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Hispanic link weekly report, October 2, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 2, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Caliifornia Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Paul Alvarado to the San Francisco City and County Superior Court. Alvarado currently sits on the San Francisco City and County Municipal Court...California state Superintendent of Public Instruction Bill Honig announces that Ben Jim&iez, a math teacher at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles, is one of 12 people statewide to receive the $25,000 California Educator Awards...Rosario Kennedy, who lost the Democratic primary runoff in August for Florida’s 18th Congressional District seat, enters the Nov. 7 race for her old seat on the Miami City Commission. Kennedy, a Cuban American, resigned from the commission to seek the congressional
post...A Los Angeles Superior Court jury convicts 29-year-old El Paso, Texas, drifter Richard Ramirez on 13 counts of murder and 30 other felony counts. Jurors found that Ramfrez was the devil-worshipping killer, known as the "Night Stalker," who terrorized Southern California in 1984-85... A Jackson, Mich., court names Anna Acuna the legal guardian of her husband, Ren£ who is being force fed by prison officials. Acuna had been fasting for six months to protest a drug conviction. Anna says she is not sure whether she will allow the force feeding to continue or permit her husband to fast...A Brooklyn Supreme Court jury orders professional basketball player Chris Mullins of the Golden State Warriors to pay Fulgencio Tirado, 38, $3.9 million. Tirado suffered permanent injuries in 1985 after being struck by a car driven by Mullins...

FBI Says No to Appeal of Decision in Bias Case
By Danilo Alfaro
The FBI announced Sept. 21 that it would not appeal a federal court decision ordering it to revamp a promotion system that discriminated against Latino agents.
The May 5 ruling resulted from a class-action suit brought in January 1987 by Bernardo "Matt" Perez, then assistant special agent in charge of the El Paso, Texas, office and the highest ranking Hispanic in the FBI.
Hugo Rodriguez, Perez’s attorney, told Weekly Report he was pleased with the bureau’s decision not to appeal and added, "I hope they do something about this rather than just placate us."
Federal District Judge Lucius Bunton of Midland, Texas, ordered the bureau to promote Perez to the next highest job position and formed an independent panel to determine whether the 310 Latino agents who joined the suit deserved promotions to compensate for past discrimination. He did not award back pay or monetary damages to any of the agents. P6rez was subsequently promoted to FBI national headquarters as deputy assistant director of the laboratory division.
Rodriguez said he had not ruled out an appeal of his own in the hope of receiving monetary compensation for the plaintiffs.
EngSsh Request Draws
The Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund filed a federal lawsuit Sept. 22 on behalf of a New York City woman who claims she was fired from her job last year for protesting the firm’s alleged English-only policy.
. Jenny Rivera, staff attorney at PRLDEF, fold Weekly Report that the plaintiff, Marlin Segarra, who worked in the legal department of New York City real estate firm Artha Management Inc. for two years, said she was told by the firm’s general counsel not to speak Spanish in the office. Later, a memo to that effect was circulated.
Norman Schaumberger, the firm’s general counsel, said that the memo was only a request that employees not speak Spanish “as a courtesy."
U.S. Mexicans, Mexico Strengthen Ties
ByFeUxPerez
More than 200 Mexican American leaders from the Southwest met with representatives of the administration of Mexico President Carlos Salinas de Gortari Sept. 14 in Tijuana, Mexico. The gathering was convened to lay the groundwork for a wide-ranging initiative to increase ties between U.S. Mexicans and their homeland.
Promoters of the effort, called lmpacto-2000, are seeking to create stronger, more diverse links in such areas as commerce, immigration, economic development, education, arts and culture, and health.
Salinas praised the preliminary plan, indicating he would instruct government agencies to facilitate its implementation.
“We have...an especially harmonious relationship with the Mexican American community. We will continue that relationship with the future generations of Mexican Americans because of the love we have for this extraordinary country...and because we want our children and grandchildren to also speak about It with pride, compassion and emotion," said Salinas.
Bea Molina, former president of the Mexican American Political Association in California,
called the parley "historical."
"Whatever relationship develops, I don’t see how we (Mexican Americans) can lose," said Molina, who participated in the Tijuana meeting.
If carried to fruition, lmpacto-2000 can increase con-
siderably the leverage Mexico can put to bear when dealing with the U.S. government, said Armando Navarro, the driving force behind the bilateral effort.
Navarro, director of the Institute for Social Justice in San Bernardino, Calif., said that while the 12.1 million-strong U.S. Mexican community is barely one step beyond its political infancy, its clout continues to increase in terms of growing numbers of elected officials, sheer numbers and buying power. A preliminary working plan for Impacto, which was presented to Salinas emissaries at the Tijuana
continued on page 2
NAVARRO
driving force behind Impacto
Analysis: AIDS Trials Miss Key Groups
By Danilo Alfaro
Latinos, blacks and intravenous drug users are greatly underrepresented in federally sponsored AIDS clinical trials, according to an analysis by the Los Angeles Times of government material obtained through the Freedom of Information Act.
While Hispanics accounted for 15% of U.S. adult AIDS patients as of the end of August, they were only 11% of patients enrolled in AIDS clinical trials held by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, according to a story in the Sept. 25 issue of the Times. Blacks fared even worse: They were 27% of AIDS patients, but 9% of AIDS trial en-rollees.
Intravenous drug users were 27.5% of AIDS patients, compared with 11.3% of trial participants.
A total of 7,659 patients have been enrolled in NIAID clinical trials, the study found.
Because of their lower representation in these federal programs, Latinos and blacks are unable to receive free, state-of-the-art treatments and experimental drugs that are readily available through the trials, according to Dr. Cervando Martfnez of the Southwest Texas Hispanic Outreach Program for AIDS.
"Many of these programs are at academic centers and medical schools — places where there are not a lot of minorities," said Martinez. "It is difficult for a poor Hispanic woman from the Bronx to travel regularly to Cornell University for blood tests and other treatment."
He noted that NIAID is currently working toward a system of community clinical trials that "are hopefully going to be in the communities where the underrepresented groups are, not necessarily in medical schools."


Groups Rally to Aid Puerto Rico’s Hurricane Hugo Victims
ByF&ixF&ez
The Telemundo Spanish-language network raised $2.25 million in a 13- hour, nationwide telethon Sept. 24 in one of the more pronounced shows of grassroot support for victims of Hurricane Hugo in Puerto Rico. Hugo blasted the northeastern part of the island Sept. 18 with 125-mi le-per-hour winds, leaving seven dead in its wake, some 25,000 to 53,000 homeless families and an estimated $1 billion in damages. As of Sept. 26, nearly 70% of the San Juan metropolitan area residents still did not have water service.
In Long Island, N.Y., $100,000 was raised Sept. 24 for the relief effort as a result of a musical concert held under the auspices of the Department of Puerto Rico Community Affairs in New York City. The concert was hosted by television personality Geraldo
Rivera and included performances by artists such as Tito Puente. Negotiations are underway for a concert at Madison Square Garden Oct. 9.
United Way broke from its unwritten policy of not becoming involved in disaster relief efforts when its Puerto Rico affiliate, Fondos Unidos, decided to tap its corporate contributors for donations.
The agency’s Santurce headquarters became a distribution center for shelters around the island. It dispensed two tractor-trailer truckloads of materials such as diapers, toothpaste and other toiletries donated by Procter & Gamble. K Mart supplied a like amount of infant clothing, and Abbott Laboratories contributed baby formula. Federal Express furnished a dozen trucks and drivers to deliver the supplies. According
to Fondos Unidos' Wendy Baker, some 35 companies made donations.
The American Red Cross announced Sept. 23 at its Washington, D.C., headquarters that it was launching a $30 million fund-raising drive through its chapters and that it was seeking to solicit another $12 million to $15 million from Fortune 500 corporations. The money will be used to aid all areas ravaged by Hugo.
For information on whereto send items such as potable water, batteries, generators and clothing, contact the Department of Puerto Rico Community Affairs, 304 Park Ave. South, New York, N.Y. 10010 (212) 473-4788. Monetary donations can be sent to Ayuda Pro-Damnificados, Huracan Hugo Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 674, New York, N.Y. 10010.
Town Mourns 20 Killed in Bus Accident
Funeral services were completed Sept. 25 for the 20 children killed in Alton, Texas, when their school bus was struck by a delivery truck and plunged into a rain-filled, 40-foot chasm Sept. 21. Sixty-three others—both drivers and 61 students — survived.
Located 20 miles north of Mexico, Alton has 3,700 residents and is 98% Hispanic.
The names and ages of the deceased are:
meeting, highlighted the role this buying power can play in helping to stabilize Mexico’s economy.
