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Hispanic link weekly report, October 21, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 21, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Congressional Hispanic Caucus member Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Calif.), chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, is heading that party's Project500, a consortium of party committees, unions and independent political groups whose goal is to retain 500 legislators in districts and states up for redistricting, in the next five years. . . Charito Kruvant, president of Creative Associates, a woman-owned consulting firm in Washington, D.C, is named the Small Business Administration’s Minority Small Business Person of the Year for Region III, which includes five northeastern states and the District of Columbia.. Minority Business Development Agency Director James Richardson-Gonzales announces the selection of the Ibero-American Chamber of Commerce of Washington, D.C., as the Minority Trade Association of the Year... New York Mayor
Edward Koch names a commission of 16 Hispanic New Yorkers to study poverty in their community. The Commission on Hispanic Concerns is chaired by Edgardo Vazquez, a senior vice president of Banco Popular de Puerto Rico... Independent Sector, a nonprofit coalition of over600 corporate, foundation and voluntary organization members, elects Ratil Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, as its secretary. Elected to the board are Linda Flores, president of the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, and Juan Rosario, national executive director of Aspira of America... Piedad Bucholtz, a Cuban immigrant who began her career in Florida’s Dade County school system 18 years ago as a teacher’s aide, is named executive assistant to Superintendent Leonard Britton. Currently the South Central Area office’s superintendent, Bucholtz will become the second-ranking Hispanic woman in the system, behind Associate Superintendent Elvira Dopico...
(^HHISPANi^JN^WEEKL^ REPORT1985
Continuous Funding for Voter Registration Urged
Three Hispanic voter registration projects combined efforts in 1984 to produce one of the nation’s largest chunks of new voters, a new report showed. But, it added, they need continuous funding for voter education and organizing activities to be truly effective.
interface, a research organization in New York, conducted a seven-month study of 12 regional and nationwide non-partisan voter registration projects for 27 of the 85 foundations
health Disparity’ Found
Margaret Heckler, outgoing Secretary of Health and Human "Services, released a report Oct. 16 which identified six areas that account for more than 80% of the health disparity between minority and nonminority U.S. residents.
The areas she isolated as causing 60,000 “excess deaths” among minorities each year include cancer, cardiovascular disease/ stroke, chemical dependency (as determined by cirrhosis of the liver mortality rates), diabetes, infant deaths and homicide/suicide/ accidents.
The study, “Report of the Secretary’s Task Force on Black& Minority Health,” fills seven volumes but contains limited health data on Latinos. Responding to a Weekly Report question, Heckler concurred that the taskforce found a “paucity of information” on Hispanics. That was due in part, she said, because “Hispanic growth has been fairly recent.”
Dr. Manning Feinleibt a task force member and director of the National Center for Health Statistics, which is overseeing the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES), added that first findings from that study would be available next month.
Among Hispanic statistics quoted in the Heckler task force survey were 1982 figures on live birth rate ratios. They showed the percentage of live births below 2,500 grams (5.5 pounds) to be 5.6% for whites, 5.7% for Mexican Americans, 5.8% for Cuban Americans, 9.1 % for Puerto Ricans, and 12.4% for blacks.
VOTERS REGISTERED IN 1984
SVREP 432,400
MVREP 162,200
NPR/HVPP 11,925
Source: Expanding Voter Registration - Interface
and corporations which funded them last year. The studied projects conducted 1,033 grassroots campaigns in 44 states and the. District of Columbia. More than two-thirds of the money contributed by the 85 foundations went to the 12 projects.
The Oct. 4 report, “ Expanding Voter Participation: An Assessment of 1984 Non-Partisan Voter Registration Efforts,” found that the projects registered 2.5 million of the 11 to 12 million total new registrants. The foundations contributed $6.7 million, while the projects raised an additional $2 million themselves.
An emphasis on registering large numbers of voters and a drop in financing between national elections make it difficult for organizations to establish registration programs
Extension for Latino Office
Chicago Mayor Harold Washington signed an executive order Oct. 15 extending for two years the Commission on Latino Affairs he created in October 1983, six months after taking office.
Maria Torres, executive director of the 15-member commission, said it will continue to be funded at $200,000 annually and operate with a staff of five. Torres noted that the commission has made 113 recommendations to the mayor in the last 18 months, 50% of which have been implemented.
Among the mayor’s actions were an executive order striking any reference to immigrant status on city job applications and a directive ordering the city personnel department to do a study on past patterns of discrimination in city hiring, Torres said. She added that the commission played a key role in having the 1992 World’s Fair canceled in that city. The commission argued that it would displace the Hispanic community of Pilsen and that contracts to Hispanics were inadequate.
with continuity, the study said.
“It is important that the people who fund voter registration understand that establishing a pattern of funding every four years when they need the Mexican vote is going to result in lower registration and turnout. It will foster alienation from the political process because they (Mexicans) are going to be voting and not seeing a remedy where it matters the most- at the local level,” said William Velasquez, executive director of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project. His organization was among those surveyed for the report.
The report noted that while both registration and turnout increased significantly in 1984, the turnout percentage declined in relation to registration since the 1980 election. It identified “the need for more year-round organizing to connect the importance of voter participation to the local issues that affect people’s most pressing needs.”
The Southwest and Midwest Voter Registration Education Projects and the National Puerto Rican/Hispanic Voter Participation Project combined efforts to register 606,525 new voters in more than 20 states.
Luis Cab4n, director of NPR/HVPP, said the report’s claim of 11,925 registered by his group reflects records kept by his office
____________________________continued on page 2
Guzman Services Set
The University of Santa Clara will conduct memorial services for Dr. Ralph Guzman, provost of Merrill College there between 1982-1984, at its Professional Arts Theater Oct. 23.
Guzman, 60, died Oct. 10 following a stroke. He was buried Oct. 12.
At the time of his death, he was working on two books, one on Chicanos in public policy and another oh accessibility to health services by international migrant families. Both will be completed by co-authors.
Surviving are a daughter, Christine, and his former wife, Margaret Stella Guzman.
