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Hispanic link weekly report, September 25, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, September 25, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Making The News This Week President Bush honors Rubftn Ortega, 19, and Freddy Torres, 18, with two of the four 1988 Young American Medals for Bravery awarded at a White House ceremony. In April 1988 Ortega subdued a classmate who held captive his English class with an assault rifle. Torres was recognized for the time he spent with hundreds of teen-age Bostonians to tell them to stay away from drugs and learn about AIDS...Bush presents Jos6 Coronado, director of the Audie L Murphy Veterans Hospital in San Antonio, with a Distinguished Presidential Rank Award for exceptional performance in government. Coronado, along with 62 others, will also receive a $20,000 bonus...Lawyers begin opening statements in the extortion, bribery and conspiracy trial of U.S. Rep. Robert Garda in Manhattan’s federal district court. The South Bronx congressman and his wife, Jane, are being tried for allegedly trading the influence of his office to help now-defunct defense contractor Wed-tech Corp. secure government contracts...California Gov. George Deukmejian signs into law a bill that prohibits armed or uniformed security guards at election booths. The legislation was a response to Orange County’s GOP posting guards last November to intimidate Latino voters... Former California Supreme Court Justice John Ar-guelles joins the Los Angeles law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher...The U.S. Senate Republican Task Force on Hispanic Affairs elects Californian Fernando Oaxaca as its chairman. Oaxaca is owner of Coronado Communications...
Vol. 7 No. 38 ( ft HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 1 |sept. 25,1989
National Dropout Study Stirs Debate
By Danilo Alfaro
N.Y. Voters Make Switch To Dinkins Mayoral Race
New York mayoral Democratic primary winner David Dinkins received 56% of the Latino vote in the Sept. 12 race against incumbent Ed Koch, according to an exit poll by The New York Daily News. Seven out of 10 Hispanic voters supported Koch in 1985.
Overall, 137,827 Hispanics voted in the Democratic and Republican primaries. They comprised 13% of the total vote. New York is roughly 20% Hispanic.
Explaining the shift against Koch in the Latino vote, Angelo Falc6n, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, said: "Koch hasn’t had serious opposition in the past."
Falcbn also credited Jesse Jackson’s 1988 presidential campaign. "Jackson broke the myth that Latinos won’t vote for blacks." Dinkins, Manhattan borough president, is black. Dinkins beat Koch 51%-42%.
Other factors that swung Hispanics over to Dinkins, according to Falcon, were Puerto Rico’s $500,000 campaign to register New York voters and the money spent to reach Latinos by a 47,000-member union of hospital workers in favor of Dinkins. Local 1199 is led by Dennis Rivera
Teens Reveal Condom Use
Hispanic males 15-19 years of age were more likely to use no or Ineffective contraceptive methods during the last time they had intercourse, according to a report published Sept. 21.
Family Planning Perspectives magazine, published by the Alan Guttmacher Institute, reported that 31% of Hispanic males in the 15-19 age category did not use contraception or depended on unreliable methods such as withdrawal, rhythm and douching. The rate for whites was 23% and for blacks, 20%.
The study also reported that 29% of Hispanics and 33% of blacks worry all the time about contracting AIDS. Only 10% of whites said they do so.
The percentages of the 1,800 respondents in the age group who had sex were:
Hispanics Blacks Whites
60% 81% 57%
The U.S. Education Department’s Sept. 14 report on dropouts, noting that Latino students are more likely than non-Latinos to quit school short of graduation and are less likely to resume it later, has triggered a fresh debate as to who is to blame and what should be done about it.
The government’s study, "Dropout Rates in the United States: 1988," took three measurements:
• Event dropout rates — In 1987, 9.5% of Hispanics in grades 10-12 dropped out of high school. This compared with 6.7% of blacks and 4.6% of whites.
• Status dropout rates — In 1988, 36% — about 1.2 million — of Hispanics ages 16-24 were not in high school and did not have a diploma or the equivalent. This compared with 15% of blacks and 13% of whites.
• Cohort dropout rates — The proportion of Hispanics in the 1980 sophomore class who left high school without graduating was 28%. This compared with 22% of blacks and 15% of whites. The department also published figures on Native Americans (36%) and Asian Americans (8%).
By 1986, 36% of the Latino dropouts had obtained either a diploma or the equivalent, compared with 49% of blacks, 48% of whites, 24% of Native Americans and 76% of Asian Americans.
Hispanic education experts viewed the study cautious-
iy-
Blandina Cardenas Ramirez, director of the Office of Minority Concerns at the American Council on Education in Washington, D.C., warned, "Simply looking at high school data gives an inaccurate picture. If we look at Hispanics who enter the first grade and never complete high school, we’re talking about a 50% dropout rate."
According to the report, as of October 1988, 31% of Hispanic dropouts ages 16-24 had completed no more than six years of school, compared with 5% of non-Hispanics. Those in
continued on page 2
Fernandez to Head N.Y.C. School System
decide between him and Fairfax County, Va., Superintendent Robert Spillane Sept. 20.
Fernandez, 53, has received national attention for his efforts to decentralize the Southern Florida school system, which is the fourth largest in the country.
ByF&ixP&ez
Dade County, Fla., Schools Superintendent Joseph Fernandez was named Sept. 20 to head of the New York City school system — the nation’s largest.
He replaces Richard
Green, who died in May. Fernandez is expected to start at his post as early as January.
Amalia Betanzos, the sole Hispanic on the seven-member school board, said Fernandez was "by general acclamation (of the board) the best qualified." The board interviewed Fernandez Sept. 18 and met to
FERNANDEZ
"We have an open mind toward Mr. Fernandez. The fact that he comes from a city that is multiracial and has a large immigrant community is a plus," said Luis Reyes, educational research director for the New York office of Aspira
Fernandez, who has headed the Dade district since May 1987, will oversee a district that has 979 schools, 940,000 students and is 34% Hispanic.
Born in New York and a Puerto Rican, Fern&ndez earned $155,000 plus expenses while at Dade.
CARDENAS-RAMIREZ high school data alone give inaccurate picture


Drug War Proposal Puts Heavy Burden on Newly Legalized
ByF&ixP6naz
Lost among the countless stories on President Bush’s ballyhooed plan to combat illegal drugs was the detail that a disproportionate share of the funding burden would fall on the program that helps newly legalized immigrants receive the education necessary to become permanent residents, charge immigrant rights advocates.
Bush made his $7.9 billion anti-drug plan public Sept. 5. It asks Congress to transfer $320 million of the plan’s $716 million price tag for next year from the State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants program. Under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, SLIAG was slated to receive $900 million each year from 1988 to 1991. Bush’s plan would siphon more than one-third of SUAG’s 1990 funding.______________________________
"We are very much opposed to rechanneling the funds even for such a noble purpose as the war on drugs," says Cecilia Munoz, immigration policy analyst at the National Council of La Raza. "It will undermine a program that is already having financial difficulty."
Munoz and others working on behalf of immigrants argue that the cutback may mean that many will not be able to complete a required course on English and U.S. civics. Classes are "almost exclusively" funded by SLIAG, says Munoz. The program’s funds are also used to reimburse states for medical services and public assistance provided to the immigrants.
The Bush administration contends that the program was overfunded, pointing out that only $237 million of the $1.8 billion allocated for 1988 and this year have been spent.
Jana Mason, director of the American Public Welfare Association’s immigration task force, counters that states have been slow to claim the money because the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services tarried in providing reimbursement guidelines. "The administration has made us jump through hoops for the money," says Mason.
La Raza and APWA are pinning their hopes on the California congressional delegation — whose state stands to lose the most money — pushing through a compromise. Democratic congressional leadership is sponsoring a version that would cut across several government programs equally.
Munoz-and Mason admit to an uphill struggle. "Newly legalized people are not at the top of the scale of priorities," says Munoz.
Politics Top Action List for L.A. County
Despite being faced with a host of problems that undermine their economic and social progress — such as a high dropout rate, limited access to health care, medical services and affordably priced housing — Los Angeles County Latinos list political participation as the critical action that will contribute most to their well-being, found a survey by The Tomas Rivera Center.
"The Los Angeles County Latino Assessment Study" suggested several ways to achieve greater political empowerment. It recommended the creation of outreach programs promoting naturalization among immigrants, developing simpler voter registration proce-
the department’s 30,000 sample included both U.S.-born and immigrant youths.
The study showed that 41% of all 1980 sophomores whose home language was other than English or predominantly non-English dropped out before graduation.
Edgewood (San Antonio) School District Superintendent James V&squez accused Educa-
1988 LATINO DROPUT RATES*
Ages 16-24
Metro Areas Suburbs Rural Areas 37% 35% 30%
West NE South Midwest 41% 37% 29% 28%
* Status dropout rates.
tion Secretary Lauro Cavazos of "expounding the rhetoric of the federal government. They think that rhetoric will solve the problem without a federal investment. As long as you keep that kind of simplistic logic, you’re not going to solve the problem."
