Juri announces he will give up his seat in the Florida House of Representatives to chal lenge incumbent Hialeah Mayor Raui Martinez this fall. He lost to Martinez in 1987 ... 1n a race candidates agree could well be decided by the Hispanic vote, Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer, New York City's top Latino official, announces his endorsement of Manhat tan Borough President David Dinkins for mayor ... Earlier, incumbent Ed Koch gains endorsements from state Senator Olga Mendez and As semblymen Angelo Del Toro of Manhattan, Israel Martinez of the Bronx, and Brooklyn Councilman Victor Robles ... Daniel Silva, 42-year-old chief investigator for San Francisco's Office of Citizen Complaints, quits his $56,000-a-year position after admitting he leaked to the press portions of an internal report implicating three high-ranking city police officials in hiding a report on the officer who al legedly beat United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta during a demonstration last September. He did so, he said, out of "outrage, II adding, "I wanted to bring to an end the numerous violations that have been perpetrated on Dolores Huerta and her family by entities of the city and county of San Francisco." ... Western New Mexico UniverHealth Foundation Encounters Widespread Skepticism By Felix Perez A recently formed health foundation targeting Hispanic children will not begin the first leg of its two-year campaign to raise $1 0 million until March 1990, b.ut already it has encountered a healthy dose of skepticism from established Latino community health and children's or ganizations. The Milwaukee-based Hispanic Children's Foundation of America, say wary organization leaders and officials, is unfamiliar with the ex isting network of service groups, does not have a Hispanic health professional on its board of directors or anyone from California-the state with the greatest number of Hispanic children and has yet to establish a service-delivery system. That the foundation's organizers are not in the health field also raises doubts, they point out. "They (the foundation's creators) are doing it backwards. They're dealing only with raising funds and not how to provide services," says Jane Delgado, president of the National Coali tion of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations. Delgado, just as all ] the other sources contacted, applauds . the foundation's mission but questions whether its lack of knowledge will cause it to dupli cate already existing services and hinder DELGADO the fund-raising ef-questions group's health ex-forts of similar and perience proven Latino organizations. Tougher Fla. College Tests Raise Concern By Danilo Alfaro The Florida Board of Education approved a plan Aug. 8 to raise the minimum passing scores of state college achievement exams, a move that critics say will deny many Hispanic and black test takers opportunities to continue higher education. Report. "But we are very distressed because we feel the problem is still going to be there." According to an analysis by the state Board of Education, among first-time test takers in March 1986, 71% of the Hispanics and 64% of the blacks passed all four sections. If they had to meet the new standard, only 30% of the Hispanics and 21% of the blacks would have passed. The foundation was organized within the last year by Milwaukee residents Darryl Hanson, a fund-raising management executive, and James Parks, an attorney. It grew out of Parks' family involvement with children in Ecuador and Hanson's belief that there is a sizable market willing to contribute to the improved health of Hispanic children. Among the services the foundation hopes to provide are building pediatric clinics to be staffed by different children's hospitals, educating parents about nutrition, providing funds for emergency operations, promoting and support ing vaccinations, and funding research programs. "If these people are going to assimilate into this nation, they have to have healthy bodies," explains Hanson, a 24-year veteran of the fund raising business. The foundation will use a multifaceted fund raising campaign to raise between $50 million $1 00 million in 10 years. HCFA will begin with a two-hour "radiothon" March 10 emanating from San Antonio. The show will be broadcast to the top 30 Hispanic markets, says Chris Lange, the foundation's development director. After the show HCFA will do a mailing of one million solicitation letters. The foundation is cur rently negotiating with Telemundo, one of two national Spanish-language television net-continued on page 2 Because of the concerns, the board agreed to phase in the changes instead of imposing them immediately. Students must pass the College Level Academic Skills Test, mandated in 1984 by the state legislature, to graduate from a two-year community college or to enter the upper division of a four-year state university. Justice Weighs Martinez for Rights Post Of Florida's 262,829 community college stu dents during the fall 1988 semester, 31,548 (12%) were Hispanic. The compromise was ptrt forth by Commis sioner of Education Betty Castor. It allowed the language skills and reading standards to be boosted this October while delaying the change in the essay section one The math standard will be raised halfway this fall and the rest of the way in 1990. "We were pleased that a compromise was reached," Miami-Dade Community College spokesperson Betty Semet told Weekly By Danilo Alfaro Utah attorney Michael Martfnez is being considered for the nomination for Assistant U.S. Attorney General for Civil Rights, a Jus tice Department source confirmed Aug. 21. The nomination of Detroit lawyer Wi IIi am Lucas was killed Aug. 1 by a Senate com mittee. The Hispanic National Bar Association has endorsed the Republican Martinez, who served as its president from 1987-88. Martinez met for three hours with Justice Department officials Aug. 19, according to the source. Reached at home, Martinez, 39, would not comment. Martfnez was deputy general counsel with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from 1982-83. In 1986 Martinez was appointed by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights as a member of its Utah Civil Rights Advisory Committee. The National Council of La Raza has an nounced its support for Martinez. "He has demonstrated an understanding and an ability to work with Hispanic organizations. We are confident he would make a terrific assistant attorney general," La Raza Vice President Charles Kamasaki told Weekly Report. The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the League of United Latin American Citizens, while both general ly positive, have not taken a stance.