On the U.S. side of the equation, Navarro sees a multifaceted network giving U.S. Mexicans, among other things, additional clout on all political levels because of the increasing importance of Mexico to the United States, new business opportunities and an ally in bilin-gual/bicultural education.
"The process (of improving relations between Mexico and Mexican Americans) will continue to accelerate," said Navarro.
The Mexican American players in the plan to foster bilateral relations, a process known as acercamiento, hail from a broad spectrum of fields. Represented are officials from the political, religious, legal, educational and activist sectors.
Arizona state Sen. Jaime Gutierrez, who did not attend the meeting but was briefed by Navarro earlier, took a more skeptical approach to the warming of relations.
Pointing to widespread charges of fraud in Mexico’s presidential election last November, he said: "I don’t want to make legitimate (through this process) some of the negative things that have been coming from the Mexico government."
Despite his misgivings that Salinas may be using acercamiento as a means to gain credibility at home and here, Guti6rrez said the
Marfa Alfaro 14 Jos£Ortega 15
Roberto Bazaldua 13 Veronica P6rez 13
Margarita Buentello 12 Yesenia Perez 15
Carmen Canales 17 Rom&n Quintero 14
Bda Cruz 12 Apolonia Regalado 13
Raul Flores 18 Marfa Regalado 14
Abd6n Garcfa 14 Ana Rodrfguez 16
Armando Gonz&lez 14 David Saenz 12
Ruby L6pez 12 Michael Saenz 14
Marfa Lozano 15 Alberto Vasquez 12
advantages far outweighed potential drawbacks. Indeed, he said, the increased cooperation being advocated by Impacto is a reality in many sister cities sharing the 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border.
Another meeting is being set between Impacto leaders and Salinas representatives for late this month or November.
When asked whether the U.S. government may take issue with the Mexican American community establishing direct relations with the Mexico government, Navarro expressed his displeasure. "Why is it that no one asks that question of the U.S. Jewish community and Israel or of the Irish community and Ireland?"
Navarro said he sent a letter to President Bush outlining the objectives of Impacto two weeks ago. By press time, he had yet to receive a response. "We’re not trying to undermine, but buttress, what the administration is doing."
Among some of the goals mentioned in the Impacto proposal are:
• an international bill of rights for undocumented workers;
• joint ventures in commerce and tourism;
•training programs for U.S. bilingual education teachers in Mexico universities; and
• training by Mexico of Mexican American medical personnel to serve the U.S. Hispanics and the Mexican national community in the United States.
INS Pays Boy $110,000 In Improper Deportation
By Danilo Alfaro
A San Antonio resident who was improperly deported to Mexico at age 14 settled his lawsuit against the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service Sept. 22 for a reported $110,000, according to sources close to the case.
The amount was the largest INS settlement in any personal injury case, said the sources.
Mario Moreno L6pez was arrested in Santa Ana, Calif., in February 1984 at a day-labor pickup spot and deported. He had received permanent legal residency in 1981.
"I’m exceptionally happy with the settlement, particularly for the family," Lopez’s attorney Peter Schey told Weekly Report. "Hopefully this will send a message to INS agents that they cannot treat these children like cattle."
Five days after deporting Lopez, INS officials admitted the agency had erred. Lopez’s attorneys filed an administrative complaint against the INS. Three years later the agency had not responded, so the lawyers filed a $1 million lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
Moreno now works in the construction business with his father.
In a separate action, the Mexican Embassy filed a complaint Sept. 15 with the U.S. State Department protesting a series of recent California-Mexico border incidents of alleged mistreatment of Mexican citizens by INS agents, including one death and one shooting.
Luis Eduardo Hern&ndez, 14, was killed Aug. 20 when an INS vehicle ran over him. Pedro Garcfa Hern&ndez, 15, was shot and wounded Aug. 27 by a Border Patrol agent.
San Diego police are investigating both occurrences.
Two hours before Pedro’s shooting, a Border Patrol agent allegedly spent more than an hour taunting a crowd of Mexican nationals with racial slurs using his vehicle’s public address system.
Mex. President Salinas Praises Impacto
continued from page 1
Oct. 2,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Raul Yzagulrre
Here We Go Again?
President Bush’s education summit has come and gone. I commend him for taking the initiative to promote excellence in education. However, I am troubled that by concentrating on increasing standards and promoting "excellence,” we will continue to leave behind the vast majority of students whom our educational system continues to fail. Without a coequal commitment to equity in education for Hispanics, other language minorities, blacks and the poor, achieving true excellence is impossible.
Almost one-third of Hispanic children in grades one through four are enrolled below grade level, about one-half do not complete high school and as many as 56% of all Hispanics are functionally illiterate.
One-third of our nation’s students will be ethnic minorities by 2000. These students t will comprise the backbone of the nation’s future labor force; Hispanics alone will constitute nearly one-third of labor force growth between now and the end of the century. Equity is an economic imperative we can no longer deny if we are to be a competitive nation tomorrow.
Yet, the major reform themes appear to shortchange the equity issue.
1 For example, the administration’s proposed new Presidential Merit Schools program and new Magnet Schools of Excellence program would reward those schools already achieving high performance levels. Simply increasing standards without simultaneously providing students the assistance to do so virtually guarantees a higher school failure rate.
“CHOICE” A FALSE PROMISE
There is a growing consensus that teachers and administrators should control more of the day-to-day education decisions. Little emphasis, however, is placed on holding them accountable for their students’ performance.
There is much discussion about "choice” plans designed to enable parents to select the schools that best meet their needs. Choice is at best a false promise to students who are frequently misplaced into special education classes, routinely tracked into non-academic groups, or denied access to instruction in their native language.
Finally, the governors are calling for more "flexibility” and less red tape in federal assistance. Few seem to recall that strict guidelines resulted from the states’ consistent failure to serve their language and racial minority students equitably.
It is surely legitimate for the nation’s chief executive to meet with his statehouse counterparts to discuss educational issues. However, they 1 will forgive those among us who have that "here we go again” feeling:
do we really need a meeting where the future of an increasingly minority education system is decided by a group composed primarily of middle-I aged white men?
HOPE THE SUMMIT A BEGINNING
But perhaps that’s too cynical an attitude. To their credit, the National Governors Association and the Department of Education solicited the views of a number of minority groups in pre-summit discussions.
Let’s hope that the summit is just a beginning, that it will result in a broad and inclusive national discussion on education reform. If so, we can anticipate a new dimension in education reform that will provide additional "coaching and training” to those who have been slighted; that will provide true choice by eliminating arbitrary tracking systems and providing sustained, effective outreach that empowers rather than I excludes Hispanic parents; and that will reduce the need for restrictive
federal regulations by ensuring equal opportunities in the first place.
If equity remains an afterthought, a sidebar issue, a promise unfulfilled, then the summit cannot possibly be deemed a success. Or it can be the catalyst for "reforming education reform” by promoting excel-I lence in education for ALL students.
(Radi Yzaguirre is president of the National Council of La Raza. Policy analyst Denise De La Rosa contributed to this article.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
TROPHY TIME: If you’re one of those few individuals who has yet to receive an ovation or a plaque during this longer, livelier Hispanic Heritage MONTH celebration, don’t go away mad. I’m aboutto open Sin Pelos' own HH Month trophy case, and you may still be a winner:
ENTREPRENEUR OF THE MONTH: Jos6 Canseco, who already earns millions hitting home runs for the Oakland Athletics, has launched a pay-to-listen phone service that could make autographs obsolete.
Dial 1 -900-234-JOSE and Jos6’s recorded voice will talk about steroids, yesterday’s game, fast cars, what he ate for lunch or anything else that pops into his mind. All the daily update will cost you is $2 for the first minute and $1 for each minute thereafter.
PUNCHING BAGS OF THE MONTH: Cabinet members Manuel Luj6n and Lauro Cavazos win in a romp. The national press seems to have let up on Interior’s Luj&n a bit lately to zero in on Education’s Cavazos.
The Oct. 2 Newsweek heads a piece on Cavazos: The Do-Nothing Education Secretary.
Cavazos, says Newsweek, "is playing the wallflower” and "for a federal education policy consisting of cheerleading, that just won’t do.”
The magazine quotes administration sources as saying that he’ll be gone by early next year. It mentions the name of New Jersey Gov. Tom Kean as a likely replacement. Kean, whose term is up in December, is no friend of bilingual education, by the way.
It has been Sin Pelos ’ contention for months that Cavazos planned to keep the Cabinet chair warm for Kean.