Noting that many Hispanics typically live below poverty levels in inner cities, Vasquez pointed to an inverse relationship of school resources to student needs. "There is a
dures and encouraging Latinos to participate in coalitions based on interest and not solely on ethnicity or race. Also put forth was increasing the number of Hispanic-backed political action committees.
Latinos are projected to account for 40% of the county’s population by 2010. Four million Hispanics are expected to be living there by then.
Following political participation, the three primary areas of interest were education, economic development and leadership development. The six secondary issues were health, social services, immigration, legal services, crime and housing.
definite link between dropouts and property-poor school districts. Schools with the least amount of resources are trying to respond to kids with the most need.
"Schools traditionally have been white, Anglo-Saxon, middle-class, English-speaking environments," he said,adding that as a result of the continuing influx of Latino immigrants, "They are now having a tough time adapting to a new student population who are none of those things."
Josu6 Gonz&lez, vice chancellor of resource development and grant management for City Colleges of Chicago, noted that in Dade County, Fla, middle-class Cuban American students suffer dropout rates just as severe as Hispanics in New York, Chicago or Texas. Twenty-four percent of Dade County eighth-graders in 1982 dropped out by 1987.
"You would not have expected that," said Gonz&lez, former head of bilingual education in the Carter administration. "But it isn’t always the most failure-prone students dropping out. It is part of the total syndrome that young people go through today. Schools are impersonal, cold and don’t respond to students' needs."
Calif. Bill Seeks Change In School District Races
The California legislature sent to Gov. George Deukmejian Sept. 13 a bill that would require nine school districts, including three in Los Angeles County, to switch away from at-large elections.
Authored by Assemblyman Pete Chacon, the bill is in response to the contention that Latino representation on these school boards has been diluted because Hispanics do not have the number of voters necessary to influence an election that is district-wide. That Hispanics tend to cluster in certain areas increases their chances of electing someone of their choice.
The districts that would be affected are ABC Unified, Hacienda La Puente Unified and Montebello in Los Angeles, Garden Grove and Orange Unified in Orange County, Sweetwater Union in San Diego, Riverside Unified in Riverside County, and one district each in Santa Clara and Alameda counties.
Peter Mehas, Deukmejian’s education adviser, said: "The governor is not looking favorably at the bill." Deukmejian has 15 days to sign or veto the bill.
Ford to Double Dealerships
The Ford Motor Co. has announced that it plans to double the number of Hispanic-owned Ford dealerships by 1994 so that it can capture a larger chunk of the growing Hispanic market.
The announcement was made Sept. 8 from the firm’s Detroit headquarters the same day it was broached at the national conference of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce conference in New Orleans.
Ford has 5,528 dealerships nationwide, 40, or 0.72%, of which are owned by Latinos.
Ed Rodriguez, assistant manager of corporate urban programs at Ford, said the company will work informally with national Hispanic organizations to identify potential dealers.
Lack of Funding Hampers Dropout Fight
continued from page 1
2
Sept 25,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arturo Madrid
Preparing for the ’90s
A newspaper reporter asked me recently what my thoughts were about the characterization of the 1980s as the decade of the Hispanic. Various people, he said, indicated that their expectations hadn’t been realized.
I don’t know what people expected would take place in the 1980s, but I believe it has been our decade. We were, until recently, an invisible population. The 1980s was a period when we entered the national consciousness. Our faces started appearing in newspapers, in news magazines, on television, and even in movies. Our art, music and literature began to receive public attention and praise.
Latinos began to participate in growing numbers in the institutional life of U.S. society. Most importantly, what had been considered private problems became public policy concerns, whether in the realms of education, employment or immigration.
Much of the attention we have garnered over the past decade has to do with the increase in our numbers. The most recent figures put us at 20 million and growing. Because we are a young population, we are the labor force of tomorrow. Our buying power has not gone unnoticed and we represent a potential political force.
MADRID
YOUTHFULNESS: PROMISE AND A THREAT
Although we have become part of the national agenda, it’s true that we still have little voice in setting or acting on that agenda. With very few exceptions, policy continues to be set in ignorance of us or despite us. We are rarely consulted, because we still lack significant economic or political power.
Our youthfulness is both a promise and a threat. We may be the workforce of the future, but the demands we place on the society’s schools and services create considerable concern.
In some areas, we lost ground during the 1980s. The number of Latino families living in poverty grew overthe past 10 years. Adequate housing and health care are increasingly beyond the means of most Latinos. Not only is unemployment a major issue, but Latinos are overwhelmingly to be found in poorly paid, dead-end and dangerous jobs.
Despite our efforts, the educational level of our population did not increase significantly. In fact, in releasing his department’s latest report on dropouts Sept. 14, U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos called the problem in the Hispanic community “a national tragedy.” He reported that as of last year, 35.7% of Hispanics ages 16-24 had failed to complete high school. The rate, worse than 10 years earlier, was nearly triple that of whites and more than double that of blacks.
EDUCATION CAN AND DOES EMPOWER
It is time thus to start addressing the challenges of the 1990s. Having captured the attention of U.S. policymakers, we must now begin to influence how they deal with us.
Sin pelos en
DANILO’S IN-BASKET: The Institute for Media Analysis, a New York non-profit group that says it exists “to foster effective communication of ideas and opinion by those concerned with humanely engaged social change,” sent us a thin paperback the other day. Written by television journalist Carl Ginsburg, it was titled “RACE AND MEDIA: The Enduring Life of the Moynihan Report,” so it ended up in Media Report proprietor Danilo Alfaro’s wire in-basket. Danilo thumbed through its 80 pages to see what it contained that prompted the institute to send it to us -- some reference, perhaps, to the status of Hispanics.
The word was not mentioned even once.
The monograph tracks how major media has sought to validate the 1965 report by then-Assistant U.S. Secretary of Labor Daniel Patrick Moynihan that, in its words, concluded “that black poverty was no longer the result of ‘external forces,’ such as economic conditions, but rather that the black family had inflicted upon itself its own demise such as to render it‘disturbed.’ “The inside back cover of the book listed a board of four directors, none Hispanic, and a 30-member board of advisers, three with Hispanic surnames.
Curious about the institute and whether it had examined any Hispanic media issues, Danilo reached William Schaap, one of the four directors.
The “Race and Media” book didn’t mention Hispanics, Schaap explained, because it was about blacks. Okay.
He added that while it had done nothing on U.S. Hispanics, the institute did publish a pair of reports on the Nicaraguan contras. The three Latinos on the advisory board were Xavier Chamorro Carde-nal, publisher of Managua’s El Nuevo Diario\ Cuban filmmaker Santiago Alvarez, and Venezuela-born, Nicaragua-based journalist Freddy Balzan.
Schaap conceded that the trio has rarely been able to travel to the United States.
If the directors want, I’m sure we could find some Latinos closer to home.
HECTOR’S EAR-PIECE: In July, Sin Pelos chastized Washington, D.C., disk jockeys Don Geronimoand Mike O’Meara for their tasteless gag about cubana singer Gloria Estefan’s “greasiness.”
Although Alan Goodman, the WAVA-FM general manager, assured us that “the fact that she’s Hispanic is coincidental to the fact that she looks greasy,” the National Association of Hispanic Journalists followed up with a critical letter to the station and a carbon copy to the FCC.
Since then, no more references to “Greasy Gloria.”
In fact, Weekly Report publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza received a phone call the other day with a report that an on-the-air caller to WAVA told one of the deejays, “I’ve got a joke for you fellows. There was this Mexican...” And he was quickly informed, “We don’t do that anymore," and disconnected.
Isn’t progress wonderful?
-- Kay B&rbaro
Where to begin? Our needs as a community are so great and so urgent. Ultimately, of course, we will not influence policy until we have become empowered politically or economically. But there is one institution whose policies and practices we need to affect: school.
The U.S. educational system does not do well by our children. Schools still track Latino students, still label and treat a disproportionate number as slow learners, and continue to have low expectations for them. Education, for all its limitations, can and does empower. Our individual and collective well-being depends in large measure on it. And because school is a local institution, subject to local governance, we can influence it. At the very least we can demand that schools make our children literate and numerate and that school personnel be rewarded for doing so and held accountable if they don’t.
(Arturo Madrid is president of the Tomas Rivera Center, a policy studies think tank in Claremont, Calif.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sept. 2
Quoting...
JOEGELLER, Dade Co., Fla., Democratic Party chairman, quoted in The Miami Herald following Republican lleana Ros-Lehtinen’s impressive victory in the traditionally Democratic 18th U.S. Congressional District special election:
'7 went down and registered for Spanish classes this morning."