A memorial foundation is being established at Santa Clara in his name.


Sin pelos en la
Draped in recognition for his accomplishments as an educator and a statesman, Ralph Guzm&n was buried in Santa Cruz, Calif., Oct. 12.
He spent his last months back in the classroom, at the University of California’s Merrill College, where he had served as provost from 1982 through 1984. Prior to that, he had served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs.
Guzman came to the United States from Mexico at age 5. Throughout most of his 60 years, he played Anglo games by Anglo rules on Anglo fields, and consistently he was a winner.
Yet his successes never seemed to give him the satisfaction he found as a teacher, sitting one-on-one, inspiring struggling Latino and Latina students. It was as though all of the rest was play-acting.
He was a wonderful storyteller. Upbeat. But his tales were spiced with the burning chile of reality.
As a child of the depression, he lived for a while in Clemenceau, Ariz., where the Mexicans were separated from the rest of town by a barb wire fence. He remembered that.
When Mexico's Jos6 Lopez Portillo visited the White House, President Carter trotted out Guzmin. his top State Department
Hispanic, to help greet the president of the neighbor republic. But during introductions, Carter became confused and welcomed Ralph, his own high appointee, to the United States. Ralph laughed whenever he told that one.
But when Guzman addressed an historic encuentro of Mexican and Mexican American educators in Mexico City in 1980, he revealed a little more of himself. He dwelled on “growing up Mexican in the United States.” He commented that at school he was sometimes taught by “racists with inferior mentalities.”
“It was not pleasant for my generation,” he said. “(It) meant suffering and considerable deprivation, but it also meant a toughening of the spirit and the acquisition of special wisdom.”
He talked often of his mother-“a beautiful woman with maybe two years of Mexican education.” Addressing a Cinco de Mayo audience of Latinos at Harvard University a few years ago, he concluded with an anecdote about the day he came home from school with his first bloody nose. He recalled his mother's advice:
“You’ll suffer much in this country if you don’t study the Americans. Watch closely how they move their mouths, how they laugh. Ask what they eat. Learn, pero nunca, nunca, nieges tu raza. Never, never, turn your Dack on your heritage.”
Ralph Guzman never did. -Kay Barbaro
Puerto Rico Flood Victims Aided Voter Registration Study
Puerto Rican and other Hispanic organizations are joining efforts to aid the victims of the early October floods and mudslide in Puerto Rico in which 7,000 people were left homeless and more than 500 believed killed.
Hispanic organizations are working to collect money for the families affected by the disaster. Even Mexican performers here and in Mexico - busy as they are with theirown reconstruction efforts after last month’s earthquakes- took time to appear in a segment of a telethon benefit Oct. 20 produced by two Puerto Rican television channels and transmitted by the Spanish International Network. Segments were included from Los Angeles, New York, San Juan and Mexico City.
A Weekly Report sampling of aid efforts shows:
• In Chicago, five Hispanic radio stations aired Oct. 12 an 18-hour radio marathon which collected $65,518 in donations. Nely Miranda, director of the Governor's Office of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico in that city, said that the donations were being deposited
Judge Halts INS Raids
A U.S. District Court judge in San Francisco granted a preliminary injunction Oct. 11 prohibiting the Immigration and Naturalization Service from entering businesses without a warrant, consent or urgent circumstances.
The injunction by Judge Robert Aguilar is the result of a suit filed in November 1984 by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund on behalf of the International Molders’ Union Local 164, five employers and nine individuals. The suit charged the INS with conducting more than 30 raids at approximately 24 different work sites from 1982 though 1985 without consent or by coercing owners into consent.
Justice Day Celebrated
The National Day of Justice for immigrants and Refugees was held Oct. 19 in 20 cities across the nation to highlight the contributions of immigrants and shed light on their plight.
in bank accounts in the Chicago Dranch of Banco Popular de Puerto Rico and in the Cooperative de Caballeros de San Juan.
• In New York, according to Noemi Santana, president of the New York City chapter of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women (NACOPRW), activities ranged from a benefit day by a predominantly Hispanic school district in the Bronx to Mayor Koch’s gesture providing a room in City Hall for the press conference launching the fundraising campaign.
As of Oct. 16, funds collected by the Migration Office of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, which is administering the money, amounted to approximately $200,000, according to its director, Jose Lumen Roman.
• In Washington, D.C., civic organizations, government representatives and other individuals organized a Catholic mass Oct. 20 led by Puerto Rican Bishop Alvaro Corrada del Rio. Funds collected are being sent to the U nited for Puerto Rico Fund, organized by the Puerto Rican government and private sector, and to the Ponce Emergency Relief Fund. Some of the monies will be used for house construction.
• Alicia Baro> national president of NACOPRW, said from Miami that people from all around the state were sending money and donating “all types of goods like clothes, shoes and even furniture.” Baro said that the money was being sent to the American Red Cross’ Puerto Rico Disaster Fund.
- Dora Delgado
Bill Forbids Alien Count
A bill to prohibit the Census Bureau from including undocumented workers in the population count used for Congressional reapportionment was introduced in the Senate Oct. 3 by Sen. Thad Cochran (R-Miss.).
He claims that in 1980, California and New York were granted additional representation in the House of Representatives because of their large undocumented populations, depriving Indiana and Georgia of seats.
continued from page 1
since September 1984 and not the total 50,000 he registered since his organization began working in April 1984. Cabdn added that many sites where workers conducted registration did not keep copies of registration forms, a practice begun in September.
Other projects with substantial new registrants for 1984 included the Citizen Leadership Foundation (656,000), National Coalition on Black Voter Participation (359,809) and Project Vote (500,000).
Overall, the report found that the projects were effective in registering new voters while Operating with small staffs(under 10 on average) and conducting 10 to 200 local campaigns spread out over five to 26 states.
The report recommended that
• Funders consider long-term commitments of sustained funding to qualified organizations to enable continuous planning, organizing and voter education activities.
• Voter education efforts should focus on local elections, personal contact and discussion and continued activity between elections.
• Organizations should seek specializations to better divide tasks among themselves to increase efficiency and reduce competition.
