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Hispanic link weekly report, October 9, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 9, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
U.S. Reps. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.) and Solombn Ortiz (D-Texas) vote in favor of a cut in the capital gains tax rate. Characterized as a gift to the rich by its opponents and a spur to the economy by its advocates, the cut passed the House...Florida state police arrest Miamian Luis Mireles, 30. He is suspected of planning to assassinate Gov. Bob Martinez...Former House Majority Whip Tony Coelho announces he will join the New York investment bank Wertheim Schroder & Co. as a managing director advising major corporations. Coelho resigned earlier this year from Congress over financial misdealings...The White House announces Adis
Maria Vila, head of the Florida Department of Administration, will be nominated to be assistant secretary for administration for the Department of Health and Human Services...U.S. Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole presents to Ernest Alferez, an employee of the Small Business Administration, and 11 other federal employees with Presidential Awards for their contributions to their agencies and their communities despite physical impairments...Philadelphia Mayor Wilson Goode reappoints Christine Torres-Matrullo as the only Hispanic on the city’s nine-member board of education...The California Senate Rules Committee appoints Antonia Hernandez, president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and William Mel&idez, vice president of the board of directors of California Literacy Volunteers, to the state Workforce Literacy Task Force...
Vol. 7 No. 40

Report Attacks ‘Disease-Promoting’ Firms’ Influence
132% between 1970-80, compared with 12%
By Danib Alfaro Latinos suffer from higher rates of diseases related to alcohol, tobacco and junk-food products, because they are heavily targeted by manufacturers of those products, according to a report released Oct. 3. But many national Hispanic organizations are reluctant to combat the problems because of the funding they receive from the industries, it concluded.
While national data on Hispanic alcoholism are lacking, the report, "Marketing Disease to Hispanics," by the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Science in the Public Interest, cited a 1975 review of autopsies in Los Angeles between 1918-1970 showing that 52% of all Mexican American male deaths between ages 30-60 were alcohol-related. This compared with 24% for non-Hispanic white males.
A national study of Hispanic lung-cancer rates does not exist, according to the report. It cited a study by the Colorado Tumor Registry showing Hispanic male lung cancer increasing
Senate Votes to Cut SL1AG
Three weeks after President Bush’s proposal to finance the war on drugs with $320 million taken from the $900 million program that provides newly legalized immigrants with educational services, basic health care and public assistance, the U.S. Senate voted Sept. 26 to cut $550 million from the beleaguered program.
The amendment to cut the program 61 % was attached to the appropriations bill for the Health and Human Services and Labor departments. The program, called State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants, is seen as easy prey because of its surplus. States and immigrant advocates argue the surplus is a result of lag time between when the services are provided and when the states are reimbursed.
SLIAG was mandated by the 1986 immigration act.
Sens. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) and Bob Graham (D-Fla), in an attempt to restore the proposed SLIAG cut, reinstated the funds through an amendment in the Labor and Health and Human Services appropriations bill for 1991.
among non-Hispanic white males.
"If there’s one product I’d want off the market and out of Hispanic households, it's tobacco," Jane Delgado, executive director of the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, told Weekly Report. "If placed on the market today, it would not receive FDA approval."
Jesse Aguirre, vice president of corporate relations for Anheuser-Busch, said the findings in the report were "to-
report"totallyunsubtantiatecf taMy unsubstantiated. The charge that these products in and of themselves cause disease is ridiculous."
Massive advertising campaigns directed at the Hispanic community exacerbate existing health problems by glamorizing the use of alcohol and cigarettes, especially among children, according to the study.
Philip Morris spokesperson Steve Weiss responded, saying, "It is reprehensible at best and absolutely racist at worst to say that Hispanics are less capable of deciding if they want to smoke than white men."
AGUIRRE
According to Hispanic Business magazine, Philip Morris and Anheuser-Busch were the second and third largest advertisers in Hispanic media in 1988.
The report stated that billboards advertising alcohol and cigarettes have "saturated" low-income, black and Latino neighborhoods and that the beer industry advertises "heavily" on Spanish-language radio and television stations. It added that Hispanic publications "would shrink in size or even fold without advertising from the alcohol and tobacco industries."
Manuel Toro, president of the National Association of Hispanic Publications, told Weekly Report he estimated that cigarette and alcohol advertising account for approximately 4% of ad revenues in Hispanic print media, pointing out that the dominant share of its revenue comes from local businesses.
"Alcohol and tobacco companies, without question, target the Hispanic community with advertising campaigns," said Carlos Molina, president of the Latino caucus of the American Public Health Association and a board member of Center for Science. "And if there’s any doubt that advertising influences behavior, why would these companies spend so much money on our community?"
In addition to targeting Hispanics with advertising, the report stated that alcohol, cigarette
continued on page 2
Senate Axes Undocumenteds from Census
Reacting to what it says would be the unfair redistribution of congressional seats, the U.S. Senate voted Sept. 29 to bar the Census Bureau from counting undocumented immigrants.
The Senate voted to prohibit the census count, on a voice vote, through an amendment attached to the $17.3 billion appropriations bill for the State, Justice and Commerce departments.
The chamber took the action despite the Bush administration’s position that it is unconstitutional.
In addition to shaping congressional redistricting, census results are used by the
federal government to allot monies to states and cities.
Referring to the phrase in the Constitution that says every person shall be counted, Arturo Vargas, coordinator of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund’s census outreach program, said, "The senators seem to think the Constitution is on a word processor where it can be deleted and changed."
The appropriations bill now goes to conference committee with the House. Hispanics and the administration are hopeful the amendment will be killed there. If not, Bush is expected to veto the bill.


Court Rules Tex. School Finance System Unconstitutional
ByF&ixP&ez
Texas’ system of financing its schools deprives students from economically disadvantaged districts of an equal education, the state’s Supreme Court ruled Oct. 2 when it overturned a state appellate court decision.
Filed in 1984 by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Edgewood vs. Kirby challenged a funding formula whereby districts with little property wealth have considerably less in resources than those districts that are property rich. School district property wealth per student
ranges from $20,000 to $14 million, or from less than $2,100 to $19,300 per student annually.
The state’s 50 poorest districts are 95% Mexican American.
Texas school districts are responsible for 49% of their budgets and the state 43%. The remaining 8% comes from federal and other sources.
The court ruled, 9-0, that the current financing system violates the students’ right under the state constitution to an efficient and equal education.
’’What this decision means is that maybe we’ll have a fair system for the first time in (Texas) history," said Al Kaufman, MALDEF’s lead attorney in the case. The suit was initiated by San Antonio’s Edgewood School District and its superintendent, James Vasquez.
Kaufman said the ruling will affect some one million students. Roughly 200-300 of Texas’ 1,060 school districts are considered property-wealth poor.
Texas has until May to put a new formula into effect.
Report Says Firms Co-opt Latino Groups
continued from page 1
and junk-food companies annually give at least $1 million to Latino groups in grants and conference sponsorships, with the bulk coming from alcohol and tobacco.
"Nothing to me is as vicious as a tobacco company," said Delgado. "If someone sold suicide pills, would you allow them to exhibit at your conference?" COSSMHO has never accepted contributions from cigarette companies and recently stopped accepting alcohol money as well, said Delgado.
Aguirre said his company gives at least $2 million yearly to Hispanic organizations.
Antonia Hernandez, president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said 3% of her organization’s $4 million budget comes from alcohol and tobacco concerns. "All the money we receive from every source comes with no strings attached."
Susan Herrera, vice president of administration and finance for the National Council of La Raza, said many Hispanic organizations are forced to turn to alcohol and cigarette
Despite a lawsuit filed by a teachers’ union, the Austin (Texas) Independent School District’s Board of Trustees voted 4-3 Sept. 25 against reinstating a $1,500 stipend this year for bilingual education teachers.
Adrienne Segal, president of the Austin Federation of Teachers, said the decision to do away with the stipend was motivated by "racism."
Segal, whose union filed the lawsuit Sept. 8, said, "There are some people on the Board of Trustees who just of kind of got it in their heads that they (bilingual education teachers) don’t deserve the stipend."
Deborah Bay, communications director for the district, called the move a "budgetary decision."
The stipend was eliminated by the trustees Aug. 10 when it voted on the district’s budget for this year. Because it is illegal for public employees to strike in Texas, the 330 teachers affected must teach through the academic year or face possible suspension of their teaching certificates.
manufacturers for support, because other corporations are not as generous.
"If taking this money is going to compromise an organization’s mission, they should not take it," Herrera said. "But we cannot be about the business of judging corporate America’s morality." She added that 1% of La Raza's $4 million annual budget comes from cigarette and alcohol companies.
Jose Garcfa De Lara, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, said alcohol and cigarette company grants account for 25% of his organization’s $500,000 annual budget. "I do not believe that our organization is going to be compromised by not going against those so-called evils because they donate to us." He conceded that Hispanic organizations need to develop other avenues of support.
Among the report’s recommendations:
• restrict the number of liquor stores and alcohol and tobacco billboards in Hispanic neighborhoods.
• greatly increase support of Hispanic civic groups by non-disease promoting businesses.
The district gave all teachers a 3% pay raise this year. The suit asks that bilingual teachers be paid at least as much as they earned last year or their current salary plus the stipend.
N.M. Health Care Officials Ask for Forms in Spanish
By Rhonda Smith
Two directors of health care service organizations testified before a New Mexico state legislative committee Sept. 25 in Las Cruces that Medicaid services for Spanish speakers were delayed because the forms were in English.
Mary Vane, director of La Clinica de Familia, added that the Human Services Department has "made no effort to make anything bilingual. The lag and the insensitivity to getting this application properly updated has been very discouraging."
Debra Orozco, director of the Southern Area Health Education Center, said because many Medicaid applicants in this border town 300 miles south of Santa Fe spoke Spanish and only limited English, the applications should be printed in both languages.
One of the committee members who heard the testimony, Rep. Paul Sandoval, said the final decision on whether the applications can be printed bilingually rests with Alex Valdez, the secretary of the Human Services Department. "He has been very receptive to having the applications provided in Spanish as well as English."
The committee will meet in November to discuss the issue further, if necessary.