CARLOS ALBERTO MONTANER, syndicated columnist with Spain’s Firmas Press Agency, on Miami’s Cubans:
"They did not arrive on the Mayflower, like the Pilgrims, in search of a better way of life. Rather, the Cubans set sail on Noah's Ark, to rescue the past, to escape the flood, disposed to reproduce themselves and to reproduce paradise lost as soon as their guayaberas dried."
i, 1989
3


COLLECTING
DROPOUT STATISTICS: “Dropout Rates in the United States: 1988” is an 88-page report that charts dropout figures for Hispanics, blacks and whites since 1972. For a free copy, write U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Office of Public Affairs, Room 2089, Washington, D.C. 20202.
CALIFORNIA LATINOS: “The Challenge: Latinos in a Changing California,” 210 pages, uses the views of more than 200 scholars, scientists, professionals, and community and public representatives to assess and address the needs of the state's growing Latino population. Fora copy make out a$12.50 checkto University of California Regents and send to UC MEXUS, 1141 Watkins Hall, University of California, Riverside, Calif. 92521.
PUBLICATIONS GUIDE: The National Council of La Raza has issued a 30-page pamphlet, “Publications Guide: Selected Publications 1980-89,” that lists its publications on issues affecting Hispanics. Most publications listed are $1. To receive the guide, send a self-addressed envelope with 450 postage to NCLR, 810 First St. NE, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20002-4205 (202) 289-1380.
AIDS VIDEOS: “Stop AIDS,” a 25-minute education video, is now available. The video consists of the top nine student-produced videos entered in a nationwide contest. They vary in format from comedy skits to dramatizations. To order the video and an accompanying teacher’s guide, send $15 to Stop AIDS, 1640 N. Gower St., Hollywood, Calif. 90028.
CONDOM USAGE: The July/August issue of Family Planning Perspectives contains a seven-page article on condom usage among Hispanic, black and white teen-age males. To receive a copy of the issue, send $5.50 to The Alan Guttmacher Institute at 111 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10003 (212) 254-5656.
LOS ANGELES COUNTY AGENDA: The Los Angeles County Latino Assessment Study" is a 24-page executive summary that attaches a value to problems affecting Latinos and programs to address them. For a free copy, contact The Torres Rivera Center, 710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711 (714) 625-6607.
CONSUMER ELECTRONICS INFORMATION: The pamphlets “Consumers Should Know: Howto Buy, Use and Care for VCRs, Camcorders and Tape” and "Consumers Should Know: About Service Contracts; About Repair Services” are now available in Spanish. For copies send a self-addressed envelope with 250 for each pamphlet to Electronic Industries Association’s Consumer Electronics Group, P.O. Box 19100, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 457-4919.
CONNECTING
DROPOUT ACADEMIES OPEN
Four alternative schools for dropouts and students likely to drop out debutted this month in Miami, Philadelphia, Long Beach, Calif., and Sacramento, Calif. The schools, along with three more due to be opened next month, one in November and two during the next academic semester, are the result of a co-venture among the Cities in Schools organization, the U.S. Justice Department and Burger King.
Called Burger King Academies, the schools provide traditional high school curricula as well as sessions on life skills and employment training. Initial funding came in the form of a $1 million grant from the Justice Department.
To be housed on donated or leased sites away from city-run schools, the academies will be run by boards of directors comprised of individuals representing the educational, corporate, social service and other public sector components of the community. T eachers will be provided by the local school districts. Each academy will handle a maximum of 125 students, with a limit of 15-20 students per class. Students are recommended from a variety of sources, including teachers, counselors and local court systems.
The locales with academies opening in October are Palm Beach County, Fla., Columbia, S.C., and Inglewood, Calif. San Antonio will open its academy in November, and Baltimore and Charleston, S.C., will inaugurate academies early next year.
GROUP PROVIDES AIDS TRAINING
The Midwest Hispanic AiDS Coalition will hold a three-day training institute for health-service providers and educators who work with AIDS prevention programs targeted at Hispanics. The institute will be held in Chicago Sept. 28-30.
Eunice Diaz, the sole Hispanic on the 15-member National Commission on AIDS and a faculty member at the University of Southern California, will be among the seminar leaders. Alberto Mata, a regional adviser on AIDS to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, will also be on the teaching staff at the institute, which will seek to provide culturally relevant information.
The institute costs $40 for coalition members and $50 for non-members.
Aside from the health-oriented training, the Midwest Coalition will sponsor Sept. 28 a benefit to bestow recognition on individuals who have contributed greatly to the education and prevention of AIDS in the Hispanic community. The master of ceremonies will be Illinois state Sen. Miguel Del Valle.
For more information call (312) 772-8195.
Calendar________________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
YOUTH LITERACY Washington, D.C. Sept. 25 As part of its observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Library of Congress is hosting a talk by U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos. His address, “1989 - The Year of the Young Reader,” will be on the significance of education and literacy for Hispanic youth.
Olga Padilla (202) 707-6662 4
EMPLOYMENT SYMPOSIUM Chicago Sept. 26, 27
The U.S. Department of Agriculture is sponsoring a Hispanic employment program symposium. The symposium will establish networks to aid in recruiting and hiring Hispanics at USDA. A job fair will also be held. Elio Montenegro, special assistant to Illinois Gov. James Thompson, will be a guest speaker.
Vionnette Tidwell (202) 382-1130 DISABLED MINORITIES Los Angeles Sept. 26,27
The California Governor’s Committee for Employment of Disabled Persons is sponsoring a conference on the employment of disabled minorities. Various workshops and keynote speeches, including a speech by Irene Martinez of Fiesta Educativa, will take place.
Marie Duffy (916) 323-2959 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Los Angeles Sept. 28
The Latino Managers Association is presenting 'The Essentials of Building aTeam," a professional development luncheon. Topics to be discussed Sept. 25, 1989
will include teamwork and problem solving.
Mary Gonzalez Wiersma (213) 636-1304 FIESTA
Washington, D.C. Sept. 30 The Mt. Pleasant Branch of the District of Columbia Public Library is sponsoring a fiesta to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. Bilingual storytelling, a film, music and poetry readings will take place. Maria Nino (202) 727-1361 VOTER REGISTRATION Washington, D.C. Oct. 1
The Council of Hispanic Community and Agencies will launch "Su Voto es Su Voz,” a drive to increase the number of Hispanic voters in the District of Columbia. A benefit celebration to support the project will also be held.
Susana Cepeda (202) 328-9451 EDUCATION AND FAMILY Charlotte, N.C. Oct. 1-3
The National Coalition for Parent Involvement in Education is holding a conference to address critical education issues. U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos will deliver a presentation.
Elvira Crocker (202) 822-7200
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


Dean
School of Education California State University, Bakersfield
California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB) invites applications and nominations for the position of Dean of the School of Education. CSUB was founded in 1968 and is one of the twenty campuses in the California State University System. The campus serves the metropolitan Bakersfield population of 250,000 and a growing and diverse population of 700,000 people who live primarily in the southern San Joaquin Valley.
The University is composed of three schools: Arts and Sciences, Education, and Business and Public Administration. The School of Education offers credential programs required in the State of California for service as elementary and secondary school teachers, counselors, and administrators. The School also offers a bachelor of science degree in physical education and a Master of Arts in Education allowing for concentrations in Bilingual/Bicultural Education, Counseling and Personnel Services, Curriculum and Instruction, Early Childhood Education, Educational Administration, Reading, and Special Education. The School is composed of three departments: Physical Education, Advanced Educational Studies, and Teacher Education.
The University has a growing enrollment which is presently at about 4800 for an annual average of 3600 full time equivalent students (FTES). Enrollments in the School of Education have been growing steadily in recent years. Education students are served by approximately thirty faculty in the School.
The Dean is expected to provide leadership for the School of Education in the areas of teaching, academic planning, research, and service. The School plays an important role in the local community of professional educators. The Dean is responsible for all budgeting, personnel and instructional services, and administers all curricular and academic support programs in the School. The Dean is expected to work closely with faculty in curricular matters and provide significant leadership in the development of strong and innovative academic programs. The Dean reports to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and represents the School to the University; external professional constituencies; local, state, and national agencies; and the regional community.
Qualifications include: (1) an earned doctorate and a record of teaching excellence and scholarly achievement or creative productivity sufficient to merit an advanced rank appointment; (2) appropriate administrative experience leading to the dean’s level of responsibility; (3) demonstrated experience in the acquisition of external funding; (4) proven ability to work with faculty, students, other administrators, and members of the community; and (5) competence to assume a leadership role in a public institution of higher education that serves an ethnically and culturally diverse population like that of the southern San Joaquin Valley.