The report concluded that to be effective, "non-partisan organizations must have some assurances of continuity; they cannot be expected to spring full-blown prior to each presidential election and find a community receptive to their message after four years of neglect. _ Ca(./os Morales
Dropout Funds Approved
A bill authored by California state Sen. Torres providing $3.1 million to combat the dropout problem there became law Oct. 2.
Gov. George Deukmejian signed the bill funding programs in school districts identifying high-risk youth. Money will also be provided for independent programs working to resolve the problem.
The Hispanic dropout rate in California is 43.2%. For Anglos, it is 30.5%.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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THE GOOD NEWS
VOTER REGISTRATION PROJECTS STUDY: Interface, an independent, non-profit public policy research organization in New York, has produced a report on 12 major voter registration efforts conducted across the country in 1984. A 39-page summary of the report is free. The full 500-page report is $15 (prepaid orders only). Contact: Interface, 251 Park Ave. South, 12th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10010(212) 674-2121.
Following are five of the projects included in the above report, with information on how to request their publications:
SOUTHWEST VOTER REGISTRATION EDUCATION PROJECT: A free brochure and list of publications produced by the project are available. Contact SVREP, 201 North St Mary’s St., Suite 501, San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 222-0224.
NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN/HISPANIC VOTER PARTICIPATION PROJECT: A free brochure and year-end report on the projects efforts in 1984 are available. The project has also produced an exit poll study it conducted in 10 cities following the 1984 presidential elections. Cost: $10. Contact NPR/HVPP, 1767 Morris Ave., Union, N.J. 07083 (201) 688-9090.
MIDWEST VOTER REGISTRATION EDUCATION PROJECT: The project has published 37 reports on Hispanic political demographics and plans to produce 30 more by the end of the year. For a list of what’s available, free, or to obtain a brochure explaining the project, contact: Juan Andrade Jr., 50 W. Broad St., Suite 1225, Columbus, Ohio 43215(614) 464-1116.
NATIONAL COALITION ON BLACK VOTER PARTICIPATION INC.: The coalition has a free annual report and Spring 1985 newsletter detailing its efforts in 1984. It will also release next spring a brochure titled“How to Organize and Implement a Successful Non-Partisan Voter Participation Campaign.” Cost: $5. Contact: NCBVP, 1101 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Suite 925, Washington, D.C. 20004 (202) 898-2220.
LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS EDUCATION FUND: The league has a free brochure on its vote project and a catalog of publications which cost 75$ to $1. There is also a$1 poster on voter registration procedures by state. Contact LWVEF, c/o Election Services, 1730 M St. NW, Washington, D C. 20036 (202)429-1965.
HEALTH THsPORT: i he U.S. Department of Health and Human Services releaseda£39rfjaagesexecutive summary of the “Report of the Secretary’s Task Force:on Black & Minority Health” on Oct 16. Representatives of Hispanic organizations and media may obtain a free copy by contacting Moses Newson, Press Office, Room 638 E, Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DiC. 20201 (202) 245-6343.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
N.A.H.J. EDUCATION SPECIALIST
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists, based in Washington, DC, seeks someone to develop and implement educational activities for Hispanics nationally. Salary is $22,000 -$25,000. Candidate must have:
• 2 yearsof experience teaching (or working with) students.
• Educational background plus on-the-job experience in print or broadcast journalism.
Fluency in Spanish and English, written and verbal.
• Willingness to travel
• Good speaking ability and presentation of self.
• Knowledge of the East Coast educational systems, including journalism schools and (especially) the * Hispanic experience” in colleges and high schools in the East
Good interpersonal skills.
Send resume toe Frank Newton, Ph.D, Executive Director, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045-
FACULTY VACANCIES
The Department of English at Iowa State University has six tenure-track positions for the Fall of 1986. Applicants must complete all requirements for Ph.D. by May 1986. M LA interview or interview in Ames Iowa atapplicanfs expense required. All positions listed are available mid-August 1986. Application deadline: Dec 2. The six tenure-track positions are:
Asst. Prof. - American Literature; Asst. Prof. - American Literature/Literature by and about Women; Asst. Prof.-Creative Writing(Fiction/ Essays); Asst Prof.- Creative Writing (Poetry); Asst Prof.-Reading; and Asst Prof.-Secondary English Education.
Send application letter, vita and dossier (creative writing candidates should also send samples of writing) to: Frank E. Haggard Chair, Department of English, Iowa State University, 203 Ross Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011.
ASSOCIATE DEAN SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE Genesee Valley Regional Center in Rochester, N.Y.
SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE, a national leader in non-traditional higher education, is seeking an Associate Dean. The Associate Dean has leadership responsibility for the academic program of the Center, maintaining standards and improving academic, quality, program innovation and development, maintaining and improving academic systems and faculty development. Salary:'low 40's. Hire date: Feb.’86. For further, information, call Dean V. Montana (716) 244-364 >
THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK
Has openings for LAW SCHOOL PROFESSOR, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OR ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. The. City University of New York School of Lawat Qqeens College began its third year of classes in September. We seek approximately four full-time faculty members for the 1986-87 academic year.
Please send a current resume, including references, to: Dean John Farago, CUNY School of Law at Queens College, 200-01 42nd Ave., Bayside, New York 11361.
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS sought by the New Jersey Education Association. Salary is commensurate with experience & training. The position requires initiative, self-motivation, and administrative competence. Ability to speak with professional skills and authority should be demonstrated. The individual must have sufficient physical and emotional stamina to spend long hours/nights and weekends. Apply to: Dr. James P. Con nerton, Executive Director, New Jersey Education Association, 180 West State St., P.O. Box 1211, Trenton, N.J. 08607.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Maryland, are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
MINORITY AND WOMEN-OWNED BUSINESS
CONFERENCE
Austin, Texas Oct. 21-22
Workshops on making business contacts* purchasing opportunities, tips on bidding and bonding and small business resources are featured Linda Lewis (512) 463-1796
HISPANIC EMPLOYEES RECOGNITION DINNER Silver Spring, Md. Oct 22
The Montgomery County government association will honor individuals for efforts to improve count' services to the Hispanic community.