DIPLOMAT OF THE MONTH: The Orange County Human Relations Commission in Santa Ana, Calif., scolded City Councilman John Acosta Sept. 14for his public comment that he didn’t attend the gay pride festival the preceding weekend because Hl probably would have been in jail today for clobbering some of those people."
Acosta admitted to the Orange County Register that he said it but insisted that the quote was taken out of context.
"All I was saying is that if I had been at the festival and some of those radical gays had shoved me, I would have decked the faggots."
GUTLESS POLITICIANS OF THE MONTH: The winners are the City Council members of Temple City, Calif.
A few months ago this wimpy body passed an ordinance requiring all business signs to be written in at least 50% English. Then came a federal court ruling in nearby Pomona declaring such laws nonsensical and illegal.
Instead of repealing their ordinance, the Temple City fathers chose Sept. 19 to leave it on the books but suspend enforcement of it.
STUPID HEADLINE OF THE MONTH: It was a close contest, but the Los Angeles Times gets the trophy for the head on its Sept. 21 story about the selection of Joseph Fernandez as New York City schools chancellor. He replaced a black chancellor, who had been preceded by two Latinos.
The Times’ head: Fernandez to Be New York Schools Chief; Minority Control Continues.
When George Bush was elected president, I failed to notice any newspapers bannering White Male Reign Prolonged.
There was a tie for runner-up: New York Mets first-baseman Keith Hernandez was demoted in the lineup from batting third down to sixth spot, so that city’s Daily News headed its story: Mex’s best spot is south in the order.
Then, when New York Yankee outfielder Luis Polonia was busted in a hotel room with a 15-year-old girl, the New York Post filled the top half of page one with two words: YANKEE PANKY. ______________________________________- Kay B&rbaro_________
YZAGUIRRE
Oct 2,1989
3


COLLECTING
SCHOOL-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS: “Urban School-Corn-munity Alliances” is a 25-page monograph reviewing literature on schools collaborating with community agencies, cultural institutions and business to improve the education of at-risk youth. To order send $3 to ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027 (212) 678-3433.
MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION: ‘Teaching and Learning in a Diverse World: Multicultural Education for Young Children” is a 225-page book for parents and educators with guidelines for introducing a multicultural perspective in early childhood education. For a copy send $18.45 to Intercultural Press, P.O. Box 700, Yarmouth, Maine 04096 (207) 846-5168.
DROPOUTS: "Dropouts in America: Enough is Known for Action” is a 69-page booklet that recommends that strategies designed to keep students in school begin in early elementary school and continue through high school. Copies cost $7.50. Write to The Institute for Educational Leadership, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036.
AIDS AND HISPANICS: "AIDS Knowledge and Attitudes of Hispanic Americans: Provisional Data from the 1988 National Health Interview” is a survey of 1,102 Hispanics 18 years of age and older. Breakdowns are provided by age, sex, education and ancestry. For afree copy of the 22-page report (specify No. 166, DHHS Publication No. 89-1250), contact the National Center for Health Statistics, 3700 East-West Highway, Room 144, Hyattsville, Md. 20782 (301) 436-8500.
TIPS FOR THE COLLEGE BOUND: “College Bound,” a 47-page guide, offers tips to college freshmen on how to select appropriate courses and instructors. To order a copy, send a check for $9.95 to The College Board, College Board Publications, Box 886, New York, N.Y. 10101-0886.
CONSUMER ELECTRONICS INFORMATION: The pamphlets "Consumers Should Know: How to Buy, Use and Care for VCRs, Camcorders and Tape” and "Consumers Should Know: About Service Contracts; About Repair Services” are now available in Spanish. For copies send a self-addressed envelope with 250 for each pamphlet to Electronic Industries Association’s Consumer Electronics Group, P.O. Box 19100, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 457-4919.
LOVING TO READ: "Raising Bookworms: A Parent’s Guide to Reading Success” is a 63-page booklet that covers activities parents can use at home to instill a love for reading in their children. Cost is $5.95 plus shipping. Contact R&E Publishers, P.O. Box 2008, Saratoga, Calif. 95070 (408) 866-6303.
CONNECTING
STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS
Some 100 students attheTexas A&l University chapter of the Texas Student Education Association in Kingsville, Texas, began Sept. 25 a pilot program to serve as one-on-one mentors with at-risk middle school students in that city.
Mentors in the volunteer program, called Of The Students, By The Students, For The Students, will tutor students at Memorial Middle School four days a week and counsel them the other day on dropout prevention, self-esteem and educational careers. An individualized training program has been devised for each mentor. The program also sets strategies to involve parents. It runs through Dec. 1.
Kingsville is 55% Hispanic.
MICHIGAN CAMPAIGN TARGETS STUDENTS
Audiences at Michigan’s 15 public universities, including parents and students in elementary, junior high and high schools, will participate Oct. 3 in a teleconference linking them with education specialists discussing the importance of staying in school and going to college.
The teleconference is part of a statewide media campaign to encourage Hispanic, black and Native American youth to remain in school. The campaign also includes the distribution of a 20-minute video with role models addressing the different groups of students targeted. Included are East Los Angeles calculus teacher Jaime Escalante and Marianna Gutierrez and her brother Miguel, valedictorian and saluta-torian of Detroit’s Western High School class of 1989. Public service announcements for radio and television will also be available.
Contactthe Office of Minority Equity, Department of Education, 600 W. St. Joseph, Suite 201, Lansing, Mich. 48933 (517) 334-6275.
ASSOCIATION RELEASES AIDS FILMS
AIDSFILMS, a New York-based non-profit company founded to increase understanding about AIDS, will distribute beginning in November three dramatic films made by experienced Hispanic and black writers and directors.
One of the 15-minute films, directed by San Francisco documentary film maker Lourdes Portillo and titled Vida, is intended for Hispanic women. Available in Spanish and English, Vida focuses on a woman having to decide to give up her boyfriend or demanding that he use condoms. Seven other films will be released in another year.
All community-service organizations and schools can receive free copies of the films and the accompanying discussion guide by requesting an application from AIDSFILMS, 50 W. 34th St., Suite 6B6, New York, N.Y. 10001 (212) 629-6288.
Calendar_________________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link’s Calendar, It must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like It to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
JOB FAIR
Washington, D.C. Oct. 4
The U.S. Justice Department is holding a job fair for Hispanics interested in career opportunities as attorneys, legal technicians, budget analysts, computer programmers, special agents and other positions.
Enrique P6rez (202) 307-9429 AWARDS LUNCHEON Los Angeles Oct. 5 4
The Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations is sponsoring the 17th annual John Anson Ford Awards Luncheon in honor of Cultural Diversity Month. Honored in the volunteer category will be Domingo Delgado.
Zara Taylor (213) 974-7606 QUINCENTENNIAL CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Oct. 6,7 The National Hispanic Quincentennial Commission is sponsoring its first conference, to bring together Hispanic leaders on the national, state and local levels and provide them the opportunity to plan and discuss Quincentennial events in their respective communities.
Elaine Coronado (202) 289-1661 HOMELESSNESS MARCH Washington, D.C. Oct. 7
The Hispanic outreach committee of HOUSING NOW! is participating in the organization of a march to the U.S. Capitol to protest homelessness. A rally at the Capitol will be held afterward.
Marina F6lix (202) 667-7700 ROLE MODEL TRIBUTE
Oct 2.1989
San Diego Oct. 7
The Mexican and American Foundation Inc. is holding its 18th annual An Evening With the Stars. Individuals from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border will be recognized for their contributions to transborder commerce and business networking on the behalf of minority entrepreneurs. U.S. Treasurer-designate Catalina Villalpando will be honored as Woman of the Year.
John Stebbins (619) 232-2244
DAY AT THE RACES Los Angeles Oct. 8
The Hispanic Public Relations Association is sponsoring its third annual excursion to Santa Anita Race Track. The event is the only fund-raiser that directly supports HPRA’s non-scholarship programs.
Grace Trujillo Daniel (818) 799-3511
COMING SOON
HEALTH CAREERS SYMPOSIUM National Institutes of Health San Antonio Oct. 22-24 Kathleen Schildbach (703) 920-0373
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


ASSISTANT VICE CHANCELLOR OF PLANNING & DESIGN University of California at Berkeley Responsible for the physical planning of the campus. Oversee the design process for capital projects. Develop Project Planning Guides & Environmental Impact Reports. Manage unit staff, budget & the formulation of goals & objectives. Coordinate space allocation. Serve as a resource for the University on all issues related to the planning & design of capital projects. Requires substantive progressively responsible experience in planning & design of major facilities. Architectural license required. Knowledge of the methods, practices & procedures of capital programming for large institutions. Experience interpreting & formulating plans & specifications, assessing cost estimates, analyzing plans, managing a professional support staff & coordinating the work of design professionals & consultants. Ability to apply technical knowledge of engineering & architecture to the needs of the academic environment. Ability to manage project budgets. Knowledge of appropriate laws, regulations & codes. Demonstrated oral & written communications skills. Demonstrated ability to work in a diverse community, & commitment to diversity & affirmative action in the work setting.