Idahoans Push for Probe of U.S. Attorney
offer statistics on arrests of Latinos on drug charges.
Representatives from Idaho Hispanic organizations are seeking to enlist the support of national Latino organizations to call for an investigation of the U.S. attorney for Idaho. The groups are incensed over a memo penned by the attorney, Maurice Ellsworth, that said Hispanic Idahoans were the major cause for increased drug trafficking in the state.
In the 25-30 page memo, written in August and leaked Sept. 18, Ellsworth listed several groups, including Hispanics, motorcycle gangs and marijuana growers, he said were major sources of illegal drugs.
"To date, most drug arrests in Idaho involve Hispanics" who are "organized along family lines," read the memo. The memo did not
Saying the report deals in generalizations, Humberto Fuentes, director of Idaho Migrant Council in Caldwell, said Ellsworth is "trying to jump on the bandwagon of the Bush administration’s war on drugs by using the Hispanic community."
Fuentes said he is working with Image of Idaho and the Canyon County Hispanic Political Awareness Committee to get support from national Hispanic groups to launch an investigation by the U.S. Justice Department.
Ellsworth held a press conference Sept. 20 to rebut charges that he was a racist and to say he would not resign.
Austin Drops Bilingual Ed Teacher Stipend
2
Oct. 9,1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Miguel P6rez
Hugo’s Winds of Change
Although the winds of Hurricane Hugo are long gone from Puerto Rico, the destructive physical and psychological effects will linger for many years.
They tell you it is too soon to bring politics into such a tragedy. But then Puerto Ricans can’t help but wonder why the federal government took so long in sending relief assistance. If it wasn’t politics, was it discrimination?
They tell you it took the feds several days to get to Puerto Rico and only several hours to respond in South Carolina. They ask how the city and state of New York sent relief planes before the feds.
So far, the federal government’s excuses have been weak.
Officials claim that, because the San Juan airport was closed, it took the Federal Emergency Management Agency several days to get to the island and inspect the damage.
“We are confused as to why Puerto Rico was not designated a disaster area as fast as South Carolina,” says Tony Burgos, a for-j mer adviser to Gov. Mario Cuomo who has
been working with a group that coordinated the relief sent from New York City and state. “Like I told some people in the federal government, I don’t understand how some reporters from New York got to Puerto j Rico on Saturday night, knowing that a hurricane was coming, and how
FEMA couldn’t do the same.”
THE ARCHIE BUNKERS MAY USE HUGO
And so Hugo becomes a political issue - in Washington, Puerto Rico and New York, where the Archie Bunkers of the city are already asking why there is so much hoopla over Puerto Rico and not about South Carolina, “our own country.”
Hugo will become part of the debate started over the three political formulas that Puerto Ricans will consider in an upcoming plebiscite. Those who favor statehood are already saying the Hugo experience proves that if Puerto Rico were a state, it would have received relief much sooner. Those who support the present commonwealth status are saying relief may have been delayed because their leader, Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n, supported Michael Dukakis. But those who favor independence are saying Hugo proves the U.S. government doesn’t care about Puerto Rican people.
Even in New York, Hugo may become part of the political and racial debate. The Archie Bunkers may be tempted to use Hugo to fortify the myths and stereotypes that feed their warped minds.
DON’T LET IT BE SAID...
n
But don’t let it be said that Puerto Ricans are asking for special treatment. As U.S. citizens, they only want the same kind of attention being given tothe people of South Carolina. Let it not be said that Puerto Ricans are sitting back waiting for the government to pour in money. Without the assistance they deserve, they are still rebuilding houses into shacks so they can at least have a roof over their heads. Let it not be said Puerto Ricans are not capable of helping themselves. In one weekend, with the help of two telethons, one walkathon and various concerts, mainland Puerto Ricans raised some $3.2 million to rebuild their homeland. Butthe damage is estimated at $1 billion. Hugo’s winds were so devastating and the political implications so profound, it led one San Juan columnist to observe that the history of Puerto Rico will now be divided into two parts: before Hugo and after Hugo.
If this is true, then Puerto Ricans, the U.S. government, and even the Archie Bunkers of New York may get a fresh chance at building bridges that were blown away by the winds of Hugo, politics and ignorance.
(Miguel P&rez is a columnist with The New York Daily News.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la
PACKAGES OF TWO: Wrigley says chew gum to double your pleasure. The National Association for Bilingual Education has T-shirtsthat invite companionship with, “Bilingual, bicultural, and by myself.”
So what else come in pairs?
CENTAVOS MALOS: Like bad pennies, Hispanic nemises Harold Ezell and William Bennett mouthed their ways back in the news this month.
Ezell, reports the Los Angeles Times’ George Ramos, is unhappy because his successor as INS's Western regional commissioner, Ben Davidian, is maintaining too low a profile on the job.
Ezell offered Davidian the unsolicited counsel: “He has to show the public who he is and what he is.”
In his six-year ego trip, Ezell certainly did that.
Davidian’s response: “I will not be seeking press advice from Mr. Ezell...The agency needs all of the support it can get both from within and without.”
Meanwhile, Bennett tried to upstage George Bush at the president's gigantic photo opportunity, the education summit, by characterizing the private meetings between the administration and the governors as “pap...and stuff that rhymes with pap.”
White House Chief of Staff John Sununu immediately put drug czar Bennett (who never should have been allowed into the summit anyway) on notice that he is now on a White House list that is a synonym for his cute mystery word.
“Thanks for your comments,” the White House press office quoted a Sununu reprimand to Bennett. “They weren’t helpful.”
I suppose we should be happy that E&B are directing their polemics at other than undocumented workers and Latino educators. But wouldn’t it be nice for the whole nation if they’d just float away on their own bile?
DOUBLE TROUBLE: Television programs with Latinos in leading roles are a rarity these days. Two Latinos at opposite ends of the country are wishing they were even more rare.
Pedro Luis Estrada Jr., 25, a reputed narcotics trafficker on the FBI’s “Ten Most Wanted” list, and Roberto Contras Urabez, 24, sought for the murder of his girlfriend and her brother, both were profiled on the hit TV show “America’s Most Wanted.”
Following a tip from a viewer, Estrada was picked up in Harrisburg, Pa., Oct. 1. The same day, Urabez, a computer operator who fled Washington, D.C., last January, surrendered to police in San Diego after seeing his alleged crime re-enacted on the national TV show.
TWO-LIP TIME: Unemployed tileworker Fernando Gonzales, 39, and his 36-year-old wife, Karen, were declared winners Sept. 26 of the first Great American Kiss-Off. The event was staged in a Reno, Nev., furniture store parking lot.
For 42 days, the Gonzaleses, parents of five, kissed from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., with allotted five-minute hourly breaks.
Fortheir affection, they won the deed to an Idaho time-share condominium and a few thousand dollars.
Ever the caballero, Fernando assured reporters when it was all over, “I’m still not tired of kissing her.”
- Kay BArbaro
Quoting...
SEN. THAD COCHRAN (R-Miss.), during Senate debate on counting undocumented immigrants in the 1990 census:
"The bottom line is illegal aliens ought to be deported, not counted
Oct 9,1989
3


COLLECTING
TOBACCO, ALCOHOL, JUNK FOOD, HISPANICS: “Marketing Disease to Hispanics” is a 100-page report that concludes health problems are increasing among Hispanics partly because of the massive marketing campaigns directed at them by alcohol, tobacco and junk food companies. The report documents the rising rate of diseases linked to these products. To order send $6.95 to the Center for Science in the Public Interest at 1501 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036, or call (202) 332-9110.
IMPACTO-2000: “lmpacto-2000 and Mexico: A Plan of Acerca-miento” is a 21-page draft plan on how to increase ties between Mexican Americans and Mexico in several areas, including commerce, education, tourism and the arts. To receive a free copy, send $5 to the Institute for Social Justice, lmpacto-2000, 350 W. Fifth St., Suite 206, San Bernardino, Calif. 92410 (714) 888-0207.
TESTIMONY ON LATINO ELDERLY I: Carmela Lacayo, president of the Asociacidn Nacional Pro Personas May ores, testified last month at a congressional hearing on Hispanic elderly. For a free copy of her 10-page testimony, titled "The Hispanic Elderly: America’s Failure to Care (The Cuban American Perspective),” contact the Asociacidn at 272 W. Sixth St., Suite 270, Los Angeles, Calif. 90057 (213) 487-1922.
TESTIMONY ON HISPANIC ELDERLY II: Suleika Cabrera Drinane, executive director of the Instituto Puertorriqueno/Hispano Para Personas Mayores, also testified at the hearing. Her six-page testimony, "The Hispanic Elderly: America’s Failure to Care, Part II,’’ is available at no cost. To receive a copy, contact the Instituto at 105 E. 22nd St., Room 615, New York, N.Y. 10010 (212) 677-4181.
TESTIMONY ON HISPANIC ELDERLY III: Tomasa Gonzales Or-dones, community liaison for the National Hispanic Council on Aging, presented testimony at the congressional hearing dealing with Mexican American elderly. The six-page "The Hispanic Elderly: America’s Failure to Care, Part III” can be obtained by sending 450 to the National Council at 2713 Ontario Road NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 745-2521.
TESTIMONY ON HISPANIC ELDERLY IV: Judith Kasper, associate director of The Commonwealth Fund Commission on Elderly People Living Alone, testified before the House Select Committee on Aging. Her 13-page testimony, "Poverty and Poor Health Among Elderly Hispanic Americans,” can be obtained for free by contacting The Commonwealth Fund Commission at 624 W. Broadway, Baltimore, Md. 21205 (301) 955-2487.
CONNECTING
PROMOTING THE ARTS, CHILDREN Nine Hispanic arts organizations in New York City will share a $100,000 grant from the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs to help with a number of activities, New York Mayor Ed Koch has announced.
The Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art will receive $20,000 for its collaborative effort with a bilingual/bicultural elementary school to expose the students to art. Receiving $15,000 are Ballet Hispanico, to open a studio, and Pregones, to help plan its Festival de Teatro Latino. International Arts Relations, the Association of Hispanic Arts, the Hostos Performing Arts Center and Reportorio Espanol will each receive $10,000. En Foco and the Visual Arts Research and Resource Center Relating to the Caribbean will get $5,000.
