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Hispanic link weekly report, September 4, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 4, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
U.S. Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole appoints Amparo Bouchey as deputy assistant secretary of labor for congressional and intergovernmental affairs...A Manhattan appeals court rules that former New York state Sen. Israel Ruiz may not run In an election to fill his own unexpired term because of a federal felony conviction for overstating his assets on a bank loan application...The sister of slain LIVE Entertainment Inc. Chairman Jos6Men6ndez charges that mobsters, angered by his refusal to do business with them, are responsible. The bullet-riddled bodies of Men6ndez, 45, and his wife, Mary, 44, were discovered last month in their Beverlv Hills mansion...Authorities at the U.S. Military
Academy in West Point, N.Y., conduct hearings over charges that Maj. Ernest Flores, a gynecologist, sexually abused three women under his care...Orange County, Calif., Superior Court Judge Jean Rheinhelmer sentences former Harvard University student Jos6Razo, 22, to 10 years \r) prison for six armed robberies committed during school vacations... Los Angeleno Raymond Navarro crashes the 27th birthday party of his estranged wife, Maria de Navarro, and opens fire with a handgun, killing her and three other women. Fifteen minutes earlier Navarro had phoned his wife threatening to come over and kill her, prompting a call to the sheriffs 911 emergency line. A dispatcher told the wife to call again if he arrived but that nothing could be done until then...
Vol. 7 No. 35
l^HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
Nation Embarks on Heritage Month
By Adrienne Urbina and Felix Perez
Nearly 21 years to the day after President Lyndon Johnson signed a proclamation designating Hispanic Heritage Week, the United States will embark Sept. 15 on the first monthlong salute of Hispanic contributions to the nation.
During the first commemoration in 1968, the only U.S. Hispanics given any significant public recognition were Mexicans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans. With the inauguration of Hispanic Heritage Month, there appears to be a greater realization that U.S. Hispanics are an amalgamation of some 21 national-origin groups. Most visible among these are the growing Salvadoran, Dominican and Nicaraguan communities.
Quincentenary activities being shaped for 1992 are helping to reinforce the positive light in which all Latinos are being cast.
Since Sept. 17, 1968, Hispanic Heritage Week has included Sept. 15 and 16. Last year, during the 100th session of Congress, Rep. Esteban Torres of California introduced an amendment to that proclamation that would extend the observance from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. President Ronald Reagan signed it Sept. 13.
Torres proposed the amendment, in part, to diffuse the criticism that the week was seen as too skewed toward Mexican Americans and to ensure other Hispanic groups felt included. Ten Latin American countries celebrate their independence or national holidays on a day during the period from Sept. 15 to Oct. 12. The latter is the more universally recognized Diade la Raza, a day to highlight the common roots of all Hispanic cultures.
"The period of a month provides for a longer time to celebrate the contributions of Hispanics
continued on page 2
Athletics Help Latina Scholastic Output
By Rhonda Smith
Hispanic females who participate in high school sports are more likely than their non-ath-letic counterparts to obtain better grades, stay in school and go on to attend four-year col-
Bilingual Police Seek Pay
Hispanic police officers in Miami have submitted a proposal to the city commissioners that would give officers with bilingual skills up to 11 % extra compensation if their second language is used on the job. The officers say they deserve the extra pay because they are often called upon to translate for other officers or take assignments that monolingual officers cannot.
Hugo Martinez, attorney for Miami’s Hispanic Officers Association and the Metro-Dade Hispanic Police Officers Association, which combined make up more than 1,000 Latino police officers, told Weekly Report, "They have to have people on the street who speak (Spanish). If speaking Spanish is an asset, then recognize it and compensate it."
Miami Police Chief Perry Anderson opposes the proposal, saying it will lead to disunity.
leges, according to a report released Aug. 15 by The Women’s Sports Foundation.
The report, based on data gathered between 1980 and 1986, was the first of its kind to include a study of sports and Hispanic youth in the academic setting. It analyzed varsity sports participation and its impact on Hispanic, black and Anglo students beginning in their sophomore year.
It found that Hispanic, black and Anglo athletes, male and female, scored higher on standardized reading, vocabulary and mathematics tests than their non-athletic counterparts. On achievement tests, 43% of rural Hispanic females scored in the top quartile, compared with 14% of their non-athletic peers.
While the report cautioned against advancing the view that participating in sports provides an "automatic pathway to upward mobility," it said Hispanic female athletes from rural schools were almost five times more likely than their non-athletic peers to attend a four-year college
Hispanic male athletes from rural schools were more than four times as likely to attend a four-year college.
Of the 3,336 athletes studied, 8.8% were Hispanic males and 3.2% Hispanic females.
Ros-Lehtinen Victorious, Wins Congressional Seat
By Danilo Alfaro
Cuba-born Republican lleana Ros-Leh-tinen became the first Latina elected to Congress Aug. 29, edging Democrat Gerald Richman in the special election to fill the Miami-based 18th Congressional District seat.
ROS-LEHTINEN election marks first
In winning what had been described as an ethnically polarized campaign, Ros-Lehtinen, 37, also became the first Cuban American elected to serve on Capitol Hill. She will join the nine other Hispanic voting Congress members.
Ros-Lehtinen received 49,638 votes (53.2%) to Richman’s 43,759 (46.9%).
The former Florida state senator said her win was "a victory for the whole Hispanic community and sends a message to our brothers in Cuba of what we can do."
Ros-Lehtinen had leveled charges of racism at Richman, 48, who had repeatedly said he was running for an "American seat."
Voter turnout was 51% overall. According to The Miami Herald, Hispanic turnout was 58%, non-Hispanic white turnout was 42%, and black turnout was 33%. The district's voting population is 44% non-Hispanic white, 37% Hispanic and 19% black. One exit poll showed the Hispanic community voting nearly exclusively for Ros-Lehtinen. Cuban Americans also won seats in Florida’s Senate and House of Representatives. In state Senate District 34, Republican attorney Lincoln Dfaz-Balart received 82.3% of the vote (26,465), beating former state Rep. Gene Flinn, who received 17.7% (5,679). In Florida House District 110, Republican lawyer Miguel De Grandy received 85% of the vote (9,766) to beat Democrat insurance and real estate broker John Walters, who received 15% (1,723).