The appointment is expected to be announced by April 30,1990, and it will begin by August 1, 1990. CSUB is firmly committed to achieving the goals of equal opportunity and affirmative action and welcomes applications from women, ethnic minorities, and the handicapped. CSUB fosters and appreciates ethnic diversity among its faculty, students, and staff. »
Salary and benefits are competitive and commensurate with experience and qualifications. For maximum consideration, deadline for receipt of application materials is November 15,1989. Nominations, or letters of application with resume and names of at least four references should be sent to:
Chair, Search Committee, Dean of Education c/o Vice President for Academic Affairs California State University, Bakersfield 9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfield, California 93311-1099
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL DEPUTY DIRECTOR .
Human rights organization seeks a Deputy Director for its Regional Office in Washington, D.C.
Innovative, dynamic person needed to: build volunteer leadership; organize volunteer groups; diversify membership; organize conferences; and coordinate death penalty abolition and country campaigns. Minimum 2 years grassroots organizing, experience with diverse racial, ethnic and cultural communities, public speaking, college degree or equivalent, computer literacy. Planning and budgeting, knowledge of other languages (esp. Spanish) assets.
Mid-$30s, excellent benefits. Apply by 10/31 to Deputy Director Search, AIUSA, 608 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Washington, D.C. 20009.
Women, racial and other minorities encouraged to apply. No calls please.
EOE


WRITER, TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS
The National Institutes of Health, the biomedical research arm oftheU.S. Public Health Service, has an opening for atechnical publications writer (GS 9/11/12) in the information office of one of its institutions. Duties include (1) writing/editing press releases, news and feature stories, patient education booklets, and other materials about research in diabetes, endocrine and metabolic diseases for a lay audience; and (2) answering media and public inquiries.
Applicant must have either a bachelor's degree in science or communications or a minimum of one year of specialized experience in science writing. Starting salary depends on the applicant’s qualifications. To apply, submit an Application for Federal Employment (SF-171) by October 2,1989 to:
NIDDK Personnel Office Bldg. 31, Rm 9A30 9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, Md. 20892
HEP&

For more information call Syd Carter, (301) 496-4231 U.S. Citizenship Required NIH is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Chicano/Latino Studies. Full-time, tenure-track position, Assistant Professor level, beginning Fall 1990.
Requires Ph.D. in one of the Social Sciences or Humanities. Preference given to candidates with teaching experience and community involvement. Appointee expected to offer courses in Chicano/Latino Studies and interdisciplinary courses in Ethnic Studies. Opportunity to assist in development and coordination of program in Chicano/Latino Studies and to teach in discipline-specific department.
Send letters of application and curriculum vitae to Barbara Paige-Pointer, Chair, Ethnic Studies Department, California State University, Hayward, Hayward, Calif. 94542. Applications must be received by October 31,1989 to assure consideration, but position will remain available until filled. Minorities and women are especially encouraged to apply. Position #90/91 ES-TT-2.
(AA/EOE)
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sept 25, 1989
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Arts & Entertainment
PAST THE PICKET LINE: Several Latinos performed this month in Las Vegas in spite of an ongoing strike by musicians in that resort city.
For several years Las Vegas hotels have scheduled performances by Hispanic singers to coincide with the 16th of September - Mexican Independence Day. This year’s “Hispanic Heritage” celebrations included concerts by Mexican singer Juan Gabriel (attheTropicana), as well as private “casino parties” by Mexico’s Yuri (at Caesar’s Palace) and Venezuela’s Jos6 Luis Rodrfguez (Las Vegas Hilton).
All of the above performances went on as scheduled, while members of Las Vegas’ musicians Local 369 picketed outside of the various hotels. Members of the union have been on strike since early June over the hotels’ use of taped music in shows.
Several artists scheduled to perform in Las Vegas during strike months, including Dean Martin and Wayne Newton, cancelled their appearances in support of the musicians’ strike.
RONSTADT SCORES AGAIN: Linda Ronstadt won an Emmy Sept. 17 in the “best performance in a variety or music program” category. Ronstadt won the award for her performance in the PBS special
Canciones de mi padre.
A first for Ronstadt, the award was the only one to go to a Hispanic this year. Nominated for the second year in a row was Jimmy Smits for his character Victor Sifuentes on LA. Law.
THEATER NOTES: Two Latino companies at opposite ends of the country bring their 1989 season to a close this month.
Los Angeles’ Bilingual Foundation of the Arts introduces Its last play, of the season this week. It is the U.S. premiere of Divinas palabras, a play by Spain’s Ram6n del Valle-lnclan, on Sept. 29. The world premiere of the English-language version -Divine Words --will be held Oct. 6. Both will run through Nov. 6.
New York’s Repertorio EspartoI finishes its season this week with final performances of three of its repertory pieces. Last performances of La generaia - a zarzuela -- and Caf6 con leche - a comedy by Gloria Gonzdlez - will be held Sept. 24. The season closes Sept. 30 with La nonna, a comedy by Roberto M. Cossa.
An English-language version of La nonna will be part of San Diego’s Old Globe Theater Season ’90. The Granny will play Jan. 6 through Feb. 18.
-- Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
GALAVISION BACKS ABC: When ABC launched a Spanish-language multimedia advertising campaign Sept. 18 promoting its new fall lineup, the two largest Spanish-language television networks, Univision and Telemundo, refused to carry the ads.
However, Spanish-language network Ga-lavision .-- based in Los Angeles, where half the budget for ABC’s campaign is targeted -agreed to run the spots.
Galavision spokesperson Starrett Berry told Weekly Report: “I don't particularly see it as promoting the competition. If it were another Spanish network, I’d see it as competition, but we’d be sticking our heads in the sand if we thought Latinos didn’t watch Anglo TV.
“There’s no deep message involved in the commercial,” he continued. “I don’t think it will hurt. Let me put it this way: If you check our
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ratings following the spot, I would doubt seriously you’d see a significant dip.”
He added that ABC was paying the standard rate for the spot.
DRAMATIZING AIDS: Tres Hombres Sin Fronteras, a series of 15 five-minute programs dramatizing how AIDS is transmitted to migrant farm workers and their families, premiered Sept. 18 on KDNA-FM, a public broadcasting station in Granger, Wash.
Funded by a border AIDS initiative grant from the California Community Foundation, the KDNA-produced series will also air on commercial radio stations in San Diego, Tucson and Phoenix, Ariz., El Paso, Texas, and Albuquerque, N.M. It airs on each station twice every weekday for a total of nine weeks.
According to KDNA General Manager Ricardo Garcfa, community foundations in each of the five cities are supporting the series and will distribute a printed foto-novela to accompany the series.
ADVERTISING ISSUES: A recent study by the Leadership Council on Advertising Issues examines the effect of the media and advertising industries on national economic growth from 1975-1988. It documents a 112% •increase in Spanish-language radio stations - from 80 to 169 -- and a 63% increase in Spanish-language TV stations - from 16 to 26.
To demonstrate the importance of advertising to media industries, the studyr “Economic and Social Impacts of Media Advertising,” projects the impact that a 5% reduction in media advertising would have in 1993. It forecasts a total of 214 Spanish-language radio stations by then and concludes that such a. reduction would cut the number of stations to 202, a 5.6% loss.
For a free copy of the 160-page stud/, write to Gail Wasserman at Ogilvy & Mather, 309 W. 49th St., New York, N.Y. 10019.
f - Danilo Alfaro
TIIE WHITE MOUSE WASHINGTON
September 11, ltM
I am delighted to extend my wermest greetings end congratulations to the members of the Hispanic American * community as you celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month, September IS - October IS, 1989.
Perhaps no single ethnic group has had a^Srofound an impact upon our Nation aa Hispanic American. From'the daye of the first explorers in what is now Florida, Texas, and California, the Hispanic peoples have played a major role in taming this Taet country and developing its abundant resources. Mexican Americana, Cuban Americans,
Puerto Rican Americans, and other men and women of Hispanic descent have not only demonstrated the power of Individual enterprise but also added to the cultural diversity that so enriches American life.
Today, Hispanic Americans continue to be leaders and -pioneers — in education, government, business, science, sports, and the arts. Every day, in communities across the United States, they remind their fellow Americans of the meaning of determination and hard work, as well as the importance of faith and devotion to one's family. The values passed from generation to generation in Hispanic American famines are values central to the American experience, and our Nation is all the stronger because these individuals have re ignited the importance of caring for one's neighbor, obtaining a good education, participating in one's church, and exercising one's rights as a citizen.
This month provides a wonderful opportunity for all of us to celebrate both our Nation's Hispanic Heritage and the beliefs that unite us. I encourage all Americans to take part.
Barbara joins me in offering Hispanic Americans best wishes for a memorable celebration and for every future happiness and success.. God bless you, and God bless America.