Send resume by 10-31-89 to: University of California, P.O. Box 07-107-18, 2539 Channing Way, Berkeley, Calif. 94720.
EEO/AA
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER UW-Whitewater invites applications for the position of Assistant Director of Admissions. Candidates should have a master’s degree and experience in admissions and transfer credit evaluation. Familiarity with computer applications preferred. Appointment to begin March 15,1990. Application deadline November 1,1989. Salary competitive and commensurate with experience.
To obtain a detailed position description and further information, please contact Mr. Lon Sherman, Admissions Office, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, Wis. 53190.
UW-Whitewater is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer.
Gloucester County College
Physical Education/Health/Recreation Instructor for a two-year county college located in South Jersey just 20 minutes from Philadelphia. Ability to coach a variety of women’s sports and to teach a variety of physical education and activity courses. Master’s in P.E. required. Submit resum6 by 10/31/89 to Personnel and Human Resources Office, Gloucester County College, Deptford Township, Sewell, N. J. 08080. Women and minorities encouraged to apply.
AAIEOE
BILINGUAL MANUFACTURING SUPERINTENDENT fabrlcating/flnlshing
Mechanical/industrial engineering degree plus ten years experience. For further information contact Caroline Price (404) 487-2725 or fax resum6 to (404) 487-3748.
AMERICAN COUNCIL ON EDUCATION Center for Adult Learning and Educational Credentials Director, PONSI
The American Council on Education is accepting applications and nominations for the position of director, Program on Non-Collegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI). PONSI seeks to facilitate the awarding of academic credit for course work and learning acquired outside the campus environment. The director plans and directs the course evaluation process, including directing upto 200 consultants annually, promotes the PONSI program, edits the National Guide, and brings together PONSI sponsors and school officials to enhance credentialing for adult learners. Position requires adult education or training experience and valuing extra-institutional learning, administrative/management experience demonstrating excellent presentational and writing skills. Extensive travel required.
Please send resume to:
Suzanne Forsyth CAL Search
American Council on Education 1 Dupont Circle, NW Washington, DC 20036
Deadline for application Is October 31, 1989.
EOE/AA
CITY OF PARAMOUNT NEIGHBORHOOD COUNSELOR-City of Paramount
California (Salary: $2,266-$2,754 per month, plus City pays employee’s 7% share of PERS). Requires Bachelor’s Degree with specialization in social science, psychology, or related field. One year experience working with youth and parents in a community setting, and familiarity with youth gang membership also required. Bilingual capability in English/Spanish also required. Will implement programs for early elementary age youth which will discourage gang membership in the community. Will conduct classroom presentations and community meetings, maintain contact with youth and their parents, prepare written reports and oral presentations, and other duties.
FAMILY COUNSELOR-City of Paramount, California (Salary: $2,820-$3,428 per month, plus City pays employee’s 7% share of PERS). Requires Bachelor’s Degree in social science, psychology, or related field. Master’s Degree desirable. MFCC of LCSW preferred. Experience working with gang-related youth in a preventative counseling capacity desirable. Bilingual capability in English/Spanish also required. Will establish and maintain counseling contact with youth who are prone to gang involvement and their families, plan and organize innovative counseling activities which will discourage gang involvement, maintain close contact with resource and referral agencies, and other duties!
For both positions:
APPLY BY: Open
APPLY AT: City of Paramount, 16400 Colorado Avenue, Paramount, Calif. 90723. Phone: (213) 531-3503 extension 326.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Oct 2, 1989
5
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Arts & Entertainment
GRINGO’S HERE: One of the decade’s most talked about and anticipated Latino-themed films arrives in movie houses this week.
Old Gringo - Jane Fonda’sfilm based on a novel by Mexico’s Carlos Fuentes - premieres nationally Oct. 6. It has been nine years in the making, reportedly since shortly after Fonda and Fuentes met in 1979.
Fonda stars as a spinster caught in a love triangle with the title character, U.S. journalist Ambrose Bierce (Gregory Peck), and a general in Pancho Villa’s army named Arroyo (Jimmy Smits).
The actress - whose Fonda Films company produced Old Gringo - claims that Carlos Fuentes decided to complete his novel about Bierce in 1980, when she told himthat her dream wasto “make a movie about my country and yours and the relationship between both.”
The novel Gringo Viejo was published in 1985 in its original Spanish, and the English version appeared the same year. In 1987 Fonda hired Argentina’s Luis Puenzo, along with his partner Aida Bortnik, to direct the film and to write its script.
The film had originally been slated for a fall 1988 release - and was
delivered on time to Columbia Pictures by Puenzo. Amid rumors that studio executives demanded changes in the film, its release was postponed to this year.
Old Gringo was well received at its world premiere this spring at the Cannes Film Festival, where it was dubbed a “Latin American” film. It had “premiere” screenings last month in Buenos Aires (where It received glowing reviews) and Mexico City (where critics were less than generous).
ANOTHER PREMIERE: A musical based on the life of San Juan, Puerto Rico’s only female mayor, Felisa Rincdn, opens this week with a gala at New York’s Teatro Puerto Rico.
Jossie de Guzm&n will play the title character in Fela and Justino Diaz will play Luis Munoz Marfn, Puerto Rico’s first elected governor. The play highlights the achievements of Rincdn, considered a pioneer advocate for women’s rights in the island and a progressive administrator who helped turn San Juan into a modern metropolis during the ’50s and ’60s.
Rincdn, who is 93, is expected to attend the one-time performance of the musical.____________________- Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
NAMING NAMES: The American Society of Newspaper Editors’ board of directors is scheduled to vote next week on whether to grant anonymity to participating daily newspapers in its next survey of minorities in the nation’s daily newsrooms.
Last month at the National Association of Black Journalists’ conference in New York, the minorities committee of ASNE voted to recommend to the 20-member board that the group no longer grant anonymity.
Mervin Aubespin, chair of ASNE’s minorities committee and editor of the Courier-Journal in Louisville, Ky., told Weekly Report the move would be a “significant” step, but he was unsure whether the board would adopt the proposal at its Oct. 11-14 meeting.
“A lot of people in the organization feel we’re in the business of disclosure, so we should play by the same rules ourselves,” Aubespin said. “But if you decide you’re going to disclose the names, there are a
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significant number of newspapers who are not going to return the survey. Some feel it would literally destroy the annual survey.”
Earlier this year, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., conducted a survey of Hispanic hiring by the nation’s 30 largest daily newspapers. Participants were told that the names of their newspapers would be published. The response rate was 77%.
ASNE’s last survey, which granted anonymity, contacted 1,581 newspapers and had a response rate of 64%.
Frank Newton, executive director of NAHJ, expressed confidence that the NAHJ/HNMA survey would continue to be conducted regardless of whether the ASNE board agrees to the minorities committee proposal.
COUNTING JOURNALISM STUDENTS: A new study conducted by researchers at Ohio State University found that college journalism and mass communications programs reflect “inequalities in American society by underrepresenting racial and ethnic minori-
ties.”
The study reported that Hispanics comprise 3.3% of journalism and mass communications students. According to the U.S. Census, Latinos are 8.1% of the U.S. mainland population.
A 1988 study by Indiana University found that Latinos are 0.2% of full-time journalism and mass communications faculty.
For a free copy of the Ohio State University study, contact Lee Becker at Ohio State University, School of Journalism, 242 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (614) 292-6291.
ON THE MOVE: Constanza Montafia, a reporter at the Chicago Tribune and NAHJ region 6 director, left Sept. 30 for a six-month journalism fellowship at Argentina’s national newspaper, El Clarfn, in Buenos Aires...Former Milwaukee Journal reporter Melita Garza joined the Chicago Tribune as a reporter Oct. 2...Rub6n Castafieda, former reporter at the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, joined The Washington Post as a reporter Oct. 2...
- Danilo Alfaro
Mexico President Carlos Salinas de Gortari addresses the Sept. 14 gathering in Tijuana, Mexico, of lmpacto-2000 (see page 1 U.S. Mexicans, Mexico Strengthen Ties story). Seated to the immediate right of Salinas is Armando Navarro, director of the Institute for Social Justice in San Bernardino, Calif. The other gentlemen are unidentified members of Salinas' security detail.