Northern Calif. Infants Without Health Insurance Soar 140%
By Danilo Alfaro
Northern California Latino infants are more likely than other infants in the region to be born to mothers without health insurance, thereby increasing their risk of illness or death, according to a new study.
Published Aug. 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine, the study found that from 1982 to 1986 the percentage of uninsured Hispanic newborns rose from 8.2% in 1982 to 19.7% in 1986, a 140% increase. Among all newborns the percent uninsured rose from 5.5% to 8% during those years, it stated.
The number of Latinos employed in service-sector jobs with inadequate benefits contributes to their lack of health insurance, said Dr. Paula Braveman of the University of California, San Francisco, who headed the study. She also cited the undocumented population, who do not qualify for Medicaid, and the overall poverty rate among Hispanics.
"This country needs to join the other industrialized nations, with the exception of South Africa, in having some form of univer-
sal health care coverage,” she told Weekly Report.
In 1986 uninsured babies were 31% more likely than insured babies to encounter problems, up from 11% in 1982.
When compared to privately insured Anglo babies, Latino newborns were more than four times as likely to die or suffer health problems, the study found. It added that uninsured Hispanics were 56% more likely than insured Hispanics to encounter problems. Uninsured black babies were more than twice as likely as insured blacks to suffer problems.
Border Patrol Wounds Teen in Shooting
By Danilo Alfaro
A U.S. Border Patrol agent in San Ysidro, Calif., shot and wounded a 15-year-old Mexican citizen Aug. 27. The boy was about to hurl a rock at the agent’s partner, according to Immigration and Naturalization Service officials. The incident occurred amid escalating tensions along the California/Mexico border.
The boy, Pedro Garcfa Hernandez, was listed in fair condition at the University of California, San Diego, Medical Center.
The shooting happened less than two hours after another Border Patrol officer allegedly spent more than an hour taunting a crowd of 100 Mexican nationals with racial slurs broadcast over his vehicle’s public address system. According to reporters who witnessed the event, the agent identified himself as"tejano."
to building this nation," Torres toid Weekly Report.
Salvadorans, Dominicans and Nicaraguans are rapidly making their presence felt as part of the 19.4 million Hispanics on the U.S. mainland.
There are an estimated 900,000 to one million Salvadorans residing here, an increase of at least 500,000 since 1979. The majority of
INDEPENDENCE DAYS, NATIONAL HOLIDAYS
Belize Sept. 21 Guatemala Sept. 15
Bolivia Oct. 12 Honduras Sept. 15
Mexico Sept. 16 Chile Sept. 18
Nicaragua Sept. 15 Costa Rica Sept. 15
Spain Oct. 12 B Salvador Sept. 15
these are in Los Angeles (300,000) and New York City (150,000).
Dominicans are predicted to pass Puerto Ricans as the largest Latino group in New York City by the year 2010. Widely varying estimates peg their numbers in the city at anywhere from 300,000 (according to the Mayor’s Office on Hispanic Affairs) to 800,000
Later that evening the reporters saw a firecracker-type device flying from the driver-side window of an INS vehicle toward a crowd along the border. The device exploded, causing the people to scatter. No one was hurt.
INS spokesperson Michael Gregg said agents are not given devices of this type, nor is jt Border Patrol policy to use the public address system to harass or taunt. "We do not condone this. If this did happen we will take appropriate action to resolve it." He said an investigation into the incidents was underway.
According to Irma Castro, executive director of the Chicano Federation of San Diego, "The agents consistently abuse people who are trying to cross the border."
A14-year-old Mexican was killed in the same area Aug. 20 when a Border Patrol vehicle ran over him.
(as reported by the Consulate of the Dominican Republic).
In Southern Florida, officials are anticipating a fresh influx of Nicaraguans due to last month’s signing of an accord by five Central American nations that disbands the U.S.-backed contras. There are some 100,000 to
150.000 Nicaraguans in greater Miami; 50,000 arrived in the past year.
Events will take place in states such as California, with the nation’s largest Hispanic community at 3.8 million, or 22% of the state’s population, and Michigan, where there are
162.000 Latinos, or 1.8% of the state. Activities planned for Hispanic Heritage Month range from a Puerto Rican parade Sept. 24 in Philadelphia to a conference Sept. 14 and 15 in Boise, Idaho, (see Calendar)
The Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs will mark the commemoration with events spanning the entire month.
"Hispanic Heritage Month gives us an opportunity to focus national attention on the concerns of the community. It’s a chance to reflect not only upon the past, but the present and future," said Marylou Olivarez-Mason, director of the Michigan commission.
Martihez Joins Hopefuls For Leland’s Empty Seat
By Rhonda Smith
Texas state Rep. Rom&n Martinez (D-Hous-ton) said Aug. 23 he is considering a bid for the 18th Congressional District seat left vacant by U.S. Rep. Mickey Leland’s death Aug. 7.
If Martfnez opts to vie for the seat, which the Democrat Leland had held for 11 years, he will join a growing list of contenders. The filing deadline for the Nov. 7 special election is Oct. 10.
Martfnez, 30, is in his fourth term as a mem-MARTINEZ ber of the Texas House of Representatives and is the only Latino so far to express an intent to seek the seat. In addition to serving his third term on the Appropriations Committee, he is the chairman of Budget and Oversight for the Elections Committee and a member of the Mexican-American Legislative Caucus.
According to 1980 census data, the 18th district is 41% black, 31% Hispanic and 27% Anglo. The increase in the number of Hispanics in that region during recent years, however, has led many to speculate that the percentage for Hispanics is higher.
Mexicans, 22%, Plan Move
Despite toughened immigration laws, 22% of Mexican citizens, or 18.7 million, say they are very likely or fairly likely to move to the United States during the next year, according to the results of a poll published in the Los Angeles Times. Forty-two percent, or 35.7 million, had no plans at all to do so.
The poll was based on face-to-face interviews with 1,835 Mexican adults. It was conducted Aug. 5-13 in 42 randomly selected cities and towns in Mexico.
Asked what they liked most about the United States, 41% cited economic opportunity. Asked what they disliked most, 42% pointed to the drug problem here. The poll was published Aug. 21.
Heritage Month Celebrates Contributions
continued from page 1
2
Sept 4.1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
HEALTH INSURANCE AND NEWBORNS: "Adverse Outcomes and Lack of Health Insurance Among Newborns In An Eight-County Area of California, 1982-1986" is a six-page article in The New England Journal of Medicine that finds Latino infants in Northern California are more likely to be born to mothers without health insurance. For a copy specify the Aug. 24 issue, and send $7 to the journal at 1440 Main St., Waltham, Mass. 02154 (617) 893-3800 ext. 1293.
HERITAGE BY CASSETTE: National Public Radio is offering for sale cassettes of its program Latin File and other periodic programs dealing with Hispanics. To receive a catalog listing the cassettes available and their prices, call 1 -800-253-0808.
STEMMING DROPOUTS: "Dropouts in America: Enough is Known for Action" looks at various strategies used to combat the dropout problem and recommends that they begin in elementary school and continue through high school. For a copy of the 69-page report, send $7.50 to the Institute for Educational Leadership, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-8405.
ATHLETICS AND GRADES: "Minorities in Sports: The Effect of Varsity Sports Participation on the Social, Educational and Career Mobility of Minority Students" finds that participation in sports among Hispanic males and females increases their chances of entering college. For a copy of the 48-page report, send $3 to the Women’s Sports Foundation, 342 Madison Ave., Suite 728, New York, N.Y. 10173 1-800-227-3988.
BULLETIN ON PUERTO RICANS: Centro de Estudios Puertorri-quehos has published the summer issue of its Bulletin. Among the topics covered in the English- and Spanish-language articles of the 119-page publication are Puerto Rican community organizations in New York City, Puerto Rican studies in the 1990s and circular migration between the island and the mainland. For a free copy (specify Vol. 11 No. 6), contact the Centro at Hunter College, City University of New York, 695 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 10021 (212) 772-5689.
CONNECTING
KRAFT HELPS STUDENTS
Nearly 200 juniors and sophomores from two Chicago high schools completed late last month summer jobs with non-profit agencies through a program that seeks to combat the dropout problem. The effort is funded by a $130,000 grant from Kraft General Foods.
The Job Readiness program, five years old and administered by Chicago United, pays the salaries of students who qualify through a 95% class-attendance rate and improved academic performance. The program also provides counseling and training. Students’ parents must sign an agreement that their children will comply with program requirements.
The students, who are chosen from Farragut Career Academy and Dunbar Vocational School, come from economically disadvantaged families. Roughly 35% are Hispanic. A similar program administered by Chicago United employs juniors and seniors in the private sector. Job Readiness hopes to expand to three additional schools in the city this year.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
Francisco Herrera rejoins the staff of U.S. Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) as the senator’s senior policy adviser. Herrera was most recently director of San Diego’s Department of Binational Affairs...
The Hispanic Public Affairs Committee of Denver and National Image of Colorado write to U.S. Sen. Timothy Wirth to request that he ask the General Accounting Office to investigate claims of discrimination in recruiting, hiring, training, promotion and grievance procedures at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services...
The Washington, D.C.-based Hitachi Foundation selects Pedro Reyes, 18, as one of six recipients of its 1989 Yoshiyama Award for Exemplary Service to the Community. Reyes, who wins $5,000, was cited for creating the Welcome Buddy project, an undertaking that helps new immigrant students become integrated into the Los Angeles school system...
Heritage Month
Following is a listing of some events taking place to commemorate Hispanic Heritage Month, Sept 15-Oct. 15.
FOLKLORIC FESTIVAL Atlanta, Ga. Sept. 10
A traditional Cuban celebration, the Vfrgen de la Caridad del Cobre festival, will be held. The festival is based on the story of the Virgin of Caridad. According to the story, a mulatto virgin appeared to three fishermen floating on a board in Cuba’s Nipe Bay. Also included in the celebration will be a parade and a reception.
Olga Ledon (404) 325-3631 BAND PERFORMANCE
Washington, D.C. Sept. 14 The District of Columbia’s Office of Latino Affairs will host a performance of the internationally recognized National Guard of Puerto Rico Band. A reception will be held following the presentation.
Eduardo L6pez (202) 939-8765 SMITHSONIAN EVENTS Washington, D.C. Sept. 15-Oct. 15 The Smithsonian Institution will celebrate Latino music and culture with a series of events, including lectures, films and performances by traditional music ensembles. Local music groups Semilla and Calidad will perform, as will Yolocamba I Ta, the in-
ternationally acclaimed group from El Salvador. Public Information (202) 357-2700 MICHIGAN LATINOS
Lansing, Mich. Sept. 15-Oct. 15 The Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs is presenting a month of activities ranging from art exhibits and video screenings to poetry readings, music and dance. Awards will be presented and prominent Latinos, including astronaut Sidney Gutierrez, will speak.
Essie Solano (517) 373-8339 FIESTAS PATRIAS Seattle Sept. 16
The Concilb for the Spanish Speaking is sponsoring a festival with food, crafts, music and dance. Raquel Obregon (206) 447-4891 D.C. LATINOS
Washington, D.C. Sept. 17 The Hispanic community and its contributions to metropolitan Washington will be recognized with a festival of music, arts and foods on the grounds of the Washington Cathedral. The festival will conclude with a worship service in the cathedral.
John Friazzell (202) 537-6540 ALBUQUERQUE EVENTS Albuquerque, N.M. Sept. 17-Oct. 15 The Albuquerque Convention and Visitors Bureau is sponsoring various events. Native Americans will celebrate their harvest days. Other events include pinto bean, chile and mariachi days, as well as the
largest annual hot-air balloon event in the world. Hispanic theater and music performances will also be featured.
Carol Garcfa (505) 842-9918
THIS WEEK
BUSINESS CONVENTION New Orleans Sept. 6-10
The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is holding its 10th annual National Conference and Business Exchange. Activities will include sessions on topics of current interest to small business owners, regional and national awards ceremonies recognizing Hispanic entrepreneurs, a Mississippi River cruise and an international ball.
Maxine Weber (816) 531-6363
AWARDS BANQUET
Las Vegas Sept. 8
The Latin Chamber of Commerce of Nevada is holding its seventh annual Awards Banquet. Awards will be given to Nevada Latinos in the categories of construction, retail/wholesale, public service and the outstanding Hispanic. Special awards will also be given to corporations that have supported the community. Rafael Franchi, deputy director of the Minority Business Development Agency in Washington, D.C., will be the keynote speaker. Otto Merida (702) 385-7367
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sept 4,1989
3


