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Hispanic link weekly report, October 16, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 16, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
President Bush presents the award for minority small business person of the year to Latina Teresa McBride at a White House ceremony. McBride, 25, of Albuquerque, N.M., founded a retail consumer electronics business in 1985 that generates $8.6 million in annual sales...The California Department of Motor Vehicles revokes the driver’s license of State Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) because he refused to submit to tests to determine his blood alcohol level after being arrested for drunk driving by Sacramento police officers. Torres was on probation for an earlier drunken driving conviction...After five days deliberation, a Los Angeles jury recommends the death sentence for devil worshiping “Night Stalker” Richard Ramirez. The El
Paso, Texas, drifter was convicted of 13 murders and 30 related felonies committed in Southern California in 1984-85...Pat Baca and Louis Saavedra emerge as the top two candidates for mayor of Albuquerque, N.M., after outpolling seven other candidates in the nonpartisan primary...As part of Hispanic Heritage Month, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management in Washington, D.C., presents achievement awards to Marfa Mercedes Olivieri, national Hispanic employment manager, General Accounting Office; Frank Elizondo, recruitment officer, Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and Hilda Reyes, program analyst, Internal RevenueService...Talk-show host Geraldo Rivera pledges to pay for the college educations of 24 junior high school students in Spanish Harlem, N.Y...A gun-wielding ninth-grader in Anaheim, Calif., shoots and wounds fellow student Mark L6pez, 15, during an hourlong classroom hostage drama...

Latinos Tally 25% of U.S. Growth
Court Orders Change In Tex. Judicial Races
By Danilo Alfaro
A U.S. District Court judge in Texas ruled Sept. 28 that the state’s 13th District Court of Appeals, which has jurisdiction over20 counties in South Texas, must switch from at-large to single-district voting when electing judges.
Of the six judges currently serving on the court, none are Hispanic. The region covered by the court is approximately 50% Latino.
“It was a very good ruling,” Rolando Rios, an attorney for the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project in San Antonio, told Weekly Report, “it allows the opportunity to go after many other election structures in a system that discriminates against Hispan-ics.”
The state was given 10 days to appeal the decision. Attorney General Jim Mattox speculated that the legislature might be given the opportunity to devise its own single-district voting system during a special session next month.
State Supreme Court Justice Tom Phillips said he would approve of having at least some judges elected through a modified singledistrict system.
L.A.’s Diario Shuts Down
After filing for bankruptcy last month, Span-ish-language daily El Diario de Los Angeles has ceased publication, the newspaper’s attorney announced Oct. 10.
Despite last-ditch attempts to raise cash, including a fund-raising campaign aimed at the newspaper’s readers, El Diario published its final issue Oct. 7. “The paper was undercapitalized, and they ran out of money,” said attorney Jos6 Castillo.
Founded in May 1987 by Mexico’s Jos6 Becerra, the paper had a circulation of30,000 and was the third largest Spanish-language daily in Los Angeles. Castillo said the owners, Inmobiliarfa America Latina Inc., hope to revive the newspaper.
Hispanics accounted for 25% of all population growth in the United States in the 12-month period ending this March, according to a report released by the U.S. Census Bureau Oct. 12.
While the overall population grew from 241.1 million in March 1988to 243.7 million in March of this year, Hispanics in the continental United States increased from 19.4 million to 20.1 million. More specifically, there were 645,000 more Hispanics at the end of the time period.
From 1980to 1989, the Hispanic population surged 39%. Growth rateforthe non-Hispanic population was 7.5%, stated the report. As of last year, Hispanics comprised 8.2% of the total U.S. population.
Mexican Americans, who make up two-thirds of Hispanics, accounted for 71% of Latino growth between March 1988 and March 1989. They saw their numbers rise to nearly 12.6 million from 12.1 million over the 12 months. Puerto Ricans, on the other hand,
experienced a decline, stated the report. They dropped from 2.5 million to 2.3 million, a decrease of 6%.
In terms of percentage increase, Latinos of Central and South American origin had the largest. Standing at more than 2.5 million in March of ’89, their numbers were up 13% from 12 months earlier.
Latinos of Central and South American ancestry had the largest percentage increase since 1982. They grew 67%, from 1.5 million to 2.5 million. “Other Hispanics” - persons from Spain or those who describe themselves as Hispanic, Spanish or Latino - had the second largest jump at 31%. Mexican Americans were next, having increased 30% since 1982.
Hispanics increased 39% since 1980. At the beginning of the decade there were 14.4 million. That number shot up some 5.6 million this year. The report attributed about half of this growth to immigration.
Latino Subgroup Populations ~ March ’88, March ’89
(numbers in thousands)
Cent., South Cuban Mexican Other Puerto Total
American American American Hispanic Rican* Hispanic
March ’88 2,242 1,035 12,110 1,573 2,471 19,431
March ’89 2,345 1,068 12,567 1,567 2,328 20,076
^Includes mainland Puerto Ricans only
Source: Census Bureau report, Oct 12
Caucus Pushes for Higher Ed Bill Support
The Congressional Hispanic Caucus sent a letter Oct. 11 to President Bush urging him to endorse legislation that would provide $70 million in federal assistance to approximately 100 colleges and universities nationwide with student enrollments that are at least 25% Hispanic.
The bill, introduced Sept. 28 by U.S. Sens. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) and Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.), is identical to one sponsored in the House by Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) in March. The Hispanic Association of Col-
leges and Universities, which has 50 member-institutions that are at least 25% Latino, assisted the staffs of Bentsen and Bingaman in drafting the legislation.
The funds would be provided on acompeti-tive basis for recruiting, tutoring, counseling and dropout prevention. The bill stipulates that participating two-year institutions reserve 25% of theirfundingto assist graduates in obtaining a bachelor’s degree. Four-year institutions would reserve an equal amount to recruit graduates of two-year schools.


N.J. Cites Failure, Takes Control of Jersey City Schools
By Danilo Alfaro
Citing "total educational failure" in Jersey City’s public schools, the New Jersey Board of Education voted Oct. 4 to have the state take control of the troubled school district.
The 15-0 vote made New Jersey the first state to seize control of a financially solvent school district. The move came after a five-year review that concluded the district was ravaged by political patronage and nepotism, poor management, fiscal disorder and a lack of commitment to educational achievement by its students. The district has 28,000 students, 34% of whom are Hispanic and
44% black.
The New Jersey order dissolved the nine-member school board, the positions of superintendent and other top administrators. It created the position of state superintendent to operate the district with complete control for five years, and named Essex County, N.J., Superintendent of Schools Elena Scambio, a non-Hispanic, to fill the position.
The takeover law also mandates the creation of a 15-member advisory board within 60 days. State Education Commissioner Saul Cooperman is charged with appointing 13 members, and local officials the re-
maining two.
The law requires that the board be representative of the community’s racial and ethnic population.
Letters were sent Oct. 5 to various civic groups - including Aspira and the Puerto Rican Association of Community Organizations - soliciting nominations for board members. Applications for the spots are being accepted through Oct. 27.
in May Boston University assumed management of the 65% Hispanic Chelsea, Mass., public schools at the request of the state Board of Education.
Judge Rules Against Santeria Sacrifices
By Rhonda Smith
Attorneys for a santeria priest who has battled Hialeah, Fla., authorities for two years for the right to perform animal sacrifices at his church say they will appeal a federal district judge’s Oct 5 ruling upholding city ordinances that prohibit the practice.
During the nine-day trial, Judge Eugene Spellman heard testimony from numerous health and medical officials on whether santeria priest Ernesto Pichardo’s proposed animal sacrifices would pose threats to human health and children who witness them.
House Votes on Census
The House of Representatives Oct. 11 turned back an attempt by Rep. Thomas Ridge (R-Pa.) to exclude undocumented immigrants from the 1990 census. A similar exclusion proposal passed the Senate two weeks ago as an amendment to the $17.3 billion appropriations bill for the State, Justice and Commerce departments.
"We’re very happy," Marfa Pinzdn, census coordinator at the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials in Washington, D.C., said of the House vote. "We did not want to change the status of the census."
The issue wil now be debated in a House-Senate conference committee considering the Commerce Department’s budget for the next fiscal year.
Census results are used by the federal government in shaping congressional districts and allotting monies to states and cities.
The effort to exclude undocumented immigrants from the census had its strongest backers in such states as Alabama, Kansas, Mississippi, North Carolina and Pennsylvania.
In his ruling Spellman said the ordinances were necessary to protect public health and animal welfare.