Betty Valdes (301) 840-2515
BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Denver Oct. 23-26
The president of the National Association for Bilingual Education, Gene Chavez, will be a featured speaker at this event sponsored by the Colorado Association for Bilingual Bicultural Education.
Rudy Ch&vez (303) 492-5416
HISPANIC CORRECTIONAL ASSOCIATION Pasadena, Calif. Oct 24,25 Correctional issues and patterns among Hispanics are explored at this conference sponsored by the Mexican American Correctional Association.
Henry Corrales (213) 620-4675
LATIN AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE FORUM New Orleans Oct. 24-26
Partially underwritten by the Louisiana governor’s Hispanic-American Affairs Commission, internationally known architects will discuss the Latin American influence on architecture in that city.
Jerome Alciatore (504) 888-2724
NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN COALITION CONFERENCE
Washington, D.C. Oct. 27-30 The theme of the National Puerto Rican Coalition's conference this year is “Survival and Growth: Puerto Rican Institutions in the Mid 1980s.”
Mara Patermaster(703) 684-0020
COMING SOON
HISPANIC PSYCHOTHERAPY CONFERENCE San Antonio, Texas Oct. 30-Nov. 1 The 2nd annual conference, co-sponsored by the National Coalition of Hispanic Mental Health and Human Services Organizations, will highlight culture-specific psychotherapy.
Tina Knoll (512) 226-3391
SMALL BUSINESS MARKETING SYMPOSIUM Williamsburg, Va. Oct. 31, Nov. 1 Topics such as telemarketing, direct mailing, publicity and media usage will be featured during this Small Business Administration-sponsored event. Success‘85 1-800-225-2468
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Arts & Entertainment
SOME 20,000 PERSONS ARE EXPECTED TO SEE the first showing of the 2nd annual Mira! Canadian Club Hispanic Art Tour whose recent opening in New York City coincided with the myriad of Hispanic art shows around the country.
In San Diego, a large exhibit of Chicano art in the Southwest ends this week. Made in Aztlan, which features paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings, photos, altars, videos and other multi-media works by over 50 artists, remains at the city’s Centro Cultural de la Raza through Oct. 27. A closing “re-encounter” Oct. 26 will include poetry readings by Chicano poets Alurista and Juan Felipe Herrera.
El Mundo de Agustin VictorCasasola-Mexico 1900-1938 continues at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago through Nov. 3. Besides the exhibit of works by the Mexican artist, a Viva Mexico series of cultural events has been held since early September. This week the program includes the Oct. 24 lecture by art historian Victor Sorell and the Oct. 26 screening of the film Redes.
In Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania is holding an exhibit
of Mayan textiles through Jan. 5 The Silent Language of Guatemalan Textiles includes 28 huipiles (shirts) with accompanying ethnographic photographs.
In New York City, the non-profit Friends of Puerto Rico Inc. presents at the Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art (MoCHA) an installation of sculptures by Jorge Luis Rodriguez and altars by Charles Abramson. Titled Orisha/Santos, the show provides an artistic interpretation of the siete potencias, or African deities.
Other exhibit dates include Eightieth Street Paintings, by Spanish artist Cesar Nicolau at Queens College, New York, through Nov. 1; Jesus Rafael Soto: A Retrospective Space/Art at the Miami Center forthe Fine Arts through Nov. 3; Peruvian Paintings 1985, an exhibit in Los Gatos, Calif., by Haydee Percivale Pastor through Nov. 1; and Huellas, a multi-artist show at the Washington, D.C., Galeria INTI though Nov. 3.
The works of 31 Hispanic artists are included in this year's edition of the Mira! tour. The show will continue at New York’s Museo del Barrio through Jan. 26. From there, the show will travel to various cities across the United States.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
COVERAGE OF PUERTO RICO: The failure of mainland media to cover events in the U.S. commonwealth of Puerto Rico has long been accepted by Puerto Rican leaders and journalists as an immutable press bias.
Language and culture were frequently cited as reasons why such distant, less populated U.S. possessions as Alaska and Hawaii, in their pre-statehood days, regularly gained positive newspaper attention while the Caribbean island went ignored.
The slow and slim coverage by U.S. media of the Oct. 7 Mameyes mud slide, which may have entombed as many as 500 people, may finally - albeit tragically - help critics make their point.
The New York Times, which has had a running battle with that city’s Puerto Rican leaders over its failure to hire or cover Latinos, surveyed several majordailiesontheirfailure to report much on the Puerto Rico disaster, .and most editors admitted that they blew it.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (1 3 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS. Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
Its survey was published Oct. 15, after New York’s Spanish-language daily, El Diario-La Prensa, protested that the disaster received only “a few flimsy columns in most papers and barely a mention on radio and television news.”
Samples of what the Times was told:
The Washington Post: “We were slow off the mark at the outset, and I have no good excuse for that.”
The New York Daily News: “There were a lot of other things going on and we just blew it.”
The Los Angeles Times sent a reporter to Ponce for one day. “In retrospect,” its national editor said, “I would have kept the reporter there to do a follow-up.”
Gerson Borerro, of the New York-based Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, called coverage of the slide - which occurred the same day the Achille Lauro was hijacked in the Mediterranean - “shameful."
“The hijacking of the ship was important, but there was no balance," he told the Times.
Louis Nunez, president of the National
“It has a fixation on the Middle East,” he told Weekly Report. “Basically, it’s very poor on all of Latin America"
“The U.S. media is ambivalent about Puerto Rico,” added Juan Gonzdlez, a founder of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights and a reporter and columnist with the Philadelphia Daily News. “Sometimes if s treated like part of the United States, but more often if s played like another Latin American country."
Does the U.S. press’ realization that it overlooked a major story on the island herald a change of coverage habits.?