Ana Veciana-Suarez
If Grandmothers Strike
My mother, who has cared for my children almost since the day they were born, had the gall to go on vacation, leaving my family life in shambles. Imagine what would happen if other abuelas (grandmothers) did the same. They would single-handedly paralyze a complex network of baby-sitting, home care and food services for at least 40% of Miami’s population.
Let’s face it. Cuban grandmothers who care for their children’s children are the most overworked, underpaid employees of modern times. In ancient Egypt, they would have been the laborers who built the pyramids.
During medieval times, they would have been the serfs tilling the soil. Today, they are the slaves of their liberated daughters and daughters-in-law.
If my mother and other grandmothers I know are any indication, I bet more than 90% of them receive no compensation — except for a greeting card at Christmas and another on Mother’s Day. Others are probably paid weekly wages ranging from $2 to $15.
DRAMATIC, DEVASTATING EFFECTS
When AFL-CIO officials get wind of this, they’ll send representatives to help organize the abuelas. And you can bet your last bowl of Mom’s ajiaco (a Cuban-type goulash) that we’ll have a strike on our hands along with demands for fair wages, better working conditions and respect.
It won’t be easy organizing a work stoppage. My mother, for instance, has been talking about a vacation alone with my father since I could walk. It has taken her five children, seven grandchildren and almost 30 years to make good on that threat. Abuelas, you see, are burdened with this enormous sense of responsibility, this self-centered idea that their grandchildren’s lives would come to a complete stop without them. And, of course, they are absolutely, totally and completely right.
The effects of a grandmothers’ strike would be dramatic and devastating. Distress calls to police and fire rescue would increase substantially, mainly from mothers who could not control their unruly offspring and from fathers exposed to large doses of small children.
Small business would shut down, and production at larger corporations would slow. Young employees, both men and women, would either call in sick or take a personal leave of absence.
A bank crisis would follow as grandmothers (on their way to Tahiti) and young mothers (two yards from insanity) withdraw money from their savings. (On the bright side, though, manufacturers of frozen and canned foods would report a jump in sales.)
DECLARE COUNTYWIDE EMERGENCY
A public official would declare a countywide emergency. Later, in an expose of private use of federal monies, the press would report the official’s own mother had walked out on his six children, ages 10, eight, seven, five, three and two.
But don’t, for a single instant, think these are the wild ramblings of a panicked victim. Anything is possible. (Or, should I say, everything is impossible when abuela leaves.) I, for one, have never hired a babysitter. I don’t know in what shape or size they come. And my husband has complained that my cafe con leche cannot hold a buttered piece of Cuban toast to the one he mooches at his in-laws’ house.
I promised my mother, as she boarded her flight, that she’ll get a raise to $25 a week with perks (use of my pool and washer and dryer). She scoffed and said she was thinking of opening a fruit and baby-sitting service. I don’t know if she would sell any mameys (tropical fruit), but I bet the children of the world (and their working mothers) would beat a path to her door.
(Ana Veciana-Suarez, who used to be with The Miami Herald, is now a reporter for The Palm Beach Post in Florida.)
Reprinted with permission of The Miami Herald
William Medina
Tracing Grandpa Ramon
A historian’s work is similar to a detective’s. Both dig for facts to reconstruct the past. They probe into people’s lives, leaf through piles of dusty records and spend endless hours fitting together the information they collect.
Using these tools, I’ve tried to piece together Grandpa Ram6n’s life.
My memory of him is vague. I remember when I was a little boy in San Bernardino,
Calif., he would sometimes visit our house, settle into a chair in our front room...and snore. I saw him as big and dark and brooding, a man with constantly tired eyes.
Conversations with my mother and grandmother have since assured me that he stood no more than 5-feet-4. Other friends and relatives mention his name fondly, proof that he was a man of greater dimensions than I could understand as a child.
Now my amateur detective work, in public libraries as well as with family and acquaintances, is filling in the gaps:
Ram6n Arellano was stocky and short-tempered. Born in Zacatecas, Mexico, in 1906, he was raised in a rural village where owning pigs, chickens and land brought respect from the neighbors.
This column trio celebrates Grandparents' Day, Sept. 10.
According to my mom, when Grandpa was growing up, the Arellanos held 40 acres of property, making them one of the biggest land-owning families in the area. Everything would have passed on to Grandpa Ram6n had it not been for the Revolution. In 1912, soldiers confiscated the Arellano ranch.
During the ’20s, U.S. railroad companies routinely sent scouts south to bring back laborers. From 1920 to 1929, more than 400,000 Mexicans were admitted to the United States to provide labor.
With neither land nor work, Grandpa Ram6n was tempted by the enticements of these railroad agents. He set out in 1929, leaving behind his wife, Trinidad Velasco, and daughter, Josefina Arellano, my mother.
He reached Arizona, where he began working for the Southern Pacific Railroad. He traveled about the Southwest, laying and repairing rails to expedite the east-west transportation of freight. He lived in boxcar communities, small colonies established by the railroad people.
In the ’30s, he moved to Indio, Calif. There he fell In love again, marrying his second wife, Enedina Mendez Arellano. She gave him two more children, Olga and Richard. According to my Aunt Olga, the family moved several times while living in the desert, settling for a while in Riverside in 1947. There Enedina died of cancer.
SURVIVED MANY BOUTS OF SORROW
My mother, Josefina, came to the United States in 1953 to visit him. After a few months, she decided to stay. Then she met and married my father, Oscar Medina
Grandpa Ramon never sought legal U.S. residency. He lived in constant fear of deportation. Nonetheless, he was able to survive two antiimmigrant epidemics. During the depression years, 500,000 Mexicans — including many who were here legally—were repatriated. They were accused of taking jobs from U.S. citizens and straining the welfare system. Again in the ’50s, a surge of anti-immigrant hysteria ignited Operation Wetback.
Grandpa died of heart failure in an Arizona hospital in 1967, at age 61. He had remained a faithful employee of the Southern Pacific Railroad. He worked hard all of his life and survived many bouts with loneliness and sorrow.
To understand his life more fully, I need to look at what we as family saw, and I need to examine the events that helped shape it. By superimposing a bit of history, it helps unravel the mystery about why he sat so silent in the front-room chair and why things turned out the way they did.
(William Medina manages his family’s restaurant in Riverside, Calif.)
1989 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sept 4.
VECIANA-SUAREZ
MEDINA
4


Cristobal Berry Caban
Don Chago’s Legacy
Don Chago hasn’t scooped a bag full of rice at the little grocery store at Avenida Puerto Rico and Calle Las Flores in Santurce for a long time. He is retired now, and most neighborhood tiendas have given way to supermarkets.
No sentimentalist, don Chago will tell you that it’s all right, it’s the way it should be, the way of a more prosperous Puerto Rico. Besides, he feels his work in politics and in social and business organizations helped pave the way.
Even in 1938, when he became a founding member of Luis Munoz Marfn’s Popular Democratic Party, my grandfather, Santiago Caban V6iez—don Chago — had espoused (along with Munoz) for everybody the slogan "Bread, Land and Liberty."
For don Chago, his store, Las Flores Provision, was the way to each of these: bread was a decent income for himself and his family; land was ownership of the little store; and liberty was the freedom to be his own boss. Even if that meant working harder than ever before. His illegal vote in 1920 for the Unionist Party had been an expression of these sentiments.
When young Santiago Cab6n Velez had first gone to work in a dry goods store, he already was dreaming of Las Flores Provision or a store very much like It. Before the store became more than a dream, he was 40 and had held a succession of jobs. Holding onto the dream of being his own boss took a lot of dedication.
MUNOZ MARIN HONORED HIM
Las Flores Provision wasn’t much, a store of half-pounds and napas — bonus portions. Rice, red beans, and other dried produce were found there in great barrels; meat was cut to order. These and canned goods and beer were delivered by Jimmy on his bicycle. Jimmy would even put the compra — your purchases — away for you.
That was the way it was. Very much the good neighbor. No one left Las Flores Provision without food, even when there was no cash. Credit with don Chago was personal: a notation in the little school notebook he kept.
Sept. 24,1964, was don Chago’s big day. On that day, he was recognized by 350 of his Chamber of Commerce colleagues as businessman of the month. He was honored for his business success, but more so for his civic contributions and his lifelong dedication to helping others.
Gov. Luis Munoz Marfn spoke at the ceremony honoring his lifelong friend. He commented proudly of the economic growth the island had experienced. He cited the Chamber of Commerce for its goal that decade of creating a free commerce economy in equilibrium between growth and fiscal responsibility.
CIVIC INVOLVEMENT, BUSINESS COMBINED Don Chago, of course, agreed. He had not abandoned, and would never abandon, his conviction that Commonwealth status was best for him and all of Puerto Rico. For don Chago this day, however, there were more important things to say.
"I commit no sin of egotism If I reject any homage being rendered exclusively to me, since another person should also partake of It. I refer to my dear wife, who has been the shining lantern, the torch light who has guided the path of my life toward success."
Don Chago worked hard in his little store. Overall he made a decent living. By never forgetting that it was people who made It possible for him to prosper, don Chago did so.
And in addition to her duties as wife, mother, and partner in Las Flores Provision, dona Jacinta Caban presided over a number of civic organizations. Civic involvement and business went well together in their case. What was good for Puerto Rico was good for the Cabans.
(Cristdbal Berry Cabin, ofReston, Va., is founder and president of At-lantic Resources Corporation.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
JOAQUIN EL BONITO: I’m sure that The New York Times misquoted Univision President Joaquin Blaya. Or at least, his words were taken out of context. Or, at the very, very least, he’s sorry he ate his foot.
Responding to critics’ complaints that Univision prefers lightskinned on-camera newspersons, Blaya, of Chilean descent, is quoted Aug. 27 by Times reporter Seth Mydans that even on Mexico television, "I submit to you that you have never, never seen a dark person."
Then, writes Mydans, “Blaya added: ’By the way, we have some very beautiful Mexican Americans on the air. They are both blond with blue eyes.’ Asked why lighter-skinned people were preferred, he said, 'It has to be said without being afraid, that television as well as movies is a business for beautiful people. It’s entertainment.’"
Remember ex-Los Angeles Dodger VP Al Campanis, Joaqufn? Maybe dark-skinned Latinos just lack the necessities to do a ** ,
. . .. .the beautiful one
good news show.
NO ‘SPANISH ONLY*: Sin Pelos’ United Nations correspondent Ed Ledesma covered the Aug. 16 U.N. hearings on the colonial status of Puerto Rico and sent me this report:
Ellgio Gonz&lez Castro, of the island’s Movimiento Albizuista Cris-tiano Revolucionario Y Nacionalista, began an attack on the statehood referendum being shaped in Congress.
Then, moved by the spirit of fair play, Gonz&lez Castro offered a counterproposal. He would support the 1991 congressional referendum on Puerto Rico IF prior to that vote, the United States agreed to conduct a referendum of its own "offering the American people the option of exercising their inalienable self-determination... to decide whether they want to give up their national sovereignty and become a state of Puerto Rico..."
He promised mainland residents "the opportunity to keep their language and their customs...We will not punish your children in school for not speaking Spanish. We will not saturate your radio waves with Spanish music that your people don’t understand...
"We will not," he concluded, "accuse American patriots of seditious conspiracy for trying to make their country free from Puerto Rico, should there be patriots in the United States."
Reported Ledesma: "This go ’round, almost half of those present were pro-statehood people who totally ignored the U.N. Decolonization Committee until the present 1,356th meeting."
LIPS THAT TOUCH MALT LIQUOR: When the Center for Science in the Public Interest launched its attack Aug. 23 against the malt liquor industry’s "targeting" blacks and Hispanics in its ad campaigns, one spokesperson drew the parallel "like advertising chocolates to diabetics."
The CSPI case was badly prepared. It had no ad-dollar figures at all to support its claim.
Nor could it find a single independent Hispanic health organization to support its attack — and it wasn’t for lack of trying. One major Latino health group that initially agreed to work with CSPI pulled out, charging that the center was paternalistic, inaccurate in its portrayal of the situation and looking only for a "rubber stamp."
— KayBcutaro
Quoting...
LEE TREVINO, quoted in the Los Angeles Times July 26, on winning:
7 played the (professional golf) tour in 1967and told Jokes and nobody laughed. Then I won the U.S. Open the next year, told the same jokes, and everybody laughed like hell."
Sept 4,1989
BERRY-CABAN
5


mO>r-"0Hm*3B>2
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
c
fr


STANFORD UNIVERSITY
Applications are invited for the position of Director of El Centro Chicano and Assistant Dean of Student Affairs at Stanford University.
Responsibilities include providing staff leadership for El Centro, a Chicano/ Latino student center; managing the Center and its budgets, programs and facility; advising and working with students in program and activities planning, based upon knowledge and experience of the cultural, organizational and variety of interests in the Chicano/Latino community; participating in campus affairs and University policy developments; developing ties with other university departments where appropriate; fostering pluralism by assisting with student programs that teach the Stanford community about Chicano/Latino culture.
Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree; MA desirable; three or more years training and experience in student affairs administration, counseling/policy analysis, budget management, staff supervision, student educational leadership programs; knowledge of development needs of 18-25-year-old students, esp. Chicanos/Latinos; excellent organizational and communication skills; ability to work in a decentralized academic setting.
Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume and three references by September 22, 1989 to: Carole Hyde, Search Committee Staff, 323 Old Union, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. 94305 (415) 723-2089.
Salary: $35,200-$40,000 depending on experience; excellent benefits.
Stanford University is an Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Employer.