Jorge Duarte, lead attorney for the priest, said the judge’s ruling "was not in accord with the evidence and gave animals constitutional rights as opposed to humans."
The church argued that prohibiting the sacrifices was a violation of the constitution’s first amendment, which calls for a separation of church and state.
Santeria, a religion originating in Africa and catholicized in Cuba, claims some 300,000 adherents in the Caribbean and elsewhere. It has long included animal sacrifices as a way to bring good fortune to its followers.
Duarte said Pichardo continues to hold services at the Church of Lukumf Babalu Ay6 but is not performing animal sacrifices.
Train Trip Ends in Death
Four men thought to be undocumented immigrants were found dead Oct. 10 in Victoria, Texas, in a rail-mountedtrucktrailerwhose cargo of flour had been fumigated with a toxic chemical.
The victims, all in their 20s or early 30s, apparently died of asphyxiation, according to Victoria police Lt. Jack Williams.
A Southern Pacific railroad inspector made the discovery about eight hours after the train carrying the trailer had left Harlingen, approximately 200 miles to the south.
Three of the four carried identification. One, Carlos De Jesus Lugardo, 32, had a Mexican passport; one had documents from Honduras and the third had papers that had been stamped in El Salvador indicating he was Venezuelan. Police did not releasethe others’ names.
Pending autopsies, authorities said they were not sure if the fumigation had caused the deaths, but stated that the victims had suffered diarrhea and vomiting, symptoms that can be caused by the flour fumigant.
Hospital Union Leader Seen as Rising Figure
By Danilo Alfaro
Forty-four private New York City hospitals, nursing homes and their workers reached a contract agreement Oct. 4 that is considered a major victory for Local 1199 of the Drug, Hospital and Health Care Workers. Key to the agreement was union president Dennis Rivera, who came to New York from Puerto Rico 12 years ago.
Approximately half the union’s 100,000 members are Hispanic.
The three-year contract, coming after five months of heated discussions, calls for a 7.5% pay raise in the first year, retroactive to July 1, a 7.5% raise in the second year, 5% in the third year and a $500 bonus to be paid in 1991. Most workers covered by the agreement are nurses’ aides, pharmacists, orderlies and lab technicians, whose average annual salaiy is about $18,000.
"These negotiations won us something even more important than money," said Rivera. "They earned us respect."
Rivera, 39, assumed the union’s presidency in April and is widely seen not only as a shrewd negotiator but an up-and-coming political leader as well. His union was instrumental last month in uniting the New York Hispanic community behind mayoral candidate David Dinkins in the Democratic primary election that resulted in the ouster of Mayor Ed Koch.
Link Marks Milestone
This issue of Hispanic Link Weekly Report marks the first produced totally in-house on a desk-top publishing system.
RIVERA
Oct 16,1989
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report
2


George Mufioz
Who’s to Judge?
If you had to go to court, would you prefer an Irish, black, Hispanic or Asian judge?
For most people, this question is offensive because competency and integrity - not race - are what matter. But justice often depends on more than these qualities.
The philosophy and personal experience of a judge can also play a role in the final decision of who is right and who is wrong. Our courts are not like computers that can mechanically determine guilt and punishment. In settling disputes, the community standards of conduct must be interpreted to determine justice.
Community standards reflect the differing views of various sectors of the community.
But in determining those standards, judges can’t help but read the laws and community standards of conduct from their personal perspective.
Those standards change over time. In the civil rights area, for example, the U.S. Supreme Court once said that segregation was legal. The law was later reversed by the same court -- but by judges from a different era.
Judges are given wide discretion in imposing punishment and fines. It’s the judge’s view of a person’s character that carries the most weight as to how much that person will be fined or punished.
RACE, ETHNICITY DO MATTER
If we agree that the philosophy and background of a judge do make I a difference on how justice is meted out, then we must also agree that I - in fairness to the community being judged -- it’s important that judges j come from a cross section of the community.
Our courts are not required to consider the viewpoints of each sector of the community. The common law of the courts attempts to follow a middle ground of the diverse viewpoints of the various community | members. But interpreting that middle ground should require the varied
perspective of those from the community.
That brings us back to the first question. Does it matter whether we have judges who are black, Irish, Asian or Hispanic?
The answer is yes.
Surely, no one can deny that perspectives can differ between ethnic groups. These differences may come about because of different cultural backgrounds or different experiences. We often hear reports of how our community is segregated by race and net worth. Segregation fosters differences in attitudes and perspectives of how we are to treat one another.
BALANCED PICTURE IMPORTANT
If our legal system relies on a judge interpreting attitudes of society and rules of conduct, then it’s important that the legal system have a balanced picture of the community it serves. Therefore, the judges must come from different communities of society if we are to develop | law that is fair.
We should not be offended by those who advocate that judges should reflect the racial and ethnic makeup of our communities. There are many individual members within ail groups who have the competency and integrity to be judges.
We need those judges not only because they are members of groups that are underrepresented.
For the sake of fairness and for the benefit of our legal system, we should make sure that those judging our actions don’t all view the world from a single perspective.
(George Mufioz, former president of the Chicago Board of Education, practices corporate law in Chicago.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pe}os en la lengua
AND SOON THERE’LL BE ONE? President Bush’s education summit provided fresh meat for the mediato conclude that Manuel Luj6n will soon be the lone Latino in his cabinet.
Following the Charlottesville, Va., gathering of governors, Education Week assessed in its Oct. 4 edition:
“The low-key role that Secretary of Education Lauro F. Cavazos played at the summit provoked widespread speculation...about how long he will remain in office...
“His role at the summit’s major events...was largely to introduce Mr. Bush.
“The Secretary was also conspicuously absent from a crucial set of meetings where White House officials and three governors negotiated the contents of the statement that is the chief tangible product of the summit.”
Concluded Ed Week in its “Reporter’s Notebook” column: “(Arkansas Gov. Bill) Clinton said all negotiations on behalf of the White House were conducted by John Sununu, the White House chief of staff, and Roger B. Porter, Mr. Bush’s domestic-policy adviser.
“Mr. Sununu and Mr. Porter were also the ones who negotiated the summit’s format with Mr. Clinton and (S. Carolina Gov. Carroll) Campbell the previous week. Aides in the Secretary’s office expressed frustration and anger the next day, admitting they did not know about the agreement until they read about it in The Washington Post.”
PATRIOTS’ PARADE: For its rally last month in Gainesville, Ga., where some 5,000 residents are Mexican American farm laborers, the Georgia Ku Klux Klan distributed flyers announcing that “hundreds of White Christian Patriots will march...to protest the thousands of filthy, illegal wetbacks that have ruined this fine North Georgia town. These disease carrying mongrels are creating more crime than the wild niggers, which is a monumental feat in itself...”
Klan authors tagged their circular: “We will have many refreshments, Klan shirts, Klan jewelery (sic) and other souvenirs for sale. Bring yourself a lawn chair and see the giant TRIPLE CROSS LIGHTING.”
CANADIAN REFUGE: USA Today led off a recent statistic-laden feature on Hispanics in baseball this year:
“Hispanics make up 15 percent of Major League Baseball's players... Most of them play second base, 27.7 percent, or shortstop, 35.8 percent.”
Of the World Series combatants: The Oakland Athletics’ roster is 20.7% Latino; the San Francisco Giants, 11.1%.
The two major league teams with the most Latinos are the only two teams NOT housed on U.S. soil: the Montreal Expos (25%) and Toronto Blue Jays (24%).
DEFACING JUSTICE: The New York Times offered this enticing lead to its coverage of the trial of Congressman Bobby Garda: “Representative Robert Garcia’s lawyer complained Thursday that the Federal judge who is presiding over Mr. Garcia’s bribery trial made faces during defense presentations to the jury.”
Later on, the reporter also revealed that chief prosecutor Edward Little complained that Garcfa’s wife, Jane Lee, “made ’visible’ facial expressions to the jury.”
NON-PERSONS: Writing in Oregon’s Hillsboro Argus Aug. 10, reporter Lucille Warren concocted this intriguing lead to a story on that town’s battle against crime:
“Most of the prostitutes have moved elsewhere and dope buys are less prevalent, but people living in police district 3 still fear the largely Hispanic population living in area apartment complexes.” To reporter Warren, Hispanics are not only scummy types, I guess they don’t even qualify as “people.” -Kay Barbaro
MUNOZ
Oct. 16, 1989
3


COLLECTING
“CHOICE” PROGRAMS AND INTEGRATION: “Choice in Public Schools: An Analysis of Transfer Requests Among Magnet Schools in Montgomery County” finds that transfers chosen by parents in this Maryland school district were based more on the racial composition and socioeconomic status of schools than academic offerings. The author suggests that some transfers be rejected to maintain racial balance. For a copy of the 10-page study, send $4 to the Center for Washington Area Studies, George Washington University, Washington, D.C. 20052 (202) 994-5240.