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Making_ The News This Week post. .. A Los Angeles Superior Court jury convicts 29-year-old El Paso, Texas drifter Richard Ramirez on 13 counts of murder and 30 other felony' counts. Jurors found that Ramfrez was the devil-worshipping killer, known as the "Night Stalker," who terrorized Southern California in 1984-85 ... A Jackson, Mich., court names AmaAcuna the legal guar dian of her husband, FS1e, who is being force fed by prison officials. Acuna had been fasting for six months to protest a drug conviction. Anna says she is not sure whether she will allow the force feeding to continue or permit her husband to fast. .. A Brooklyn Supreme Court jury orders professional basketball player Chris Mullins of the Golden State War riors to pay Fulgencio Tirado, 38, $3.9 million. Tirado suffered per manent injuries in 1985 after being struck by a car driven by Mullins ... Caliifornia Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Paul Alvarado to the San Francisco City and County Superior Court. Alvarado currently sits on the San Francisco City and County Municipal Court ... California state Superintendent of Public Instruction Bill Honig announces that Ben a math teacher at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles, is one of 12 people statewide to receive the $25,000 California Educator Awards ... Rosario Kennedy, who lost the Democratic primary runoff in August for Florida's 18th Congressional District seat, enters the Nov. 7 race for her old seat on the Miami City Commission. Kennedy, a Cuban American, resigned from the commission to seek the congressional . FBI to U.S.IVIexicans, Mexico of DeciSIOn In BiaS Case 8yFe/ixPetez called "historical." TieS By Danilo Alfaro More than 200 Mexican American leaders "Whatever relationship develops, I don't see The FBI announced Sept. 21 that it would not from the Southwest met with representatives how we (Mexican Americans) can lose," said appeal a federal court decision ordering it to of the administration of Mexico President Car-Molina, who par, revamp a promotion system that discriminated los Salinas de Gortari Sept. 14 in Tijuana, tic i pate d in the against Latino Mexico. The gathering was convened to lay the Tijuana meeting. [ The May 5 ruling resulted from a class-action groundv.:ork for a wide-ranging. initiative to If carried to fruition, r suit brought in January 1987 by Bernardo crease t1es between U.S. Mex1cans and the1r /mpacto-2000 can 1 "Matt" Perez, then assistant special agent in homeland. increase con-charge of the El Paso, Texas, office and the Promoters of the effort, called lmpacto-2000, siderably the highest ranking Hispanic in the FBI. are seeking to create stronger, more diverse leverage Mexico can Hugo Rodriguez, Perez's attorney, told Weeklinks in areas as commerce: immigration, put to bear when ly Report he was pleased with the bureau's economic development, education, arts and dealing with the U.S. decision not to appeal and added, "I hope they cultu.re, and . . . . . government, said do something about this rather than just pia. Salinas the preliminary plan, 1n?1catArmando Navarro, cate us... 1ng he would Instruct government agenc1es to NAVARRO the driving force beFederal District Judge Lucius Bunton of Midits . driving force behind lmpacto hind the bilateral ef-land, Texas, ordered the bureau to promote w.e ha.ve .... an har.mon1ous fort. Perez to the next highest job position and V.:lth the. Mexican Nayarr?, director of for. Social formed an independent panel to determine munlty. We Will that With Justice In San Bernardino, Calif., said that whether the 31 0 Latino agents who joined the the future generations of Mexican. while 2.1 million-strong U.S. suit deserved promotions to compensate for because of the love we have for th1s extraord1barely one 1 ts past discrimination. He did not award back pay na.ry country ... and .because we want our cal Infancy, 1ts clout cont1nues to mcrease 1n or monetary damages to any of the agents. to also terms of growing numbers of elected officials, P , b tl t d t FBI it With pnde, compassion and emot1on, satd sheer numbers and buying power. A prelimierez was su sequen y promo e o naSalinas k' 1 f tional headquarters as deputy assistant direc. . . nary war 1ng Pan or lmpacto, wh1ch was t 4th I b t d' . . Baa Molina, former president of the Mexican presented to Salinas emissaries at the Tijuana oro. e a ora ory IVISion. American Political Association in California Rodriguez said he had not ruled out an appeal ' continued on page 2 of his own in the hope of receiving monetary compensation for the plaintiffs. Er{Jish 'Recpest' Dravvs Sul Analysis: AIDS Trials Miss Key Groups The Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund filed a federal lawsuit Sept. 22 on behalf of a New York City woman who claims was fired from her job last year for protesting the firm's alleged English-only policy. . Jenny Rivera, staff attorney at PRLDEF, told Weekly Report that the plaintiff, Marlin Segarra, who worked in the legal depart ment of New York City real estate firm Artha Management Inc. for two years, said she was told by the firm's general counsel not to speak Spanish in the office. Later, a memo to that effect was circulated. Norman Schaumberger, the firm's general counsel, said that the memo was only a request that employees not speak Spanish "as a courtesy." By Danilo Alfaro Latinos, blacks and intravenous drug users are greatly underrepresented in federally sponsored AIDS clinical trials, according to an analysis by the Los Angeles Times of govern ment material obtained through the Freedom of Information Act. While Hispanics accounted for 15% of U.S. adult AIDS patients as of the end of August, they were only 11 % of patients enrolled in AIDS clinical trials held by the National In stitute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, ac cording to a story in the Sept. 25 issue of the Times. Blacks fared even worse: They were 27% of AIDS patients, but 9% of AIDS trial en rollees. Intravenous drug users were 27.5% of AIDS patients, compared with 11.3% of trial par ticipants. A total of 7, 659 patients have been enrolled in NIAID clinical trials, the study found. Because of their lower representation in these federal programs, Latinos and blacks are unable to receive free, state-of-the-art treatments and experimental drugs that are readily available through the trials, according to Dr. Cervando Martinez of the Southwest Texas Hispanic Outreach Program for AIDS. "Many of these programs are at academic centers and medical schools places where there are not a lot of minorities," said Martinez. "It is difficult for a poor Hispanic woman from the Bronx to travel regularly to Cornell Univer sity for blood tests and other treatment." He noted that NIAID is currently working toward a system of community clinical trials that "are hopefully going to be in the com munities where the underrepresented groups are, not necessarily in medical schools."