SOCIAL WORKER
SOCIAL WORKER, fa new substance abuse prevention program for Hispanic youth.
Bilingual with BA in human services required. Master’s degree preferred.
Send resum6 to:
Child and Family Services 412 Century Lane Holland, Mich. 49423
ADMINISTRATIVE
MANAGER
Ann. No. 1187-OA-DPW Salary: $28,392
Coordinates budget preparation and expenditures, develops and implements training programs, coordinates with outside contact companies for refuse collection and disposal services.
Requires Bachelor’s degree in public administration, business administration or a related field plus two years of experience in public administration and/or budget preparation and review. Relevant Master’s degree may substitute for one year of experience.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. RESUMES SUBMITTED WITHOUT A COMPLETED OFFICIAL ARLINGTON COUNTY APPLICATION FORM WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Applications must be received in the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 pm on SEPTEMBER 21, 1989. To request application material, please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 2100 Clarendon Boulevard Suite 511
Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE/MFH
CITY OF PARAMOUNT
S/Tt/AT/ONS WANTED
89 Computer Science Graduate (B.S., SUNY, Stonybrook)
Interested in obtaining a challenging position preferably in graphic software development. I have research experience developing graphic software on Sun workstations using the C programming language and the Unix operating system.
Ready to relocate.
Richard S. Avila (516) 223-4305 2591 Harrison Ave.
Baldwin, New York 11510
FAMILY COUNSELOR - City of Paramount, Calif. (Salary: $2,820^3,428 per month, plus City pays employee’s 7% share of PERS.)
Requires Bachelor’s Degree in social science, psychology, or related field. Master’s Degree desirable. MFCC a LCSW preferred. Experience working with gang-related youth in a preventative counseling capacity desirable.
Will establish and maintain counseling contact with youth who are prone to gang involvement and their families, plan and organize innovative counseling activities which will discourage gang involvement, maintain close contact with resource and referral agencies, and other duties.
NEIGHBORHOOD COUNSELOR - City of Paramount, Calif. (Salary: $2,266-$2,754 per month, plus City pays employee’s 7% share of PERS.)
Requires Bachelor’s Degree with specialization in social science, psychology, or related field. One year experience working with youth and parents in a community setting, and familiarity with youth gang membership also required.
Will implement programs for early elementary age youth which will discourage gang membership in the community. Will conduct classroom presentations and community meetings, maintain contact with youth and their parents, prepare written reports and oral presentations, and other duties.
APPLY BY: Open.
APPLY BY: Open.
APPLY AT: City of Paramount, 16400 Colorado Avenue, Paramount, Calif. 90723. Phone (213) 531-3503 Extension 326
6
Sept 4, 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF
AMERICAN HISTORY SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
Position available for historian with strong experience in oral history, folklore fieldwork and archival research. Work will concentrate on Hispanic and American Indian cultures in the Southwest U.S. Candidate must have strong knowledge and prior research experience in these areas. Must have the ability to speak, read and translate Spanish. Historian will work with museum team to produce a major exhibition at the Smithsonian commemorating the Columbus Quincentenary.
Position is a 3-year appointment located at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Work will require travel to New Mexico. Salary $28,852 + benefits (GS-11). For further information contact: Harold Closter, (202) 357-2124, or send Federal Employment Form (SF-171) to: Smithsonian Institution, Office of Personnel Administration, Branch 3, P.O. Box 23294, Washington, D.C. 20026-3294. Reference Announcement #9-3132. Applications by October 31,1989.
AA/EOE
SENIOR
ACCOUNTANT
Southern Connecticut service subsidiary of major international consumer products corporation needs mature accountant experienced in general accounting, including knowledge of letters of credit.
Heavy South American transactions requiring Spanish fluency & aptitude for detail. Secure position offers $40,000 & superb benefits. Degree preferred.
Reply to:
Six Landmark Square, Suite 400 Stamford, Connecticut 06901 Telephone (203) 359-5678 Fax (203) 324-7051
PERSONNEL AGENCY FEES PAID BY HIRING COMPANY.
A Place in Your Future
PRESIDENT
UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO
Nominations and expressions of interest are invited for the position of President of the University of New Mexico. The President is the chief executive officer of the University and is directly responsible to the Board of Regents for directing the programs and administration of the University under policy established by the Board.
The University of New Mexico is the largest and most comprehensive of the state’s institutions of higher education. Founded in 1889, the University serves a multicultural student population of over 28,000 on five campuses and operates on an annual budget of $500 million. Comprised of 11 degree-granting units, UNM has the state’s only schools of Architecture & Planning, Law, Medicine, and Pharmacy. It offers over 150 undergraduate and graduate degree programs, and includes nationally recognized programs in several disciplines. The main campus in Albuquerque is a 640-acre campus whose award-winning landscaping and congenial mix of historic and modern buildings reflect its roots and look toward its future.
Candidates must have the ability to lead a complex, comprehensive research institution. A commitment to the traditions of the Southwest and the ability to articulate the mission, goals, needs, and achievement of the university to diverse publics is essential. They should possess a distinguished record of scholarly and professional achievement, academic vision, superior leadership skills, and strong personal integrity.
The Search Committee will begin screening candidates on or about October 15,1989 and continue until the position is filled.
Nominations and letters of interest should be submitted to:
Mr. R. William Funk Heidrick and Struggles Attn: UNM/HLWR/6123-01 1999 Bryan, Suite 1919 Dallas, Texas 75201
The University of New Mexico is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer which actively seeks and encourages nominations of and expressions of interest from minority and female candidates.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES:
90 cents per word (city, state & ZIPcode count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES:
(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch
Ordered by_ Organization. Street
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sept 4, 1989
7
m o > i" tj h ^ 20 > 2


Arts & Entertainment
UNEQUAL TV: Hispanic, Asian American and Native American characters are virtually invisible on network television, according to a study by the National Commission on Working Women.
The study, released Aug. 23 by the Washington, D.C.-based organization, found that most minority characters in entertainment television are upper-class blacks. Of the 78 minority lead characters counted during the 1989 spring season, 65 (83%) were black, nine (12%) were Hispanic, three (4%) were Asian and only one was Native American.
Research for Unequal Picture: Black, Hispanic, Asian and Native American Characters on Television — the full name of the study — included the examination of some 150 episodes of 30 prime-time network entertainment programs.
Unequal Picture found that nine out of 10 minority TV characters are middle class or wealthy and that most minority characters exist in a world of racial harmony.
Authored by Sally Steeland, the report found that 93% of the producers of the programs studied were white.
The nine Hispanic characters listed in the study included four men and five women. The men are Victor Sifuentes (portrayed by Jimmy Smits)onLA Law; Lt. Castillo (Edward James Olmos) on Miami Vice ; Alberto Rufz (Ramon Franco) on Tour of Duty; and Reuben (Paul Calderon) on Dream Street. The women are Marfa (Marfa Conchita Alonso) on One of the Boys; Marfa (Leslie Bega) on Head of the Class; Yolanda (Roxann Biggs) on Nightingales; Pilar (Katherine Ortega) on Falcon Crest; and Gina (Saundra Santiago) on Miami Vice.
Only three of the nine Hispanic characters — Victor, Alberto and Pilar — are expected to return for the 1989-90 season.
ONE UNERS: Berlin Blues, a remake of the German classic film The Blue Angel, features Puerto Rican singer/actress Julia Migenes Johnson in the Marlene Dietrich role...The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce announces that rock legend Ritchie Valens will be honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame...
— Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
MALT LIQUOR ADS RIPPED: A coalition of 22 minority and health organizations, including three Hispanic groups, called on the government Aug. 23 to stop beer companies from targeting malt liquor products — which contain more alcohol than regular beer — at Hispanics and blacks. They also sought a ban on advertising that implies alcohol potency and a limit on how much alcohol such beverages can contain.
The average alcohol content of regular beer is 4.6%, while malt liquor averages 6.6%, according to Michael Jacobson, executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest.
In letters to Health and Human Services Secretary Louis Sullivan and Treasury Secretary Nicholas Brady, the groups charged, "Malt liquor advertising typically features blacks and Latinos and includes images that are blatantly sexual or convey high alcohol content." They say that such marketing practices exacerbate alcoholism rates among
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ’N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina.
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No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30
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blacks and Hispanics as well as pave the way toward more potent drug use.
"These companies are clearly trying to take advantage of a community that receives less health education and less resources for treatment programs in order to maximize their profits," said Carlos Molina, president of the Latino Caucus of the American Public Health Association.
Also among the groups protesting the ads were the National Puerto Rican Coalition and the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund.
Responding to the call for Hispanic publications to stop running ads for the brews, Manuel Toro, president of the National Association of Hispanic Publications, told Weekly Report, "We don’t need anybody to tell us what to publicize or what to omit. Just because we advertise a beverage doesn’t mean people are going to follow us blindly."
STAY IN SCHOOL: NAHP is seeking funds for a nationwide campaign designed to curb the Latino dropout rate by stressing the importance of education. Scheduled to be launched this fall, the "Stay In School" campaign will
consist of public service advertisements in Hispanic print media, editorials, press conferences, school presentations and posters used in schools and social agencies.
NAHP has already received funding from Coca-Cola USA and is seeking a contribution from the Ford Motor Co.
HISPANIC FAMILY SERIES: In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, National Public Radio’s Latin File will feature a series of six-minute reports on five U.S. Hispanic families throughout September.
The programming will focus on a different family each Friday, examining their heritage, traditions and evolution in a multicultural society.
The series kicked off Sept. 1 with a segment on a Cuban American family in Miami. The segments that follow will feature a Puerto Rican family in New York City, a Salvadoran family that recently immigrated to Los Angeles, a Mexican American family in El Paso, Texas, culminating Sept. 29 with Latin File’s host Paz Cohen exploring her European and Chilean heritage.
— Danilo Alfaro
U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos unveils portrait for National Association of Hispanic Publications’ ’Stay in School’ campaign. From left: Randolph Ramos-Cobian, of sponsor Coca-Cola, Cavazos, artist Esperanza Martinez, and NAHP President Manuel Toro. (See Media Report.)