FELLOWSHIPS FOR TEACHERS OF SPANISH: The 1990 Quin-centennial Summer Program for Spanish Teachers and the King Juan Carlos Fellowships are offering 300 fellowships at $1,845 each for U.S. teachers of Spanish. The program seeks to integrate curricula for classroom use. Deadline is March 15. Applications and information can be obtained from Quincentennial Program, 202 Westbrook Hall, The Global Campus, University of Minnesota, 77 Pleasant St. SE, Minneapolis, Minn. 55455 (612) 626-7138.
TEACHERS AND STUDENT DIALECTS: Public school teachers and prospective teachers, even those who have taken sensitivity courses, often stereotype students with dialects. Copies of the study, by Beverly Mattox-Kerr, can be obtained by sending a 9 1/2-by-12 1/2-inch envelope with $2.45 postage affixed to Texas A&M, Office of Public Information, College Station, Texas 77843-4245 (409) 845-4641.
POPULATION REPORT: The U.S. Census Bureau released Oct. 12 a three-page report with the most current Hispanic population figures - up until March of this year. The report includes data on subgroups. For a free copy (specify CB89-158), contact Carmen DeNavas at Ethnic and Spanish Statistics Branch, U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233 (301) 763-7955.
REFUGEES AND ASYLUM SEEKERS: The “World Refugee Survey: 1988 in Review” contains two articles on U.S. refugee and asylum policy. The first, four pages, holds that U.S. agencies have been negligent in implementing the spirit of the Refugee Act of 1980 and contains 15 recommendations on improving asylum adjudication and refugee protection. The other, three pages, concludes the U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals has taken to narrowing the definition of the word persecution, thereby increasing the number of rejections. For a copy of the 94-page publication, send $8 to the U.S. Committee on Refugees, 1025 Vermont Ave. NW, Suite 920, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 347-3507.
CONNECTING
ACTIVISTS SOUGHT FOR HONOR Recognizing the need for activists to step away from their typically grueling day-to-day activities and recharge their energies, the Youth Project has announced it will accept applications for its 1990 Charles Bannerman Memorial Fellowships until Dec. 1.
Each of thefivefellowshipsto be awarded provides$10,000stipends for “activists of color” and gives them an opportunity to take three-month or longer sabbaticals. Jesris Aguilar, with the Central American Refugee Center in Los Angeles, and Baldemar Velasquez, president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee in Toledo, Ohio, were among last year’s winners.
Requirements are that the applicants have at least five years experience in community activism, take at least a three-month sabbatical devoted to activities completely unrelated to their field of activism, and that they continue their grassroots work after the paid respite.
For more information contact the Charles Bannerman Memorial Fellowship Program, c/o The Youth Project, 233518th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 483-0030.
AFFINITY CARDS, REFERENCE AWARD The Hispanic National Bar Association has announced that it has teamed up with Maryland Bank, N.A., to offer an affinity credit card.
The bank and HNBA are making available the Gold MasterCard at an annual percentage rate of 16.9%, with a waiver of the annual $36 fee for the first year and up to a $15,000 credit line. Call 1-800-847-7378...
The Denali Press and the American Library Association have announced the establishment of The Denali Press Award. The $500 award is to recognize outstanding reference works on U.S. ethnic and minority groups. Information and applications are available from Andrew Hansen, American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, III. 60611, or call 1 -800-545-2433.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES The La Raza Lawyers Association of California elects Thomas Spiel-bauer, a Santa Ana County deputy public defender, president..PODER ~ Programas de Ocupaciones y Desarrollo Econdmico Real -- presents its Community Service Award to Jos6 Vega, assistant dean of the College of Education at the University of Wisconsin, River Falls. As chairman of the group’s board of directors and a founding member, Vega helped to attract federal and state grants so that PODER could establish educational programs...
Calendar_________________________
THIS WEEK HISPANIC LINK TRIBUTE Washington, D.C. Oct. 16
The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials will sponsor a salute to the Hispanic Link News Service for its 10 years of service to the community. U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.) will be among the expected guests.
Michael Zamba (202) 546-2536
ART CONFERENCE Albuquerque, N.M. Oct. 18
The Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce and the Hispanic Culture Foundation are presenting “Art Means Business.” The conference will provide information about how New Mexico artists and arts communities can promote and develop their work in the Hispanic art market.
Diane P6rez (505) 842-9003
RACIAL HARMONY River Falls, Wis. Oct. 18,19 4
The University of Wisconsin, River Falls, is sponsoring a workshop aimed at promoting cultural and racial harmony on college campuses. Conference leaders will discuss racism, howto prevent conflicts from occurring and other topics.
O.J. Clark (715) 425-3771 MARKETING CONFERENCE New York Oct. 18-20
Advertising Age magazine is sponsoring the second annual “Hispanic Media and Marketing Conference.” It will offer sessions on creative strategies, promotions and public relations, media alternatives and other issues facing those who want to reach the Hispanic market.
Susan Damiani 1-800-233-3435
BAR CONVENTION
Washington, D.C. Oct. 18-21
The National Hispanic Bar Association is holding its
14th annual convention. Attorneys, judges, public
officials and educators will give presentations, and
seminars on office management, immigration law,
communications law and other topics will be held.
Michael Martinez (212) 840-7570
Gl FORUM ROAST Washington, D.C. Oct. 19
Oct 16,1989
The American Gl Forum will have a roast honoring Pablo Sedillo, executive director of the Secretariat for Hispanic Affairs atthe U.S. Catholic Conference. Money raised will be used to support the Forum’s community programs.
Alex Armendaris (202) 833-1866
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Los Angeles Oct. 20-22
The United Teachers-Los Angeles union’s Chi-cano/Latino Education Committee, along with the Media Institute, will co-sponsor the third annual “Chicano Youth Leadership Conference.” Some of the issues to be discussed include culture and identity, personal development and self-esteem, and college and scholarship.
Mark Meza-Overstreet (213) 221-5250
HEALTH CAREERS San Antonio Oct. 22-24
Health research company Technautics Inc. is sponsoring a symposium that will provide Hispanic high school, undergraduate, graduate and medical students and their educators information about training and career opportunities in biomedical/health research.
Gerald L6pez (703) 920-0373
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


Carmen Abreu - John Aldrt Joseph Fernandez - Josepi zalez - Elisa Granados -Lopez - David Lopez -tinez - Maria Mayfield scoso - Edgar Ochoa -checo - Steph aine Quintan
10,000
REASONS
Joanna Cruz - Liliana D a - Michele Gomez - Hec ria Hernandez - Mario J : - Melissa Marquez -1 tanez - Jeanne Moral - Mary Olivares - Cla
WHY YOU SHOULD SUPPORT-"-
Sara Ramos - Leonard Ranaud lia Rodriguez - Barbara Rodz nd Rodriguez - Lucinda Romez inas - Auroi shiells - Rc jillo - Ste\ dez - Jaime gas - Elisa gil - Veronj no - Aurora ayo - Myrna ial - Jorge driguez - E. asquillo - J Samuel Coop< lliam Dwyer ras - Angel,
Gamboa - Ca Rebecca Gar Gomez - Cyn Francisco G ez - Susie josa - Patr Jacquez - R Left - Mary Maria Lopez Joey Machad ez - Antoni Magdalena Menchaca -
NHSF
In the last thirteen years, the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund has awarded $6.4 million in scholarships to 10,000 deserving Hispanic-American students nationwide.
With the strong support from CFC individual contributors |na and the corporate sector, NHSF has been able to make the educational .dreams of thousands of Hispanic-American students a reality. As expected, hundreds of these recipients are the sons and daughters of federal workers.
We encourage you to join the NHSF partnership which has proven to be very successful in the last decade. Become a part of NHSF's efforts at assisting a greater number of deserving Hispanic-American scholars. Designate the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund on your Combined Federal Campaign pledge.
YOUR HELP IS NEEDED!