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SBA Overhauls Contract Set-Aside Program Amid Abuse By Danilo Alfaro The U.S. Small Business Administration an nounced Aug. 15 a new set of regulations aimed at averting abuse in its 8(a) set-aside program. The program for helping minority business owners came under sharp attack most recently because of the Wedtech scan dal. The new rules are designed to ensure com panies that participate are prepared to sur vive in the marketplace when they leave the program and to discourage .. fraudulent and abusive activities,.. said SBA Administrator Susan Engeleiter. The SBA set stringent new guidelines to determine who can qualify for the program, which assists firms for up to nine years. A business owner's net worth, excluding home and business equity, cannot exceed $250,000 to enter the program. That net worth may grow to $500,000 over the first four years of the program and may reach $750,000 during the last five years. Veronica Gouabault, eastern regional manager of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of L.A. Remap Suit Seeks Release of Talks By Rhonda Smith A U.S. District Judge was scheduled to decide late last week if the Los Angeles Coun ty Board of Supervisors must adhere to a federal magistrate's Aug. 4 ruling that their private conversations concerning reapportion ment be made public. The five-member board met in groups of two in 1981 to discuss the county's reapportion ment. By doing this, charges a complaint, they sidestepped the state's open meetings law, which stipulates that while a majority of a local government board can meet in private to dis cuss personnel or litigation matters, they can not meet privately to act on public business. A federal lawsuit alleges that the supervisors redrew county political boundaries in a way that precludes Hispanics from gaining seats on the board. The American Civil Liberties Union and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund have also filed suits against the county. Group Admits to Lack of Hispanic Input continued from page 1 works, to put on a telethon either in the winter of 1990 or spring of 1991. HCFA will contract with credit card institutions to receive a percentage for every card issued under its name. The foundation will also ask the roughly 42,000 Hispanic physicians in the United States to contribute $1,000 yearly for five years into life insurance policies that list the foundation as beneficiary and pay off after the five years. Hanson acknowledges the lack of outreach to Hispanic health organizations, but he says the foundation is in its formative stages and plans more extensive networking. He also says part of Bustamante's role is to recruit Latino ex perts and health organizations. In response to some veiled criticism that the foundation was set up to cash in on the current popularity of Hispanics, Hanson 'replies that HCFA will receive 6.4% of the money raised during its first two-year period to cover ex penes, a rate lower than most fund-raisers, says Hanson. He also says foundation officers will not receive salaries. Commerce, told Weekly Report she was generally encouraged by the major provisions of the SBA plan ... We're positive as to the new regulations, .. she said, adding that 11Some provisions are yet to be worked out. .. The rules also require 8(a) firms to compete among themselves for manufacturing con tracts worth more than $5 million and all other contracts worth more than $3 million. Minority businessmen have complained that this provision may deter federal agencies from participating in the program. UFW Will Appeal Ruling Finding Boycott Unlawful By Rhonda Smith The United Farm Workers will appeal an Aug. 7 decision in which the California Agricultural Labor Relations Board ruled that the UFW vio lated a state law three years ago in boycotting retail stores, restaurants and wholesalers that sold or used products bought from a Ventura County egg distributor. The ALRB said the union broke a state law by not fully identifying its relationship to the dis tributor or what 'it was boycotting. The UFW has boycotted retailers that sell or use farm products in the past, a practice known as a secondary boycott, to bring attention to union concerns. The boycott stemmed from a 1986 decision by the Egg City chicken ranch in Moorpark to cut employee salaries by up to 30% to help contain mounting debts. Employees, repre sented by the UFW up until that point, walked out and the UFW subsequently called a boycott of stores that did business with the ranch. Dianna Lyons, an attorney for the UFW, said the ALRB ,.usurped their authority .. with the ruling. 