In Los Angeles, KCBS-TV has donated $10,000 to Para Los Ninos, a non-profit social service agency dedicated to decreasing child abuse and neglect. The money will go toward helping the agency’s child care center, juvenile intervention project and family crisis center.
SHORT-STORY CONTEST OPENS Hispanic magazine and Philip Morris Cos. have kicked off their 1989 HispanicShort Story Contest. Open to all unpublished writers 18years and older, the deadline for entries is Dec. 10.
The winner will receive a $1,000 honorarium and have his or her submission published in the January/February issue of Hispanic magazine. Submissions, works of fiction on the U.S. Hispanic experience, must be no longer than 5,000 words.
Entries should be sent to Hispanic-New Voices, 111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 410, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 682-9023.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, is named a fellow at the Institute of Politics at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Yzaguirre will audit classes in business, law and political science from October through December...Graciela Nemes, a professor emeritus of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Maryland, College Park, receives the institution’s highest honor, the President’s Medal. Nemes was recognized for her contributions to the campus’ intellectual and cultural life... Dr. Richard Krieg, acting commissioner of the Chicago Health Department, names Alina Fernandez as director of Childhood Health Screening...The Chicago Public Library system opens a branch named after Rudy Lozano, the late Pilsen-Little Village leader who fought for improved educational and employment opportunities for local residents. Some 6,000 books were presented to the library by Mexico...
Calendar________________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
QUINCENTENNIAL SYMPOSIUM Santa Fe, N.M. Oct. 11-13
The University of New Mexico and the National Park Service are sponsoring an international symposium titled "Old World and New: New Mexico and the Columbus Quincentennial.” The event will consist of a series of speeches on topics such as Spanish colonialism and the founding of towns, and New Mexico art.
Edwina Abrau (505) 766-8743 4
COMMUNICATIONS CONFERENCE Indianapolis Oct. 12
The Greater Indianapolis Hispanic Chamber of Commerce wilt conduct a communications seminar designed to help small-business owners better manage telecommunications and computers.
Jos6 Cuevas (317) 252-1156 JOB FAIR
Washington, D.C. Oct. 13,14
The Washington Navy Yard Hispanic Heritage Month Committee is holding a job fair designed to increase Hispanic representation in the U.S. Navy. Civilian positions offered include professional, administrative, technical, clerical and blue collar.
Shirley Curry (202) 433-6836 DINNER
Los Angeles Oct. 14
The National Centerfor Immigrants’ Rights will hold its third annual dinner as part of the American Immigration Lawyers’ Association’s West Coast training conference. Half the funds raised at the dinner will be used for NCIR’s Immigrant/Refugee Oct 9, 1989
Children’s Project.
Peter Schey (213) 388-8693
DINNER Denver Oct. 14
The Latin American Research and Service Agency is holding a fund-raising dinner/dance to celebrate its silver anniversary. Entertainment will be provided by salsa group Conjunto Colores.
Mat Sparling (303) 839-8300
COMING SOON
HISPANIC LINK TRIBUTE National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Washington, D.C. Oct. 16 Mike Zamba (202) 546-2536
SPOTLIGHT
The National Conference of Puerto Rican Women will hold its 17th annual conference Nov. 10-12 in Old Greenwich, Conn. In addition to workshops and panels, a special exhibit will highlight the outstanding efforts of Latinas who have supported and empowered others. For information contact Rosamelia de la Rocha at (202) 387-4716.
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
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In the last thirteen years, the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund has awarded $6.4 million in scholarships to 10,000 deserving Hispanic-American students nationwide.
With the strong support from CFC individual contributors and the corporate sector, NHSF has been able to make the educational dreams of thousands of Hispanic-American students a reality. As expected, hundreds of these recipients are the sons and daughters of federal workers.
We encourage you to join the NHSF partnership which has proven to be very successful in the last decade. Become a part of NHSF's efforts at assisting a greater number of deserving Hispanic-American scholars. Designate the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund on your Combined Federal Campaign pledge.
YOUR HELP IS NEEDED!
cia Uinoiosa - Cristina "TtudftA - SeTHlO llFSTTr,
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irzna Meza - Leona
Brenda Mendoza
HUMANITIES FELLOWSHIPS Southwest Hispanic Research Institute University of New Mexico
The Southwest Hispanic Research Institute at the University of New Mexico announces the availability of two humanities fellowships for the 1990-91 academic year.
The fellowships are made possible by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and provide for a $30,000 stipend plus $3,000towards relocation costs and other benefits, interested scholars are invited to submit research proposals on issues critical to an understanding of the Hispanic/ Chicano experience in the context of the changing Southwest.
Eligibility criteria include an awarded doctorate in the humanities or related social sciences and ability to devote full time to a research project during the residency period.
For proposal guidelines write to:
Southwest Hispanic Research Institute University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131
Deadline for submission of proposals: December 15, 1989.
Dean of the College Office BROWN UNIVERSITY
Assistant/Assoclate Dean & Director Third World Center
Twelve-month position, beginning 2/1/90 or no later than 7/1/90.
Responsibilities as Assistant/Associate Dean of the College: Academic advising, administration of various programs, coordination of the Minority Peer Counselors Program and Third World Transition Program, planning and coordination of programs on issues of racism, diversity, pluralism, and community.
Responsibilities as Director of Third World Center: Sponsor academic programs and activities, provide advice and assistance to Third World student organizations and the Center’s outreach program, chair the Third World Advisory Council.
Master’s degree required, Ph.D. preferred; at least 2 yrs. academic and/or administrative experience; counseling experience; demonstrated ability to work with and serve the interests of diverse minority populations. Ability to work effectively with students, faculty, and staff. Candidates should have a commitment to the philosophy and goals of the Brown Curriculum» Beginning salary commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Submit letter of application, resume, and 3 letters of reference to Ruth Oppenheim, Brown University, Box 1828, Providence, Rl 02912 by 11/17/89.
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
BROWN UNIVERSITY
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Oct 9, 1989
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
SOUTHWEST TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY ANTICIPATED TENURE-TRACK FACULTY POSITIONS FALL 1990
Chair, Department of Accounting: Associate or Full Professor.
Closing date: January 15,1990.
Chair, Department of Biology: Associate or Full Professor.
Closing date: January 15,1990.
Chair, Department of Home Economics: Associate or Full Professor.
Closing date: February 1,1990.
Chair, Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation: Associate or Full Professor.
Closing date: December 1,1989.
Chair, Department of Sociology/Anthropology: Associate or Full Professor.
Closing date: Undetermined, contact Dr. Robert Fischer, Department of Modern Languages.
Accounting: Assistant or Associate Professor.
Closing date: January.1,1990.
Agriculture: Assistant or Associate Professor (Animal Science).
Closing date: November 10,1989.
Art: Assistant Professor.
Closing Date: February 2,1990.
Biology: Assistant Professor (Structural Botany).
Closing date: December 15,1989.
Computer Science: Assistant Professor.
Closing date: March 1,1990.
Curriculum & Instruction: Two positions in reading, both Assistant Professor.
Closing date: December?, 1989.
Educational Administration and Psychological Services: Assistant Professor (Developmental Education).
Closing date: December 1,1989.
Assistant or Associate Professor (Educational Administration).
Closing date: November 22,1989.
English: Assistant Professor.
Closing date: November 15,1989.
Finance and Economics: Assistant or Associate Professor in Finance. Assistant Professor in Economics.
Closing date: December 1,1989.
Health Administration: Assistant Professor (Health Care Planning).
Closing date: February 28,1990.
Health, Physical Education and Recreation: Two positions, both Assistant Professor (Recreational Administration).
Closing date: January 20,1990.
History: Two positions, both Assistant Professor.
Closing date: October 20,1989.
Home Economics: Two positions, Assistant or Associate Professor, and Assistant Professor (both Fashion Merchandising).
Closing date: February 1,1990.
Management and Marketing: Assistant Professor (Business Policy).
Closing date: January 1,1990.
Modern Languages: Assistant Professor.
Closing date: November 15,1989.
Political Science: Three positions, Assistant Professor.
Closing date: November 15,1989.
Sociology/Anthropology: Assistant Professor.
Closing date: January 15,1990.
Although no tenure-track vacancies are anticipated in other areas, applications are welcome for consideration for temporary appointments. The University continues to seek applications in the departments listed above as well as in the departments of Accounting, Allied Health Sciences, Biology (three positions), Chemistry, Computer Information Systems and Administrative Sciences, Criminal Justice, Geography and Planning, Journalism, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Psychology, Speech Communications, Technology and Theater Arts. For more information please contact the appropriate department, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666.
The University reserves the right not to proceed with any appointments for financial or programmatic reasons.
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS National Council of La Raza
National Hispanic Organization seeks Administrative Assistants. Good organizational skills needed, plus ability to work independently. Typing and/or word processing skills necessary; familiarity with database preferred. Salary approximately $17,000, negotiable, depending on experience. Bilingual English/ Spanish preferred.
Please contact: Charles Kamasaki, National Council of La Raza, 810 First St. NE, Suite 300 Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 289-1380.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR POLITICAL SCIENCE Hayward, Calif.
Tenure-Track Assistant Professor of Political Science specializing in public law and American government, beginning September 1990. Must have Ph.D.
Send r6sum6 and three letters of recommendation to: Dr. Emily Stoper, Chair, Political Science Department, California State University, Hayward, Hayward, Calif. 94542. Deadline: December 1, 1989. Position #90-91 POSC-TT-1.
An Affirmative Action/Equal Employment
(f ^
CHRISTMAS WITH A
HISPANIC FLAVOR
Do you have a product with a Hispanic flavor that Weekly Report readers could send to friends, family or business associates as gifts this Christmas?
Fosters._AJbums_.Tapes_.Cookbooks... Greeting Cards...Holiday Food Packages...Paintlngs...Books...Theme T-Shirts...Arts or Crafts...Magazine Subscriptions...Toys...Jewelry... Guayaberas... Fashions... Religious ltems...Gifts that share the Joy and warmth of la cuttura latina?
Weekly Reports first "Holiday Marketplace" product advertisement page will appear Oct. 30,1989, to allow our readers time to place their Christmas orders with you.