Lnstina Hu&rt&
- Rolando Reyes - Rebecca na Rodriguez - Jose Rodrigu ,Jr. - Georgia Rubio - Ide Walter Schm - Laura To Id Urrabazo a - Saul Va Velez Rive Zamarripa Abreu Del idalgo - Ju Rodriguez -Veronica Be Patricia C
- Natalia D strada - Hec Ido Franco
Olga Garcia ties - Beatri
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National Hispanic Scholarship Fund P.O. Box 748
San Francisco. California 94101
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- Jeffrey J
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NURSE PRACTITIONER
The University of Wisconsin-White-water Student Health Services announces a 75% nine-month position for a Gynecologic Clinical Nurse Specialist/Nurse Practitioner to provide reproductive health care, counseling, manage contraceptives, GYN care and treatment of STDs in collaboration with supervising physician. May also have responsibility in primary care. To obtain further information and a position announcement, interested persons should write or call:
Ruth Swisher Student Health Service UW-Whitewater Whitewater, Wl 53190 (414) 472-5600
The University of Wisconsin-White-water is an equal opportunity employer.
RADIO REPORTER Serious committed radio news operation seeks experienced reporter. Will produce news and feature reports for daily news program; must generate story ideas, research, interviews, and use standard broadcast equipmentto produce reports. Minimum 2 years broadcast news experience required. Must have strong writing, interviewing, and journalistic skills plus mature, credible announcing style. Degree preferred. Send letter, r6sum6 non-returnable tape and salary expectations to: James Horn, Personnel Director, KERA, 3000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75201 (214)871-1390.
EEO
PROJECT DIRECTOR National Hispanic Organization seeks Senior Policy Analyst/Project Director for Hispanic Elderly Network Projects. Good organizational skills needed. Knowledge of and experience with policy-making process at the state and federal level preferred. Experience with minority elderly issues and/or programs required. Excellent writing and oral communication skills required. Advanced degree in relevant field strongly preferred. Salary approximately $32,000, negotiable depending on experience. Please contact:
Charles Kamasaki National Council of La Raza 810 First Street N.E. Suite 300 Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 289-1380
PROJECT DIRECTOR
:COSSMHO!J'! professional to join tj#£lcof^(^ other drug abuse
tn social WOfk, pubtfc health or related â–  field preferred.; ishpuldliHave experience in program management;;)^ stance> abtj(se, ^ooth and famriy, juvenile delinquency; i aind professional writing skills.! Bilinglial/bicul-tural preferred. Salsify negotiable; Send rasurtte to: Paul Cardenas COSSMHO, 10301SthSl NW, Suite 1053, Washington, 0+C,2000$<
DEAN, COLLEGE OF LAW NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY DeKalb, Illinois
Northern Illinois University invites applications and nominations for the positionof Dean of the College of Law.
The Dean of the College of Law serves as the chief academic and administrative officer of the only state law school in northern Illinois, an area in which more than eight million people live. Founded in 1974, the College currently offers a full-time program to over300 students, with a faculty of 19 full-time members. As a member of a faculty committed to excellence, the Dean exercises the creative leadership necessary to realize the full potential of the academic program. Off campus, primary responsibilities include maintaining a close working relationship with the Bench and Bar and communicating the College’s goals and programs to alumni, as well as various state and national constituencies.The Dean is an important member of the university’s administration and works closely with the university President and Provost.
Northern Illinois University is a major instructional and research center enrolling more than24,000students on and off campus. In addition to the J.D., the university offers baccalaureate, master’s, Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees. These programs are offered in 40 academic departments in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business, Education, Engineering and Technology, Law, Professional Studies, and Visual and Performing Arts.
Candidates should have an established record of distinguished professional achievement indicating the ability to provide leadership in the College’s academic mission and in its institutional relationship with a variety of university and external constituencies. A detailed job description will be provided all applicants.
Nominations are invited. Applications, including curriculum vita, and names, addresses and telephone numbers of five references, must be received no later than January 1,1990. Send to:
Dr. Kendall L. Baker Vice President and Provost Chair, College of Law Dean Search Committee Northern Illinois University DeKalb, IL60115
NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. WOMEN AND MINORITIES ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Oct 16, 1989
5


Arts & Entertainment
GRINGO CONTROVERSY: A Los Angeles-based Latino group is protesting what it calls “stereotypical portrayals of Mexicans” in the just released film Old Gringo.
Members of the Mexican American Coalition picketed a Los Angeles benefit screening of the film - produced for Columbia Pictures by Jane Fonda’s Fonda Films - the eve of its national opening, Oct. 6. According to Raul Ruiz, a Chicano studies professor at the California State University, Northridge, campus and a coalition spokesperson, thefilm contains “adouble standard...a heroic, courageous old gringo and...cowardly, violent Mexican males and whorish females...”
Coalition members reportedly objected to the fact that an Argentine, Luis Puenzo, was chosen to write and direct the film, and that a Puerto Rican actor, Jimmy Smits, was given the only Mexican lead role.
Old Gringo is based on a novel by Mexican author Carlos Fuentes, who reportedly approved of the Puenzo screenplay (written in collaboration with Aida Bortnik) and cooperated with Fonda during the making of the film. Fonda stars with Gregory Peck and Smits in the work.
Another Los Angeles-based Latino group has expressed its dissatisfaction over the fact that Old Gringo is not being released by Columbia in a Spanish-language version in the United States, al-thoughthefilm premiered last month in Mexico with55subtitled prints.
“What is Columbia afraid of by not releasing this film in our native language to our community?” asked Armando Durdn, president of the National Hispanic Media Coalition, in a statement. “How can a real dialogue occur if many in our community can’t partake in any dialogue until weeks after the film is released?”
According to Santiago Pozo, president of The Arenas Group, a publicity firm hired by Columbia to promote the film among Spanish-language media, “O/of Gringo is an upscale picture that will appeal to middle-class Latinos, people who are already in the mainstream. It doesn’t have blue-collar appeal.”
ONE LINER: This year’s Women in Film Festival, which continues in Los Angeles through Oct. 19, includes the film La ofrenda, produced and directed by Oscar-nominated film makers Lourdes Portillo and Susana Munoz. Thefilm reflects on the pre-Hispanic origins of El dfa de los muertos and its present-day celebration in Mexico and the United States.
____________________________________- Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
TRAINING PROGRAM SHELVED: After 13years of service, the Berkeley, Calif.-based Institute for Journalism Education will scrap its Summer Program for Minority Journalists, it announced Oct. 5.
Founded in 1969 at New York’s Columbia University and considered the most successful endeavor of its kind, the program had trained and placed 275 entry-level daily newspaper reporters, 20% of whom were Latinos.
“If it hadn’t been for the program, I would never have had an opportunity in the profession,” said Virginia Escalante, who graduated from the program in 1979. “We’re already hurting for minority representation. The death of this program is an additional blow.”
Escalante was placed in a reporting position at the Los Angeles Times after completing the program and is now associate professor of journalism at the University of Arizona.
"We can’t do everything,” said IJE president Steve Montiel. “But there are enough
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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1420 'N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or (202) 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: F6lix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith.
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other routes that (eliminating the program) isn’t going to have an adverse effect.” He added that IJE was prepared to offer its experience and expertise to help other entities establish a similar program.
The summer program, which was run in cooperation with the school of journalism at the University of California, Berkeley, offered 11 weeks of intensive training for up to 15 participants each year. Trainees received tuition, transportation, room and board and a monthly stipend, and were guaranteed placement with a sponsoring newspaper upon completion of the program.
Montiel said the institute was shifting its emphasis away from helping Hispanic, black, Asian American and Native American reporters break into journalism. Instead, he said it would concentrate on training those already in the business for promotions to management positions.
"We feel that in the long run, the more editors and managers there are who are nonwhite, the more who will get in the door as a result,” Montiel said.
F6lix Gutierrez, dean of academic services and special programs at the University of Sourthern California in Los Angeles and a former professor of journalism there, agreed that the change was appropriate. “It doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to get Latinos into the business if they’re leaving the business at higher rates than whites,” he said.
NAHJ CREATES INTERNSHIP FUND: A fund to provide annual 12-month reporting internships at Hispanic Link News Service in Washington, D.C.,for aspiring Latino journalists was announced Oct. 16 by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.
Supported by contributions from foundations, corporations and individuals, the fund will provide $16,000 yearly stipends to the interns, the first of whom will be selected in a national competition beginning later this fall.
For more information on the fund or to receive an internship application, contact Frank Newton, executive director of NAHJ, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228.