111 would be amenable to anyone raising money for Hispanic children, but that much money may be the same money we will be tap ping into, .. says Gloria Rodriguez. She is presi dent and founder of Avance, a nationally recognized family support group serving Hispanic youth and parents in the San Antonio Va. City's Police Tallies Draw Questions area. Dr. Cynthia Tellez, director of the Spanish Speaking Clinic at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a key individual with the Hispanic Health Foundation, says she is not concerned with the amount of money HCF A raises ... The relevant questions are: Who's in volved? Are its goals consistent with the needs of the Hispanic community? And does it have an effective network? .. HCFA has one Latino on its board of direc tors, Ricardo Dfaz, who as commissioner of the Department of City Development is the highest ranking Latino in the Milwaukee city govern ment. Congressman Albert Bustamante (D Texas) is chairman of HCFA's advisory board. He accepted the position, says a Bustamante aide, because he supports HCFA's goals, but he has yet to become involved. 2 By Danilo Alfaro Police in Manassas, Va., have begun routine investigations into overcrowding, conducting house-by-house head counts in poor neighborhoods. A reporter there charg es that the practice is targeted against Hispanics. Two officers, one of them bilingual, went door to door Aug. 20 tallying the number of persons in each home and apprising the families of the city's overcrowding ordinan ces, according to Police Chief Sam Ellis. Manassas, 15 miles east of Washington, D.C., with a population of roughly 28,000, has experienced a recent influx of Latinos. Ellis told Weekly Report police had received numerous complaints from local residents and community groups about over crowding in the area According to CouncilAug.28, 1989 man Maury Gerson, .. The concern was that Hispanic people were not familiar with the regulations ... Gerson said the families visited by police were .. predominantly .. Latino, although Ellis denied that Hispanics were targeted in the operation. He said the officers .. just went up one side of the street and down the other ... The reporter, Barry Hall of the Manassas Journal Messenger, questioned several of the families and claimed that the operation had been aimed exclusively at Latino households. When questioned by Hall, the officers stated that they were acting at the behest of Gerson. Both Gerson and Ellis told Weekly Report that the officers were acting on their own. The officers could not be reached for comment. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Luis Rodriguez The Chicano Moratorium and Me On Aug. 29, 1970, I stepped off a bus on the Atlantic Boulevard line and into a moment of destiny-one of those moments in which anger from generations of indignities rises up in a fiery cry for justice. A 16-year-old street kid, I had come to participate in the Chicano Moratorium Against the Vietnam War, a protest involving some 30,000 people from throughout the Southwest. We marched through the heart of East Los Angeles-the largest Mexican community in the country. At Laguna Park, speakers, dancers and musicians greeted the marchers. Yet the protest was far from a celebration. Some 25% of the Vietnam War casualties were from Spanish-speaking communities, although this population consisted of less than 6% of the t United States total at the time. Uke other young people from working-class communities, Mexican and Puerto Rican youth were carrying the brunt of the fighting. Yet at home they were treated as second-class RODRIGUEZ citizens. We snaked through streets past countless furniture stores, used car , lots and cemeteries. Around me were young mothers with babies in strollers, factory hands, cholos, uniformed Brown Berets in cadence, a newlywed couple still in tuxedo and wedding gown. At the park, the multitude spread out on the grass. Speeches, music and street theater filled the air. BLOOD GLISTENED IN THE SUN I walked toward a nearby liquor store. It had closed early. A number of us wanted to get more to drink. A shotgun, pushed up against my head, caused me to jerk backward. "Move, or I'll blow your head off," a sheriff's deputy demanded. I left, wandering through feet and bodies, coolers and blankets. At the edge of the park, a brown line of deputies -with high-powered rifles, billyclubs and tear gas launchers-began to swagger toward the crowd. Those who hesitated were cut down by swinging clubs. A deputy ordered me to move. I told him, "Chafe (no), this is my park ... Before I knew it, my face was being smeared into the grass and dirt, a throbbing in my head. Drops of blood glistened in the sun. By then the battle of Laguna Park had burst open. People scurried in all directions. Through the tear gas mist could be seen shadows of children crying, mothers yelling, bodies on the ground, kicking and gouging as officers thrust blackjacks into ribs and spines. A deputy pushed me into the back of a squad car. Somebody lay next to me, his hair oiled with blood. I didn't want to look for fear his brains were coming out. I gave him a piece of my blue shirt, my favorite. We were transferred to a county jail bus and chained to one another. RUBEN SALAZAR WAS SILENCED That night, we