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Groups Rally to Aid Puerto Rico's Hurricane Hugo Victims ByFelixPSrez The Telemundo Spanish-language network raised $2.25 million in a 13 hour, nationwide telethon Sept. 24 in one of the more pronounced shows of grassroot support for victims of Hurricane Hugo in Puerto Rico . Hugo blasted the northeastern part of the is land Sept. 18 with 125-mile per-hour winds, leaving seven dead in its wake, some 25,000 to 53,000 homeless families and an es timated $1 billion in damages. As of Sept. 26, nearly 70% of the San Juan metropolitan area residents still did not have water service. In Long Island, N.Y., $100,000 was raised Sept. 24 for the relief effort as a result of a musical concert held under the auspices of the Department of Puerto Rico Community Affairs in New York City. The concert was hosted by television personality Geraldo Rivera and included performances by artists such as Tito Puente. Negotiations are under way for a concert at Madison Square Garden Oct. 9. United Way broke from its unwritten policy of not becoming involved in disaster relief ef forts when its Puerto Rico affiliate, Fondos Unidos, decided to tap its corporate contributors for donations. The agency's Santurce headquarters be came a distribution center for shelters around the island. It dispensed two tractor-trailer truckloads of materials such as diapers, toothpaste and other toiletries donated by Procter & Gamble. K Mart supplied a like amount of infant clothing, and Abbott Laboratories contributed baby formula. Federal Express furnished a dozen trucks and drivers to deliver the supplies. According Town Mourns 20 Killed in Bus Accident Funeral services were completed Sept. 25 for the 20 children killed in Alton, Texas, when their school bus was struck by a delivery truck and plunged into a rain-filled, 40-foot chasm Sept. 21. Sixty-three others-both drivers and 61 students survived. Located 20 miles north of Mexico, Alton has 3, 700 residents and is 98% Hispanic. The names and ages of the deceased are: Marfa Alfaro Roberto Bazaldua Margarita Buentello Carmen Canales Elda Cruz Raul Flores Abd6n Garcia Armando Gonzalez Ruby L6pez Marfa Lozano 14 Jose Ortega 15 13 Veronica Perez 13 12 Yesenia Perez 15 17 Roman Quintero 14 12 Apolonia Regalado 13 18 Marfa Regalado 14 14 Ana Rodriguez 16 14 David Saenz 12 12 Michael Saenz 14 15 Alberto Vasquez 12 Mex. President Salinas Praises lmpacto continued from page 1 meeting, highlighted the role this buying power can play in helping to stabilize Mexico's economy. _ On the U.S. side of the equation, Navarro sees a multifaceted network giving U.S. Mexicans, among other things, additional clout on all political levels because of the increasing importance of Mexico to the United States, new business opportunities and an ally in bilin gual/bicultural education. "The process (of improving relations between Mexico and Mexican Americans) will continue to accelerate," said Navarro. The Mexican American players in the plan to foster bilateral relations, a process known as acercamiento, hail from a broad spectrum of fields. Represented are officials from the political, religious, legal, educational and activist sectors . Arizona state Sen. Jaime Gutierrez, who did not attend the meeting but was briefed by Navarro earlier, took a more skeptical ap proach to the warming of relations. Pointing to widespread charges of fraud in Mexico's presidential election last November, he said: "I don't want to make legitimate (through this process) some of the negative things that have been coming from the Mexico government." Despite his misgivings that Salinas may be using acercamiento as a means to gain credibility at home and here, Gutierrez said the 2 advantages far outweighed potential draw backs. Indeed, he said, the increased cooperation being advocated by lmpacto is a reality in many sister cities sharing the 2, 000mile U.S.-Mexico border. Another meeting is being set between lmpac to leaders and Salinas representatives for late this month or November. When asked whether the U.S. government may take issue with the Mexican American community establishing direct relations with the Mexico government, Navarro expressed his displeasure. "Why is it that no one asks that question of the U.S. Jewish community and Is rael or of the Irish community and Ireland?" Navarro said he sent a letter to President Bush outlining the objectives of lmpacto two weeks ago . By press time, he had yet to receive a response. "We're not trying to under mine, but buttress, what the administration is doing." Among some of the goals mentioned in the lmpacto proposal are: • an international bill of rights for undocu mented workers; • joint ventures in commerce and tourism; • training programs for U.S. bilingual educa tion teachers in Mexico universities; and • training by Mexico of Mexican American medical personnel to serve the U.S. Hispanics and the Mexican national community in the United States. Od.2, 1989 to Fondos Unidos' Wendy Baker, some 35 companies made donations. The American Red Cross announced Sept. 23 at its Washington, D.C., headquarters that it was launching a $30 million fund-raising drive through its chapters and that it was seeking to solicit another $12 million to $15 million from Fortune 500 corporations. The money will be used to aid all areas ravaged by Hugo. For information on where to send items such as potable water, batteries, generators and clothing, contact the Department of Puerto Rico Community Affairs, 304 Park Ave. South, New York, N.Y. 10010 (212) 4734788. Monetary donations can be sent to Ayuda Pro-Damnificados, Huracan Hugo Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 674, New York, N.Y. 10010. INS Pays Boy $110,000 In Improper Deportation By Danilo Alfaro A San Antonio resident who was improperly deported to Mexico at age 14 settled his law suit against the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service Sept. 22 for a reported $110,000, according to sources close to the case. The amount was the largest INS settlement in any personal injury case, said the sources. Mario Moreno L6pez was arrested in Santa Ana, Calif., in February 1984 at a day-labor pickup spot and deported. He had received permanent legal residency in 1981. "I'm exceptionally happy with the settlement, particularly for the family," Lopez's attorney Peter Schey told Weekly Report. "Hopefully this will send a message to INS agents that they cannot treat these children like cattle.'' Five days after deporting Lopez, INS officials admitted the agency had erred. Lopez's attor neys filed an administrative complaint against the INS. Three years later the agency had not responded, so the lawyers filed a $1 million lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. Moreno now works in the construction busi ness with his father. In a separate action, the Mexican Embassy filed a complaint Sept. 15 with the U.S. State Department protesting a series of recent California-Mexico border incidents of alleged mistreatment of Mexican citizens by INS agents, including one death and one shooting . Luis Eduardo Hernandez, 14, was killed Aug. 20 when an INS vehicle ran over him. Pedro Garcfa Hernandez, 15, was shot and wounded Aug. 27 by a Border Patrol agent. San Diego police are investigating both occurrences. Two hours before Pedro's shooting, a Border Patrol agent allegedly spent more than an hour taunting a crowd of Mexican nationals with ra cial slurs using his vehicle's public address system. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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I i I. I .! t I Raul Yzaguirre Here We Go Again? President Bush's education summit has come and gone. I commend him for taking the initiative to promote excellence in education. However, I am troubled that by concentrating on increasing standards and promoting "excellence," we will continue to leave behind the vast majority of students whom our educational system continues to fail. Without a coequal commitment to equity in education for Hispanics, other language minorities, blacks and the poor, achieving true excellence is impossible. Almost one-third of Hispanic children in grades one through four are enrolled below grade level, about one-half do not complete high school and as many as 56% of all Hispanics are functionally illiterate. One-third of our nation's students will be ethnic minorities by 2000. These students will comprise the backbone of the nation's future labor force; Hispanics alone will constitute nearly one-third of labor force growth between now and the end of the century. EqVZAGUIRRE uity is an economic imperative we can no longer deny if we are to be a competitive nation tomorrow. Yet, the major reform themes appear to shortchange the equity issue. For example, the administration's proposed new Presidential Merit Schools program and new Magnet Schools of Excellence program would reward those schools already achieving high performance levels. Simply increasing standards without simultaneously providing students the assistance to do so virtually guarantees a higher school failure rate. "CHOICE" A FALSE PROMISE There is a growing consensus that teachers and administrators should control more of the day-to-day education decisions. Little emphasis, however, is placed on holding them accountable for their students' performance. There is much discussion about "choice" plans designed to enable parents to select the schools that best meet their needs. Choice is at best a false promise to students who are frequently misplaced into special education classes, routinely tracked into non-academic groups, or denied access to instruction in their native language. Finally, the governors are calling for more "flexibility" and less red tape in federal assistance. Few seem to recall that strict guidelines resulted from the states' consistent failure to serve their language and racial minority students equitably. It is surely legitimate for the nation's chief executive to meet with his statehouse counterparts to discuss educational issues. However, they will forgive those among us who have that "here we go again" feeling: do we really need a meeting where the future of an increasingly minority education system is decided by a group composed primarily of middleaged white men? HOPE THE SUMMIT A BEGINNING But perhaps that's too cynical an attitude. To their credit, the National Governors Association and the Department of Education solicited the views of a number of minority groups in pre-summit discussions. Let's hope that the summit is just a beginning, that it will result in a broad and inclusive national discussion on education reform. If so, can anticipate a new dimension in education reform that will provide additional"coaching and training" to those who have been slighted; that will provide true choice by eliminating arbitrary tracking systems and providing sustained, effective outreach that empowers rather than excludes Hispanic parents; and that will reduce the need for restrictive federal regulations by ensuring equal opportunities in the first place. If equity remains an afterthought, a sidebar issue, a promise unfulfilled, then the summit cannot possibly be deemed a success. Or it can be the catalyst for "reforming education reform" by promoting excellence in education for ALL students. (Raul Yzaguirre is president of the National Council of La Raza. Policy analyst Denise De La Rosa contributed to this article.