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making_ The News This Week U.S. Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole appoints Amparo Bouchey as deputy assistant secretary of labor for congressional and inter governmental affairs ... A Manhattan appeals court rules that former New York state Sen. Israel Ruiz may not run in an election to fill his own un expired term because of a federal felony conviction for overstating his assets on a bank loan application ... The sister of slain LIVE Entertain ment Inc. Chairman Josel\llenendez charges that mobsters, angered by his refusal to do business with them, are responsible. The bullet-riddled bodies of Menendez, 45, and his wife, Mary, 44, were discovered last month in their Beverlv Hills mansion ... Authorities at the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., conduct hearings over charges that Maj. Ernest Flores, a gynecologist, sexually abused three women under his care ... Orange County, Calif., Superior Court Judge Jean Rhelnheimer sentences former Harvard University student Jose Raze, 22, to 1 0 years in prison for six armed robberies committed during school vaca tions ... Los Angeleno Raymond Navarro crashes the 27th birthday party of his estranged wife, Maria de Navarro, and opens fire with a hpndgun, killing her and three other women. Fifteen minutes earlier Navarro had phoned his wife threatening to come over and kill her, prompting a call to the sheriff's 911 emergency line. A dispatcher told the wife to call again if he arrived but that nothing could be done until then ... HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT!sept.4,1989 Nation Embarks on Heritage Month By Adrienne Urbina and Felix Perez Nearly 21 years to the day after President Lyndon Johnson signed a proclamation desig nating Hispanic Heritage Week, the United States will embark Sept. 15 on the first monthlong salute of Hispanic contributions to the nation. During the first commemoration in 1968, the only U.S. Hispanics given any significant public recognition were Mexicans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans. With the inauguration of Hispanic Heritage Month, there appears to be a greater realization that U.S. Hispanics are an amalgamation of some 21 national-origin groups. Most visible among these are the growing Salvadoran, Dominican and Nicaraguan communities. . Quincentenary activities being shaped for 1992 are helping to reinforce the positive light in which all Latinos are being cast. Since Sept. 17, 1968, Hispanic Heritage Week has included Sept. 15 and 16. Last year, during the 1 OOth session of Congress, Rep. Esteban Torres of California introduced an amendment to that proclamation that would ex tend the observance from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. President Ronald Reagan signed it Sept. 13. Torres proposed the amendment, in part, to diffuse the criticism that the week was seen as too skewed toward Mexican Americans and to ensure other Hispanic groups felt included. Ten Latin American countries celebrate their independence or national holidays on a day during the period from Sept. 15 to Oct. 12. The latter is the more universally recognized ora de Ia Raza, a day t _ o highlight the common roots of all Hispanic cultures. "The period of a month provides for a longer time to celebrate the contributions of Hispanics continued on page 2 Athletics Help Latina Scholastic Output By Rhonda Smith Hispanic females who participate in high school sports are more likely than their non-ath letic counterparts to obtain better grades, stay in school and go on to attend four-year col-Bilingual Police Seek Pay Hispanic police officers in Miami have submitted a proposal to the city commis sioners that would give officers with bilin gual skills up to 11% extra compensation if their second language is used on the job. The officers say they deserve the extra pay because they are often called upon to trans late for other officers or take assignments that monolingual officers cannot. Hugo Martinez, attorney for Miami's Hispanic Officers Association and the Metro-Dade Hispanic Police. officers As sociation, which combined make up more than 1,000 Latino police officers, told Weekly Report, "They have to have people on the street who speak (Spanish). If speaking Spanish is an asset, then recog nize it and compensate it." Miami Police Chief Perry Anderson op poses the proposal, saying it will lead to dis unity. leges, according to a report released Aug. 15 by The Women's Sports Foundation. The report, based on data gathered between 1980 and 1986, was the first of its kind to in clude a study of sports and Hispanic youth in the academic setting. . It analyzed varsity sports participation and its impact on Hispanic, black and Anglo students beginning in their sophomore year. It found that Hispanic, black and Anglo ath letes, male and female, scored higher on standardized reading, vocabulary and mathematics tests than their non-athletic counter parts. On achievement tests, 43% of rural Hispanic females scored in the top quartile, compared with 14% of their non-athletic peers. While the report cautioned against advancing the view that participating in sports provides an "automatic pathway to upward mobility," it said Hispanic female athletes from rural schools were almost five times more likely than their non-athletic peers to attend a four-year college Hispanic male athletes from rural schools were more than four times as likely to attend a four -year college. Of the 3,336 athletes studied, 8.8% were Hispanic males and 3.2% Hispanic females. By Danilo Alfaro Cuba-born Republican Ileana Ros-Leh tinen became the first Latina elected to Congress Aug. 29, edging Democrat Gerald Richman in the special election to fill the Miami-based 18th Congressional Dis trict seat. In winning what had been described as an ethnically polarized campaign, Ros-Lehtinen, 37, also became the first Cuban American elected to serve on Capitol Hill. She will join the nine other ROS-LEHTINEN Hispanic voting Con-eleCtion marks first gress members. Ros-Lehtinen received 49,638 votes (53.2%) to Richman's 43,759 (46.9%). The form . er Florida state senator said her win was "a victory for the whole Hispanic community and sends a message to our brothers in Cuba of what we can do." Ros-Lehtinen had leveled charges of racism at Richman, 48, who had repeated ly said he was running for an "American seat." Voter turnout was 51% overall. According to The Miami Herald, Hispanic turnout was 58%, non-Hispanic white turnout was 42%, and black turnout was 33%. The district's voting population is 44% non-Hispanic white, 37% Hispanic and 19% black. One exit poll showed the Hispanic community voting nearly exclusively for Ros-Lehtinen. Cuban Americans also won seats in Florida's Senate and House of Representatives. In state Senate District 34 I Republican attorney Lincoln Dfaz-Balart received 82.3% of the vote (26,465), beat ing former state Rep. Gene Flinn, who received 17.7% (5,679). In Florida House District 11 0, Republican lawyer Miguel De Grandy received 85% of the vote (9,766) to beat Democrat insurance and real estate broker John Walters, who received 15% (1,723).

PAGE 2

Northern Calif.lnfants Without Health Insurance Soar 140% By Dani/o Alfaro Northern California Latino infants are more likely than other infants in the region to be born to mothers without health insurance, thereby increasing their risk of illness or death, according to a new study. Published Aug . 24 in the New England Jour nal of Medicine, the study found that from 1982 to 1986 the percentage of uninsured Hispanic newborns rose from 8.2% in 1982 to 19.7% in 1986, a 140% increase. Among all newborns the percent uninsured rose from 5.5% to 8% during those years, it stated. The number of Latinos employed in service sector jobs with inadequate benefits con tributes to their lack of health insurance, said Dr. Paula Braveman of the University of California, San Francisco, who headed the study. She also cited the undocumented population, who do not qualify for Medicaid, and the overall poverty rate among Hispanics. "This country needs to join the other in dustrialized nations, with the exception of South Africa, in having some form of univer-Border Patrol Wounds Teen in Shooting By Danilo Alfaro A U.S. Border Patrol agent in San Ysidro, Calif., shot and wounded a 15-yearold Mexican citizen Aug. 27. The boy was about to hurl a rock at the agent's partner, according to Immigration and Naturalization Service offi cials. The incident occurred amid escalating tensions along the California/Mexico border. The boy, Pedro Garcfa Hernandez, was listed in fair condition at the University of California, San Diego, Medical Center. The shooting happened less than two hours after another Border Patrol officer allegedly spent more than an hour taunting a crowd of 100 Mexican nationals with racial slurs broad cast over his vehicle's public address system. According to reporters who witnessed the event, the agent identified himself as 11tejano. '' Later that evening the reporters saw a firecracker-type device flying from the driver side window of an INS vehicle toward a crowd along the border. The device exploded, caus ing the people to scatter. No one was hurt. INS spokesperson Michael Gregg said agents are not given devices of this type, nor is it Border Patrol policy to use the public ad dress system to harass or taunt. 11We do not condone this. If this did happen we will take ap propriate action to resolve it. II He said an inves tigation into the incidents was underway. According to Irma Castro, executive director of the Chicano Federation of San Diego, 11The agents consistently abuse people who are trying to cross the border.•• A 14-year-old Mexican was killed in the same area Aug. 20 when a Border Patrol vehicle ran over him. Heritage Month Celebrates Contributions continued from page 1 to building this nation, i l Torres toid Weekiy Report. Salvadorans, Dominicans and Nicaraguans are rapidly making their presence felt as part of the 19 . 4 million Hispanics on the U.S. main land. There are an estimated 900,000 to one mil lion Salvadorans residing here, an increase of at least 500,000 since 1979. The majority of INDEPENDENCE DAYS, NATIONAL HOLIDAYS Belize Bolivia Mexico Nicaragua Spain Sept. 21 Oct. 12 Sept. 16 Sept. 15 Oct. 12 Guatemala Honduras Chile Costa Rica 8 Salvador Sept. 15 Sept. 15 Sept. 18 Sept. 15 . Sept. 15 these are in Los Angeles (300, 000) and New York City (150,000). Dominicans are predicted to pass Puerto Ricans as the largest Latino group in New York City by the year 201 0. Widely varying es timates peg their numbers in the city at anywhere from 300,000 (according to the Mayor's Office on Hispanic Affairs) to 800,000 2 (as reported by the Consulate of the Dominican Republic). In Southern Florida, officials are anticipating a fresh influx of Nicaraguans due to last month's signing of an accord by five Central American nations that disbands the U.S.-back ed contras. There are some 1 00,000 to 150,000 Nicaraguans in greater Miami; 50,000 arrived in the past year. Events will take place in states such as California, with the nation's largest Hispanic community at 3. 8 million, or 22% of the state's population, and Michigan, where there are 162,000 Latinos, or 1.8% of the state. Activities planned for Hispanic Heritage Month range from a Puerto Rican parade Sept. 24 in Philadelphia to a conference Sept. 14 and 15 in Boise, Idaho. (see Calendar) The Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs will mark the commemoration with events spanning the entire month. "Hispanic Heritage Month gives us an oppor tunity to focus national attention on the con cerns of the community. It's a chance to reflect not only upon the past, but the present and fu ture, •• said Marylou Olivarez-Mason, director of the Michigan commission. Sept4,1989 sal health care coverage," she told Weekly Report. In 1986 uninsured babies were 31% more likely than insured babies to encounter problems, up from 11% in 1982. When compared to privately insured Anglo babies, Latino newborns were more than four times as likely to die or suffer health problems, the study found. It added that unin sured Hispanics were 56% more likely than insured Hispanics to encounter problems. Uninsured black babies were more than twice as likely as insured blacks to suffer problems. Marbhez Joins Hopefuls For Leland's Empty Smt By Rhonda Smith Texas state Rep. Roman Martfnez (D-Hous ton) said Aug. 23 he is considering a bid for the 18th Congressional District seat left vacant by U.S. Rep. Mickey Leland's death Aug. 7. . . , If Martfnez opts to vie \. ''i: for the seat, which the . ' Democrat Leland had \, • held for 11 years, he 'ij,, will join a growing list :\ of contenders. The \ =::, filing deadline for the Nov. 7 special election is Oct. 10. Martfnez, 30, is in his fourth term as a memMARTINEZ ber of the Texas House of Representa tives and is the only Latino so far to express an intent to seek the seat. In addition to serving his third term on the Appropriations Com mittee, he is the chairman of Budget and Oversight for the Elections Committee and a member of the Mexican-American Legislative Caucus . According to 1980 census data, the 18th dis trict is 41% black, 31% Hispanic and 27% Anglo. The increase in the number of Hispanics in that region during recent years, however, has led many to speculate that the percentage for Hispanics is higher. Mexicans, 2?/o, Plan Move Despite toughened immigration laws, 22% of Mexican citizens, or 18.7 million, say they are very likely or fairly likely to move to the United States during the next year, according to the results of a poll published in the Los Angeles Times. Forty two percent, or 35.7 mi Ilion, had no plans at all to do so. The poll was based on face-toface inter views with 1,835 Mexican adults. It was conducted Aug. 5-13 in 42 randomly selected cities and towns in Mexico. Asked what they liked most about the United States, 41% cited economic oppor tunity. Asked what they disliked most, 42% po!nted to the drug problem here. The poll was published Aug. 21. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