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Full Text

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Making The News This Week statements in the extortion, bribery and conspiracy trial of U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia in Manhattan's federal district court. The South Bronx congressman and his wife, Jane, are being tried for allegedly trading the influence of his office to help now-defunct defense contractor Wed tech Corp. secure government contracts ... California Gov. Deukmejian signs into law a bill that prohibits armed or uniformed security guards at election booths. The legislation was a to Orange County's GOP posting guards last November mt1m1date Latino voters ... Former California Supreme Court Just1ce John Ar guelles joins the Los Angeles law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher ... The U.S. Senate Republican Task Force on Hispanic Affairs elects Califor nian Fernando Oaxaca as its chairman. Oaxaca is owner of Coronado Communications ... President Bush honors Ruben Ortega, 19, and Freddy Torres, 18, with two of the four 1988 Young American Medals for Bravery awarded at a White House ceremony. In Apri11988 Ortega subdued a classmate who held captive his English class with an assault rifle. Torres was recognized for the time he spent with hundreds of teen-age Bostonians to tell them to stay away from drugs and learn about AIDS ... Bush presents Jose Coronado, director of the Audie L. Murphy Veterans Hospital in San Antonio, with a Distinguished Presidential Rank Award for exceptional performance in government. Coronado, along with 62 others, will also receive a $20,000 bonus ... Lawyers begin opening N.Y. Voters Make Switch To Dinkins Mayoral Race New York mayoral Democratic primary win ner David Dinkins received 56% of the Latino vote in the Sept. 12 race against incumbent Ed Koch, according to an exit poll by The New York Daily News. Seven out of 1 0 Hispanic voters supported Koch in 1985. Overall, 137,827 Hispanics voted in the Democratic and Republican primaries. They comprised 13% of the total vote. New York is roughly 20% Hispanic. Explaining the shift against Koch in the Latino vote, Angelo Falcon, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, said: "Koch hasn't had serious opposition in the past." Falcon also credited Jesse Jackson's 1988 presidential campaign. "Jackson broke the myth that Latinos won't vote for blacks." Dinkins, Manhattan borough president, is black. Dinkins beat Koch 51%-42%. Other factors that swung Hispanics over to Dinkins, according to Falcon, were Puerto Rico's $500,000 campaign to register New York voters and the money spent to reach Latinos by a 47,000-member union of hospital workers in favor ' of Dinkins. Local 1199 is led by Dennis Rivera. Teens Reveal Condom Use Hispanic males 15-19 years of age were more likely to use no or ineffective contraceptive methods during the last time they had inter course, according to a report published Sept. 21. Family Planning Perspectives magazine, published by the Alan Guttmacher Institute, reported that 31% of Hispanic males in the 1519 age category did not use contraception or depended on unreliable methods such as withdrawal, rhythm and douching. The rate for whites was 23% and for blacks, 20%. The study also reported that 29% of Hispanics and 33% of blacks worry all the time about con tracting AIDS. Only 1 0% of whites said they do so. The percentages of the 1, 800 respondents in the age group who had sex were: Hispanics Blacks Whites 60% 81% 57% National Dropout Study Debate By Danilo Alfaro 198.6, 36% the Latmo drop?uts had obThe u.s. Education Department's Sept. 14 tamed or report on dropouts, noting that Latino students pared blacks, ofowh1tes, are more likely than nonLatinos to quit school of Nat1ve Amencans and 7.6 of Asian short of graduation and are less likely to Amencans. resume it later, has triggered a fresh debate as Hispanic educa-te who is to blame and what should be done tion experts viewed about it. the study cautiousThe government's study, "Dropout Rates in ly. the United States: 1988," took three measureBlandina Cardenas ments: Ramirez, director of • Event dropout rates In 1987, 9.5% of the Office of Minority Hispanics in grades 10-12 dropped out of high Concerns at the school. This compared with 6.7% of blacks and American Council 4.6% of whites. on Education in CARDENAS-RAMIREZ W h' t D C • Status dropout ratesIn 1988, 36%-as mg on, ., high school data alone S about 1.2 millionof Hispanics ages 16-24 giveinaccuratepicture warned, " imply were not in high school and did not have a I oo king at high diploma or the equivalent. This compared with school data gives an inaccurate picture. If we 15% of blacks and 13% of whites. look at Hispanics who enter the first grade and • Cohort dropout rates_ The proportion of never complete high school, we're talking Hispanics in the 1980 sophomore class who about a 50% dropout rate." left _high school without graduating was 28%. According to the report, as of October 1988, This compared with 22% of blacks and 15% of 31% of Hispanic dropouts ages 16-24 had whites. The department also published figures completed no more than six years of school, on Native Americans (36%) and Asian compared with 5% of non-Hispanics. Those in Americans (8%). continued on page 2 ,_ , -Fernandez to Head N. Y.C. School System ByFetixf'erez Dade County, Fla., Schools Superinten dent Joseph Fernandez was named Sept. 20 to head of the New York City school system the nation's largest. He replaces Richard Green, who died in May. Fernandez is ex pected to start at his post as early as January. Amalia Betanzos, the sole Hispanic on the seven-member school board, said Fernandez was "by general acclamation FERNANDEZ (of the board) the best qualified ... The board interviewed Fernandez Sept. 18 and met to decide between him and Fairfax County, Va., Superintendent Robert Spillane Sept. 20. Fernandez, 53, has received national atten tion for his efforts to decentralize the Southern Florida school system, which is the fourth largest in the country. "We have an open mind toward Mr. Fernandez. The fact that he comes from a city that is multiracial and has a large immigrant community is a plus," said Luis Reyes, educational research director for the New York office of Aspira Fernandez, who has headed the Dade dis trict since May 1987, will oversee a district that has 979 schools, 940,000 students and is 34% Hispanic. Born in New York and a Puerto Rican, Fernandez earned $155,000 plus expenses while at Dade.

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Drug War Proposal Puts Heavy Burden on Newly Legalized By FBiix Perez Lost among the countless stories on Presi dent Bush's ballyhooed plan to combat illegal drugs was the detail that a disproportionate share of the funding burden would fall on the program that helps newly legalized im migrants receive the education necessary to become permanent residents, charge im migrant rights advocates. Bush made his $7.9 billion anti-drug plan public Sept. 5. It asks Congress to transfer $320 million of the plan's $716 million price tag for next year from the State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants program. Under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, SLIAG was slated to receive $900 mil lion each year from 1988 to 1991. Bush's plan would siphon more than one-third of SLIAG's 1990 funding. "We are very much opposed to rechannel ing the funds even for such a noble purpose as the war on drugs," says Cecilia Munoz, im migration policy analyst at the National Council of La Raza. "It will undermine a program that is already having financial difficulty." Munoz and others working on behalf of im migrants argue that the cutback may mean that many will not be able to complete are quired course on English and U.S. civics. Classes are "almost exclusively" funded by SLIAG, says Munoz. The program's funds are also used to reimburse states for medical ser vices and public assistance provided to the immigrants. The Bush administration contends that the program was overfunded, pointing out that only $237 million of the $1.8 billion allocated for 1988 and this year have been spent. Politics Top Action List for L.A. County Despite being faced with a host of problems that undermine their economic and social progress such as a high dropout rate, limited access to health care, medical services and affordably priced housing Los Angeles County Latinos list political participation as the critical action that will contribute most to their well-being, found a survey by The Tomas Rivera Center. "The Los Angeles County Latino Assessment Study" suggested several ways to achieve greater political empowerment. It recom mended the creation of outreach programs promoting naturalization among immigrants, developing simpler voter registration procedures and encouraging Latinos to participate in coalitions based on interest and not solely on ethnicity or race. Also put forth was increas ing the number of Hispanic-backed political ac tion committees. Latinos are projected to account for 40% of the county's population by 2010. Four million Hispanics are expected to be living there by then. Following political participation, the three primary areas of interest were education, economic development and leadership development. The six secondary issues were health, social services, immigration, legal ser vices, crime and housing. Lack of Funding Hampers Dropout Fight continued from page 1 the departmenfs 30,000 sample included both U.S.