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua TROPHY TIME: If you're one of those few individuals who has yet to receive an ovation or a plaque during this longer, livelier Hispanic Heritage MONTH celebration, don't go away mad. I'm about to open Sin Palos' own HH Month trophy case, and you may stilrbe a winner: ENTREPRENEUR OF THE MONTH: Jose Canseco, who already earns millions hitting home runs for the Oakland Athletics, has launched a pay-to-listen phone service that could make autographs obsolete. Dial 1-900-234-JOSE and Jose's recorded voice will talk about steroids, yesterday's game, fast cars, what he ate for lunch or anything else that pops into his mind. All the daily update will cost you is $2 for the first minute and $1 for each minute thereafter. PUNCHING BAGS OF THE MONTH: Cabinet members Manuel Lujan and Lauro Cavazos win in a romp. The national press seems to have let up on Interior's Lujan a bit lately to zero in on Education's Cavazos. The Oct. 2 Newsweek heads a piece on Cavazos: The Do-Nothing Education Secretary. Cavazos, says Newsweek, "is playing the wallflower" and "for a federal education policy consisting of cheerleading, that just won't do." The magazine quotes administration sources as saying that he'll be gone by early next year. It mentions the name of New Jersey Gov. Tom Kean as a likely replacement. Kean, whose term is up in December, is no friend of bilingual education, by the way. It has been Sin Palos' contention for months that Cavazos planned to keep the Cabinet chair warm for Kean. DIPLOMAT OF THE MONTH: The Orange County Human Rela tions Commission in Santa Ana, Calif., scolded City Councilman John Acosta Sept. 14 for his public comment that he didn't attend the gay pride festival the preceding weekend because .. I probably would have been in jail today for clobbering some of those people." Acosta admitted to the Orange County Register that he said it but insisted that the quote was taken out of context. .. Alii was saying is that if I had been at the festival and some of those radical gays had shoved me, I would have decked the faggots." GUTLESS POLITICIANS OF THE MONTH: The winners are the City Council members of Temple City, Calif. A few months ago this wimpy body passed an ordinance requiring all business signs to be written in at least SOOA> English. Then came a federal court ruling in nearby Pomona declaring such laws nonsen sical and illegal. Instead of repealing their ordinance, the Temple City fathers chose Sept. 19 to leave it on the books but suspend enforcement of it. STUPID HEADLINE OF THE MONTH: It was a close contest, but the Los Angeles Times gets the trophy for the head on its Sept. 21 story about the selection of Joseph Fernandez as New York City schools chancellor. He replaced a black chancellor, who had been preceded by two Latinos. The Times' head: Fernandez to Be New York Schools Chief; Minority Control Continues. When George Bush was elected president, I failed to notice any newspapers bannering White Male Reign Prolonged. There was a tie for runner-up: New York Mets first-baseman Keith Hernandez was demoted in the lineup from batting third down to sixth spot, so that city's Daily News headed its story: Mex's best spot Is south In the order. Then, when New York Yankee outfielder Luis Polonla was busted in a hotel room with . a 15-year -old girl, the New York Post filled the top half of page one with two words: YANKEE PANKY. -Kay Barbaro Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Oct 2. 1989 3

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COLLECTING SCHOOL-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS: "Urban School-Com munity Alliances" is a 25-page monograph reviewing literature on schools collaborating with community agencies, cultural institutions and business to improve the education of at-risk youth. To order send $3 to ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027 (212) 678-3433. MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION: "Teaching and Learning in a Di verse World: Multicultural Education for Young Children'' is a 225-page book for parents and educators with guidelines for introducing a multicultural perspective in early childhood education. For a copy send $18 . 45 to Intercultural Press, P.O. Box 700, . Yarmouth, Maine 04096 (207) 846-5168. DROPOUTS: ''Dropouts in America: Enough is Known for Action" is a 69-page booklet that recommends that strategies designed to keep students in school begin in early elementary school and continue through high school. Copies cost $7.50. Write to The Institute for Educational Leadership, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite310, Wash ington, D.C. 20036. AIDS AND HISPANICS: "AIDS Knowledge and Attitudes of Hispanic Americans: Provisional Data from the 1988 National Health Interview" is a survey of 1,102 Hispanics 18 years of age and older. Breakdowns are provided by age, sex, education and ancestry. For a free copy of the 22-page report (specify No. 166, DHHS Publication No. 89-1250), contact the National Center for Health Statistics, 3700 East-West Highway, Room 144, Hyattsville, Md. 20782 (301) 436-8500. TIPS FOR THE COLLEGE BOUND: "College Bound," a 47 -page guide, offers tips to college freshmen on how to select appropriate courses and instructors. To order a copy, send a check for $9.95 to The College Board, College Board Publications, Box 886, New York, N.Y. 101 01-0886. CONSUMER ELECTRONICS INFORMATION: The pamphlets "Con sumers Should Know: How to Buy, Use and Care for VCRs, Camcor ders and Tape" and "Consumers Should Know: About Service Con tracts; About Repair Services" are now available in Spanish. For copies send a self-addressed envelope with 25 for each pamphlet to Elec tronic Industries Association's Consumer Electronics Group, P.O. Box 19100, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 457-4919. LOVING TO READ: "Raising Bookworms: A Parent's Guide to Read ing Success" is a 63-page booklet that covers activities parents can use at home to instill a love for reading in their children . Cost is $5.95 plus shipping. Contact R&E Publishers, P. 0. Box 2008, Saratoga, Calif. 95070 (408) 866-6303. CONNECTING STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS Some 1 00 students at the TexaS A&l University chapter of the Texas Student Education Association in Kingsville, Texas, began Sept. 25 a pilot program to serve as one-on-one mentors with at-risk middle school students in that city. Mentors in the volunteer program, called Of The Students, By The Students, For The Students, will tutor students at Memorial Middle School four days a week and counsel them the other day on dropout prevention, self-esteem and educational careers. An individualized training program has been devised for each mentor. The program also sets strategies to involve parents. It runs through Dec. 1. Kingsville is 55% Hispanic. MICHIGAN CAMPAIGN TARGETS STUDENTS Audiences at Michigan's 15 public universities, including parents and students in elementary, junior high and high schools, will partici pate Oct. 3 in a teleconference linking them with education specialists discussing the importance of staying in school and going to college . The teleconference is part of a statewide media campaign to encour age Hispanic, black and Native American youth to remain in school. The campaign also includes the distribution of a 20-minute video with role models addressing the different groups of students targeted. Included are East Los Angeles calculus teacher Jaime Escalante and Marianna Gutierrez and her brother Miguel, valedictorian and saluta torian of Detroit's Western High School class of 1989. Public service announcements for radio and television will also be available. Contact the Office of Minority Equity, Department of Education, 600 W. St. Joseph, Suite 201, Lansing, Mich. 48933 (517) 334-6275. ASSOCIATION RELEASES AIDS FILMS AIDSFILMS, a New York-based non-profit company founded to in crease understanding about AIDS, will distribute beginning in Novem ber three dramatic films made by experienced Hispanic a'1d black writers and directors. One of the 15-minute films, directed by San Francisco documentary film maker Lourdes Portillo and titled Vida, is intended for Hispanic women. Available in Spanish and English, Vida focuses on a woman having to decide to give up her boyfriend or demanding that he use condoms. Seven other films will be released in another year. All community-service organizations and schools can receive free copies of the films and the accompanying discussion guide by re questing an application from AIDSFILMS, 50 W. 34th St., Suite 6B6, New York, N.Y. 1 Q001 (212) 629-6288. Calendar TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be in cluded in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. The Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations is sponsoring the 17th annual John An son Ford Awards Luncheon in honor of Cultural Diversity Month. Honored in the volunteer category will be Domingo Delgado. San Diego Oct. 7 The Mexican and American Foundation Inc. is hold ing its 18th annual An Evening With the Stars. Individuals from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border will be recognized for their contributions to transborder commerce and business networking on the behalf of minority entrepreneurs. U.S. Treas urer-designate Catalina Villalpando will be hon ored as Woman of the Year. THIS WEEK JOB FAIR Washington, D.C. Oct. 4 The U.S. Justice Department is holding a job fair for Hispanics interested in career opportunities as at torneys, legal technicians, budget analysts, com puter programmers, special agents and other posi tions. Enrique Perez (202) 307-9429 AWARDS LUNCHEON Los Angeles Oct. 5 4 Zara Taylor (213) 97 4-7606 QUINCENTENNIAL CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Oct. 6, 7 The National Hispanic Quincentennial Commis sion is sponsoring its first conference, to bring together Hispanic leaders on the national, state and local levels and provide them the opportunity to plan and discuss Quincentennial events in their respective communities. Elaine Coronado (202) 289-1661 HOMELESSNESS MARCH Washington, D.C . Oct. 7 The Hispanic outreach committee of HOUSING NOW! is participating in the organization of a march to the U.S. Capitol to protest homelessness. A rally at the Capitol will be held afterward. Marina Felix (202) 667-noo ROLE MODEL TRIBUTE Oct 2, 1989 John Stebbins (619) 232-2244 DAY AT THE RACES Los Angeles Oct. 8 The Hispanic Public Relations Association is sponsoring its third annual excursion to Santa Anita Race Track. The event is the only fund-raiser that directly supports HPRA's non-scholarship programs. Grace Trujillo Daniel (818) 799-3511 COMING SOON HEALTH CAREERS SYMPOSIUM National Institutes of Health San Antonio Oct. 22-24 Kathleen Schildbach (703) 920-0373 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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ASSISTANT VICE CHANCELLOR OF PLANNING & DESIGN University of California at Berkeley Responsible for the physical planning of the campus. Oversee the design process for capital projects. Develop Project Planning Guides & Environmental Impact Reports. Manage unit staff, budget & the formulation of goals & objectives. Coordinate space allocation. Serve as a resource for the University on all issues related to the plan ning & design of capital projects. Requires substantive pro gressively responsible experience in planning & design of major facilities. Architectural license required. Knowledge of the methods, practices . & procedures of capital pro gramming for large institutions. Experience interpreting & formulating plans & specifications, assessing cost esti mates, analyzing plans, managing a professional support staff & coordinating the work of design professionals & consultants. Ability to apply technical knowledge of engi neering & architecture to the needs of the academic envi ronment. Ability to manage project budgets. Knowledge of appropriate laws, regulations & codes. Demonstrated oral & written communications skills. Demonstrated ability to work in a diverse community, & commitment to diversity & affirmative action in the work setting. Send resume by 10-31-89 to: University of California, P.O. Box 07-107-18, 2539 Channing Way, Berkeley, Calif. 