were driven to the East L.A. jail, the county jail, juvenile hall, and finally locked up with hardcore youth offenders in the Hall of Justice. There we heard that the "East L.A. riot" had escalated. Stores 1 were being burned and looted. Police had killed people. Fires flared in other communities such as Wilmington and Venice. A radio announcer reported that KMEX news director Ruben Salazar had been killed in a bar by sheriffs deputies. Salazar had been a lone voice in the media for the Mexican people's struggle. Now he was silenced. For five days, I did not exist. My parents searched for me throughout the criminal justice system. At last, in the middle of night, a guard awakened me, pulling me out of the cell and down some brightly lit corridors. Through a small, thick, glass window I saw my mother's weary face. 1 remember telling her, .. I ain't no criminal, Ma." She looked at me and replied, "I know, mijo, I know ... (Luis Rodrfguez, . a free-lance writer, now resides in Chicago.) Rhonda Smith Being Bilingual Doesn't Pay While working as a customer service representative at Contel Service Corp. 17 years ago, Paula Soriano watched intently as a Mexican American customer tried in vain to explain what type of telephone ser vice he needed. No one on the staff could speak Spanish. Soriano, who speaks it fluently, walked over to the counter and helped diffuse the situation, to everyone's relief. The 58-year-old mother of four explained recently how she had just . joined the work force, following the death of her husband, and was pleased to be getting off to such a good start. After the customer left, Soriano's supervisor pulled her aside and said, "It was rude of you to speak Spanish in front of people who don't un derstand it. Don't ever do that again." Today, supervisors and procedures at Contel are somewhat different. Changing demographics have forced this telephone company, the third largest in the SMITH California region, and the other two major ones there, to find personnel who can service bilingual customers. In 1986, Contel, General Telephone and Pacific Telesis, along with a coalition of Hispanic and Asian American community groups, issued a joint report containing two major recommendations. SKILLS NOT RECOGNIZED First, the report said the telephone companies should consider estab lishing new job classifications with pay differentials for employees who use extra language skills. It also said employers should recognize the special efforts and skills used on the job in annual employee evalua tions and make accommodations for this extra work in establishing worker responsibilities. According to Soriano, "Contel told me they would lose too much money by paying the bilingual workers for our skill." She also said the skills are not recognized on her employee evaluations. .. At Contel," Soriano explained, "they rotate three of us weekly to han dle Spanish-speaking customers. Some employees who can speak Spanish deny it to avoid having to handle the excessive work load. But they say, 'If you don't speak it, you don't have a job.' .. On Jan. 7, 1987, a call from a Hispanic customer came in and was transferred to Soriano. She refused to take it. Her explanation: "I had handled so many calls from bilingual customers that day, I was just tired of it... She was escorted out of the building and told not to return. Soriano contacted her union and the next day received a call from her manager cordially inviting her to return to work . . She returned and again became responsible for fielding calls from Spanish-speaking cus tomers. PAY US OR LEAVE US ALONE Soriano sensed that all was not well when one Contel supervisor told her that her actions that day would be .. a scar you wear for the rest of your employment here ... Soriano went to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which filed a lawsuit Aug. 3. The suit contends that the company is dis criminating on the basis of national origin. The EEOC is seeking to recover the pay differential from the time employees began using their bilingual skills, plus a new job classification for those with extra language skills. Soriano said the consensus among bilingual employees is that Contel should .. pay us the differential or leave us alone." Legal experts are watching this case closely because it is the first in which an employee has filed a complaint to receive compensation for an extra language skill, something many employers take for granted. The EEOC trial attorney, Douglas Farmer, says it could take a year or longer before the case actually goes to court. To Soriano, it's more a matter of fairness and respect than time or monetary gain. .. I'm too old for this suit to do me any good, .. she concludes, "but maybe it will help our children. II (Rhonda Smith is a reporter with the Hispanic Link News SeNice.) Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Aug.28, 1989 3