To introducethisfeature, our 1989 rates are more than reasonable. For prices and details, drop a note or call: Carlos Erick-sen-Mendoza, Marketing Manager, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone: (202) 234-0737.
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Oct 9, 1989
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
The following positions are with the University of Arizona.
COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT
The Department of Psychology at the University of Arizona is seeking applica-tionsfor atenure-track appointment at the Assistant or Associate Professor level, beginning fall 1990. A particular interest in the area of conceptual or semantic development is preferred, although other areas of specialization within cognitive development will be considered. Candidates must show evidence of a strong ongoing program of research as well as interest in teaching at the graduate levels.
Applications from women and minority candidates are especially encouraged. Interested candidates should send vitae, letter of interest, selected reprints, and three letters of reference to:
Rosemary A. Rosser, Chair Cognitive Development Search Committee Department of Psychology The University of Arizona Tucson, Ariz. 85721
Deadline for receipt of applications is January 15, 1990.
SOCIAL/PERSONALITY
The Department of Psychology at the University of Arizona is seeking candidates for an Assistant/early Associate Professor position (tenure track), beginning in fall 1990. Candidates must show evidence of a strong ongoing program of research in the Social/Personality area and must have a strong background in both traditional and contemporary approaches to the study of personality. Primary teaching responsibilities will be in the Social/Personality area, but preference will be given to applicants who are well suited to teach large sections of introductory psychology.
Applications from women and minority candidates are especially encouraged. Interested candidates should send vitae, letter of interest, selected reprints, and three letters of reference to:
Hal Arkowitz, Chair Search Committee for Social/Personality Department of Psychology The University of Arizona Tucson, Ariz. 85721
Deadline for receipt of applications is December 1, 1989.
The University of Arizona is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT and
DIRECTOR OF AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
The University of Toledo invites applications and nominations for the position of Assistant to the President and Director of Affirmative Action.
Founded in 1872, the University of Toledo has been a member of University system of the State of Ohio since 1967. It is also a member of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges. The University of Toledo has an enrollment of 22,800 undergraduate and graduate students and employs approximately 1,200 full-time and part-time faculty members. The University consists of seven degree-granting colleges (Arts & Sciences, Business Administration, Education, Engineering, Law, Pharmacy and University College), a Graduate School which grants doctorates in 21 disciplines and the College of Law, a Community and Technical College located at the Scott Park Campus and a Division of Continuing Education.
Its 210-acre Bancroft Campus is located in a pleasant residential area on the western edge of the city of Toledo. It also has a convocation facility that is part of a recently completed convention center in downtown Toledo.
The Assistant to the President and Director of Affirmative Action reports directly to the President and is responsible for working with all Colleges, departments and divisions of the University to ensure compliance with affirmative action and equal opportunity regulations. The Director shall encourage compliance with the spirit and law of equal employment and affirmative action. This will include reviewing and directing compliance training and programs. The Director shall also perform other duties as assigned by the President.
Professional requirements include an earned doctorate, faculty experience preferred and prior knowledge and experience with affirmative action policies and programs. Salary and fringe benefits are competitive.
The position will remain open until filled. The Search Committee will begin its review of applications on November 30,1989. In order to assure full consideration, nominations and applications should be received before that date. Interested persons should submit a letter indicating an interest in the position, a complete r6sum6 and the names, addresses and telephone numbers of at least five references. Nominations and applications should be addressed to:
Dr. James E. Todd The University of Toledo 2801 W. Bancroft St.
Toledo, Ohio 43606
The University of Toledo is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
Arlington County Personnel Office 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, VA 22201
Employment Information 703-358-3500
Job Line 703-538-3363
TDD (hearing impaired only) 703-284-5521
Equal Opportunity Employer
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Oct 9, 1989
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Arts & Entertainment
HERITAGE AND ART: The last U.S. engagement of a traveling exhibit of work by 19th century Spanish painter Joaquin Sorolla coincides with this week’s celebration of the 497th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the Americas and the nation’s ongoing celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month.
Organized jointly by the San Diego Museum of Art and the Instituto Valenciano de Arte Moderno of Valencia, Spain, the exhibit Joaquin Sorolla: Painter of Light opened this spring at the IBM Gallery of Science and Art in New York, eight decades after the painter’s last major exhibit in the United States and 66 years after his death. After visiting the St. Louis Museum of Art in the summer, the show arrived in San Diego this fall, where it continues on view through Oct. 29.
After its San Diego engagement, the show travels to Valencia.
Exhibits by various Latino artists continue on view this month through the nation. Among them:
• One Hundred Years of Uruguayan Art, at New York’s Venezuelan Art Center through Oct. 13.
• La tierra: visiones de LatinoamGrica, a showing by 10 Latin American artists at New York’s Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art through Nov. 6.
• Chile from Within, a photographic exhibit, and Arpilleras: The Chilean Murals of Today, a showing of needlework, continue at San Diego’s Mandeville Gallery through Oct. 15. Both showings are thematically tied to Chile’s "disappeared ones."
• Six Artists from Buenos Aires, at Galerfa Ruth Benzacar in Washington, D.C., through Oct. 27.
REVIVING RANCHERA: A "modern ranchero musical" play premieres in Los Angeles this week. Del rancho a la ciudad - or Heavy Nopal - honors Lucha Reyes, a Mexican singer of the ’30s and ’40s.
The show opens for a weekend run Oct. 12 at the Teatro Blanquita.
THE TIME IS NOW: Novels, short stories, poetry, plays and essays - in Spanish -will be accepted until Oct. 12 for the fourth annual Letras de Oro contest. Deadline is Oct. 12.
For information contact Letras de Oro, International Studies, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Fla. 33124 (305) 284-3266.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
AUTUMN READING LIST: Following are some of the latest titles for readers interested in books by and about Hispanics:
A GIFT OF HOPE, by Tony Melendez (Harper & Row Publishers Inc., 10 E. 53rd St., New York, N.Y. 10022), 170 pp., $13.95 hardcover.
This is the autobiography of a young Nicaraguan American who was one of thousands of babies victimized by thalidomide, a drug prescribed to his mother during pregnancy that caused him to be born without arms and with a deformed leg and foot. It chronicles his struggle to overcome his handicap and master playing the guitar with his feet. A highlight is his performance for Pope John Paul II.
AZTLAN, edited by Rudolfo Anaya and Francisco Lomelf (University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, N.M. 87131), 248 pp., $12 paperbound.
This collection of essays examines the concept of Aztlan as a symbol of the total libera-
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service inc.
1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or (202) 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: F6lix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith.
Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $108 T rial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
tion of Chicanos and as a mythical region where racial injustice, poverty and old age have been banished forever. The essays range from historical and anthropological explorations to interpretations of myth.
MAYA RESISTANCE TO SPANISH RULE, by Grant Jones (University of New Mexico Press), 400 pp., $39.50 hardcover.
This book explores the Maya response to Spanish attempts to colonize their lands during the 16th and 17th centuries. It examines alternating periods of widespread native rebellion and partial submission, and other responses to colonial rule.
THE BELL OF DAWN, by Ernesto Dfaz Rodriguez (Of Human Rights, Box 2160, Hoya Station, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. 20057), 91 pp. $11 paperbound.
This bilingual volume is a compilation of poems for children written by a Cuban political prisoner serving a 40-year sentence in Havana after being accused of conspiring to overthrow Fidel Castro.
CHICANO WRITERS, edited by Francisco
Lomelf and Carl Shirley (Gale Research Inc., Book Tower, Detroit, Mich. 48226), 388 pp., $98 hardcover.
Volume 82 in the Dictionary of Literary Biography, this edition gathers 52 biographical and critical essays representing a cross section of authors who have contributed to Chi-cano literature. Each contains a chronological discussion of the author’s life and works to show the effect of one upon the other.
A HISTORY OF HISPANIC THEATRE IN THE UNITED STATES, by Nicolds Kanellos (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, T exas78713), 328 pp., $38 hardcover.
This book is the first study of Hispanic theater, starting with its origins in the mid-19th century until the beginning of World War II. It contains details about plays, authors, directors and theatrical circuits. The book is organized around the cities where Hispanic theater was active, including Los Angeles, San Antonio, New York, El Paso, Texas, Tucson, Ariz., and San Francisco.
- Danilo Alfaro
>NA$wmew today praised HUNGARY* OffcN-RoRDER TOUcy.
and pointed tom OF EAST CRRffANS To THE WEST**
..AS A RINGING YcTetoR LIBERTY AND ECONOMIC freedom
no word yet on when m as. \nhl
THROW 0?EN ITS BORDER WITH MEXICO
(c) 1989, Boston Globe Newspaper. Reprinted with permission of the Los Angeles Times Syndicate.