No one went so far as to suggest that
NAMES: Former Carter White House aide Raul Tapia has been elected chairman of Republic Communications Corp., permittee of KRRT-TV, scheduled to air next month as the first independent television station in the Kerrville-San Antonio, Texas market. . . In Miami, popular antFCommunist commentator Armando P§rez has been signed as general manager of Radio Mambi, the Spanish-language station which purchased the license and plant of WGBS-TV. It will begin broad-
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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-----------------------.,., 'J Making The News This Week OC1 2 J. \985 Edward Koch names a commission of 16 Hispanic New Yorkers to study poverty in their community. The Commission on Hispanic Concerns is chaired by Edgardo Vizquez, a senior vice president of Banco Popular de Puerto Rico ... Independent Sector. a nonprofit coalition of over600 corporate, foundation and voluntary organization members, elects Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, as its secretary . Elected to the board are Linda Flores, president of the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund, and Juan Rosario, national executive director of Aspira of America . .. Pledad Bucholtz, a Cuban immigrant who began her career in Florida's Dade County school system 18 years ago as a teacher's aide, is named executive assistant to Superintendent Leonard Britton. Currently the South Central Area office's superintendent, Bucholtz will become the second-ranking Hispanic woman in the system, behind Associate Superintendent Elvira Doplco ... Congressional Hispanic Caucus member Rep. Tony Coelho (D Calif.), chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, is heading that party's Project 500, a consortium of party committees, unions and independent political groups whose goal is to retain 500 ;legislators in districts and states up for redistricting, in the next five years. . . Charlto Kruvant, president of Creative Associates, a woman-owned consulting firm in Washington, D.C, is named the Small Business Administration's Minority Small Business Person of the Year for Region Ill, which includes five northeastern states and the District of Columbia .. Minority Business Development Agency Director James Richardson-Gonzales announces the selection of the lbero-American Chamber of Commerce of Washington, D .C., as the Minority Trade Association of the Year. . . New York Mayor Vol. 3 No. 42 HISPANIC LIN Continuous Funding for Voter Registration Urged Three Hispanic voter registration projects combined efforts in 1984 to produce one of the nation's largest chunks of new voters, a new report showed. -Bufltadded,they need continuous funding for voter education and _ organizing activities to be truly effective. rntertace, a research organization in New York, conducted a seven-month study of 12 regional and nationwide non-partisan voter . registration projects for 27 of the 85 foundations 'Health Disparity' Found Margaret Heckler, outgoing Secretary of Health and HumanSeiVIces, released a report Oct. 16 which identified six areas that account for more than 80% of the health disparity between minority and non minority U.S. residents. The areas she isolated as causing 60,000 "excess deaths" among minorities each year include cancer, cardiovascular disease/ stroke, chemical dependency (as determined by cirrhosis of the liver mortality rates), diabetes, infant deaths and homicide/suicide/ accidents. The study, "Report of the Secretary's Task Force on Black& Minority Health," fills seven volumes -6ufcontains limited health data on Latinos. Responding to a Weekly Report question, Heckler concurred that the task force found a "paucity of information" on Hispanics. That was due in part, she said, because "Hispanic growth has been fairly recent." Dr. Manning Feinleib, a task force member and director of the National Center for Health Statistics, which is overseeing the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES), added that first findings from that study would be available next month. Among Hispanic statistics quoted in the Heckler task force survey were 1982 figures on live birth rate ratios. They showed the percentage of live births below 2,500 grams (5.5 pounds) to be5.6% for whites, 5.7% for Mexican Americans, 5.8% for Cuban Americans, 9.1% for Puerto Ricans, and 12.4% for bll,lcks. VOTERS REGISTERED IN 1984 SVREP MVREP NPR/HVPP 432,400 162,200 11,925 Source: Expanding Voter Registration-Interface and corporations which funded them last year. The studied projects conducted 1 ,033 grassroots campaigns in 44 states and the District of Columbia. More than two-thirds of the money contributed by the 85 foundations went to the 12 projects. The Oct. 4 report," Expanding Voter Partici pation: An Assessment of 1984 NonPartisan Voter Registration Efforts," found that the projects registered 2.5 million of the 11 to 12 million total new registrants. The foundations contributed $6.7 million, while the projects raised an additional $2 million themselves. An emphasis on registering large numbers of voters and a drop in financing between national elections make it difficult for organi zations to establish registration programs Extension for Latino Office Chicago Mayor Harold Washington signed an executive order Oct. 1 5 extending for two years the Commission on Latino Affairs he created in October 1983, six months after taking office. Maria Torres, executive director of the 15 member commission, said it will continue to be funded at $200,000 annually and operate with a staff of five. Torres noted that the commission has made 113 recommendations to the mayor in the last 18 months, 50% of which have been implemented. Among the mayor's actions were an executive order striking any reference to immigrant status on city job applications and a directive ordering the city personnel department to do a study on past patterns of discrimination in city hiring, Torres said. She added that the commission played a key role in having the 1992 World's Fair canceled in that city. The commission argued that it would displace the Hispanic community of Pilsen and that con tracts to Hispanics were inadequate. with continuity, the study said. "It is important that the people who fund voter registration understand that establishing a pattern of funding every four years when they need the Mexican vote is going to result in lower registration and turnout. It will foster alienation from the political process because they (Mexicans) are going to be voting and not seeing a remedy where it matters the most-at the local level," said William Velasquez, executive director of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project. His organi zation was among those surveyed for the report. The report noted that while both registration and turnout increased significantly in 1984, the turnout percentage declined in relation to registration since the 1980 election. It identified "the need for more year-round organizing to connect the importance of voter participation to the local issues that affect people's most pressing needs." The Southwest and Midwest Voter Regis tration Education Projects and the National Puerto Rican/Hispanic Voter Participation Project combined efforts to register 606,525 new voters in more than 20 states. Luis Caban, director of NPR/HVPP , said the report's claim of 11 ,925 registered by his group reflects records kept by his office continued on page 2 Guzman Services Set The University of Santa Clara will conduct memorial services for Dr. Ralph Guzman, provost of Merrill College there between 1982, at its Professional Arts Theater Oct.23. Guzman, 60, died Oct. 10 following a stroke. He was buried Oct. 12. At the time of his death, he was working on two books, one on Chicanos in public policy and another on accessibility to health services by international migrant families. Both will be completed by co-authors. Surviving are a daughter, Christine , and his former wife, Margaret Stella Guzman . A memorial foundation is being established at Santa Clara in his name.