- Danilo Alfaro
NUMBER OF HISPANIC ORIGIN PERSONS: APRIL 1980 AND MARCH 1982 TO MARCH 1989
(Numbers In thousands)
25.000
20.000
15.000
10.000 5,000
0
1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1989
Source: U.S. Census Bureau


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Paso Texas drifter was convicted of 13 murders and 30 related ' ' Making The News This Week felonies committed in Southern . California in 1984-85 ... Pat Baca and Louis Saavedra emerge as the top two candidates for mayor of Al buquerque, N.M., after outpolling seven other candidates in the non partisan primary ... Aspart of Hispanic Heritage Month, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management in Washington, D.C., presents achieve ment awards to Maria Mercedes Olivieri, national Hispanic employ ment manager, General Accounting Office; Frank Elizondo, recruit ment officer, Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and Hilda Reyes, program analyst, Internal Revenue Service ... Talk-show host Geraldo Rivera pledges to pay for the college educations of 24 junior high school students in Spanish Harlem, N.Y ... A gun-wielding ninth grader in Anaheim, Calif., shoots and wounds fellow student Mark L6pez, 15, during an classroom hostage drama ... President Bush presents the award for minority small business person of the year to Latina Teresa McBride at a White House cere mony. McBride, 25, of Albuquerque, N.M., founded a retail consumer electronics business in 1985 that generates $8.6 million in annual sales ... The California Department of Motor Vehicles revokes the driver's license of State Sen. Ai1 Torres (D-Los Angeles) because he refused to submit to tests to determine his blood alcohol level after being arrested for drunk driving by Sacramento police officers. Torres v was on probation for an earlier drunken driving conviction ... After five days deliberation, a Los Angeles jury recommends the death sen tence for devil worshiping "Night Stalker" Richard Ramirez. The El Court Orders Chaf.lQfl Latinos Tally 25% of u.s. Growth In Tex . Judicial Races By Danilo Alfaro _ _ A U.S. District Court judge in ruled Sept. 28 that the state's 13th District Court of Appeals, which has jurisdiction over-20 coun ties in South Texas, must switch from at-large to single-district voting when electing judges. Of the six judges currently serving on the court, none are The region covered by the court is approximately 5Q<>.k Latino. "It was a very good ruling," Rolando Rfos, an attorney for the Southwest Voter Registra tion Education Project in San Antonio, told Weekly Report. "It allows the opportunity to go after many other election structures in a system that discriminates against Hispan ics.'' The state was given 10 days to appeal the decision. Attorney General Jim Mattox specu l . ated that the legislature might be given the opportunity to devise its own single-district voting system during a special session next month. State Supreme Court Justice Tom Phillips said he wouJd approve of having at least some judges elected through a modified single district system. L.A.'s Diario Shuts Down After filing for bankruptcy last month, Span ish-language daily E/Diario de Los Angeles has ceased publication, the newspaper's at torney announced Oct. 1 0. Despite last-ditch attempts to raise cash, including a fund-raising campaign aimed at the newspaper's readers, El Diario published its final issue Oct. 7. "The paper was under capitalized, and they ran out of money," said attorney Castillo. Founded in May 1987 by Mexico's Becerra, the paper had a circulation of 30,000 and was the third largest Spanish-language daily in Los Angeles. Castillo said the owners, /nmobiliarfa America Latina Inc., hope torevive the newspaper. Hispanics accounted for 25% of all popula tion growth in the United States in the 12month period ending this March, according to a report released by the U.S. Census Bureau Oct. 12. While the overall population grew from 241.1 million in March 1988 to 243.7 million in March of this year, Hispanics in the continental United States increased from 19.4 million to 20.1 million. More specifically, there were 645,000 more Hispanics at the end of the time period. From 1980to 1989, the Hispanic population surged 39%. Growth rate for the non-Hispanic population was 7.5%, stated the report. As of last year, Hispanics comprised 8.2<>-k of the total U.S. population. Mexican Americans, who make up two thirds of Hispanics, accounted for 71% of Latino growth between March 1988 and March 1989. They saw their numbers rise to nearly 12.6 million from 12.1 million over the 12 months. Puerto Ricans, on the other hand, experienced a dedine, stated the report. They dropped from 2.5 million to 2.3 million, a decrease of 6%. In terms of percentage increase, Latinos of Central and South American origin had the largest. Standing at more than 2.5 million in March of '89, their numbers were up 13% from 12 months earlier. Latinos of Central and South American an cestry had the largest percentage increase since 1982. They grew 67%, from 1.5 million to 2.5 million. "Other Hispanics" -persons from Spain or those who describe them selves as Hispanic, Spanish or Latino -had the second largest jump at 31%. Mexican Americans were next, having increased 30% since 1982. Hispanics increased 3go,4 since 1980. At the beginning of the decade there were 14.4 million. That number shot up some 5.6 million this year. The report attributed about half of this growth to immigration. Latino Subgroup Populations --March '88, March '89 (numbers in thousands) Cent., South Cuban Mexican Other Puerto Total American American American Hispanic Rican* Hispanic March '88 March '89 2,242 1,035 12,110 1,573 2,471 19,431 2,345 1 ,068 12,567 1 ,567 2,328 20,076 *Includes mainland Puerto Ricans only Source: Census BureaiJ report, Oct. 12 Caucus Pushes for Higher Ed Bill Support The Congressional Hispanic Caucus sent a letter Oct. 11 to President Bush urging him to endorse legislation that would provide $70 million in federal assistance to approximately 1 00 colleges and universities nationwide with student enrollments that are at least 25% Hispanic. The bill, introduced Sept. 28 by U.S. Sans. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) and Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.), is identicaltoonesponsored in the House by Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) in March. The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, which has 50 mem ber -institutions that are at least 25% Latino, assisted the staffs of Bentsen and Bingaman in drafting the legislation. The funds would be provided on a competi tive basis for recruiting, tutoring, counseling and dropout prevention. The bill stipulates that participating two-year institutions reserve 25% of their funding to assist graduates in ob taining a bachelor's degree. Four-year insti tutions would reserve an equal amount to recruit graduates of two-year schools.

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N.J. Cites Failure, Takes Control of Jersey City School s By Danilo Alfaro Citing "total educational failure" in Jersey City's public schools, the New Jersey Board of Education voted Oct. 4 to have the state take control of the troubled school district. The 15-0 vote made New Jersey the first state to seize control of a financially solvent school district. The move came after a fiveyear review that concluded the district was ravaged by political patronage and nepotism, poor management, fiscal disorder and a lack of commitment to educational achievement by its students. The district has 28,000 students, 34% of whom are Hispanic and 44% black. The New Jersey order dissolved the ninemember school board, the positions of super intendant and other top administrators. It created the position of state superintendent to operate the district with complete control for five years) and named Essex County, N.J., Superintendent of Schools Elena Scambio, a non-Hispanic, to fill the position. The takeover law also mandates the creation of a 15-member advisory board within 60 days. State Education Commissioner Saul Cooperman is charged with appointing 13 members, and local officials the re. Judge Rules Against Santeria Sacrifices By Rhonda Smith Attorneys for a santeria priest who has battled Hialeah, Fla., authorities for two years for the right to perform animal sacrifices at his church say they will appeal a federal district judge's Oct. 5 ruling upholding city ordinances that prohibit the practice. During the nine-day trial, Judge Eugene Spellman heard testimony from numerous health and medical officials on whether san teria priest Ernesto Pichardo's proposed animal sacrifices would pose threats to human health and children who witness them. House Votes on Census The House of Representatives Oct. 11 turned back an attempt by Rep. Thomas Ridge (R-Pa.) to exclude undocumented immigrants from the 1990 census. A similar exclusion proposal passed the Senate two weeks ago as an amendment to the $17.3 billion appropriations bill for the State, Justice and Commerce departments. "We're very happy," Marfa Pinz6n, census coordinator at the National Associa tion of Latino Elected and Appointed . Officials in Washington, D.C., said of the House vote . "We did not want to change the status of the census.'' The issue wll roN be debated in a HooseSenate conference committee consider, _ ing the Commerce Department's budget for the next fiscal year. Census results are used by the federal government in shaping congressional districts and allotting monies to states and cities. The effort to exclude undocumented immigrants from the census had fts strongest backers in such states as Alabama, Kansas, Mississippi, North Carolina and Pennsylvania. 