Full Text

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Making_ The News This Week Maria Vila, head of the Florida Department of Administration, will be nominated to be assistant secretary for administration for the Depart ment of Health and Human Services ... U.S. Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole presents to ErnestAiferez, an employee of the Small Business Administration, and 11 other federal employees with Presidential Awards for their contributions to their agencies and their communities despite physical impairments ... Philadelphia Mayor Wil son Goode reappoints Christine Torres-Matrullo as the only Hispanic on the city's nine-member board of education ... The California Senate Rules Committee appoints Antonia Hernandez, president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and William Melendez, vice president of the board of directors of California Literacy Volunteers, to the state Workforce Literacy Task Force ... U.S. Reps. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), Ileana Ros-Lehtlnen (R Fia.) and Solom6n0rtiz (D-Texas) vote in favor of a cut in the capital gains tax rate. Characterized as a gift to the rich by its opponents and a spur to the economy by its advocates, the cut passed the House ... Fiorida state police arrest Miamian Luis Mireles, 30. He is suspected of planning to assassinate Gov. Bob Martinez ... Former House Majority Whip Tony Coelho announces he will join the New York investment bank Wertheim Schroder & Co. as a managing director ad vising major corporations. Coelho resigned earlier this year from Con gress over financial misdealings ... The White House announces Adis Latinos suffer from higher rates of diseases among non-Hispanic white males. Philip Morris and Anheuser-Busch were the related to alcohol, tobacco and junk-food "If there's one product I'd want off the market second and third largest advertisers in products, because they are heavily targeted by and out of Hispanic households, it's tobacco," Hispanic media in 1988. manufacturers of those products, according to Jane Delgado, executive director of the NationThe report stated that billboards advertising a report released Oct. 3. But many national al Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Seralcohol and cigarettes have "saturated" low-inHispanic organizations are reluctant to combat vices Organizations, come, black and Latino neighborhoods and the problems because of the funding they told Weekly Report. that the beer industry advertises "heavily" on receive from the industries, it concluded. "If placed on the Spanish-language radio and television staWhile national data on Hispanic alcoholism market today,, it tions. It added that Hispanic publications are lacking, the report, "Marketing Disease to would not rece1ve "would shrink in size or even fold without adHispanics," by the Washington, D.C.-based FDA approval." vertising from the alcohol and tobacco inCenter for Science in the Public Interest, cited Jesse Aguirre, vice dustries.'' a 1975 review of autopsies in Los Angeles be-president of cor-Manuel Tore, president of the National Astween 1918-1970 showing that 52% of all porate relations for sociation of Hispanic Publications, told WeekMexican American male deaths between ages Anheuser-Busch, ly Report he estimated that cigarette and 30-60 were alcohol-related. This compared said the findings in alcohol advertising account for approximately with 24% for non-Hispanic white males. AGUIRRE . the report were "to4% of ad revenues in Hispanic print media . . report •totally unsubtant1ated' t II b t . . . . ' A national study of Hispamc lung-cancer rates . a Y u n s u .s anpo1nt1ng out that the share of 1ts does not exist, according to the report. It cited t1ated. The charge these In revenue comes from local businesses. a study by the Colorado Tumor Registry showof themselves cause disease IS ndlculous. "Alcohol and tobacco companies, without ing Hispanic male lung cancer increasing Massive advertising campaigns directed at question, target the Hispanic community with the Hispanic community exacerbate existing advertising campaigns," said Carlos Molina, health problems by glamorizing the use of alpresident of the Latino caucus of the American cohol and cigarettes, especially among Public Health Association and a board mem children, according to the study. ber of Center for Science. "And if there's any Senate Votes to Cut SL.JAG Three weeks after President Bush's proposal to finance the war on drugs with $320 million taken from the $900 million program that provides newly legalized im migrants with educational services, basic health care and public assistance, the U.S. Senate voted Sept. 26 to cut $550 million from the beleaguered program. The amendment to cut the program 61% was attached to the appropriations bill for the Health and Human Services and Labor departments. The program, called State Legalization Impact Assistance Grants, is seen as easy prey because of its surplus. States and immigrant advocates argue the surplus is a result of lag time between when the services are provided and when the states are reimbursed. SLIAG was mandated by the 1986 im migration act. Sens. Pete Wilson (A-Calif.) and Bob Graham (D-Fia ) . , in an attempt to restore the proposed SLIAG cut, reinstated the funds through an amendment in the Labor and Health and Human Services ap propriations bill for 1991. Philip Morris spokesperson Steve Weiss doubt that advertising influences behavior, responded, saying, "It is reprehensible at best why would these companies spend so much and absolutely racist at worst to say that money on our community?" Hispanics are less capable of deciding if they 1 n addition to targeting Hispanics with adverwant to smoke than white men." tising, the report stated that alcohol, cigarette continued on page 2 Senate Axes Undocumenteds from Census Reacting to what it says would be the unfair redistribution of congressional seats, the U.S. Senate voted Sept. 29 to bar the Census Bureau from counting undocumented immigrants. The Senate voted to prohibit the census count, on a voice vote, through an amendment attached to the $17.3 billion appropriations bill for the State, Justice and Commerce depart ments. The chamber took the action despite the Bush administration's position that it is uncon stitutional. In addition to shaping congressional redistricting, census results are used by the federal government to allot monies to states and cities. Referring to the phrase in the Constitution that says every person shall be counted, Arturo Vargas, coordinator of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund's census outreach program, said, "The senators seem to think the Constitution is on a word processor-where it can be deleted and changed." The appropriations bill now goes to con ference committee with the House. Hispanics and the administration are hopeful the amend ment will be killed there. If not, Bush is ex pected to veto the bill.

PAGE 2

Court Rules Tex. School Finance System Unconstitutional Byt=e/ixPetez ranges $20,000 to $14 million, or from "What this decision means is that maybe we'll have a fair system for the first time in (Texas) history,,._ said AI Kaufman, MALDEF's lead attorney in the case. The suit was initiated by San Antonio's Edgewood School District and its superintendent, James Vasquez. Texas' system of financing its schools less than $2,100 to $19,300 per student an deprives students from economically disadnually. vantaged districts of an equal education, the The state's 50 poorest districts are 95% state's Supreme Court ruled Oct. 2 when it Mexican American. overturned a state appellate court decision. Texas school districts are responsible for Filed in 1984 by the Mexican American 49% of their budgets and the state 43%. The Legal Defense and Educational Fund, remaining 8% comes from federal and other Kaufman said the ruling will affect some one million students. Roughly 200-300 of Texas' 1, 060 school districts are considered proper ty-wealth poor. Edgewood vs. Kirby cha . llenged a funding forsources. mula whereby districts with little property The court ruled, 9-0, that the current financ wealth have considerably less in resources ing system violates the students' right under than those districts that are property rich. the state constitution to an efficient and equal Texas has until May to put a new formula into effect. School district property wealth per student education. Report Says Firms Co-opt Latino Groups N.M. Health Care Officials Ask for Forms in Spanish continued from page 1 . and junk-food companies annually give at least $1 million to Latino groups in grants and conference sponsorships, wit h the bulk com ing from alcohol and tobacco. .. Nothing to me is as vicious as a tobacco company,.. said Delgado. ..If someone sold suicide pills, would you allow them to exhibit at your conference? .. COSSMHO has never ac cepted contributions from cigarette companies and recently stopped accepting alcohol money as well, said Delgado. Aguirre said his company gives at least $2 million yearly to Hispanic organizations. Antonia Hernandez, president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said 3% of her organization's $4 million budget comes from alcohol and tobacco con cerns ... All the money we receive from every source comes with no strings attached ... Susan Herrera, vice president of administra tion and finance for the National Council of La Raza, said many Hispanic organizations are forced to turn to alcohol and cigarette manufacturers for support, because other cor porations are not as generous. "If taking this money is going to compromise an organization's mission, they should not take it, .. Herrera said ... But we cannot be about the business of judging corporate America's morality ... She added that 1% of La Raza's $4 million annual budget comes from cigarette and alcohol companies . Jose Garcia De Lara, president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, said alcohol and cigarette company grants account for 25% of his organization's $500,000 annual budget. .. I do not believe that our organization is going to be compromised by not going against those so-called evils because they donate to us ... He conceded that Hispanic organizations need to develop other avenues of support. Among the report's recommendations: • restrict the number of liquor stores and al cohol and tobacco billboards in Hispanic neighborhoods. • greatly increase support of Hispanic civic groups by non-disease promoting businesses. By Rhonda Smith Two directors of health care service organiza tions testified before a New Mexico state legis lative committee Sept. 25 in Las Cruces that Medicaid services for Spanish speakers w er e delayed because the forms were in English . Mary Vane, director of La Clinica de Familia, added that the Human Services Department has .. made no effort to make anything bilingual. The lag and the insensitivity to getting this ap plication properly updated has been very dis. couraging ... Debra Orozco, director of the Southern Area Health Education Center, said because many Medicaid applicants in this border town 300 miles south of Santa Fe spoke Spanish and only limited English, the applications should be printed in both languages. Austin Drops Bilingual Ed Teacher Stipend One of the committee members who heard the testimony, Rep. Paul Sandoval, said the final decision on whether the applications can be printed bilingually rests with Alex Valdez, the secretary of the Human Services Department. "He has been very receptive to having the ap plications provided in Spanish as well as English . " Despite a lawsuit filed by a teachers' union, the Austin (Texas) Independent School District's Board of Trustees voted 4-3 Sept. 25 against reinstating a $1,500 stipend this year for bilingual education teachers. Adrienne Segal, president of the Austin Federation of Teachers, said the decision to do away with the stipend was motivated by "racism." Segal, whose union filed the lawsuit Sept. 8, said, "There are some people on the Board of Trustees who just of kind of got it in their heads that they (bilingual education teachers) don't deserve the stipend." Deborah Bay, communications director for the district, called the move a "budgetary decision." The stipend was eliminated by the trustees Aug. 1 0 when it voted on the district's budget for this year. Because it is illegal for public employees to strike in Texas, the 330 teachers affected must teach through the academic year or face possible suspension of their teaching certificates. 