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Sin pelos en Ia len ,gua Hispanic, to help greet the president of the neighbor republic. But during introductions, Carter became confused and welcomed Ralph, his own high appointee, to the United States. Ralph laughed whenever he told that one. Draped in recognition for his accomplishments as an educator and a statesman, Ralph Guzman was buried in Santa Cruz, Calif., Oct. 12. He spent his last months back in the classroom, at the Universityof California's Merrill College, where he had served as provost from 1982 through 1984. Prior to that, he had served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs. Guzman came to the United States from Mexico at age 5. Throughout most of his 60 years, he played Anglo games by Anglo rules on Anglo fields, and consistently he was a winner. But when Guzman addressed an historic encuentro of Mexican and Mexican American educators in Mexico City in 1980, he revealed a little more of himself. He dwelled on "growing up Mexican in the United States." He commented that at school he was sometimes taught by "racists with inferior mentalities." Yet his successes never seemed to give him the satisfaction he found as a teacher, sitting one-on-one, inspiring struggling Latino and Latina students. It was as though all of the rest was play-acting. "It was not pleasant for my generation," he said. "(It) meant suffering and considerabl . e deprivation, but it also meant a toughening of the spirit and the acquisition of special wisdom." He talked often of his mother-"abeautiful woman with maybe two years of Mexican education." Addressing a Cinco de Mayo audience of Latinos at Harvard University a few years ago, he concluded with an anecdote about the day he came home from school with his first bloody nose. He recalled his mother's advice: He was a wonderful storyteller. Upbeat. But his tales were spiced with the burning chile of reality. As a child of the depression, he lived for a while in Clemenceau, Ariz., where the Mexicans were separated from the rest of town by a barb wire fence. He remembered that. "You'll suffer much in this country if you don't study the Americans. When Mexico's Jose Lopez Portillo visited the White House, President Carter trotted out Guzman. his top State DepartmP.Ilt Watch closely how they move their mouths, how they laugh. Ask what they eat. Learn, pero nunca, nunc a, nieges tu raza Never, never, turn your oacK on your heritage." Ralph Guzman never did. -Kay Barbaro Puerto Rico Flood Victims Aided Puerto Rican ana other Hispanic organizations are joining efforts to aid the victims of the early October floods and mudslide in Puerto Rico in which 7,000 people were left homeless and more than 500 believed killed. Hispanic organizations are working to collect money for the families affected by the disaster . Even Mexican performers here and in Mexico -busy as they are with their own reconstruction efforts after last month's earthquakes-took time to appear in a segment of a telethon benefit Oct. 20 produced by two Puerto Rican television channels and transmitted by the Spanish International Network. Segments were included from Los Angeles, New York, San Juan and Mexico City. A Weekly Report sampling of aid efforts shows: • In Chicago, five Hispanic radio stations aired Oct. 12 an 18-hour radio marathon which collected $65,518 in donations. Nely Miranda, director of the Governor's Office of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico in that city, said that the donations were being deposited Judg, e Halts 1 -NS Raids A U.S. District Court judge in San Francisco granted a preliminary injunction Oct. 11 prohibiting the Immigration and Naturalization Service from entering businesses without a warrant, consent OT urgent circumstances. The injunction by Judge Robert Aguilar is the result of a suit filed in November 1984 by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund on behalf of the International Molders' Union Local 164, five employers and nine individuals. The suit charg .ed the INS with conducting more than 30 raids at approximately .24 different work sites from 1982 though 1985 without consent or by coercing owners into consent. Justice Day Celebrated The National Day of Justice for Immigrants and Refugees was held Oct. 19 in 20 cities across the nation to highlight the contributions of immigrants and shed light on their plight. 2 in bank accounts in the Chicago oranch of Banco Popular de Puerto Rico and in the Cooperativa de Caballeros de San Juan. • In New York, according to NoemiSantana, president of the New York City chapter of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women (NACOPRW), activities ranged from a benefit day by a predominantly Hispanic school district in the Bronx to Mayor Koch's gesture providing a room in City Hall for the press conference launching the fundraising campaign. As of Oct. 16, funds collected by the Migration Office of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, which is administering the money, amounted to approximately $200,000, according to its director, Jose Lumen Roman. e In Washington, D.C., civic organizations, government representatives and other individuals organized a Catholic mass Oct. 20 led by Puerto Rican Bishop Alvaro Corrada del Rio. Funds collected are being sent to the United for Puerto Rico Fund, organized by the Puerto Rican government and private sector, and to the Ponce Emergency Relief Fund. Some of the monies will be used for 11ouse constructiol). • Alicia Baro, national president of NACOPRW, said from Miami that people from all around the state were sending money and donating "all types of goods like clothes, shoes and even furniture." Baro said that the money was being sent to the American Red Cross' Puerto Rico Disaster Fund. Dora Delgado Bill Forbids Alien Count A bill to prohibit the Census Bureau from including undocumented workers in the population count used for Congressional reapportionment was introduced in the Senate Oct. 3 Thad Cochran (RMiss.). He claims that in 1980, California and New York were granted additional repre sentation in the House of Representatives because of their large undocumented populations, depriving Indiana and Georgia of seats. Voter Registration Study continued from page 1 since September 1984 and not the total 50,000 he registered since his organization began working in April 1984. Caban added that many sites where workers conducted registration did not keep copies of registration forms, a practice begun in September. Other projects with substantial new registrants for 1984 included the Citizen Leadership Foundation (656,000), National Coalition on Black Voter Participation (359,809) and Project Vote (500,000). Overall, the report found that the projects were effective in registering new voters while Operating with small staffs (under 1 0 on average) and conducting 1 0 to 200 local campaigns