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COLLECTING CONGRESSIONAL FELLOWSHIPS: The American Political Science Association is offering fellowships to scholars who have just completed their Ph . D . s or have done so within the last 15 years. The program, which offers a $20,000 sti p end and a travel allowance, starts Novem ber 1990 and ends April 1 991. Deadline is Dec . 15 . F or applications contact APSA at 1527 New Hampshire Ave. NW , Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 483 2512. ENCOURAGING READING: The Reading Is Fundamental group has developed Spanishand English-language brochu r es to help parents encourage reading in the home. Illustrations are multicultural. To obtain both send $5 to RIF , Publications Department, P.O. Box 23444, Washington, D.C. 20026 ( 202) 287-3530. HANDLING HAZARDOU S MATERIALS: The University of California at Berkeley has just published its 40-page bilingual safety pamphlet for workers handling hazardous materials. Single copies to workers are free; copies to organizations are $2.50 each. To order contact the Labor Occupational Health Program, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, Calif. 94720 (415) 642-5507. TIPS FOR THE COLLEGE BOUND: "Off to College" and "What to Take to College" are free pamphlets offering packing tips for the col lege-bound student. Send a self-addressed envelope with 25 postage to Pro-Pak Inc., 527 Dundee Road, Northbrook, Ill. 60002. TRANSITIONING TO COLLEGE: "School-College Collaborations: A Strategy for Helping Low-Income Minorities" is a 34-page monograph that looks at collaborative efforts between high schools and colleges across the country to make the transition easier for disadvantaged stu dents. Also included is a reference list, pitfalls and successes. For a copy (specify Urban Series No. 98) send $8 to ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027 (212) 6783433. MEDIA DIRECTORY: "Burrelle's 1989 Hispanic Media Directory" is a guide to media serving the U.S. Hispanic population, including radio and 1V stations, daily and weekly newspapers, magazines, newslet ters and college publications. For a copy of the 245-page publication, send $80 to Burrelle's Media Directories, 75 E. Northfield Road, Livingston, N.J. 07039 1-800-631-1160. MUSEUM RESOURCES: The Smithsonian Institution has a new pub lication that features programs it has on Hispanic and Latin American issues and resources. For a free copy of the 40-page brochure, contact the Smithsonian Information Center, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 20560 (202) 357-2700. I CONNECTING I GROUP SEEKS AIDS PROPOSALS The U.S . Conference of Mayors has set Oct. 12 as the deadli n e for its eighth round of funding for community-based AIDS/HIV education programs . The group will award approximately 20 grants ranging from $20,000 to $50,000 each. Among the populations the proposal should target are racial and e th nic minorities, substance abusers and individuals who have tested positive for HIV. The grants will be awarded to non-profit, communi ty based organizations only. Programs are anticipated to begin Nov em ber 1990 . For more information contact Matthew Murguia, B.J. Harris or Mir iam Fields at the Conference of Mayors, 1620 'I' St. NW, Washington, D. C. 20006 (202) 293-7330. KELLOGG PROMOTES LEADERSHIP Dec . 15 is the deadline for applications to the W. K Kellogg Nation al Fellowship Program, an initiative for professionals in the early part of their careers who want to improve their leadership skills. Begun in 1980, KNFP will select about 50 people for its 11th group. Fellows receive a grant of $35,000 over three years to follow an individualized learning plan outside their area of expertise and to take part in two seminars yearly, one in Latin America. Eligible employer s are reimbursed for one-half of employee release time at 12.5% of the fellow's salary. Some 440 people have participated in the fellowship program since its inception. To request an application, contact the Fellowship Office, W.K Kel logg Foundation, 400 North Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 49107-3398 (616) 969-2005. NAME DROPPING U.S . Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos and federal drug czar Wil liam Bennett appoint Camerino Lopez, principal of Garfield Elementary School in Phoenix, Ariz., to the 16-m ember National Commission on Drug-Free Schools. The commission will recommend ways for school districts to judge if its schools are free from drugs and what they can do to achieve a drug-free environment. It will also study whether deny ing federal aid to students is an effective deterrent against drugs ... The William C. Norris Institute announces that former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros has been elected to its board of directors. The in stitute links private and public cooperation to address societal needs ... Joseph DeSio, acting general counsel of the National Labor Relations Board, announces Roberto Chavarry as the new assistant general counsel in the