-born and immigrant youths. The study showed that 41% of all 1980 sophomores whose home language was other than English or predominantly non-English dropped out before graduation. Edgewood (San Antonio) School District Su perintendent James Vasquez accused Educa-1988 LATINO DROPUT RATES* Ages 16-24 Metro Areas Suburbs Rural Areas 37% 35% 30% West NE South Midwest 41% 37% 29% 28% *Status dropout rates. tion Secretary Lauro Cavazos of "expounding the rhetoric of the federal government. They think that rhetoric will solve the problem without a federal investment. As long as you keep that kind of simplistic logic, you're not going to solve the problem." Noting that many Hispanics typically live below poverty levels in inner cities, Vasquez pointed to an inverse relationship of school resources to student needs. "There is a 2 definite link between dropouts and property poor school districts. Schools with the least amount of resources are trying to respond to kids with the most need. "Schools traditionally have been white, Anglo-Saxon, middle-class, English-speaking environments," he said, adding that as a result of the continuing influx of Latino immigrants, "They are now having a tough time adapting to a new student population who are none of those things." Josue Gonzalez, vice chancellor of resource development and grant management for City Colleges of Chicago, noted that in Dade Coun ty, Fla, middle-class Cuban American stu dents suffer dropout rates just as severe as Hispanics in New York, Chicago or Texas. Twenty-four percent of Dade County eighth graders in 1982 dropped ou_t by 1987. "You would not have expected that," said Gonzalez, former head of bilingual education in the Carter administration. "But it isn't always the most failure-prone students dropping out. It is part of the total syndrome that young people go through today. Schools are imper sonal, cold and don't respond to students' needs.'' Sept 25, 1989 Jana Mason, director of the American Public Welfare Association's immigration task force, counters that states have been slow to claim the money because the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services tarried in provid ing reimbursement guidelines. "The ad ministration has made us jump through hoops for the money," says Mason. La Raza and APWA are pinning their hopes on the California congressional delegation whose state stands to lose the most money -pushing through a compromise. Democratic congressional leadership is sponsoring a version that would cut across several government programs equally. Munoz-and Mason admit to an uphill struggle. "Newly legalized people are not at the top of the scale of priorities," says Munoz. Calif. Bill Seeks Change In School District Races The California legislature sent to Gov. George Deukmejian Sept. 13 a bill that would require nine school districts, including three in Los Angeles County, to switch away from at large elections. Authored by Assemblyman Pete Chacon, the bill is in response to the contention that Latino representation on these school boards has been diluted because Hispanics do not have the number of voters necessary to influence an election that is district-wide. That Hispanics tend to cluster in certain areas increases their chances of electing someone of their choice. The districts that would be affected are ABC Unified, Hacienda La Puente Unified and Mon tebello in Los Angeles, Garden Grove and Orange Unified in Orange County, Sweetwater Union in San Diego, Riverside Unified in River side County, and one district each in Santa Clara and Alameda counties. Peter Mehas, Deukmejian's education ad viser, said: "The governor is not looking favorably at the bill." Deukmejian has 15 days to sign or veto the bill. Ford to Double Dealerships The Ford Motor Co. has announced that it plans to double the number of Hispanic owned Ford dealerships by 1994 so that it can capture a larger chunk of the growing Hispanic market. The announcement was made Sept. 8 from the firm's Detroit headquarters the same day it was broached at the national conference of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce conference in New Orleans. Ford has 5,528 dealerships nationwide, 40, or 0. 72%, of which are owned by Latinos. Ed Rodrfguez, assistant manager of cor porate urban programs at Ford, said the company will work informally with national Hispanic organizations to identify potential dealers. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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Arturo Madrid Preparing for the '90s A newspaper reporter asked me recently what my thoughts were about the characterization of the 1980s as the decade of the Hispanic. Various people, he said, indicated that their expectations hadn't been realized. I don't know what people expected would take place in the 1980s, but I believe it has been our decade. We were, until recently, an invisible population. The 1980s was a period when we entered the national consciousness. Our faces started appearing in newspapers, in news magazines, on television, and even in movies. Our art, music and literature began to receive public attention and praise. Latinos began to participate in growing numbers in the institutional life of U.S. society. Most importantly, what had been consid ered private problems became public policy concerns, whether in the realms of educa tion, employment or immigration. Much of the attention we have garnered MADRID over the past decade has to do with the increase in our numbers. The most recent figures put us at 20 million and growing. Because we are a young population, we are the labor force of tomorrow. Our buying power has not gone unnoticed and we represent a potential political force. YOUTHFULNESS: PROMISE AND A THREAT Although we have become part of the national agenda, it's true that we still have little voice in setting or acting on that agenda. With very few exceptions, policy continues to be set in ignorance of us or despite us. We are rarely consulted, because we still lack significant economic or political power. Our youthfulness is both a promise and a threat. We may be the workforce of the future, but the demands we place on the society's schools and services create considerable concern. In some areas, we lost ground during the 1980s. The number of Latino families living in poverty grew overt he past 10 years. Adequate housing and health care are increasingly beyond the means of most Latinos. Not only is unemployment a major issue, but Latinos are overwhelm ingly to be found in poorly paid, dead-end and dangerous jobs. Despite our efforts, the educational level of our population did not increase significantly. In fact, in releasing his department's latest report on dropouts Sept. 14, U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos called the problem in the Hispanic community "a national tragedy." He reported that as of last year, 35.7% of Hispanics ages 16-24 had failed to complete high school. The rate, worse than 1 0 years earlier, was nearly triple that of whites and more than double that of blacks. EDUCATION CAN AND DOES EMPOWER It is time thus to start addressing the challenges of the 1990s. Having captured the attention of U.S. policymakers, we must now begin to influence how they deal with us. Where to begin? Our needs as a community are so great and so urgent. Ultimately, of course, we will not influence policy until we have become empowered politically or economically. But there is one institution whose policies and practices we need to affect: school. The U.S. educational system does not do well by our children. Schools still track Latino students, still label and treat a disproportion ate number as slow learners, and continue to have low expectations for them. Education, for all its limitations, can and does empower. Our individual and collective well-being depends in large measure on it. And because school is a local institution, subject to local governance, we can influence it. At the very least we can demand that schools make our children literate and numerate and that school personnel be rewarded for doing so and held accountable if they don't. (Arturo Madrid is president of the Tomas Rivera Center, a policy studies think tank in Claremont, Calif.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua DANILO'S IN-BASKET: The Institute for Media Analysis, a New York non-profit group that says it exists "to foster effective commu nication of ideas and opinion by those concerned with humanely engaged social change," sent us a thin paperback the other day. Written by television journalist Carl Ginsburg, it was titled "RACE AND MEDIA: The Enduring Life of the Moynihan Report," so it ended up in Media Report proprietor Danilo Alfaro's wire in basket. Danilo thumbed through its 80 pages to see what it con tained that prompted the institute to send it to us --some reference, perhaps, to the status of Hispanics. The word was not mentioned even once. The monograph tracks how major media has sought to validate the 1965 report by then-Assistant U.S. Secretary of Labor Daniel Patrick Moynihan that, in its words, concluded "that black poverty was no longer the result of 'external forces,' such as economic con ditions, but rather that the black family had inflicted upon itself its own demise such as to render it 'disturbed.' "The inside back cover of the book listed a board of four directors, none Hispanic, and a 30-member board of advisers, three with Hispanic surnames. Curious about the institute and whether it had examined any Hispanic media issues, Danilo reached William Schaap, one of the four directors. The "Race and Media" book didn't mention Hispanics, Schaap explained, because it was about blacks. Okay. He added that while it had done nothing on U.S. Hispanics, the institute did publish a pair of reports on theN icaraguan contras. The three Latinos on the advisory board were Xavier Chamorro Carde nal, publisher of Managua's El Nuevo Diario; Cuban filmmaker Santiago Alvarez, and Venezuela-born, Nicaragua-based journalist Freddy Balzan. Schaap conceded that the trio has rarely been able to travel to the United States. If the directors want, I'm sure we could find some Latinos closer to home. HECTOR'S EAR-PIECE: In July, Sin Palos chastized Washing ton, D.C., disk jockeys Don Geronimo and Mike O'Meara for their tasteless gag about cubana singer Gloria Estefan's "greasiness." Although Alan Goodman, the WAVA-FM general manager, as sured us that "the fact that she's Hispanic is coincidental to the fact that she looks greasy," the National Association of Hispanic Jour nalists followed up with a critical letter to the station and a carbon copy to the FCC. Since then, no more references to "Greasy Gloria." In fact, Weekly Report publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza re ceived a phone call the other day with a report that an on-the-air caller to WAVA told one of the deejays, "I've got a joke for you fellows. There was this Mexican ... " And he was quickly informed, "We don't do that anymore," and disconnected. Isn't progress wonderful? -Kay_ Barbaro Quoting ... JOE GELLER, Dade Co., Fla., Democratic Party chairman, quoted in The Miami Herald following Republican Ileana Ros-Lehtinen's impres sive victory in the traditionally Democratic 18th U.S. Congressional District special election: Ill went down and registered for Spanish classes this morning." CARLOS ALBERTO MONTANER, syndicated columnist with Spain's Firmas Press Agency, on Miami's cubans: 11They did not arrive on the Mayflower, like the Pilgrims, in search of a better way of life. Rather, the Cubans set sail on Noah's Ark, to rescue the past, to escape the flood, disposed to reproduce themselves and to reproduce paradise lost as soon as their guayaberas dried." Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sept. 25, 1989 3