2 In his ruling Spellman said the ordinances were necessary to protect public health and animal welfare. Jorge Duarte, lead attorney for the priest, said the judge's ruling "was not in accord with the evidence and gave animals constitu tional rights as opposed to humans." The church argued that prohibiting the sac rifices was a violation of the constitution's first amendment, which calls for a separation of church and state. Santeria, a religion originating in Africa and catholicized in Cuba, claims some 300,000 adherents in the Caribbean and elsewhere. It has long included animal sacrifices as a way to bring good fortune to its followers. Duarte said Pichardo continues to hold services at the Church of Lukumf Babalu Aye but is not performing animal sacrifices . Train Trip Ends in Death Four men thought to be undocumented immigrants were found dead Oct. 10 in Victoria, Texas, inarail-mountedtrucktrailerwhose cargo of flour had been fumigated with a toxic chemical. The victims, all in their 20s or early 30s, apparently died of asphyxiation, according to Victoria police Lt. Jack Williams. A Southern Pacific railroad inspector made the discovery about eight hours after the train carrying the trailer had left Harlingen, approximately 200 miles to the south. Three of the four carried identification. One, Carlos De Jesus Lugardo, 32, had a Mexican passport; one had documents from Honduras and the third had papers that had -been stamped in El Salvador indicating he was Venezuelan. Police did not release the others' names. Pending autopsies, authorities said they were not sure if the fumigation had caused the deaths, but stated that the victims had suffared diarrhea and vomiting, symptoms that can be caused by the flour fumigant. Oct 16, 1989 maining two. The law requires that the board be representative of the commurity's racial and ethnic population. Letters were sent Oct. 5 to various civic groups --including Aspira and the Puerto Rican Association of Community Organizations --soliciting nominations for board members. Applications for the spots are being accepted through Oct. 27. In May Boston University assumed management of the 65% Hispanic Chelsea, Mass., public schools at the request of the state Board of Education. Hospital Union Lead e r Seen as Rising Figure By Danilo Alfaro Forty-four private New York City hospitals, nursing homes and their workers reached a contract agreement Oct. 4 that is consid ered a major victory for Local 1199 of the Drug, Hospital and Health Care Workers. Key t o the agreement was union presiden t Dennis R ivera, who came to New York from P uerto Rico 12 years ago. Approximately hatf the union's 100,000 members are Hispanic. The three-year contract, coming after five months of heated dis russions, calls for a 7.5% pay raise in the first year, RIVERA retroactive to July 1, a 7.5% raise in the second year, 5% in the third year and a $500 bonus to be paid in 1991. Most workers covered by the agreement are nurses' aides, pharmacists, orderlies and lab technicians, whose average annual salary is about $18,000. 'These negotiations won us something even more important than money," said Rivera. ''They earned us respect.'' Rivera, 39, assumed the union's presidency in April and is widely seen not only as a shrewd negotiator but an up-and-coming as well. His union was instrumental last month in uniting the New York Hispanic community behind mayoral candidate David Dinkins in the Democratic primary election that resulted in the ouster of Mayor Ed Koch. Link Marks Milestone This issue of Hispanic Link Weekly Report marks the first produced totally in-house on a desk-top publishing system. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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George Munoz Who's to Judge? If you had to go to court, would you prefer an Irish, black, Hispanic or Asian judge? For most people, this question is offensive because competency and integrity --not race -are what matter. But justice often depends on more than these qualities. The philosophy and personal experience of a judge can also play a role in the final decision of who is right and who is wrong. Our courts are not like computers that can mechanically determine guilt and pun ishment. In settling disputes, the community standards of conduct must be interpreted to determine justice. Community standards reflect the differing views of various sectors of the community. But in determining those standards, judges can't help but read the laws and community standards of conduct from their personal perspective. Those standards change over time. In the civil rights area, for example, the U . S . Su p reme Court once said that segregation was legal. The law was later reversed by the same court --but by judges from a different era. MUNOZ Judges are given wide discretion in imposing punishment and fines. It's the judge's view of a person's character that carries the most weight as to how much that person will be fined or punished. RACE, ETHNICITY DO MATTER If we agree that the philosophy and background of a judge do make a difference on how justice is meted out, then we must also agree that --in fairness to the community being judged--it's important that judges come from a cross section of the community. Our courts are not required to consider the viewpoints of each sector of the community. The common law of the courts attempts to follow a middle ground of the diverse viewpoints of the various community members. But interpreting that middle ground should require the varied perspective of those from the community. That brings us back to the first question. Does it matter whether we have judges who are black, Irish, Asian or Hispanic? The answer is yes. Surely, no one can deny that perspectives can differ between ethnic groups. These differences may come about because of different cultural backgrounds or different experiences. We often hear reports of how our community is segregated by race and net worth. Segregation fosters differences in attitudes and perspectives of how we are to treat one another. BALANCED PICTURE IMPORTANT If our legal system relies on a judge interpreting attitudes of society and rules of conduct, then it's important that the legal system have a balanced picture of the community it serves. Therefore, the judges must come from different communities of society if we are to develop law that is fair. We should not be offended by those who advocate that judges should reflect the racial and ethnic makeup of our communities. There are many individual members within all groups who have the compe tency and integrity to be judges. We need those judges not only because they are members of groups that are underrepresented. For the sake of fairness and for the benefit of our legal system, we should make sure that those judging our actions don't all view the world from a single perspective. (George Munoz, former president of the Chicago Board of Educa tion, practices corporate law in Chicago.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua AND SOON THERE'LL BE ONE? President Bush's education summit provided fresh meat for the media to conclude that Manuel Lujan will soon be the lone Latino in his cabinet. Following the Charlottesville, Va., gathering of governors, Edu cation Week assessed in its Oct. 4 edition: "The low-key role that Secretary of Education Lauro F. Cavazos played at the summit provoked widespread speculation ... about how long he will remain in office ... "His role at the summit's major events ... was largely to introduce Mr. Bush. ''The Secretary was also conspicuously absent from a crucial set of meetings where White House officials and three governors negotiated the contents of the statement that is the chief tangible product of the summit." Concluded Ed Week in its "Reporter's Notebook" column: "(Arkansas Gov. Bill) Clinton said all negotiations on behalf of White House were conducted by John Sununu, the White House chief of staff, and Roger B. Porter, Mr. Bush's domestic policy adviser. "Mr. Sununu and Mr. Porter were also the ones who negotiated thesummit'sformatwith Mr. Clinton and (S. Carolina Gov. Carroll) Campbell the previous week. Aides in the Secretary's office ex pressed frustration and anger the next day, admitting they did not know aboutthe agreement until they read about it in The Washing ton Post.'' PATRIOTS' PARADE: For its rally last month in Gainesville, Ga., where some 5,000 residents are Mexican American farm laborers, the Georgia Ku Klux Klan distributed flyers announcing that "hundreds of White Christian Patriots will march ... to protest the thousands of filthy, illegal wet backs that have ruined this fine North Georgia town. These disease carrying mongrels are creating more crime than the wild niggers, which is a monumental feat in itself ... " Klan authors tagged their circular: "We will have many refresh ments, Klan shirts, Klan jewelery (sic) and other souvenirs for sale. Bring yourself a lawn chair and see the giant TRIPLE CROSS LIGHTING." CANADIAN REFUGE: USA Today led off a recent statistic-laden feature on Hispanics in baseball this year: "Hispanics make up 15 percent of Major League Baseball's play ers ... Most of them play second base, 27.7 percent, or shortstop, 35.8 percent." Of the World Series combatants: The Oakland Athletics' roster is 20.7% Latino; the San Francisco Giants, 11.1%. The two major league teams with the most Latinos are the only two teams NOT housed on U.S. soil: the Montreal Expos (25%) and Toronto Blue Jays (24%). DEFACING JUSTICE: The New York Times offered this enticing lead to its coverage of the trial of Congressman Bobby Garcia: "Representative Robert Garcia's lawyer complained Thursday that the Federal judge who is presiding over Mr. Garcia's bribery trial made faces during defense presentations to the jury." Later on, the reporter also revealed that chief prosecutor Edward Little complained that Garcfa's wife, Jane Lee, "made 'visible' facial expressions to the jury." NON-PERSONS: Writing in Oregon's Hillsboro Argus Aug. 1 o, reporter Lucille Warren concocted this intriguing lead to a story on that town's battle against crime: "Most of the prostitutes have moved elsewhere and dope buys are less prevalent, but people living in police district 3 still fear the largely Hispanic population living in area apartment complexes." To reporter Warren, Hispanics are not only scummy types, 1 guess they don't even qualify as "people." --Kay Barbaro Hispanic Link Weekly Report Oct. 16, 1989 3