PAGE 3

COLLECTING HEALTH INSURANCE AND NEWBORNS: "Adverse Outcomes and Lack of Health Insurance Among Newborns in An Eight-County Area of California, 1982-1986" is a six-page article in The New England Jour nal of Medicine that finds Latino infants in Northern California are more likely to be born to mothers without health insurance. For a copy specify the Aug. 24 issue, and send $7 to the journal at 1440 Main St., Wal tham, Mass. 02154 (617) 893-3800 ext. 1293. HERITAGE BY CASSETTE: National Public Radio is offering for sale cassettes of its program Latin File and other periodic programs deal ing with Hispanics. To receive a catalog listing the cassettes available and their prices, call 1-800-253-0808. STEMMING DROPOUTS: "Dropouts in America: Enough is Known for Action" looks at various strategies used to com bat the dropout problem and recommends that they begin in elementary school and continue through high school. For a copy of the 69-page report, send_ $7.50 to the Institute for Educational Leadership, 1 001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-8405. ATHLETICS AND GRADES: "Minorities in Sports: The Effect of Var sity Sports Participation on the Social, Educational and Career Mobility of Minority Students" finds that participation in sports among Hispanic males and females increases their chances of entering college. For a copy of the 48-page report, send $3 to the Women's Sports Founda tion, 342 Madison Ave., Suite 728, New York, N.Y. 10173 1-800-2273988. BULLETIN ON PUERTO RICANS: Centro de Estudios Puertorri rp!!Jfa; has published the summer issue of its Bulletin. Among the topics covered in the Englishand Spanish-language articles of the 119-page publication are Puerto Rican community organizations in New York City, Puerto Rican studies in the 1990s and circular migration between the island and the mainland. For a free copy (specify Vol. 11 No.6), contact the Centro at Hunter College, City University of New York, 695 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 1 0021 (212) 772-5689. I CONNECTING I KRAFT HELPS STUDENTS Nearly 200 juniors and sophomores from two Chicago high schools completed late last month summer jobs with non-profit agencies through a program that seeks to combat the dropout problem. The ef fort is funded by a $130,000 grant from Kraft General Foods. The Job Readiness program, five years old and administered by Chicago United, pays the salaries of students who qualify through a 95% class-attendance rate and improved academic performance. The program also provides counseling and training. Students' parents must sign an agreement that their children will. comply with program require ments. The students, who are chosen from Farragut Career Academy and Dunbar Vocational School, come from economically disadvantaged families. Roughly 35% are Hispanic. A similar program administered by Chicago United employs juniors and seniors in the private sector. Job Readiness hopes to expand to three additional schools in the city this year. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Francisco Herrera rejoins the staff of U.S. Sen. Pete Wilson (A-Calif.) as the senator's senior policy adviser. Herrera was most recently direc tor of San Diego's Department of Binational Affairs ... The Hispanic Public Affairs Committee of Denver and National Image of Colorado write to U.S. Sen. Timothy Wirth to request that he ask the General Accounting Office to investigate claims of discrimination in recruiting, hiring, training, promotion and grievance procedures at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ... The Washington, D.C.-based Hitachi Foundation selects Pedro Reyes, 18, as one of six recipients of its 1989 Yoshiyama Award for Exemplary Service to the Community. Reyes, who ' wins $5,000, was cited for creating the Welcome Buddy project, an undertaking that helps new immigrant students become integrated into the Los Angeles school system ... Heritage Month ternationally acclaimed group from El Salvador. Public Information (202) 357-2700 largest annual hot-air balloon event in the world. Hispanic theater and music performances will also be featured. Following is a listing of some events taking place to commemorate Hispanic Heritage Month, Sept. 15-0ct. 15. FOLKLORIC FESTIVAL Atlanta, Ga. Sept. 1 0 A traditional Cuban celebration, the Vfrgen de Ia Caridad del Cobre festival, will be held. The festival is based on the story of the Virgin of Caridad. Ac cording to the story, a mulatto virgin appeared to three fishermen floating on a board in Cuba's Nipe Bay. Also included in the celebration will be a parade and a reception. Olga Ledon (404) 325-3631 BAND PERFORMANCE Washington, D.C. Sept. 14 The District of Columbia's Office of Latino Affairs will host a performance of the internationally recog nized National Guard of Puerto Rico Band. A recep tion will be held following the presentation. Eduardo Lopez (202) 939-8765 SMITHSONIAN EVENTS Washington, D.C. Sept. 15-0ct. 15 The Smithsonian Institution will celebrate Latino music and culture with a series of events, including lectures, films and performances by traditional music ensembles. Local music groups Semil/a and Calidadwill perform, as will Yo/ocamba ITa, the in-Hispanic Unk Weekly Report MICHIGAN LATINOS Lansing, Mich. Sept. 15-0ct. 15 The Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs is presenting a month of activities ranging from art exhibits and video screenings to poetry readings, music and dance. Awards will be presented and prominent Latinos, including astronaut Sidney Gutierrez, will speak. Essie Solano (517) 373-8339 FIESTAS PATRIAS Seattle Sept. 16 The Concilio for the Spanish Speaking is sponsor ing a festival with food, crafts, music and dance. Raquel Obregon (206) 447-4891 D.C. LATINOS Washington, D.C. Sept. 17 The Hispanic community and its contributions to metropolitan Washington will be recognized with a festival of music, arts and foods on the grounds of the Washington Cathedral. The festival will con clude with a worship service in the cathedral. John Friazzell (202) 537-6540 ALBUQUERQUE EVENTS Albuquerque, N.M. Sept. 17-0ct. 15 The Albuquerque Convention and Visitors Bureau is sponsoring various events. Native Americans will celebrate their harvest days. Other events include pinto bean, chile and mariachi days, as well as the Sepl4, 1989 Carol Garcfa (505) 842-9918 THIS WEEK BUSINESS CONVENTION New Orleans Sept. 6-1 0 The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is hold ing its 1 Oth annual National Conference and Busi ness Exchange. Activities will include sessions on topics of current interest to small business owners, regional and national awards ceremonies recogniz ing Hispanic entrepreneurs, a Mississippi River cruise and an international ball. Maxine Weber (816) 531-6363 AWARDS BANQUET Las Vegas Sept. 8 The Latin Chamber of Commerce of Nevada is hold ing its seventh annual Awards Banquet. Awards will be given to Nevada Latinos in the categories of con struction, retail/wholesale, public service and the outstanding Hispanic. Special awards will also be given to corporations that have supported the com munity. Rafael Franchi, deputy director of the Minority Business Development Agency in Washington, D.C., will be the keynote speaker. Otto Merida (702) 385-7367 3