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COLLECTING DROPOUT STATISTICS: "Dropout Rates in the United States: 1988" is an 88-page report that charts dropout figures for Hispanics, blacks and whites since 1972. For a free copy, write U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Office of Public Affairs, Room 2089, Washington, D.C. 20202. CALIFORNIA LA TIN OS: "The Challenge: Latinos in a Changing California," 210 pages, uses the views of more than 200 scholars, sci entists, professionals, and community and public representatives to assess and address the needs of the state's growing Latino population. For a copy make out a $12.50 check to University of California Regents and send to UC MEXUS, 1141 Watkins Hall, University of California, Riverside, Calif. 92521. PUBLICATIONS GUIDE: The National Council of La Raza has issued a 30-page pamphlet, "Publications Guide: Selected Publica tions 1980-89," that lists its publications on issues affecting Hispanics. Most publications listed are $1. To receive the guide, send a self addressed envelope with 45 postage to NCLR, 81 0 First St. N E, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20002-4205 (202) 289-1380. AIDS VIDEOS: "Stop AIDS," a 25-minute education video, is now available. The video consists of the top nine student-produced videos entered in a nationwide contest. They vary in format from comedy skits to dramatizations. To order the video and an accompanying teacher's guide, send $15 to Stop AIDS, 1640 N. Gower St., Hollywood, Calif. 90028. CONDOM USAGE: The July/August issue of Family Planning Per spectives contains a seven-page article on condom usage among Hispanic, black and white teen-age males. To receive a copy of the issue, send $5.50 to The Alan Guttmacher Institute at 111 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 10003 (212) 254-5656. LOS ANGELES COUNTY AGENDA: 'The Los Angeles County Latino Assessment Study" is a 24-page executive summary that at taches a value to problems affecting Latinos and programs to address them. For a free copy, contact The Tomas Rivera Center, 710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711 (714) 625-6607 . CONSUMER ELECTRONICS INFORMATION: The pamphlets "Con sumers Should Know: How to Buy, Use and Care for VCRs, Camcor ders and Tape" and "Consumers Should Know: About Service Con tracts; About Repair Services'' are now available in Spanish. For copies send a self-addressed envelope with 25 for each pamphlet to Elec tronic Industries Association's Consumer Electronics Group, P.O. Box 19100, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 457-4919. CONNECTING DROPOUT ACADEMIES OPEN Four alternative schools for dropouts and students likely to drop out debutted this month in Miami, Philadelphia, Long Beach, Calif., and Sacramento, Calif. The schools, along with three more due to be opened next month, one in November and two during the next aca demic semester, are the result of a co-venture among the Cities in Schools organization, the U.S. Justice Department and Burger King. Called Burger King Academies, the schools provide traditional high school curricula as well as sessions on life skills and employment training. Initial funding came in the form of a $1 million grant from the Justice Department. To be housed on donated or leased sites away from city-run schools, the academies will be run by boards of directors comprised of individu als representing the educational, corporate, social service and other public sector components of the community. Teachers will be provided by the local school districts. Each academy will handle a maximum of 125 students, with a limit of 15-20 students per class. Students are recommended from a variety of sources, including teachers, counsel ors and local court systems. The locales with academies opening in October are Palm Beach County, Fla., Columbia, S.C., and Inglewood, Calif. San Antonio will open its academy in November, and Baltimore and Charleston, S.C., will inaugurate academies early next year. GROUP PROVIDES AIDS TRAINING The Midwest Hispanic AiDS Coalition will hold a three-day training institute for health-service providers and educators who work with AIDS prevention programs targeted at Hispanics. The institute will be held in Chicago Sept. 28-30. Eunice Dfaz, the sole Hispanic on the 15-member National Commis sion on AIDS and a faculty member at the University of Southern California, will be among the seminar leaders. Alberto Mata, a regional adviser on AIDS to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, will also be on the teaching staff at the institute, which will seek to provide culturally relevant information. The institute costs $40 for coalition members and $50 for non-mem bers. Aside from the health-oriented training, the Midwest Coalition will sponsor Sept. 28 a benefit to bestow recognition on individuals who have contributed greatly to the education and prevention of AIDS in the Hispanic community. The master of ceremonies will be Illinois state Sen. Miguel Del Valle. For more information call (312) 772-8195. Calendar EMPLOYMENT SYMPOSIUM Chicago Sept. 26, 27 will include teamwork and problem solving. Mary Gonzalez Wiersma (213) 636-1304 FIESTA TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be in cluded in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Ad dress items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. THIS WEEK YOUTH LITERACY Washington, D.C. Sept. 25 As part of its observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Library of Congress is hosting a talk by U.S. Education : Secretary Lauro Cavazos. His ad dress, "1989 --The Year of the Young Reader," will be on the significance of education and literacy for Hispanic youth. Olga Padilla (202) 707-6662 4 The U.S. Department of Agriculture is sponsoring a Hispanic employment program symposium. The symposium will establish networks to aid in recruit ing and hiring Hispanics at USDA. A job fair will also be held. Elio Montenegro, special assistant to Illi nois Gov. James Thompson, will be a guest speaker. Vionnette Tidwell (202) 382-1130 DISABLED MINORITIES Los Angeles Sept. 26, 27 The California Governor's Committee for Employ ment of Disabled Persons is sponsoring a confer ence on the employment of disabled minorities. Various workshops and keynote speeches, includ ing a speech by Irene Martinez of Fiesta Educativa, will take place. Marie Duffy (916) 323-2959 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Los Angeles Sept. 28 The Latino Managers Association is presenting "The Essentials of Building a Team," a professional development luncheon. Topics to be discussed Sept. 25, 1989 Washington, D.C. Sept. 30 The Mt. Pleasant Branch of the District of Columbia Public Library is sponsoring a fiesta to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. Bilingual storytelling, a film, music and poetry readings will take place. Maria Nino (202) 727-1361 VOTER REGISTRATION Washington, D.C. Oct. 1 The Council of Hispanic Community and Agencies will launch "Su Voto es Su Voz," a drive to increase the number of Hispanic voters in the District of Columbia. A benefit celebration to support the project will also be held. Susana Cepeda (202) 328-9451 EDUCATION AND FAMILY Charlotte, N.C. Oct. 1-3 The National Coalition for Parent Involvement in Education is holding a conference to address criti cal education issues. U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos will deliver a presentation. Elvira Crocker (202) 822-7200 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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Dean School of Education California State University, Bakersfield State University, Bakersfield (CSUB) invites applications and n ominations for the position of Dean of the School of Education. CSUB was founded in 1968 and is one of the twenty campuses in the Cali fornia State University System. The campus serves the metropolitan Bakersfield population of 250,000 and a growing and diverse population o f 700,000 people who live primarily in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The University is composed of three schools: Arts and Sciences, Education, and Business and Public Administration . The School of Education offers credential programs required in the State of California for service as elementary and secondary school teachers, counselors, and adm i nistrators. The School also offers a bachelor of science degree i n physical education and a Master of Arts in Education allowing for concentrations in Bilingual/Bicultural Education, Counseling and Personnel Services, Curriculum and Instruction, Early Childhood Education , Educational Administration, Reading, and Special Education. The School is composed of three departments: Physical Education, Advanced Educational Studies, and Teacher Education. The University has a growing enrollment which is presently at about 4800 for an annual average of 3600 full time equivalent students (FTES) . Enrollments in the School of Education have been growing steadily in recent years. Education students are served by approximately thirty faculty in the School. The Dean is expected to provide leadership for the School of Education in the areas of teaching, academic planning, research, and service . The School plays an important role in the local community of professional educators . The Dean is responsible for all budgeting, personnel and instructional services , and administers all curricular and a c ademic support programs in the School. The Dean is expected to work close l y with faculty in curricular matters and provide significant leadership in the development of strong and innovative academic programs. The Dean reports to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and represents the School to the University; external professional constituencies; local, state , and national agencies ; and the regional community. Qualifications include: (1) an earned doctorate and a record of teaching excellence and scholarly achievement or creative productivity sufficient to merit an advanced rank appointment; (2) appropriate administrative experience leading to the dean's level of responsibility; (3) demonstrated experience in the acquisition of external funding; (4) proven ability to work with faculty, students, othe r administrators, and members of the community; and (5) competence to assume a leadership role in a public institution of higher education that serves an ethnically and culturally diverse population like that of the southern San Joaquin Valley . The appointment is expected to be announced by April 30, 1990 , and it will begin by August 1, 1990 . CSUB is firmly committed to achieving tt t e goals of equal opportunity and affirmative action and welcomes applications from women, ethnic minorities, and the handicapped. CSUB fosters and appreciates ethnic diversity among its faculty, students, and staff. • Salary and benefits are