94720. EEO/AA ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER UW-Whitewater invites applications for the position of Assistant Director of Admissions. Candidates should have a master's degree and experience in admissions and transfer credit evaluation. Familiarity with computer appli cations preferred. Appointment to begin March 15, 1990. Application deadline November 1, 1989. Salary competi tive and commensurate with experience. To obtain a detailed position description and further infor mation, please contact Mr. Lon Sherman, Admissions Office, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, Wis. 53190. UWWhitewater is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer. Gloucester County College Physical Education/Health/Recreation Instructor for a two-year county college located in South Jersey just 20 minutes from Philadelphia. Ability to coach a variety of women's sports and to teach a variety of physical educa tion and activity courses. Master's in P.E. required . Submit resume by 10/31/89 to Personnel and Human Resources Office, Gloucester County College, Deptford Township, Sewell, N.J. 08080. Women and minorities encouraged to apply. AA/EOE BILINGUAL MANUFACTURING SUPERINTENDENT fabricating/finishing Mechanical/industrial engineering degree plus ten years experience. For further information contact Caroline Price (404) 487-2725 .or fax resume to (404) 487-3748. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report AMERICAN COUNCIL ON EDUCATION Center for Adult Learning and Educational Credentials Director, PONSI The American Council on Education is accepting applications and nominations for the position of director, Program on Non-Collegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI). PONSI seeks to facilitate the awarding of academic credit for course work and learning acquired outside the campus environment. The director plans and directs the course evaluation process, including directing up to 200 consultants annually, promotes the PONSI program, edits the National Guide, and brings together PONSI sponsors and school officials to en hance credentialing for adult learners. Position requires adult educa tion or training experience and valuing extra-institutional learning, administrative/management experience demonstrating excellent pre sentational and writing skills. Extensive travel required. Please send resume to: Suzanne Forsyth CAL Search American Council on Education 1 Dupont Circle, NW Washington, DC 20036 Deadline for application Is October 31, 1989. EOE!AA • • • * • CITY OF PARAMOUNT NEIGHBORHOOD COUNSELOR-City c:1 Paramount, Californ _ ia (Salary: $2,266-$2,754 per month, plus City pays employee's 7% share of PERS). Requires Bachelor's Degree with specialization in social science, psychology, or related field. One year experience working with youth and parents in a community setting, and familiarity with youth gang member ship also required. Bilingual capability in English/Spanish also required. Will implement programs for early elementary age youth which will discourage gang membership in the commu nity. Will conduct classroom presentations and community maintain contact with youth and their parents, pre pare written reports and oral presentations, and other duties. FAMILY COUNSELOR-City of Paramount, California (Salary: $2,820-$3,428 per month, plus City pays employee's 7% share of PEAS). Requires Bachelor's Degree in social science, psychology, or related field. Master's Degree desir able. MFCC of LCSW preferred. Experience working with gang-related youth in a preventative counseling capacity desirable. Bilingual capability in English/Spanish also re quired. Will establish and maintain counseling contact with youth who are prone to gang involvement and their families ' plan and organize innovative counseling activities which will discourage gang involvement, maintain close contact with resource and referral agencies, and other duties: For both positions: APPLY BY: Open APPLY AT: City of Paramount, 16400 Colorado Avenue Paramount, Calif. 90723. Phone: (213) 531-3503 326. Oct 2, 1989 5

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Arts & Entertainment delivered on time to Columbia Pictures by Puenzo. Amid rumors that studio executives demanded changes in the film, its release was postponed to this year. GRINGO'S HERE: One of the decade's most talked about and anticipated Latino-themed films arrives in movie houses this week. Old Gringo was well received at its world premiere this spring at the Cannes Film Festival, where it was dubbed a "Latin American" film. It had "premiere" last month in Buenos Aires (where it received glowing reviews) and Mexico City (where critics were less than generous). Old Gringo --Jane Fonda's film based on a novel by Mexico's Carlos Fuentes -premieres nationally Oct. 6. It has been nine years in the making, reportedly since shortly after Fonda and Fuentes met in 1979. Fonda stars as a spinster caught in a love triangle with the title char acter, U.S. journalist Ambrose Bierce (Gregory Peck), and a general in Pancho Villa's army named Arroyo (Jimmy Smits). ANOTHER PREMIERE: A musical based on the life of San Juan, Puerto Rico's only female mayor, Felisa Rinc6n, opens this week with a gala at New York's Teatro Puerto Rico. The actress -whose Fonda Films company produced Old Gringo --claims that Carlos Fuentes decided to complete his novel about Bierce in 1980, when she told him that her dream was to'' make a movie about my country and yours and the relationship between both." Jessie de Guzman will play the title character in Fela and Justina Dfaz will play Luis Munoz Marfn, Puerto Rico's first elected governor. The play highlights the achievements of Rinc6n, considered a pioneer advocate for women's rights in the island and a progressive adminis trator who helped turn San Juan into a modern metropolis during the '50s and '60s. The novel Gringo Viejo was published in 1985 in its original Spanish, and the English version appeared the same year. In 1987 Fonda hired Argentina's Luis Puenzo, along with his partner Aida Bartnik, to direct the film and to write its script. Rinc6n, who is 93, is expected to attend the one-time performance The film had originally been slated for a fall 1988 release --and was of the musical. --Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report NAMING NAMES: The American Society of Newspaper Editors' board of directors is scheduled to vote next week on whether to grant anonymity to participating daily news papers in its next survey of minorities in the nation's daily newsrooms. Last month at the National Association of Black Journalists' conference in New York, the minorities committee of ASNE voted to recommend to the 20-member board that the group no longer grant anonymity. Mervin Aubespin, chair of ASNE's minori ties committee and editor of the Courier Journal in Louisville, Ky., told Weekly Re port the move would be a "significant" step, but he was unsure whether the board would adopt the proposal at its Oct. 11-14 meeting. "A lot of people in the organization feel we're in the business of disclosure, so we should play by the same rules ourselves," Aubespin said. "But if you decide you're going to disclose the names, there are a HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or (202) 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per col inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. significant number of newspapers who are not going to return the survey. Some feel it would literally destroy the annual survey." Earlier this year, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., conducted a survey of Hispanic hiring by the nation's 30 largest daily newspapers. Participants were told that the names of their newsp:1pers would be published. The response rate was 77%. ASNE's last survey, which granted ano nymity, contacted 1,581 newspapers and had a response rate of 64%. Frank Newton, executive director of NAHJ, expressed confidence that the NAHJ/HNMA survey would continue to be conducted re gardless of whether the ASNE board agrees to the minorities committee proposal. COUNTING JOURNALISM STUDENTS: A new study conducted by researchers at Ohio State University found that college jour nalism and mass communications programs reflect "inequalities in American society by underrepresenting racial and ethnic minorities.'' The study reported that Hispanics com prise 3.3% of journalism and mass communi cations students. According to the U.S. Cen sus, Latinos are 8.1% of the U.S. mainland population. A 1988 study by Indiana University found that Latinos are 0.2<>A> of full-time journalism and mass communications faculty. For a free copy of the Ohio State University study, contact Lee Becker at Ohio State Uni versity, School of Journalism, 242 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, Ohio43210 (614) 292-6291. ON THE MOVE: Constanza Montana, a reporter at the Chicago Tribune and NAHJ region 6 director, left Sept. 30 for a six-month journalism fellowship at Argentina's national newspaper, B Clatfn, in Buenos Aires ... Former Milwaukee Journal reporter Melita Garza joined the Chicago Tribune as a reporter Oct. 2 ... Ruben Castaneda, former reporter at the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, joined The Washington Post as a reporter Oct. 2 ... -Danilo Alfaro Mexico President Carlos Salinas de Gortarl addresses the Sept. 14 gathering In Tijuana, Mexico, of /mpacto-2000 (see page 1 U.S. Mexicans, Mexico Strengthen Ties story). Seated to the Immediate right of Salinas Is Armando Navarro, director of the Institute for Social Justice In San Bernardino Calif. The other entlemen are unidentified members of Salinas• secur detail.