spread out over five to 26 states. The report recommended that: • Funders . consider long-term commitments of sustained funding to qualified organizations to enable continuous planning, organizing and voter education activities. • Voter education efforts should focus on local elections, personal and discussion and continued activity between elections. • Organizations should seek specializations to better divide tasks among themselves to increase efficiency and reduce competition. The report concluded that to be effective, "non-partisan organizations must have some assurances of continuity; they cannot be expected to spring full-blown prior to each presidential election and find a community receptive to their message after four years of neglect." Carlos Morales Dro . pout Funds Approved A bill authored by California state Sen. Torres providing $3.1 million to combat the dropout problem there became law Oct. 2. Gov. George Deukmejian signed the bill funding programs in school districts identifying high-risk youth. Money will also be provided for independent programs working to resolve the . problem. The Hispanic dropout rate in California is 43.2%. For Anglos, it is 30.5%. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS VOTER REGISTRATION PROJECTS STUDY: Interface, an . independent, non-profit public policy research organization in New York, has produced a report on 12 major voter registration efforts conducted across the country in 1984. A 39-page summary of the report is free . The full500-page report is $15 (prepaid orders only). Contact: lnterface, . 251 Park Ave. South, 12th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10010 (212) 674-2121. Following are five of the projects included in the above report, with information on how to request their publications: SOUTHWEST VOTER -REGISTRATION EDUCATION PROJECT: A free brochure and list of publications produced by the project are available . Contact SVREP, 201 North StMary's St, Suite 501, San Antonio, Texas 78205 (512) 222-0224. NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN/HISPANIC VOTER PARTICIPATION PROJECT: A free brochure and year-end report on the projecfs efforts in 1984 are available. The project has also produced an exit poll study it conducted in 10 cities following the 1984 presidential elect ions. Cost: $10. Contact: NPR/HVPP, 1767 Morris Ave., Union, N.J . 07083 (201) 688-9090. MIDWEST VOTER REGISTRATION EDUCATION PROJECT: The project has published 37 reports on Hispanic political demographics and plans to produce 30 more by the end of the year. For a list of whafs available, free, or to obtain a brochure explaining the project, contact: Juan Andrade Jr., 50 W. Broad St, Suite 1225, Columbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 464-1116. NATIONAL COALITION ON BLACK VOTER PARTICIPATION INC.: The coalition has a free annual report and Spring 1985 newsletter detailing its efforts in 1 984. It will also release next spring a brochure titled"How to Organize and Implement a Succ-essful Non Partisan Voter Participation Campaign." Cost: $5. Contact: NCBVP, 1101 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Suite 925, Washington, D.C. 20.004 (202) 898-2220. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS EDUCATION FUND: The league has a free brochure on its vote project and a catalog ofpublications which cost 7 5 to $1, There is also a '$1 poster . on voter registration procedures by . stat-e. Contact: LWVEF, c/o Election Services, 1730 M St NW, Washington, D . C . '20036 (202)429-1965. HEALTH the U . S . .Department of Health and Human Services released :a-23 : 9-l*!,ge;-executive summary of the " Report of the Secr-etary',s T:ask Forcce.:on 'Black & Minority Health" on Oct 16. Representatives of Hispanic organizations and media may obtain a free copy by :contactiA!l Moses Newson, Press Office, Room 638 E, Department of Health :and Human Services, 200 Independence Ave . SW, Washington, .D.C. 20'201 (202) 245-6343. Denver Oct. 23'\ CO : R : PORATE CLASSI FIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispani c Link help you in your search f .or . executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified,adsto: .Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW . Washington, D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p . m . (ET) Tuesday will .be carried in .Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same .week. Ad r.ates : 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per .column inch. N . A. H . J . EDUCA"TI()N :SPECIALIST The Natiooal Association of Hispanic Journalists. based in Washington , . D .C., seeks someone to develop and implement educational activities for Hispanics nationally. Salary is .$22,000 .$25,000. Candidate must have: • 2 yearsofexperienceteaching(orworki ng with) students. e Educational background plus on-the-job experience in print or broadcast journalism. - • Fluency in Spanish and English , written and verbal. e Willingness to travel • Good speaking ability and presentation of self . e Knowledge of the East Coast educational systems, including journalism schools and the "H i spanic experience• in colleges and high schools in the Easl • Good i nterpersonal skills. Send resume .ta Frank Newton, Ph.D. Executive Director, National Assoc i ation of Hispanic Journalists, National Press Bu i lding. Suite 634, Washington , D . C . 20045. FACULTY VACANCIES The Department of English at Iowa State University has six tenure-track positions for the Fall of 1986. -Applicants must complete all requirements for Ph.D . by May 1986. MLA interview or interview in Ames. Iowa at applicanfs expense required. ' All positions listed are available m i d-August 1986. deadline: Dec. 2. Thesixtenure-trackpos itio ns are: Asst. Prof . American Literature; Asst. Pr of. -American Literature/Literature by and about Women; Asst. Prof.Creative Writing(Fiction/ Essays); Asst. Prof.Creative Writing (Poetry); Assl Prof. Reading; and Assl Prof.Secondary Engli sh Education. Send application letter, vita and dossier (creative writing candidates should also send samples of writing) to: Frank E . Haggard Chair, Department of English, Iowa State University, 203 Ross Hall, Ames. Iowa 5001 1. ASSOCIATE DEAN SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE Genesee Valley Regional Center in Roches ter, N.Y. SUN Y/ EMPIRE STATE COLLEG E , a national lead e r in n o n-trad itional h ig he r education, is seeking an Associate Dean. The Associate Dean has leadership responsibility for the academic program of the Center: maint aini ng standards and improving academic._quality, program i nnovation and development, maintaining and improving academic Systems and faculty developme nt. Salary. low 40's. Hire date: Feb. '86. For further. information, c all Dean V . Montana (716) 244-364 • THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK Ha s openings for. LAW SCHOOL PROFESSOR, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OR ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Th e City University of New Yo rk S chool of Law a1_ 011eens College began i t s third year of c lass e s i n September. We seek approximately fou r fuiHime faculty members for the 1986:87 academic year. Pleas e se nd a current resume, including ref e ren ces, to : Dean John CUNY School of Law a t Queens College, 200 4 2 nd Ave . , B aysi de, New York 11361. DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONSsought by the New Jersey Education Association. Salary is commensurate with experience & training. The position requires initiative, self motivation, a nd administrative competence. Ability to speak with professional skills and authorit y should be demonstrated . The individual must have su ffi cien t physical and emotional stamina to s p e nd long hours/nights and weekends. Apply to: Dr . James P . Connerton, Executive Director , New Jersey Education Assoc ia ti o n , 180 West State St., P . O . Box 1 2 1 1 , Trent on, N.J . 