competitive and commensurate with experience and qualifications. For maximum consideration, deadline for receipt of application materials is November 15, 1989 . Nominations, or letters of application with and names of at least four references should be sent to : Chair, Search Committee, Dean of Education c/o Vice President for Academic Affairs California State University, Bakersfield 9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfield, California 93311-1099 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL • DEPUTY DIRECTOR • Human rights organization seeks a Deputy Director for its Regional Office in Washington, D.C. Innovative, dynamic person needed to: build volunteer leadership; organize volunteer groups; diversify member ship; organize conferences; and coordinate death penalty abolition and country campaigns. Minimum 2 years grass roots organizing, experience with diverse racial, ethnic and cultural communities, public speaking, college degree or computer literacy. Planning and budgeting, knowl edge of other languages (esp. Spanish) assets. Mid-$30s, benefits. Apply by 10/31 to Deputy Di rector Search, AI USA, 608 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Wash ington, D.C. 20009. Women, racial and other minorities encouraged to apply. No calls please. EOE Hispanic Unk Weekly Report WRITER, TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS The National Institutes of Health, the biomedical research arm of the U.S. Public Health Service, has an opening for a technical publications writer (GS 9/11 /12) in the information office of one of its institutions. Duties include (1) writing/editing press re leases, news and feature stories, patient education booklets, and other materials about research in diabetes, endocrine and metabolic diseases for a lay audience; and (2) answering media and public inquiries. Applicant must have either a bachelor's degree in science or communications or a minimum of one year of specialized expe rience in science writing. Starting salary depends on the applicant's qualifications. To apply, submit an Application for Federal Employment (SF-171) by October 2, 1989 to: NIDDK Personnel Office &'"'\.. Bldg. 31, Rm 9A30 9000 Rockville Pike i. -(-m Bethesda, Md. 20892 HEt--0 For more information call Syd Carter, (301) 496-4231 U . S . Citizenship Required NIH is an Equal Opportunity Employer Chicano/Latlno Studies . Full-time, tenure-track position, As sistant Professor level, beginning Fall1990. Requires Ph.D. in one of the Social Sciences or Humanities. Preference given to candidates with teaching experience and community involvement. Appointee expected to offer courses in Chi cana/Latino Studies and interdisciplinary courses in Ethnic Stud ies. Opportunity to assist in development and coordination of prqgram in Chicano/Latino Studies and to teach in discipline specific department. Send letters of application and curriculum vitae to Barbara Paige Pointer, Chair, Ethnic Studies Department, California State Univer sity, Hayward, Hayward, Calif . 94542. Applications must be re ceived by October 31, 1989 to assure consideration, but position will remain available until filled. Minorities and women are espe cially encouraged to apply. Position #90/91 ES-TT-2. • (AAIEOE) HELP! #0443 National Image Inc. needs your contribution to provide support to Hispanic Americans in the areas of Education, Employment and Civil Rights. @ IKNUKII WeAre • The Largest Pan Hispanic Organization • A source of scholarships, technical assistance, train ing and leadership. • Open to all persons who support equality of oppor tunity in education, employa1o First Street NE ment and CiVil rightS for Third Floor washington, o .c. 20002 Hispanic Ame' ricans. Please designate #0443, National Image Inc. for your gift to the Combined Federal Cam. pa1gn. Sept 25. 1989 : : : l : . . : . . ::: '!!: . :: : ' ! ,: : ' ' ; ' : : : . : : l . : ; : : . : : ' : . . : : .. ; . : 5

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Arts & Entertainment Canciones de mi padre. A first for Ronstadt, the award was the only one to go to a Hispanic this year. Nominated for the second year in a row was Jimmy Smits for PAST THE PICKET LINE: Several Latinos performed this month in Las Vegas in spite of an ongoing strike by in that resort city. his character Victor Sifuentes on L.A. Law. For several years Las Vegas hotels have scheduled performances by Hispanic singers to coincide with the 16th of September-Mexican Independence Day. This year's "Hispanic Heritage" celebrations included concerts by Mexican singer Juan Gabriel (at the Tropicana), as well as private "casino parties" by Mexico's Yuri (at Caesar's Palace) and Venezuela's Jose Lu. is Rodriguez (Las Vegas Hilton). THEATER NOTES: Two Latino companies at opposite ends of the country bring their 1989 season to a close this month. . All of the above performances went on as scheduled, while mem bers of Las Vegas' musicians Local 369 picketed outside of the various hotels. Members of the union have been on strike since early June over the hotels' use of taped music in shows. Los Angeles' Bilingual Foundation of the Arts introduces its last play . of the season this week. It is , the U.S. premiere of Divinas palabras, a play by Spain's Ram6n del Valle-lnclan, on Sept. 29. The world premiere of the English-language version--Divine Words-will be held Oct. 6. Both will run through Nov. 6. New York's Repertorio Espana/ finishes its season this week with final performances of three of its repertory pieces. Last performances of La genera/a --a zarzuela --and Cafe con leche --a comedy by Gloria Gonzalez -will be held Sept. 24. The season closes Sept. 30 with La nonna, a comedy by Roberto M. Cossa. Several artists scheduled to perform in Las Vegas during strike months, including Dean Martin and Wayne Newton, cancelled their appearances in support of the musicians' strike. RONSTADT SCORES AGAIN: Linda Ronstadtwon an Em my Sept. . 17 in the "best performance in a variety or music program" category. An English-language version of La nonna will be part of San Diego's Old Globe Theater Season '90. The Granny will play Jan. 6 through Feb. 18 . Ronstadt won the award for her performance in the PBS special Media Report GAlAV/S/ON BACKS ABC: When ABC launched a Spanish-language multimedia advertising campaign Sept. 18 promoting its new fall lineup, the two largest Spanish-lan guage television networks, Univision and Telemundo, refused to carry the ads. However, Spanish-language network Ga lavision --based in Los Angeles, where half the budget for ABC's campaign is targeted --agreed to run the spots. . Galavision spokesperson Starrett Berry told Weekly Report: "I don't particularly see it as promoting the competition. If it were another Spanish network, I'd see it as competition, but we'd be sticking our heads in the sand if we thought Latinos didn't watch Anglo TV. "There's no deep message involved in the commercial," he continued. "I don't think it will hurt. Let me put it this way: If you check our • HISPANIC LINK ' WEEKLY REPORT . " A national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-o280 or (202) 234-o737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (131ssues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED$: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. ratings following the spot, I would doubt seri ously you'd see a significant dip." He added that ABC was paying the stan dard rate for the spot. DRAMATIZING AIDS: Tres Hombres Sin Fronteras, a series of 15 five-minute programs dramatizing how AIDS is transmitted to mi grant farm workers and ttieir families, pre miered Sept. 18 on KDNA-FM, a public broad casting station in Granger, Wash. Funded by a border AIDS initiative grant from the California Community Foundation, the KDNA-produced series will also air on commercial radio stations in San Diego, TL and Phoenix, Ariz., El Paso, Texas, and Al buquerque, N.M. It airs on each station twice every weekday for a total of nine weeks. According to KDNA General Manager Ricardo Garda, community foundations in each of the five cities are supporting the series and will distribute a printed toto-nove/a to accom pany the series. TilE IIOUSE WA!itUNOTON I am delighted to extend mJ warmeat creetlnga and congratulations to the membera of the Hlapanic American community •• you celebrate National Hiapanic Heritage Month, September 15 October 15, 11119. Perhapa no single ethnic group baa bad aArofound an Impact upon our Natlon •• Hiapanic From 'the daya of the ftrat explorers ln what Ia now Florida, Texas, and California, the Hispanic people• have played a role ln taming thla vaat country and developing lta abundant reaourcea. Me:dcan Americana, Cuban Americana, Puerto Rican Americana. and other men and women or Hispanic descent have not only demonstrated the power of Individual enterprise but alao added to the cultural diversity that eo enriches American Ufe. • TodaJ, Hispanic Americans continue to be leaders and pioneers -in education • government, business, ecience, sports, and the arts. Every day, ln communities across the United States, they remind their fellow Americans of the meaning of determination and hard work, as well as the importance of faith and devotion to one's family . The values passed from generation to generation ln Hispanic American families are values central to the American experience. and our Nation is all the atronger because these Individuals have re. )gni&ed the importance of caring for one's neighbor, obtaining a good education, participating in one's church, and exercising one's rights as a citizen. This month provides a wonderful opportunity for all of us to celebrate both our Nation's Hispanic Heritage and the beliefs that unite us. I encourage all Americans to take part. Barbara joins me in offering Hispanic best wishes for a memorable celebration and for every future happiness and succe&s . . God bless you. and God bless America. --Antonio Mejias-Rentas ADVERTISING ISSUES: A recent study by the Leadership Council on Advertising Is.;. sues examines the effect of the media and ad vertising industries on national economic growth from 1975-1988. It documents a 112<>k . increase in Spanish-language radio stations --from 80 to 169 _.;: and a 63% increase in Spanish-language TV --from 16 to 26. To demonstrate the importance of advertis ing to media the study r "Economic and Social Impacts of Media • prDjects the impact that a 5% reduction in media advertising have in 1993. It fore casts a total of 214 Spanish-language radio stations by then and concludes that such a . reduction would cut the number of stations to . 202, a 5.6% loss. For a free copy of the 1.60-page write to Gail Wasserman at Ogilyy & Mather, 309 W. 49th St., New York, N.Y. 10019. -Danilo Alfaro