2 The district gave all teachers a 3% pay raise this year. The suit asks that bilingual teachers be paid at least as much as they earned last year or their current salary plus the stipend. The committee will meet in November to dis cuss the issue further, if necessary. Idahoans Push for Probe of U.S. Attorney Representatives from Idaho Hispanic oroffer statistics on arrests of Latinos on drug ganizations are seeking to enlist the support charges. of national Latino organizations to call for an Saying the report deals in generalizations, investigation of the U.S. attorney for Idaho. Humberto Fuentes, director of Idaho Migrant The groups are incensed over a memo Council in Caldwell, said Ellsworth is "trying penned by the attorney, Maurice Ellsworth, to jump on the bandwagon of the Bush that said Hispanic Idahoans were the major administration's war on drugs by using the cause for increased drug trafficking in the Hispanic community." state. Fuentes said he is working with Image of In the 25-30 page memo, written in August Idaho and the Canyon County Hispanic and leaked Sept. 18, Ellsworth listed several Political Awareness Committee to get sup groups, including Hispanics, motorcycl_ e port from national Hispanic groups to launch gangs and marijuana growers, he said were an investigation by the U.S. Justice Departmajor sources of illegal drugs. ment. "To date, most drug arrests in Idaho involve Ellsworth held a press conference Sept. 20 Hispanics" who are "organized along family to rebut charges that he was a racist and to lines," read the memo. The memo did not say he would not resign. Oct.9, 1989 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

PAGE 3

I I Miguel Perez Hugo's Winds of Change Although the winds of Hurricane Hugo are long gone from Puerto Rico, the destructive physical and psychological effects will linger for many years. They tell you it is too soon to bring politics into such a tragedy. But then Puerto Ricans can't help but wonder why the federal government took so long in sending relief assistance. If it wasn't politics, was it discrimination? They tell you it took the feds several days to get to Puerto Rico and only several hours to respond in South Carolina. They ask how the city and state of New York sent_relief planes before the feds. So far, the federal government's excuses have been weak. Officials claim that, because the San Juan airport was closed, it took the Federal Emergency Management Agency several days to get to the island and inspect the damage. "We are confused as to why Puerto Rico was not designated a disaster area as fast as South Carolina," says Tony Burgos, a for-PEREZ mer adviser to Gov. Mario Cuomo who has been working with a group that coordinated the relief sent from New York City and state. "Like I told some people in the federal government, I don't understand how some reporters from New York got to Puerto Rico on Saturday night, knowing that a hurricane was coming, and how FEMA couldn't do the same." THE ARCHIE BUNKERS MAY USE HUGO And so Hugo becomes a political issue--in Washington, Puerto Rico and New York, where the Archie Bunkers of the city are already asking why there is so much hoopla over Puerto Rico and not about South Carolina, "our own country." Hugo will become part of the debate started over the three political formulas that Puerto Ricans will consider in an upcoming plebiscite. Those who favor statehood are already saying the Hugo experience proves that if Puerto Rico were a state, it would have received relief much sooner. Those who support the present commonwealth status are saying relief may have been delayed because their leader, Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n, supported Michael Dukakis. But those who favor independence are saying Hugo proves the U.S. government doesn't care about Puerto Rican people. Even in New York, Hugo may become part of the political and racial debate. The Archie Bunkers may be tempted to use Hugo to fortify the myths and stereotypes that feed their warped minds. DON'T LET IT BE SAID ••. But don't let it be said that Puerto Ricans are asking for special treatment. As U.S. citizens, they only want the same kind of attention being given to the people of South Carolina. Let it not be said that Puerto Ricans are sitting back waiting for the government to pour in money. Without the assistance they deserve, they are still rebuilding houses into shacks so they can at least have a roof over their heads. Let it not be said Puerto Ricans are not capable of helping themselves. In one weekend, with the help of two telethons, one walkathon and various concerts, mainland Puerto Ricans raised some $3.2 million to rebuild their homeland. But the damage is estimated at$1 billion. Hugo's winds were so devastating and the political implications so profound, it led one San Juan columnist to observe that the history of Puerto Rico will now be divided into two parts: before Hugo and after Hugo. If this is true, then Puerto Ricans, the U.S. government, and even the Archie Bunkers of New York may get a fresh chance at building bridges that were blown away by the winds of Hugo, politics and ignorance. (Miguel Perez is a columnist with The New York Daily News.) Sin pelos en Ia /engua PACKAGES OF TWO: Wrigley says chew gum to double your pleasure. The National Association for Bilingual Education has Tshirts that invite companionship with, .. Bilingual, bicultural, and by myself." So what else come in pairs? CENTAVOS MALOS: Like bad pennies, Hispanic nemises Ha rold Ezell and William Bennett mouthed their ways back in the news this month. . Ezell, reports the Los Angeles limes' George Ramos, is unhappy because his successor as INS's Western regional commissioner, Ben Davidian, is maintaining too low a profile on the job. Ezell offered Davidian the unsolicited counsel: .. He has to show the public who he is and what he is." In his six-year ego trip, Ezell certainly did that. Davidian's response: .. I will not be seeking press advice from Mr. Ezell ... The agency needs all of the support it can get both from within and without." Meanwhile, Bennett tried to upstage George Bush at the presi dent's gigantic photo opportunity, the education summit, by char acterizing the private meetings between the administration and the governors as ''pap ... and stuff that rhymes with pap.'' White House Chief of Staff John Sununu immediately put drug czar Bennett (who never should have been allowed into the summit anyway) on notice that he is now on a White House list that is a synonym for his cute mystery word. . "Thanks for your comments," the White House press office quoted a Sununu reprimand to Bennett. "They weren't helpful." I suppose we should be happy that E&B are directing their polem ics at other than undocumented workers and Latino educators. But wouldn't it be nice for the whole nation if they'd just float away on their own bile? DOUBLE TROUBLE: Television programs with Latinos in lead ing roles are a rarity these days. Two Latinos at opposite ends of the country are wishing they were even more rare. Pedro Luis Estrada Jr., 25, a reputed narcotics trafficker on the FBI's "Ten Most Wanted" list, and Roberto Contras Urabez, 24, sought for the murder of his girlfriend and her brother, both were profiled on the hit TV show "America's Most Wanted." Following a tip from a viewer, Estrada was picked up in Harrisburg, Pa., Oct.1. The same day, Urabez, acomputeroperatorwho fled Washington, D.C., last January, surrendered to police in San Diego after seeing his alleged crime re-enacted on the national TV show. TWO-LIP TIME: Unemployed tileworker Fernando Gonzales, 39, and his 36-year -old wife, Karen, were declared winners Sept. 26 of the first Great American Kiss-Off. The event was staged in a Reno, Nev., furniture store parking lot. For 42 days, the Gonzaleses, parents of five, kissed from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., with allotted five-minute hourly breaks. For their affection, they won the deed to an Idaho time-share con dominium and a few thousand dollars. Ever the caballero, Fernando assured reporters when it was all over, "I'm still not tired of kissing her." Kay Barbaro Quoting ... SEN. THAD COCHRAN (A-Miss.), during Senate debate on counting undocumented immigrants in the 1990 census: "The bottom line is illegal aliens ought to be deported, not counted." Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Oct 9, 1989 3

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COLLECTING TOBACCO, ALCOHOL, JUNK FOOD, HISPANICS: "Marketing Disease to Hispanics" is a 100-page report that concludes health prob lems are increasing among Hispanics partly because of the massive marketing campaigns directed at them by alcohol, tobacco and junk food companies. The report documents the rising rate of diseases linked to these products. To order send $6.95 to the Center for Science in the Public Interest at 1501 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036, or call (202) 332-9110. IMPACT0-2000: "lmpacto-2000 and Mexico: A Plan of Acerca miento" is a 21-page draft plan on how to increase ties between Mexican Americans and Mexico in several areas, including commerce, education, tourism and the arts. To receive a free copy, send $5 to the Institute for Social Justice, lmpacto-2000, 350 W. Fifth St., Suite 206, San Bernardino, Calif. 92410 (714) 888-0207. TESTIMONY ON LATINO ELDERLY 1: . Carmela Lacayo, president of the Asociaci6n Nacional Pro Personas May ores, testified last month at a congressional hearing on Hispanic elderly. For a free copy of her 10page testimony, titled "The Hispanic Elderly: America's Failure to Care (The Cuban American Perspective)," contact theAsociaci6n at 272 W. Sixth St., Suite 270, Los Angeles, Calif. 90057 (213 ) 487-1922. TESTIMONY ON HISPANIC ELDERLY II: Suleika Cabrera Drinane, executive director of the lnstituto Puertorriqueno/Hispano Para Perso nas Mayores, also testified at the hearing. Her six-page testimony, "The Hispanic Elderly: America's Failure to Care, Part II," is available at no cost. To receive a copy, contact the lnstituto at 105 E. 22nd St., Room 615, New York, N.Y. 10010 (212) 677-4181. TESTIMONY ON HISPANIC ELDERLY Ill: Tomasa Gonzales Or dories, community liaison for the National Hispanic Council on Aging, presented testimony at the congressional hearing dealing with Mexican American elderly. The six-page "The Hispanic Elderly: America's Fail ure to Care, Part Ill" can be obtained by sending 45 to the National Council at 2713 Ontario Road NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 745-2521. TESTIMONY ON HISPANIC ELDERLY IV: Judith Kasper, associate director of The Commonwealth Fund Commission on Elderly People Living Alone, testified before the House Select Committee on Aging. Her 13-page testimony, "Poverty and Poor Health Among Elderly Hispanic Americans," can be obtained for free by contacting The Commonwealth Fund Commission at 624 W. Broadway, Baltimore, Md. 21205 (301) 955-2487. CONNECTING PROMOTING THE ARTS, CHILDREN Nine Hispanic arts organizations in New York City will share a $100,000 grant the city's Department of Cultural Affairs to help with a number of activities, New York Mayor Ed Koch has announced. The Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art will receive $20,000 for its collaborative effort with a bilingual/bicultural elementary school to expose the students to art. Receiving $15,000 are Ballet Hispanico , to open a studio, and Pregones, to help plan its Festival de Teatro Latino . International Arts Relations, the Association of Hispanic Arts, the Hastes Performing Arts Center and Reportorio Espana/ will each receive $10,000. En Foco and the Visual Arts Research and Resource Center Relating to the Caribbean will get $5,000. In Los Angeles, KCBS-TV has donated $10,000 to Para Los Niflos, a non-profit social service agency dedicated to decreasing child abuse and neglect. The money will go toward helping the agency's child care center, juvenile intervention project and family crisis center. SHORT-STORY CONTEST OPENS Hispanic magazine and Philip Morris Cos. have kicked off their 1989 Hispanic Short Story Contest. Open to all unpublished writers 18 years and older, the deadline for entries is Dec. 10. The winner will receive a $1,000 honorarium and have his or her submission published in the January/February issue of Hispanic magazine . Submissions, works of fiction on the U.S. Hispanic expe rience, must be no longer than 5,000 words. Entries should be sent to Hispanic-New Voices, 111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 410, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 682-9023. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, is named a fellow at the Institute of Politics at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. Yzaguirre will audit classes in business, law and political science from October through December ... Gracie Ia Nemes, a professor emeritus of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Maryland, College Park, receives the in stitution's highest honor, the President's Medal. Nemes was recog nized for her contributions to the campus' intellectual and cultural life ... Dr. Richard Krieg, acting commissioner of the Chicago Health De partment, names Alina Fernandez as director of Childhood Health Screening ... The Chicago Public Ubrary system opens a branch named after Rudy Lozano, the late Pilsen-Little Village leader who fought for improved educational and employment opportunities for local resi dents. Some 6,000 books were presented to the library by Mexico ... Calendar COMMUNICATIONS CONFERENCE Children's Project. TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be in cluded in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. THIS WEEK QUINCENTENNIAL SYMPOSIUM Santa Fe, N.M. Oct. 11-13 The University of New Mexico and the National Park Service are sponsoring an international sympo sium titled "Old World and New: New Mexico and the Columbus Quincentennial." The event will con sist of a series of speeches on topics such as Spanish colonialism and the founding of towns, and New Mexico art. Edwina Abrau (505) 766-87 43 4 Indianapolis Oct. 12 The Greater Indianapolis Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will conduct a communications seminar designed to help small-business owners better manage telecommunications and computers. Jose Cuevas (317) 252-1156 JOB FAIR Washington, D.C. Oct. 13, 14 The Washington Navy Yard Hispanic Heritage Month Committee is holding a job fair designed to increase Hispanic representation in the U.S. Navy. Civilian positions offered include professional, administrative, technical, clerical and blue collar. Shirley Curry (202) 433-6836 DINNER Los Angeles Oct. 14 The National Centerfor Immigrants' Rights will hold its third annual dinner as part of the American Immigration Lawyers' Association's West Coast training conference. Half the funds raised at the dinner will be used for NCIR's Immigrant/Refugee Oct 9, 1989 Peter Schey (213) 388-8693 DINNER Denver Oct. 14 The Latin American Research and Service Agency is holding a fund-raising dinner/dance to celebrate its silver anniversary. Entertainment will be provided by sa/sa group Conjunto Co/ores. Mat Sparling (303) 839-8300 COMING SOON HISPANIC LINK TRIBUTE National Association of Latino Elected and Ap pointed Officials Washington, D.C. Oct. 16 Mike Zamba (202) 546-2536 SPOTLIGHT The National Conference of Puerto Rican Women will hold its 17th annual conference Nov . 1 0-12 in Old Greenwich, Conn. In addition to work shops and panels, a special exhibit will highlight the outstanding efforts of Latinas who have sup ported and empowered others. For information contact Rosamelia de Ia Rocha at (202) 387-4716 . Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I carmen Abreu -John Aldrc 10 ooo Joanna cruz -Liliana D Joseph Fernandez -Josepj [a -Michele Gomez -Hec zalez -Elisa Granados ' tria Hernandez Mario J Lopez -David Lopez . -Melissa Marquez -tinez -Maria Mayfield 1tanez Moral scoso -Edgar Ochoa -Mary -Cla WHY YOU SHOULD = Sara Ramos -Leonard Ranaud N H sF -Rolando Reyes -Rebecca lia Rodriguez -Barbara Rodz na Rodriguez -Jose Rodrigu nd Rodriguez -Lucinda Romez , Jr. -Georgia Rubio -Ide inas -Auro Walter Schm shi ells Rc In the last thirteen years, the National Hispanic Scholarship ' -Laura To jillo stel Fund has awarded $6.4 million in scholarships to 10,000 urrabazo dez -Jaime deserving Hispanic-American students nationwide. a -saul va gas -Elisa Velez Rive gi 1 -Veron With the strong support from CFC individual contributors na Zamarripa no -Aurora and the corporate sector, NHSF has been able to make r Abreu Del ayo -Myrna the educational dreams of thousands of Hispanic-American 'flidalgo -Ju ial-Jorge students a reality. As expected, hundreds of these Rodriguezd r i gue z -E recipients are the sons and daughters of federal workers. Veronica Be asquillo J r Patrici a C s amuel coopE We encourage you to join the NHSF partnership which -Natalia D lliam Dwyer has proven to be very successful in the last decade. -Hec ras -Angel Become a part of NHSF's efforts at assisting a greater Franco Gamboa -ca number of deserving Hispanic-American scholars. Oesig-Olga Garcia Rebecca Gar; nate the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund on your res -Beatri Gomez -Cyn Combined Federal Campaign pledge. -Belinda G Francisco G tierrez -Le ez -Susie YOUR HELP IS NEEDED! 1Bernardo H josaPatr Hue a-;;,erq u .J.I.Jci.L c1. -Jeffrey J Jacquez R -Brenda Jo Leff -Mary National Hispanic Scholarship Fund Lopez -Jua Maria Lopez P.O. Box 748 Pamela Luce Joey Machad San Francisco, California 94101 -Willia ez -Antoni Jeffrey Magdalena Mencnaca -Brenaa Menaoza Bertna Meza Miranda -Dean of the College Office BROWN UNIVERSITY HUMANITIES FELLOWSHIPS Southwest Hispanic Research Institute University of New Mexico The Southwest Hispanic Research I nsti tute at the University of New Mexico an nounces the availability of two humanities fellowships for the 1990-91 academic year. The fellowships are made possible by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and provide for a $30,000 stipend plus $3,000 towards relocation costs and other benefits. Interested scholars are invited to submit research proposals on issues criti cal to an understanding of the Hispanic/ Chicano experience in the context of the changing Southwest. Eligibility criteria include an awarded doctorate in the humanities or related social sciences and ability to devote full time to a research project dJring the residency period. For proposal guidelines write to: Southwest Hispanic Research Institute University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 Deadline for submission of proposals: December 15, 1989. HELP! #0443 Assistant/Associate Dean & Director Third World Center Twelve-month position, beginning 211/90 or no later than 711/90. Responsibilities as Assistant/Associate Dean of the College: Academic advising, administration of various programs, coordination of the Minority Peer Counselors Program and Third World Transition Program, planning and coordination of programs on issues of racism, diversity, pluralism, and community. National Image Inc. needs your contri bution to provide support to Hispanic Ameri cans in the areas of Education, Employment and Civil Rights. Responsibilities as Director of Third World Center: Sponsor academic programs and activities, provide advice and assistance to Third World student organizations and the Center's outreach program, chair the Third World Advisory Council. Master's degree required, Ph.D. preferred; at least 2 yrs. academic and/or administrative experience; counseling experience; demonstrated ability to work with and serve the interests of diverse minority populations. Ability to work effectively with students, faculty, and staff. Candidates should have a commitment to the philosophy and goals of the Brown Beginning salary commensurate with qualifications and experience. Submit letter of application, resume, and 3/etters of reference to Ruth Oppenheim, Brown University, Box 1828, Providence, Rl 02912 by 11/17189. Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. :1 BROWN UNIVERSITY ..a NATIONAL 'lll&f:f!c :It ... 810 First Street NE Third Floor Washington, D. C. 20002 WeAre • The Largest Pan Hispanic Organization. • A source of scholarships, technical assistance, train ing and leadership. • Open to all persons who support equality of opportunity in education, employ ment and civil rights for Hispanic Americans. Please designate #0443, National Image Inc. for your gift to the Combined Federal Cam-. pa1gn. Hispanic Link Weekly Report Oct9, 1989 .. . : : : : : . . : . ,,,,,,, . :; : . ' . . : : :. : '. ,:::.::!: ' !]!]( : : . . . . : : . : . ' ' : H:\ i ;. , . i : . : . . / . . : . . . : l : . ,' . . . : : ; : . : : ' . 5 . . : . '•

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6 I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I SOUTHWEST TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY ANTICIPATED TENURE-TRACK FACUL TV POSITIONS FALL 1990 Chair, Department of Accounting: Associate or Full Professor. Closing date: January 15, 1990. Chair, Department of Biology: Associate or Full Professor. Closing date: January 15, 1990. Chair, Department of Home Economics: Associate or Full Professor. Closing date: February 1 , 1990. Chair, Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation: Associate or Full Professor. Closing date: December 1 , 1989. Chair, Department of Sociology/Anthropology: Associate or Full Professor. Closing date: Undetermined, contact Dr. Robert Fischer, Department of Modern Languages. Accounting: Assistant or Associate Professor. Closing date: January.1, 1990. Agriculture: Assistant or Associate Professor (Animal Science). Closing date: November 10, 1989. Art: Assistant Professor. Closing Date: February 2, 1990. Biology: Assistant Professor (Structural Botany). Closing date: December 15, 1989. Computer Science: Assistant Professor. Closing date: March 1, 1990. Curriculum & Instruction: Two positions in reading, both Assistant Professor. Closing date: December 7, 1989. Educational Administration and Psychological Services: Assistant Professor (Developmental Education). Closing date: December 1, 1989. Assistant or Associate Professor (Educational Administration). Closing date: November 22, 1989. English: Assistant Professor. Closing date: November 15, 1989. Finance and Economics: Assistant or Associate Professor in Finance. Assistant Professor in Economics. Closing date: December 1, 1989. Health Administration: Assistant Professor (Health Care Planning). Closing date: February 28, 1990. Health, Physical Education and Recreation: Two positions, both Assistant Professor (Recreational Administration). Closing date: January 20, 1990. History: Two positions, both Assistant Professor. Closing date: October 20, 1989. Home Economics: Two positions, Assistant or Associate Professor, and Assistant Profes sor (both Fashion Merchandising). Closing date: February 1, 1990. Management and Marketing: Assistant Professor (Business Policy). Closing date: January 1, 1990. Modern Languages: Assistant Professor. Closing date: November 15, 1989. Political Science: Three positions, Assistant Professor. Closing date: November 15, 1989. Sociology I Anthropology: Assistant Professor. Closing date: January 15, 1990. Although no tenure-track vacancies are anticipated in other areas, applications are welcome for consideration for temporary appointments. The University continues to seek applications in the departments listed above as well as in the departments of Accounting, Allied Health Sciences, Biology (three positions), Chemistry, Computer Information Sys tems and Administrative Sciences, Criminal Justice, Geography and Planning, Journalism, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Psychology, Speech Communications, Technology and Theater Arts. For more information please contact the appropriate department, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666. The University reserves the right not to proceed with any appointments for financial or programmatic reasons. An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer Oct 9, 1989 . ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS National Council of La Raza National Hispanic Organization seeks Ad ministrative Assistants. Good organizational skills needed, plus ability to work independ ently. Typing and/or word processing skills necessary; familiarity with database preferred. Salary approximately $17,000, negotiable, depending on experience. Bilingual English/ Spanish preferred. Please contact: Charles Kamasaki, National CouncilofLaRaza, 810FirstSt. NE, Suite300 Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 289-1380. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR POLITICAL SCIENCE Hayward, Calif. Tenure-Track Assistant Professor of Politi cal Science specializing in public law and American government, beginning Septem ber 1990. Must have Ph.D. Send resume and three letters of recom mendation to: Dr. Emily Stoper, Chair, Politi cal Science Department, California State University, Hayward, Hayward, Calif. 94542. Deadline: December 1, 1989. Position #90-91 POSC-TI-1. An Affirmative Action/Equal Employment CHRISTMAS WITH A HISPANIC FLAVOR Do you have a product with a Hispanic flavor that Weekly Report readers could send to friends, family or business asso ciates as gifts this Christmas? Posters...Aibums... Tapes... Cookbooks ... Greeting Cards ... Holiday Food Packages ... Paintings ... Books ... Theme T-Shirts ... Arts or Crafts ... Magazine Subscriptions ... Toys ... Jewelry ... Guayaberas ... Fashions ... Religious ltems .•. Gifts that share the joy and warmth of Ia cultura latina? Weekly Report's first "Holiday Market place" product advertisement page will appear Oct. 30, 1989, to allow our readers time to place their Christmas orders with you. To introduce this feature, our 1989 rates are more than reasonable. For prices and details, drop a note or call: Carlos Erick san-Mendoza, Marketing Manager, His panic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone: (202) 234-0737. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS The following positions are with the University of Arizona. COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT The Department of Psychology at the University of Arizona is seeking applica tions for a tenure-track appointment at the Assistant or Associate Professor level, beginning fall 1990. A particular interest in the area of conceptual or semantic development is preferred, although other areas of specialization within cognitive development will be considered. Candi dates must show evidence of a strong ongoing program of research as well as interest in teaching at the graduate levels. Applications from women and minority candidates are especially encouraged. Interested candidates should send vitae, letter of interest, selected reprints, and three letters of reference to: Rosemary A. Rosser, Chair Cognitive Development Search Committee Department of Psychology The University of Arizona Tucson, Ariz. 85721 Deadline for receipt of applications is January 15, 1990. SOCIAL/PERSONALITY The Department of Psychology at the University of Arizona is seeking candi dates for an Assistant/early Associate Professor position (tenure track), begin ning in fall1990. Candidates must show evidence of a strong ongoing program of research in the Social/Personality area and must have a strong background in both traditional and contemporary ap proaches to the study of personality. Primary teaching responsibilities will be in the Social/Personality area, but prefer ence will be given to applicants who are well suited to teach large sections of in troductory psychology. Applications from women and minority candidates are especially encouraged. Interested candidates should send vitae, letter of interest, selected reprints, and three letters of reference to: Hal Arkowitz, Chair Search Committee for Social/Personality Department of Psychology The University of Arizona Tucson, Ariz. 85721 Deadline for receipt of applications is December 1, 1989. The University of Arizona is an Affirma tive Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Hispanic Link Weekly Report ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT and DIRECTOR OF AFFIRMATIVE ACTION The University of Toledo invites applications and nominations for the position of Assistant to the President and Director of Affirmative Action. Founded in 1872, the University of Toledo has been a member of University system of the State of Ohio since 1967. It is also a member of the National Asso ciation of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges. The University of Toledo has an enrollment of 22,800 undergraduate and graduate students and employs approximately 1 ,200 full-time and part-time faculty members. The University consists of seven degree-granting colleges (Arts & Sciences, Business Admini stfation, Education, Engineering, Law, Pharmacy and University College), a. Graduate School which grants doctorates in 21 disciplines and the College of Law, a Community and Technical College located at the Scott Park Campus and a Division of Continuing Education. Its 21 0-acre Bancroft Campus is located in a pleasant residential area on the western edge of the city of Toledo. It also has a convocation facility that is part of a recently completed convention center in d9wntown Toledo. The Assistant to the President and Director of Affirmative Action reports directly to the President and is responsible for working with all Colleges, departments and divisions of the University to ensure compliance with affirmative action and equal opportunity regulations. The Director shall encourage compliance with the spirit and law of equal employment and affirmative action. This will include reviewing and directing compliance training and programs. The Director shall also perform other duties as assigned by the President. Professional requirements include an earned doctorate, faculty experience pre ferred and prior knowledge and experience with affirmative action policies and programs. Salary and fringe benefits are competitive. The position will remain open until filled. The Search Committee will begin its review of applications on November 30, 1989. In order to assure full considera tion, nominations and applications should be received before that date. Interested persons should submit a letter indicating an interest in the position, a complete resume and the names, addresses and telephone numbers of at least five references. Nominations and applications should be addressed to: Dr. James E. Todd The University of Toledo 2801 W. Bancroft St. Toledo, Ohio 43606 The University of Toledo is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Arlington County Personnel Office 2100 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 511 Arlington, VA 22201 Employment Information Job Une TOO (hearing impaired only) Equa• Opportunity Employer Oct 9, 1989 703-358-3500 703-538-3363 703-284-5521 I 7

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Arts & Entertainment • La tierra: visiones de Latinoamerica, a showing by 1 0 Latin American artists at New York's Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art through Nov. 6. HERITAGE AND ART: The last U.S. engagement of a traveling exhibit of work by 19th century Spanish painter Joaquin Sorolla coincides with this week's celebration of the 497th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' arrival in the Americas and the nation's ongoing celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month. • Chile from Within, a photographic exhibit, and Arpilleras: The Chilean Murals of Today, a showing of needlework, continue at San Diego's Mandeville Gallery through Oct. 15. Both showings are thematically tied to Chile's "disappeared ones." Organized jointly by the San Diego Museum of Art and the lnstituto Valenciano de Arte Moderno of Valencia, Spain, the exhibit Joaquin Sorolla: Painter of Light opened this spring at the IBM Gallery of Science and Art in New York, eight decades after the painter's last major exhibit in the United States and 66 years after his death. After visiting the St. Louis Museum of Art in the summer, the show arrived in San Diego this fall, where it continues on view through Oct. 29. • Six Artists from Buenos Aires, at Galerfa Ruth Benzacar in Wash ington, D.C., through Oct. 27. REVIVING RANCHERA: A "modern ranchero musical" play pre mieres in Los Angeles this week. Del rancho a Ia ciudad --or Heavy Nopal --honors Lucha Reyes, a Mexican singer of the '30s and '40s. The show opens for a weekend run Oct. 12 at the Teatro Blanquita. THE TIME IS NOW: Novels, short stories, poetry, plays and essays -in Spanish --will be accepted until Oct. 12 for the fourth annual Letras de Oro contest. Deadline is Oct. 12. After its San Diego engagement, the show travels to Valencia. Exhibits by various Latino artists continue on view this month through the nation. Among them: • One Hundred Years of Uruguayan Art, at New York's Venezuelan Art Center through Oct. 13. For information contact Letras de Oro, International Studies, Univer sity of Miami, Coral Gables, Fla. 33124 (305) 284-3266. Media Report AUTUMN READING LIST: Following are some of the latest titles for readers interested in books by and about Hispanics: A GIFT OF HOPE, by Tony Melendez (Harper & Row Publishers Inc., 10 E. 53rd St., New York, N.Y. 10022), 170 pp., $13.95 hardcover. This is the autobiography of a young Nica raguan American who was one of thousands of babies victimized by thalidomide, a drug prescribed to his mother during pregnancy that caused him to be born without arms and with a deformed leg and foot. It chronicles his struggle to overcome his handicap and master playing the guitar with his feet. A highlight is his performance for Pope John Paul II. AZTLAN, edited by Rudolfo Anaya and Fran cisco Lomelf (University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, N.M. 87131), 248 pp., $12 paperbound. This collection of essays examines the concept of Aztlan as a symbol of the total Iibera-HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or (202) 234-Q737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED$: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. tion of Chicanos and as a mythical region where racial injustice, poverty and old age have been banished forever. The essays range from historical and anthropological explora tions to interpretations of myth. MAYA RESISTANCE TO SPANISH RULE, by Grant Jones (University of New Mexico Press), 400 pp., $39.50 hardcover. This book explores the Maya response to Spanish attempts to colonize their lands dur ing the 16th and 17th centuries. It examines alternating periods of widespread native re bellion and partial submission, and other re sponses to colonial rule. THE BELL OF DAWN, by Ernesto Dfaz Rodriguez (Of Human Rights, Box 2160, Hoya Station, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. 20057), 91 pp. $11 paperbound. This bilingual volume is a compilation of poems for children written by a Cuban politi cal prisoner serving a 40-year sentence in Havana after being accused of conspiring to overthrow Fidel Castro. CHICANO WRITERS, edited by Francisco "\JN6Al2Y'S Ofat fOUcy," , .. AS 1\ {l.\N6\NG VO\E fo(l E.CONOM\G -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Lomelf and Carl Shirley (Gale Research Inc., Book Tower, Detroit, Mich. 48226), 388 pp., $98 hardcover. Volume 82 in the Dictionary of Literary Biog raphy, this edition . gathers 52 and critical essays representing a cross sec tion of authors who have contributed to Chi cano literature. Each contains a chronologi cal discussion of the author's life and works to show the effect of one upon the other. A HISTORY OF HISPANIC THEATRE IN THE UNITED STATES, by Nicolas Kanellos (University of Texas Press, P . . O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas78713), 328 pp., $38 hardcover. This book is the first study of Hispanic . theater, starting with its origins in the mid-19th century until the beginning of World War II. It contains details about plays, authors, direc:. tors and theatrical circuits. The book is organ ized around the cities where Hispanic theater was active, including Los Angeles, San Anto nio, New York, El Paso, Texas, Tucson, Ariz., and San Francisco. -Danilo Alfaro ... AND f0\N$t> To 11\E. OF ,.o 1t\E WESf, .. NO 'iE't oN 'lf\\E.N 1\\E. \RILL 1\\tzoW ot'N \\S. 'li\'t\\ M@ .. : DO DO DO t DO (c) 1989, Boston Globe Newspaper. Reprinted with permission of the Los Angeles Times Syndicate.