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Ana Veciana-Suarez If Grandmothers Strike My mother, who has cared for my children almost since the day they were born, had the gall to go on vacation, leaving my family life in shambles. Imagine what would happen if other abue/as (grandmothers) did the same. They would single-handedly paralyze a complex network of baby-sitting, home care and food services for at least 40% of Miami's population. Let's face it. Cuban grandmothers who care for their children's children are the most over worked, underpaid employees of modern times. In ancient Egypt, they would have been the laborers who built the pyramids. During medieval times, they would have been the serfs tilling the soil. Today, they are the slaves of their liberated daughters and daughters-in-law. If my mother and other grandmothers I know are any indication, I bet more than 90% of them receive no compensation except VECIANA-SUAREZ for a greeting card at Christmas and another on Mother's Day. Others are probably paid weekly wages ranging from $2 to $15. DRAMATIC, DEVASTATING EFFECTS When AFL-CIO officials get wind of this, they'll send representatives to help organize the abuelas. And you can bet your last bowl of Mom's ajiaco (a Cuban-type goulash) that we'll have a strike on our hands along with demands for fair wages, better working conditions and respect. It won't be easy organizing a work stoppage. My mother, for instance, has been talking about a vacation alone with my father since I could walk. It has taken her five children, seven grandchildren and almost 30 years to make good on that threat. Abue/as, you see, are burdened with this enormous sense of responsibility, this self-centered idea that their grandchildren's lives would come to a complete stop without them. And, of course, they are absolutely, totally and completely right. The effects of a grandmothers' strike would be dramatic and devas tating. Distress calls to police and fire rescue would increase substan tially, mainly from mothers who could not control their unruly offspring and from fathers exposed to large doses of small children. Small business would shut down, and production at larger corpora tions would slow. Young employees, both men and women, would either call in sick or take a personal leave of absence. A bank crisis would follow as grandmothers (on their way to Tahiti) and young mothers (two yards from insanity) withdraw money from their savings. (On the bright side, though, manufacturers of frozen and canned foods would report a jump in sales.) DECLARE COUNTYWIDE EMERGENCY A public official would declare a countywide emergency. Later, in an expose of private use of federal monies, the press would report the official's own mother had walked out on his six children, ages 1 0, eight, seven, five, three and two. But don't, for a single instant, think these are the wild ramblings of a panicked victim. Anything is possible. (Or, should I say, everything is impossible when abuela leaves.) I, for one, have never hired a baby sitter. I don't know in what shape or size they come. And my husband has complained that my cafe con /eche cannot hold a buttered piece of Cuban toast to the one he mooches at his in-laws' house. 1 promised my mother, as she boarded her flight, that she'll get a raise to $25 a week with perks (use of my pool and washer and dryer). She scoffed and said she was thinking of opening a fruit and baby-sitting service. I don't know if she would sell any mameys (tropical fruit), but I bet the children of the world (and their working mothers) would beat a path to her door. (Ana Veciana-Sutuez, who used to be with The Miami Herald, is now a reporter for The Palm Beach Post in Florida.) Reprinted with permission of The Miami Herald William Medina Tracing Grandpa Ram6n A historian's work is similar to a detective's. Both dig for facts to reconstruct the past. They probe into people's lives, leaf through piles of dusty records and spend endless hours fitting together the informa tion they collect. Using these tools, I've tried to piece together Grandpa Ramon's life. My memory of him is vague. I remember when I was a little boy in San Bernardino, Calif., he would sometimes visit our house, settle into a chair in our front room ... and snore. I saw him as big and dark and brood ing, a man with constantly tired eyes. Conversations with my mother and grandmother have since assured me that he stood no more than 5-feet-4. Other friends and relatives mention his name fondly, proof that he was a man of greater dimensions than I could understand as a child. Now my amateur detective work, in public MEDINA libraries as well as with family and acquaintances, is filling in the gaps: Ram6n Arellano was stocky and short-tempered. Born in Zacatecas, Mexico, in 1906, he was raised in a rural village where owning pigs, chickens and land brought respect from the neighbors. This column trio celebrates Grandparents' Day, Sept. 10. According to my mom, when Grandpa was growing up, the Arellanes held 40 acres of property, making them one of the biggest land-owning families in the area. Everything would have passed on to Grandpa Ram6n had it not been for the Revolution. In 1912, soldiers confiscated the Arellano ranch. During the '20s, U.S. railroad companies routinely sent scouts south to bring back laborers. From 1920 to 1929, more than 400,000 Mexicans were admitted to the United States to provide labor. With neither land nor work, Grandpa Ram6n was tempted by the en ticements of these railroad agents. He set out in 1929, leaving behind his wife, Trinidad Velasco, and daughter, Josefina Arellano, my mother. He reached Arizona, where he began working for the Southern Pacific Railroad. He traveled about the Southwest, laying and repairing rails to expedite the east-west transportation of freight. He lived in boxcar com munities, small colonies established by the railroad people. In the '30s, he moved to Indio, Calif. There he fell in love again, mar rying his second wife, Enedina Mendez Arellano. She gave him two more children, Olga and Richard. According to my Aunt Olga, the family moved several times while living in the desert, settling for a while in Riverside in 1947. There Enedina died of cancer. SURVIVED MANY BOUTS OF SORROW My mother, Josefina, came to the United States in 1953 to visit him. After a few months, she decided to stay. Then she met and married my father, Oscar Medina Grandpa Ramon never sought legal U.S. residency. He lived in con stant fear of deportation. Nonetheless, he was able to survive two anti immigrant epidemics. During the depression years, 500,000 Mexicans -including many who were here legallywere repatriated. They were accused of taking jobs from U.S. citizens and straining the welfare sys tem. Again in the '50s, a surge of anti-immigrant hysteria ignited Opera tion Wetback. Grandpa died of heart failure in an Arizona hospital in 1967, at age 61. He had remained a faithful employee of the Southern Pacific Rail road. He worked hard all of his life and survived many bouts with loneli ness and sorrow. To understand his life more fully, I need to look at what we as family saw, and I need to examine the events that helped shape it. By super imposing a bit of history, it helps unravel the mystery about why he sat so silent in the front-room chair and why things turned out the way they did. (William Medina manages his family's restaurant in Riverside, Ca/it) 4 Sept 4,1989 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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CristObal Berry Caban Don Chago's Legacy Don Chago hasn't scooped a bag full of rice at the little grocery store at.Avanida Puerto Rico and Calla Las Floras in Santurce for a long time. He is retired now, and most neighborhood tiendas have given way to supermarkets. No sentimentalist, don Chago will tell you that it's all right, it's the way it should be, the way of a more prosperous Puerto Rico. Besides, he feels his work in politics and in social and business organizations helped pave the way. Even in 1938, when he became a founding member of Luis Munoz Marin's Popular Democratic Party, my grandfather, Santiago QD3nVetez-don Chagohad espoused (along with Munoz) for everybody the slogan "Bread, Land and Liberty." For don Chago, his store, Las Flores Provision, was the way to each of these: bread was a decent income for himself and his family; land was ownership of the little store; and liberty was the freedom to be his BERRY-CABAN own boss. Even if that meant working harder than ever before. His illegal vote in 1920 for the Unionist Party had been an expression of these sentiments. When young Santiago Caban Velez had first gone to work in a dry goods store, he already was dreaming of Las Floras Provision or a store very much like it. Before the store became more than a dream, he was 40 and had held a succession of jobs. Holding onto the dream of being his own boss took a lot of dedication. MUNOZ MARIN HONORED HIM Las Flores Provision wasn't much, a store of half-pounds and napes -bonus portions. Rice, red beans, and other dried produce were found there in great barrels; meat was cut to order. These and canned goods and beer were delivered by Jimmy on his bicycle. Jimmy would even put the compra -your purchases away for you. That was the way it was. Very much the good neighbor. No one left Las Flores Provision without food, even when there was no cash. Credit with don Chago was personal: a notation in the little school notebook he kept. Sept. 24, 1964, was don Chago's big day. On that day, he was recog nized by 350 of his Chamber of Commerce colleagues as businessman of the month. He was honored for his business success, but more so for his civic contributions and his lifelong dedication to helping others. Gov. Luis Munoz Marin spoke at the ceremony honoring his lifelong friend. He commented proudly of the economic growth the island had experienced. He cited the Chamber of Commerce for its goal that decade of creating a free commerce economy in equilibrium between growth and fiscal responsibility. CIVIC INVOLVEMENT, BUSINESS COMBINED Don Chago, of course, agreed. He had not abandoned, and would never abandon, his conviction that Commonwealth status was best for him and all of Puerto Rico. For don Chago this day, however, there were more important things to say. "I commit no sin of egotism if I reject any homage being rendered ex clusively to me, since another person should also partake of it. I refer to my dear wife, who has been the shining lantern, the torch light who has guided the path of my life toward success." Don Chago worked hard in his little store. Overall he made a decent living. By never forgetting that it was people who made it possible for him to prosper, don Chago did so. And in addition to her duties as wife, mother, and partner in Las Flores Provision, dona Jacinta Caban presided over a number of civic organiza tions. Civic involvement and business went well together in their case. What was good for Puerto Rico was good for the Cabans. (Crist6bal Berry Caban, of Reston, Va., is founder and president of At lantic Resources Corporation.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua JOAQUIN EL BONITO: I'm sure that The New York Times misquoted Univision President Joaquin Blaya. Or at least, his words were taken out of context. Or, at the very, very least, he's sorry he ate his foot. Responding to critics' complaints that Univision prefers light skinned on-camera newspersons, Blaya, of Chilean descent, is quoted Aug. 27 by Times reporter Seth Mydans that even on Mexico television, "I submit to you that you have never, never seen a dark person." Then, writes Mydans, "Biaya added: •By the way, we have some very beautiful Mexican Americans on the air. They are both blond with blue eyes.' Asked why lighter-skinned people were preferred, he said, •It has to be said without being afraid, that television as well as movies is a busi ness for beautiful people. It's entertain ment.'" Remember ex-Los Angeles Dodger VP AI Campanls, Joaquin? Maybe dark-skinned Latinos just lack the necessities to do a good news show. BLAYA ... the beautiful one NO 'SPANISH ONLY': Sin Pelos' United Nations correspondent Ed Ledesma covered the Aug. 16 U.N. hearings on the colonial status of Puerto Rico and sent me this report: Ellglo Gonzalez Castro, of the island's Movimiento Albizuista Cris tiano Revolucionario Y Nacionalista, began an attack on the statehood referendum being shaped in Congress. Then, moved by the spirit of fair play, Gonzalez Castro offered a counterproposal. He would support the 1991. congressional referendum on Puerto Rico IF prior to that vote, the United States agreed to conduct a referendum of its own "offering the American people the option of exercising their inalienable self-determina tion ... to decide whether they want to give up their national sovereignty and become a state of Puerto Rico ... " He promised mainland residents"the opportunity to keep their lan guage and their customs ... We will not punish your children in school for not speaking Spanish. We will not saturate your radio waves with Spanish music that your people don't ... "We will not," he concluded, "accuse American patriots of seditious conspiracy for trying to make their country free from Puer to Rico, should there be patriots in the United States." Reported Ledesma: "This go 'round, almost half of those present were pro-statehood people who totally ignored the U.N. Decolonization Committee until the present 1 ,356th meeting." LIPS THAT TOUCH MALT LIQUOR: When the Center for Science in the Public Interest launched its attack Aug. 23 against the malt liquor industry's "targeting" blacks and Hispanics in its ad campaigns, one spokesperson drew the parallel "like advertising chocolates to diabetics." The CSPI case was badly prepared. It had no ad-dollar figures at all to support its claim. Nor could it find a single independent Hispanic health organiza tion to support its attack-and it wasn't for lack of trying. One major Latino health group that initially agreed to work with CSPI pulled out, charging that the center was paternalistic, inaccurate in its portrayal of the situation and looking only for a "rubber stamp." -Kay Barbaro Quoting ... LEE TREVINO, quoted in the Los Angeles Times July 26, on win ning: "I played the (professional goiQ tour in 1967 and told jokes and nobody laughed. Then I won the U.S. Open the next year, told the same jokes, and everybody laughed like hell." Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Sept. 4, 1989 5