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COLLECTING "CHOICE" PROGRAMS AND INTEGRATION: "Choice in Public Schools: An Analysis of Transfer Requests Among Magnet Schools in Montgomery County" finds that transfers chosen by parents in this Maryland school district were based more on the racial composition and socioeconomic status of schools than academic offerings. The author suggests that some transfers be rejected to maintain racial balance . For a copy of the 1 0-page study, send $4 to the Center for Washington Area Studies, George Washington University, Washing ton, D.C. 20052 (202) 994-5240. FELLOWSHIPS FOR TEACHERS OF SPANISH: The 1990 Quin centennial Summer Program for Spanish Teachers and the King Juan Carlos Fellowships are offering 300 fellowships at $1 ,845 each for U.S. teachers of Spanish. The program seeks to integrate curricula for classroom use. Deadline is March 15. Applications and information can be obtained from Quincentennial Program, 202 Westbrook Hall, The Global Campus, University of Minnesota, 77 Pleasant St. SE, Minnea polis, Minn. 55455 (612) 626-7138. TEACHERS AND STUDENT DIALECTS: Public school teachers and prospective teachers, even those who have taken sensitivity courses, often stereotype students with dialects. Copies of the study, by Beverly Mattox-Kerr, can be obtained by sending a 9 1 /2-by-12 1/2-inch envelope with $2.45 postage affixed to Texas A&M, Office of Public Information, College Station, Texas 77843-4245 (409) 845-4641. POPULATION REPORT: The U.S. Census Bureau released Oct. 12 a three-page report with the most current Hispanic population figures --up until March of this year. The report includes data on subgroups. For a free copy (specify CB89-158), contact Carmen DeNavas at Ethnic and Spanish Statistics Branch, U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233 (301) 763-7955. REFUGEES AND ASYLUM SEEKERS: The "World Refugee Sur vey: 1988 in Review" contains two articles on U.S. refugee and asylum policy. The first, four pages, holds that U.S. agencies have been negligent in implementing the spirit of the Refugee Act of 1980 and contains 15 recommendations on improving asylum adjudication and refugee protection. The other, three pages, concludes the U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals has taken to narrowing the definition of the word persecution, thereby increasing the number of rejections. For a copy of the 94-page publication, send $8 to the U.S. Committee on Refugees, 1025 Vermont Ave. NW, Suite 920, Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 347-3507. CONNECTING ACTIVISTS SOUGHT FOR HONOR Recognizing the need for activists to step away from their typically grueling day-to-day activities and recharge their energies, the Youth Project has announced it will accept applications for its 1990 Charles Bannerman Memorial Fellowships until Dec. 1. Each ofthefivefellowshipsto be awarded provides$1 0,000 stipends for ''activists of color'' and gives them an opportunity to take three month or longer sabbaticals. Jesus Aguilar, with the Central American Refugee Center in Los Angeles, and Baldemar Velasquez, president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee in Toledo, Ohio, were among last year's winners. Requirements are that the applicants have at least five years experi ence in community activism, take at least a three-month sabbatical devoted to activities completely unrelated to their field of activism, and that they continue their grassroots work after the paid respite. For more information contact the Charles Bannerman Memorial Fel lowship Program, c/o The Youth Project, 2335 18th St. NW, Washing ton, D.C. 20009 (202) 483-0030. AFFINITY CARDS, REFERENCE AWARD The Hispanic National Bar Association has announced that it has teamed up with Maryland Bank, N.A., to offer an affinity credit card. The bank and HNBA are making available the Gold MasterCard at an annual percentage rate of 16.9%, with a waiver ofthe annual $36 fee fo r the first year and up to a $15,000 credit line. Call1-800-847-7378 ... The Denali Press and the American Library Association have an nounced the establishment of The Denali Press Award. The $500 award is to recognize outstanding reference works on U.S. ethnic and minority groups. Information and applications are available from An drew Hansen, American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, Ill. 60611, or call1-800-545-2433. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES The La Raza Lawyers Association of California elects Thomas Spiel bauer, a Santa Ana County deputy public defender, president ... PODER --Programas de Ocupaciones y Desarrollo Econ6mico Real --pres ents its Community Service Award to Jose Vega, assistant dean of the College of Education at the University of Wisconsin, River Falls. As chairman of the group's board of directors and a founding member, Vega helped to attract federal and state grants so that PODER could establish educational programs ... Calendar THIS WEEK HISPANIC LINK TRIBUTE Washington, D.C. Oct. 16 The University of Wisconsin, River Falls, is sponsor ing a workshop aimed at promoting cultural and racial harmony on college campuses. Conference leaders will discuss racism, how to prevent conflicts from occurring and other topics. The American Gl Forum will have a roast honoring Pablo Sedillo, executive director of the Secretariat for Hispanic Affairs atthe U.S. Catholic Conference. Money raised will be used to support the Forum's community programs. The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials will sponsor a salute to the Hispanic Link News Service for its 1 0 years of service to the community. U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros Lehtinen (R-Fia.) will be among the expected guests. Michael Zamba (202) 546-2536 ART CONFERENCE Albuquerque, N.M. Oct. 18 The Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce and the Hispanic Culture Foundation are present ing "Art Means Business." The conference will pro vide information about how New Mexico artists and arts communities can promote and develop their work in the Hispanic art market. Diane Perez (505) 842-9003 RACIAL HARMONY River Fails, Wis. Oct. 18, 19 4 O.J. Clark (715) 425-3771 MARKETING CONFERENCE New York Oct. 18-20 Advertising Age magazine is sponsoring the sec ond annual "Hispanic Media and Marketing Con ference." It will offer sessions on creative strategies, promotions and public relations, media alterna tives and other issues facing those who want to reach the Hispanic market. Susan Damiani 1-800-233-3435 BAR CONVENTION Washington, D.C. Oct. 18-21 The National Hispanic Bar Association is holding its 14th annual convention. Attorneys, judges, public officials and educators will give presentations, and seminars on office management, immigration law, communications law and other topics will be held. Michael Martinez (212) 840-7570 Gl FORUM ROAST Washington, D.C. Oct. 19 Oct. 16, 1989 Alex Armendaris (202) 833-1866 LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Los Angeles Oct. 20-22 The United Teachers-Los Angeles union's Chi cano/Latino Education Committee, along with the Media Institute, will co-sponsor the third annual "Chicano Youth Leadership Conference." Some of the issues to be discussed include culture and identity, personal development and self-esteem, and college and scholarship. Mark Meza-Overstreet (213) 221-5250 HEALTH CAREERS San Antonio Oct. 22-24 Health research company Technautics Inc . is spon soring a symposium that will provide Hispanic high school, undergraduate, graduate and medical stu dents and their educators information about train ing and career opportunities in biomedical/health research. Gerald L6pez (703) 920-0373 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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Carmen Abreu -John Aldr1 10 000 Cruz -Liliana D Joseph Fernandez -JosepJ Gomez -Hec zalez -Elisa Granados I tria Hernandez -Mario J = REASONS scoso -Edgar Ochoa -Mary -Cla checo Steph< $ ULD SUPPORJ'eralta -Kri laine Quintanc WHY YOU HO Zamirez -Ric Sara Ramos -Leonard Ranaud N SF -Rolando Reyes Rebecca lia Rodriguez Barbara Rodz H na Rodriguez Jose .Rodrigu nd Rodriguez -Lucinda Romel , Jr. -Ide inas -Auro Walter Schm s hi e 11 s R In the last thirteen years, the National Hispanic Scholarship -Laura T 0 ji llo -ste Fund has awarded $6.4 million in scholarships to 10,000 ld urrabazo dez -Jaime deserving Hispanic-American students nationwide. a -saul va gas -Elisa Velez Rive gi 1 -Veron With the Strong support from CFC individual contributors a Zamarripa no -Aurora and the corporate sector, NHSF has been able to make Abreu Del a y 0 -Myrna the educational . dreams of thousands of Hispanic-American i d a 1 g 0 -J u ial -Jorge students a reality. As expected, hundreds of these Rodriguez -driguez E . recipients are the sons and daughters of federal workers . Veronica Be asquillo Patricia C samuel coop We encourage you to join the NHSF partnership which -Natalia D 11 i am Dwyer has proven to be very successful in the last decade. t rad a -Hec ras -Angel Become a part of NHSF's efforts at assisting a greater do Franco -Gamboa -ca number of deserving Hispanic-American scholars. DesigOlga Garcia Rebecca Gar nate the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund on your es -Beatri G C -Belinda G omez -yn Combined Federal Campaign pledge. Francisco G tierrez -Le ez Susie YOUR HELP IS NEEDED! Bernardo H j os a Pat r ........... """"'""'""---------, -Jeffrey J Jacquez R -Brenda Jo Leff :-tary National Hispanic Scholarship Fund Lopez -Jua Maria Lopez P.O. Box 748 Pamela Luce Joey Machad If ez-Willia ez -Antoni San Franci _sco, Ca I ornia 94101 -Jeffrey Magda 1 en a M o ,\f i rand a NURSE PRACTITIONER The University of Wisconsin-White water Student Health Services an nounces a 75% nine-month position for a Gynecologic Clinical Nurse Specialist/Nurse Practitioner to pro vide reproductive health care, coun seling, manage contraceptives, GYN care and treatment of STDs in collabo ration with supervising physician. May also