Division of Operations Management. Chavarry, 45, is a native of Havana, Cuba .. Calendar TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Unk's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calen dar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. r.IN, Washington, D.C. 20005. ment and the evening's banquet festivities. Proceeds from the event will provide scholarships for disadvantaged Latino students pursuing degrees in business and related fields. be Aztec ceremonial dancing and Ballet Folklorico. Fred Thompson (619) 299-2190 COMING SOON BUSINESS CONVENTION THIS WEEK GOLF(fENNIS TOURNAMENT City of Industry, Calif. Aug. 28 The Latin American Business Association is holding its seventh annual Golf and Tennis Invitational Tournament. Numerous sports and entertainment celebrities will take part in the fund-raising tourna-4 Albert Canong (213) 721-4000 SALSA FESTIVAL New York Aug. 28-Sept. 4 Ralph Mercado Management is presenting the 14th annual New York Salsa Festival. Dozens of perfor mances by bands from around the world will take place at various New York venues. Two major con certs, featuring performers such as Celia Cruz and Ruben Blades, will be presented. Harriet Wasser (212) 570-7037 MARIACHI FESTIVAL San Diego Sept. 2 Mariachi Festival '89, presented by the Alba 80 Society, will feature Vikki Carr and Lola Beltran along with four other mariachi groups in the city's first mariachi festival. Also included in the program will Aug.28, 1989 U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce New Orleans Sept. 6-1 0 Maxine Weber (816) 531-6363 PRESIDENTIAL TRIBUTE National Hispanic Presidential Tribute Gala Com mittee Washington, D.C. Sept. 12 Susan Gonzalez (202) 662-1355 MARKETING CONFERENCE Hispanic Business magazine Los Angeles Sept. 12-14 Lysa Kessman (805) 682-5843 FUND-RAISER Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Washington, D.C. Sept. 13 Uliana Navia (202) 543-1771 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I EDITORIAL PUBLISHING DIRECTOR To direct and administer the daily operation of professional membership association's pub lishing operation. BA degree plus 1 0 years prior related work experience, at least six years must be in pub lications management. Experience in books and journals publishing, budgeting, long-range planning and financial analysis. Extensive managerial/administrative experience essen tial. Knowledge of database technology. Starting salary to $46,500 plus excellent bene fits. Resume to: Director Office of Personnel Management NASW 7981 Eastern Ave. Silver Spring, Md. 20910 EOE ALLIED HEALTH INSTRUCTOR Requires bachelor's degree in health-related field/education, California RN or EMT -P. For application and complete position an nouncement call Human Resources, Palo mar College (619) 7 44-1150, ext. 2201. Closing date: 4:30p.m. PST 9/13/89. EO/AAE Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Arlington County Personnel Office 21 00 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, VA 22201 Employment Information Job Une TDD (hearing impaired only) 703-358-3500 703-538-3363 703-284-5521 Equal Opportunity Employer • * * * * CITY OF PARAMOUNT FAMILY COUNSELOR City of Para mount, Calif. (Salary: $2,820-$3,428 per month, plus City pays employee's 7% share of PERS) . Requires Bachelor's Degree in social sci ence, psychology, or related field. Mas ter's Degree desirable. MFCC or LCSW preferred. Experience working with gang-related youth in a preventative counseling capac ity desirable. Will establish and maintain counseling contact with youth who are prone to gang involvement and their families, plan and organize innovative counseling activities which will discourage gang maintain close contact with resource and referral agencies and other duties. APPLY BY: Open. NEIGHBORHOOD COUNSELOR City a Calif. (Salary: $2,266$2,754 per month, plus City pays em ployee's 7% share of PERS). Requires Bachelor's Degree with spe cialization in social science, psychol ogy, or related field. One year experi ence working with youth and parents in a community setting, and familiarity with youth gang membership also required. Will implement programs for early elementary age youth which will dis courage gang membership in the com munity. Will conduct classroom pres entations and community meetings, maintain contact with youth and their parents, prepare written reports and oral presentations, and other duties. APPLY BY: Open. APPLY AT: City of Paramount, 16400 Colorado Avenue, Paramount, Calif. 90723 . Phone: (213) 531-3503 Extension 326. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of His panic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 2340280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. ClASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & ZIP code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPlAY ClASSIFIED RATES: Ordered by ________ _ Organization _______ _ Street ----------City, State & Zip ______ _ (ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 Area Code & Phone per column inch ------Aug. 28, 1989 5