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6 I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I STANFORD UNIVERSITY Applications are invited for the position of Director of El Centro Chicano and Assistant Dean of Student Affairs at Stanford University. Responsibilities include providing staff leadership for El Centro, a Chicano/ Latino student center; managing the Center and its budgets, programs and facility; advising and working with students in program and activities planning, based upon knowledge and experience of the cultural, organizational and variety of interests in the Chicana/Latino community; participating in campus affairs and University policy developments; developing ties with other univer sity departments where appropriate; fostering pluralism by assisting with student programs that teach the Stanford community about Chicano/Latino culture. Qualifications: Bachelor's degree; MA desirable; three or more years training and experience in student affairs administration, counseling/policy analysis, budget management, staff supervision, student educational leader ship programs; knowledge of development needs of 18-25-year -old students, esp. Chicanos/Latinos; excellent organizational and communication skills; ability to work in a decentralized academic setting. Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume and three references by September 22, 1989 to: Carole Hyde, Search Committee Staff, 323 Old Union, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. 94305 (415) 723-2089. Salary: $35,200-$40,000 depending on experience; excellent benefits. Stanford University is an Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Employer. SOCIAL WORKER SOCIAL WORKER, fanew substance abuse prevention program for Hispanic youth. Bilingual with BA in human serv ices required. Master's degree pre ferred. Send resume to: ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER Ann. No. 1187-0A-DPW Salary: $28,392 Coordinates budget preparation and expenditures, develops and implements training programs, coordinates with out side contact companies for refuse collec tion and disposal services. Requires Bachelor's degree in public administration, business administration or a related field plus two years of experience in public administration and/or budget preparation and review. Relevant Master's degree may substitute for one year of experience. All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. RESU MES SUBMITTED WITHOUT A COM PLETED OFFICIAL ARLINGTON COUNTY APPLICATION FORM WILL NOT BE AC CEPTED. Applications must be received in the Personnel Department no later than 5:00pm on SEPTEMBER 21, 1989. To request application material, please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only). ARLINGTON COUNTY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 21 00 Clarendon Boulevard Suite 511 Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE/MFH • • • • • Child and Family Services 412 Century Lane CITY OF PARAMOUNT Holland, Mich. 49423 89 Computer Science Graduate (B.S., SUNY, Stonybrook) Interested in obtaining a challenging position preferably in graphic software development. I have research experi ence developing graphic software on Sun workstations using the C pro gramming language and the Unix operating system. Ready to relocate. Richard S. Avila (516) 223-4305 2591 Harrison Ave. Baldwin, New York 11510 FAMILY COUNSELOR -City of Paramount, Calif. (Salary: $2,820-$3,428 per month, plus City pays employee's 7% share of PEAS.) Requires Bachelor's Degree in social sci ence, psychology, or related field. Master's Degree desirable. MFCC or LCSW preferred. Experience working with gang-related youth in a preventative counseling capacity desir able. Will establish and maintain counseling contactwithyouthwhoare prone to gang in volvement and their families, plan and or ganize innovative counseling activities which will discourage gang involvement, maintain close contact with resource and referral agencies, and other duties. NEIGHBORHOOD COUNSELOR City ct Paramount, Calif. (Salary: $2,266-$2,754 per month, plus City pays employee's 7% share of PEAS.) Requires Bachelor's Degree with spe cialization in social science, psychology, or related field. One year experience work ing with youth and parents in a community setting, and familiarity with youth gang membership also required. Will implement programs for early ele mentary age youth which will discourage gang membership in the community. Will conduct classroom presentations and community meetings, maintain contact with youth and their parents, prepare written reports and oral presentations, and other duties. APPLY BY: Open. APPLY BY: Open. APPLY AT: City of Paramount, 16400 Colorado Avenue, Paramount, Calif. 90723. Phone (213) 531-3503 Extension 326 Sept 4, 1989 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION Posilioo available for historiCil with strong experience in oral history, folklore fieldwork and archival research. Work will concen trate on Hispanic and American Indian cultures in the Southwest U.S. Candidate must have strong knowledge and prior research experience in these areas. Must have the ability to speak, read and trans late Spanish. Historian will work with museum team to produce a major exhibi tion at the Smithsonian commemorating the Columbus Quincentenary. Position is a 3-year appointment lo cated at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Work will require travel to New Mexico . Salary $28,852 +benefits (GS-11). For further information con tact: Harold Closter, (202) 357-2124, or send Federal Employment Form (SF-171) to: Smithsonian Institution, Office of Personnel Administration, Branch 3, P.O. Box 23294, Washington, D.C. 20026-3294. Reference Announcement #9-3132. Applications by October 31, 1989 . AA/EOE SENIOR ACCOUNTANT Southern Connecticut service subsidi ary of major international consumer prod ucts corporation needs mature account ant experienced in general accounting, including knowledge of letters of credit. Heavy South American transactions requiring Spanish fluency & aptitude for detail. Secure position offers $40,000 & superb benefits. Degree preferred. Reply to: Six Landmark Square, Suite 400 Stamford, Connecticut 06901 Telephone (203) 359-5678 Fax (203) 324-7051 PERSONNEL AGENCY FEES PAID BY HIRING COMPANY. Hispanic Link Weekly Report A Place in Your Future PRESIDENT UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO Nominations and expressions of interest are invited for the position of President of the University of New Mexico. The President is the chief executive officer of the University and is directly responsible to the Board of Regents for directing the programs and administration ofthe University under policy estab lished by the Board. The University of New Mexico is the largest and most comprehensive of the state's institutions of higher education. Founded in 1889, the University serves a multicultural student population of over 28,000 on five campuses and operates on an annual budget of $500 million. Comprised of 11 degree-grant ing units, UNM has the state's only schools of Architecture & Planning, Law, Medicine, and Pharmacy. It offers over 150 undergraduate and graduate degree programs, and includes nationally recognized programs in several disciplines. The main campus in Albuquerque is a 640-acre campus whose award-winning landscaping and congenial mix of historic and modern build ings reflect its roots and look toward its future. Candidates must have the ability to lead a complex, comprehensive research institution. A commitment to the traditions of the Southwest and the ability to articulate the mission, goals, needs, and achievement of the univer sity to diverse publics is essential. They should possess a distinguished record of scholarly and professional achievement, academic vision, superior leadership skills, and strong personal integrity. The Search Committee will begin screening candidates on or about October 15, 1989 and continue until the position is filled. Nominations and letters of interest should be submitted to: Mr. R. William Funk Heidrick and Struggles Attn: UNM/HLWR/6123-01 1999 Bryan, Suite 1919 Dallas, Texas 75201 The University of New Mexico is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer which actively seeks and encourages nominations of and expres sions of interest from minority and female candidates. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy re ceived (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & ZIP code Ordered by _________ _ count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 Organization _________ _ word). Multiple use rates on Street DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: . ---.--------(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 City, State & Z1p _______ _ per column inch Area Code & Phone ________ _ Sept. 4, 1989 7

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Authored by Sally Steeland, the report found that 93% of the producers of the programs studied were white. Arts & Entertainment UNEQUAL TV: Hispanic, Asian American and Native American characters are virtually invisible on network television, according to a study by the National Commission on Working Women. The nine Hispanic characters listed in the study included four men and five women. The men are Victor Sifuentes (portrayed by Jimmy Smits) on LA. Law; Lt. Castillo (Edward James Olmos) on Miami \nee; Alberto Rufz (Ramon Franco) on Tour of Duty; and Reuben (Paul Calder6n) on Dream Street. The women are Marfa (Marfa Conchita Alonso) on One of the Boys; Marfa (Leslie Bega) on Head of the Class; Yolanda (Roxann Biggs) on Nightingales; Pilar (Katherine Ortega) on Falcon Crest; and Gina (Saundra Santiago) on Miami Vice. The study, released Aug. 23 by the Washington, D.C.-based or ganization, found that most minority characters in entertainment television are upper-class blacks. Of the 78 minority lead characters counted during the 1989 spring season, 65 (83%) were black, nine (12%) were Hispanic, three (4%) were Asian and only one was Native American. Research for Unequal Picture: Black, Hispanic, Asian and Native American Characters on Television-the full name of the study-in cluded the examination of some 150 episodes of 30 prime-time network entertainment programs. Only three of the nine Hispanic characters-Victor, Alberto and Pilar are expected to return for the 1989-90 season. Unequal Picture found that nine out of 10 minority TV characters are middle class or wealthy and that most minority characters exist in a world of racial harmony. ONE UNERS: Berlin Blues, a remake of the German classic film The Blue Angel, features Puerto Rican singer/actress Julia Migenes Johnson in the Marlene Dietrich role ... The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce announces that rock legend Ritchie Valens will be honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame ... Antonio Mejfas-Rentas Media Report MALT LIQUOR ADS RIPPED: A coalition of 22 minority and health organizations, includ ing three Hispanic groups, called on the government Aug. 23 to stop beer companies from targeting malt liquor products which contain more alcohol than regular beer -at Hispanics and blacks. They also sought a ban on advertising that implies alcohol potency and a limit on how much alcohol such beverages can contain. The average alcohol content of regular beer is 4. 6%, while malt liquor averages 6. 6%, ac cording to Michael Jacobson, executive direc tor of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. In letters to Health and Human Services Secretary Louis Sullivan and Treasury Secretary Nicholas Brady, the groups charged, "Malt liquor advertising typically fea tures blacks and Latinos and includes images that are blatantly sexual or convey high al cohol content." They say that such marketing practices exacerbate alcoholism rates among HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Urbina. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 per word. Display ads are $45 per column anch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. blacks and Hispanics as well as pave the way toward more potent drug use. "These companies are clearly trying to take advantage of a community that receives less health education and less resources for treat ment programs in order to maximize their profits," said Carlos Molina, president of the Latino Caucus of the American Public Health Association. Also among the groups protesting the ads were the National Puerto Rican Coal it ion and the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Educa tion Fund. Responding to the call for Hispanic publica tions to stop running ads for the brews, Manuel Tore, president of the National Association of Hispanic Publications, told Weekly Report, "We don't need anybody to tell us what to publicize or what to omit. Just because we advertise a beverage doesn't mean people are going to follow us blindly." STAY IN SCHOOL: NAHP is seeking funds for a nationwide campaign designed to curb the Latino dropout rate by stressing the impor tance of education. Scheduled to be launched this fall, the "Stay In School" campaign will consist of public service advertisements in Hispanic print media, editorials, press con ferences, school presentations and posters used in schools and social agencies. NAHP has already received funding from Coca-Cola USA and is seeking a contribution from the Ford Motor Co. HISPANIC FAMILY SERIES: In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, National Public Radio's Latin File will feature a series of six-minute reports on five U.S. Hispanic families throughout September. The programming will focus on a different family each Friday, examining their heritage, traditions and evolution in a multicultural society. The series kicked off Sept. 1 with a segment on a Cuban American family in Miami. The segments that follow will feature a Puerto Rican family in New York City, a Salvadoran family that recently immigrated to Los An geles, a Mexican American family in El Paso, Texas, culminating Sept. 29 with Latin File's host Paz Cohen exploring her European and Chilean heritage. Danilo Alfaro U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos unveils portrait for National Association of Hispani Publications' 'Stay in School' campaign. From left: Randolph Ramos-Cobian, of sponsor Coca Cola, Cavazos, artist Esperanza Martinez, and NAHP President Manuel Toro. (See Media Report.)