have responsibility in prin1ary care. To obtain further information and a position announcement, interested persons should write or call: Ruth Swisher Student Health Service UW-Whitewater Whitewater, Wl53190 (414) 472-5600 The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater is an equal oppatunity employer. RADIO REPORTER Serious committed radio news opera tion seeks experienced reporter. Will produce news and feature reports for daily news program; must generate story ideas, research, interviews, and use standard broadcast equipment to produce reports. Minimum 2 years broadcast news experi ence required. Must have strong writing, interviewing, and journalistic skills plus mature, credible announcing style. De gree preferred. Send letter, non returnable tape and salary expectations to : James Horn, Personnel Director, KERA, 3000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75201 (214) 871-1390. EEO Hispanic Link Weekly Report PROJECT DIRECTOR National Hispanic Organization seeks Senior Policy Analyst/Project Director for Hispanic Elderly Network Projects. Good organizational skills needed. Knowledge of and experience with pol icy-making process at the state and federal level preferred. Experience with minority elderly issues and/or programs required. Excellent writing and oral communication skills required. Advanced degree in relevant field strongly pre ferred. Salary approximately $32,000, negotiable depending on experience. Please contact: Charles Kamasaki National Council of La Raza 810 First Street N.E. Suite 300 Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 289-1380 Oct 16, 1989 DEAN, COLLEGE OF LAW NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY DeKalb, Illinois Northern Illinois University invites appli cations and nominations for the positionof Dean of the College of Law. The Dean of the College of Law serves as the chief academic and administrative of ficer of the only state law school in northern Illinois, an area in which more than eight million people live. Founded in 1974, the College currently offers a full-time pro. gram to over 300 students, with a faculty of 19 full-time members. As a member of a faculty committed to excellence, the Dean exercises the creative leadership neces sary to realize the full potential of the aca demic program. Off campus, primary re sponsibilities include maintaining a close working relationship with the Bench and Bar and communicating the College's goals and programs to alumni, as well as various state and national constituencies. The Dean is an important member ofthe university's administration and works closely with the university President and Provost. Northern Illinois is a major instructional and research center enrolling more than 24,000 students on and off cam pus. In addition to the J.D., the university offers baccalaureate, master's, Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees. These programs are of fered in 40 academic departments in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business, Education, Engineering and Technology, Law, Professional Studies, and Visual and Performing Arts. Candidates should have an established record of distinguished professional achievement indicating the ability to pro vide leadership in the College's academic mission and in its institutional relationship with a variety of university and external constituencies. A detailed job description will be provided all applicants. Nominations are invited. Applications, including curriculum vita, and names, addresses and telephone numbers of five references, must be received no later than Janua,Y 1 , 1990. Send to: Dr. Kendall L. Baker Vice President and Provost Chair, College of Law Dean Search Committee Northern Illinois University DeKalb, IL 60115 NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNNERSITY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. WOMEN AND MI NORITIES ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY. . ::: . . . . . 1: .• ! : i!!!i ; . . . ; . . . . . . : . : .. . : ::/\ = . . . : . ; : : . : . : . . : : ! ; : : ; i : . : . : : : . . j . . .. . : : .. . . : : : : : : : . : .. : 1 : : : • l • : . . : : : . : : . : l 5

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Arts & Entertainment Another Los Angeles-based Latino group has expressed its dissat isfaction over the fact that Old Gringo is not being released by Columbia in a Spanish-language version in the United States, al though the film premiered last month in Mexico with 55 subtitled prints. GRINGO CONTROVERSY: A Los Angeles-based Latino group is protesting what it calls .. stereotypical portrayals of Mexicans" in the just released film Old Gringo. .. What is Columbia afraid of by not releasing this film in our native language to our community?" asked Armando Dur6n, president of the National Hispanic Media Coalition, in a statement. .. How can a real dialogue occur if many in our community can't partake in any dialogue until weeks after the film is released?" Members oft he Mexican American Coalition picketed a Los Angeles benefit screening of the film --produced for Columbia Pictures by Jane Fonda's Fonda Films --the eve of its national opening, Oct. 6. According to Raul Rufz, a Chicano studies professor at the California State University, Northridge, campus and a coalition spokesperson, the film contains II a double standard ... a heroic, courageous old gringo and ... cowardly, violent Mexican males and whorish females ... " Coalition members reportedly objected to the fact that an Argentine, Luis Puenzo, was chosen to write and direct the film, and that a Puerto Rican actor, Jimmy Smits, was given the only Mexican lead role. According to Santiago Pozo, president of The Arenas Group, a publicity firm hired by Columbia to promote the film among Spanish language media, .. Old Gringo is an upscale picture that will appeal to middle-class Latinos, people who are already in the mainstream. It doesn't have blue-collar appeal." Old Gringo is based on a novel by Mexican author Carlos Fuentes, who reportedly approved oft he Puenzo screenplay (written in collabo ration with Aida Bartnik) and cooperated with Fonda during the making of the film. Fonda stars with Gregory Peck and Smits in the work. ONE LINER: This year's Women in Film Festival, which continues in Los Angeles through Oct. 19, includes the film La ofrenda, pro duced and directed by Oscar -nominated film makers Lourdes Portillo and Susana Munoz. The film reflects onthe pre-Hispanic origins of El dfa de los muertos and its present-day celebration in Mexico and the United States. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report TRAINING PROGRAM SHELVED: After 13years of service, the Berkeley, Calif.-based Institute for Journalism Education will scrap its Summer Program for Minority Journal ists, it announced Oct. 5. Founded in 1969 at New York's Columbia University and considered the most success ful endeavor of its kind, the program had trained and placed 275 entry-level daily news paper reporters, 20% of whom were Latinos. .. If it hadn't been for the program, I would never have had an opportunity in the profes sion," said Virginia Escalante, who graduated from the program in 1979. "We're already hurting for minority representation. The death of this program is an additional blow." Escalante was placed in a reporting posi tion at the Los Angeles Times after completing the program and is now associate profes sor of journalism at the University of Arizona. "We can't do everything," said IJE presi dent Steve Montiel. "But there are enough HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service Inc. 1420 •N• Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or (202) 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Unk Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (131ssues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED$: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. other routes that (eliminating the program) isn't going to have an adverse effect." He added that IJ E was prepared to offer its experience and expertise to help other entities establish a similar program. The summer program, which was run in cooperation with the school of journalism at the University of California, Berkeley, offered 11 weeks of intensive training for up to 15 participants each year. Trainees received tui tion, transportation, room and board and a monthly stipend, and were guaranteed placement with a sponsoring newspaper upon completion of the program . Montiel said the institute was shifting its emphasis away from helping Hispanic, plack, Asian American and Native American reporters break into journalism. Instead, he said it would concentrate on training those already in the business for promotions to management positions. "We feel that in the long run, the more editors and managers there are who are nonwhite, the more who will get in the door as a result," Montiel said. Felix Gutierrez, dean of academic services and special programs at the University of Sourthern California in Los Angeles and a former professor of journalism there, agreed that the change was appropriate. "It doesn't make a whole lot of sense Latinos into the business if they're leaving the business at higher rates than whites," he said. NAHJ CREATES INTERNSHIP FUND: A fund to provide annual12-month reporting internships at Hispanic Link News Service in Washington, D.C., for aspiring Latino journal ists was announced Oct. 16 by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. Supported by contributions from founda tions, corporations and individuals, the fund will provide $16,000 yearly stipends to the interns, the first of whom will be selected in a national competition beginning later this fall. For more information on the fund or to receive an internship application, contad Frank Newton, executive director of NAHJ, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228. Danilo Alfaro NUMBER OF HISPANIC ORIGIN PERSONS: APRIL 1980 AND MARCH 1982 TO MARCH 1989 (Numbers in thousands) 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1989 Source: U.S. Census Bureau