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Arts & Entertainment the event is held in two parts: part I, Aug. 28 to Sept. 4, and part II, Sept. 14 and 15. BICOASTAL MUSIC NOTES: Two distinct forms of Latino music are highlighted this week in separate events held at opposite ends of the nation. This week's attractions include a Salsa Meets Jazz concert featuring Mongo Santamaria and Japan's Orquesta Luz (Aug. 28 at the Village Gate), a Nite of Skins with Tito Puente and Ray Barreto (Aug. 29 at SOB's) and a Gran Concierto with Celia Cruz, El Gran Combo, La SonoraPorcefJa, among others (Sept. 2, Forest Hills Tennis Stadium). In San Diego the Mariachi Festival'89, to be held Sept. 2, will feature performances by Vikki Carr and Mexico's Lola Beltran. Groups from Los Angeles (Mariachi Los Camperos and Mariachi Sol de Mexico), Orlan do, Fla. (Mariachi Cobre), and Tucson, Ariz. (Los Changuitos Feos), will perform at the first such event in the city. For the first time, the festival includes a merengue event, Sept. 3, with a roster of acts from the Dominican Republic. The festival concludes Sept. 15 with a Festival de los Soneros concert at Madison Square Gar den. Mariachi Festival'89 is a fund-raiser for Alba 80 Society, a non-profit organization that raises money for Hispanic college students. In other music news, preliminaries for the first national talent show for U.S. Hispanics begin airing this week on the Univision television net work. Sponsored by Anheuser-Busch, the program titled Buscando estral/as con Budweiser will select winners in seven categories. Back east, Latin music lovers are already enjoying the first portion of this year's 14th annual New York International Salsa Festival. This year Media Report By Carlos sanchez, president of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D . C. A friend of mine showed me an editorial car toon in The Daily Texan, the student newspaper at the University of Texas at Austin, where I went to school. It ran after the grisly mur der of Mark Kilroy, the UT student who was killed by satan worshippers in Matamoros, Mexico. : The cartoon said, SANCHEZ "Come to Mexico " ' and pictured a bullfighter, a Mexican woman in a shawl, a mariachi guitarist, and a flamenco dancer from Spain for some reason, all standing behind a skeleton. I have to believe that if one Latino had been a part of that staff, the cartoon would not have run. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix f>erez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 When some Latino students protested the cartoon, one letter to the editor rebuked them for attempting to "make a racial/cultural issue of this" and "defend a nation that can't defend its own people or its visitors. That's not race, gentlemen. That is fact, II the letter said. What is also fact is that these attitudes at the college level are tougher to defend against be cause of a decade-long decline of minorities enrolling in colleges across the country. Minority students must constantly choose between acceptance among their peers or defiance. Students such as myself preferred denial of our background to confrontation. To be at once accepted by our peers and defiant of their prejudiced attitudes is hard. I remember the lonliness I once felt when I did a summer internship at the Arizona Daily Star in Tucson. I worked. I got stories in the newspaper. But I also regretted not being part of a special minority internship program that was operating out of the newsroom that sum mer. I regretted missing out on the comradery that I saw among those interns. But then I saw what they were working toward: It was a small, six-page tabloid that they ended up distributing in the newsroom. Antonio Mejias-Rentas Nobody read it. I felt that these minority stu dents, while they may have had more fun than I that summer, had been robbed. Ever since then I have had a bias against such minority programs. They segregate the student from a real newsroom environment. The net effect is that it teaches the student to place more emphasis on culture than ac complishment. I am the only Latino reporter working for The Washington Post. No longer am I intimidated by being different. It gets . me noticed in a newsroom with 400 reporters. No longer do I avoid confrontation with prevailing attitudes in the newsroom. Such confrontation is ap preciated as a different perspective that en sures additional sensitiVity. The answer to pluralizing the college newsroom is simple: Make it a requirement. You do a disservice to minority students by treating them differently. But you also do them a disservice by ignoring their differences. (This is a condensed version of a presenta tion Sanchez made Aug. 11 at the annual con ference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.) CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. (See Media Report)