08607. ENTRY LEVEL Montgomery County , Maryland, are available on a continuous basis . Call (301) 251-2252. Washington, D . C . Oct. 27-30 Calen.da. r The president of the National Association for Bilingual Education, Gene Chavez, will be a featured speaker at this event sponsored by the Colorado Association for Bilingual Bicultural Education. The theme of the National Puerto Rican Coalition s conference this year is "Survival and Growth ; Puerto Rican Institutions in the Mid 1980s." Mara Patermaster (703) 684 THIS WEEK MINORITY AND WOMEN-OWNED BUSINESS CONFERENCE Austin, Texas Oct. 21 Workshops on making business contacts, purchasing opportunities, tips on bidding and bonding and small business resources are featured. Linda Lewis (512) 463 1796 HISPANIC EMPLOYEES RECOGNITION DINNER Silver Spring, Md. Oct. 22 Rudy Chavez (303) 492-5416 HISPANIC CORRECTIONAL ASSOCIATION Pasadena, Calif . Oct. 24,25 Correctional issues and patterns among Hispanics are explored at this conference , sponsored by the Mexican American Correctional Association. Henry Corrales (213) 620 LATIN AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE FORUM New Orleans Oct. 24-26 COMING SOON HISPANIC PSYCHOTHERAPY CONFERENCE San Antonio , Texas Oct. 30-Nov . 1 The 2nd annual conference, co-sponsored by the National Coalition of Hispanic Mental Health and Human Services Organizations, will highlight culture specific psychotherapy . Tina Knoll (512) 226 SMALL BUSINESS MARKETING SYMPOSIUM Williamsburg , Va. Oct. 31, Nov. 1 The Montgomery County government association will honor individuals for efforts to improve count' s ervice s to the Hispanic community . Betty Valdes (301) 840 BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE Hispanic Link Weekly Report Partially underwritten by the Louisiana governor's Hispanic-American Affairs CommisSion, internationally known architects will discuss the Latin American influence on architecture in that city . Jerome Alciatore (504) 888 NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN COALITION CONFERENCE Topics such as telemarketing, direct mailing, publicity and media usage will be featured during this Small Business Administration-sponsored event. Success '85 1-2468 3

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Arts & Entertainment ot Mayan te x tiles through Jan . 5 The Silent Language of Guatemalan Tex tiles includes 28 huipiles (shirts) with accompanying ethnographic photographs. SOME 20,000 PERSONS ARE EXPECTED TO SEE the first showing of the 2nd annual Mira! Canadian Club Hispanic Art Tour whose recent opening in New York City coincided with the myriad of In New York City, the non-profit Friends of Puerto Rico Inc. presents at the Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art (MoCHA) an installation of sculptures by Jorge Luis Rodriguez and altars by Charles Abramson. Titled Orisha/Santos, the show provides an artistic interpretation of the siete potencias, or African deities. Hispanic art shows around the country. In San Diego, a large exhibit of Chicano art in the Southwest ends this week. Made in Aztlan, which features paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings, photos, altars, videos and other multi-media wor-ks by over 50 artists, remains at the city's Centro Cultural de Ia Raza through Oct. 27. A closing " re-encounter'' Oct. 26 will include poetry readings by Chicano poets Alurista and Juan Felipe Herrera . Other exhibit dates include Eightieth Street Paintings, by Spanish artist Cesar Nicolau at Queens College, New York, through Nov. 1; Jesus Rafael Sotn: A Retrospective Space/Art at the Miami Center El Mundo de Agustin Victor Casasola Mexico 1900-1938 continues at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago through Nov . 3 . Besides the exhibit of works by the Mexican artist, a Viva Mexico series of cultural events has been held s ince early September. This week the program includes the Oct. 24 lecture by art historian Victor Sorell and the Oct. 26 screening of the film Redes . for the r-Tne)l.rtsthrough Nov.3; Peruvian Pamtmgs 1985, an exh1b1t m Los Gatos, Calif., by Haydee Percivale Pastor through Nov. 1; and Hue/las, a multi-artist show at the Washington, D .C., Galeria INTI though Nov. 3. The works of 31 Hispanic artists are included in this year's edition of the Mira! tour. The show will continue at New York's Museo del Barrio through Jan. -26. From there, fhe show will travel to various cities across the United States. In Philadelphia, thP. University of Pennsylvania is holding an exhibit -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report COVERAGE OF PUERTO RICO: The failure of mainland media to cover events in the U . S . commonwealth of Puerto Rico has long been accepted by Puerto Rican leaders and journalists as an immutable press bias . Language and culture were frequently cited as reasons why such distant, less populated U.S. possessions as Alaska and Hawaii , in their pre-statehood days , regularly gained positive newspaper attention while the Caribbean island went ignored . The slow and slim coverage by U . S . media of the Oct. 7 Mameyes mud slide , which may have entombed as many as 500 people , may finallyalbeit tragicallyhelp critics make their point. The New York Times, which has had a running battle with that city's Puerto Rican leaders over its failure to hire or cover Latinos, surveyed several major dailies on their failure _ to report much on the Puerto Rico disaster , most editors admitted that they blew it. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nat•onal pubt•cat•on of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street N . W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-0737 Publis her H ec t o r E ric k s en-Mendoza Editor Carl o s M o ral es Reporting: Dora Delgado, Feli x Perez , Charlie Er icksen, Antonio MejiasRentas , Elsa Ericksen Mendoza. No port1on ol H1span,c Lml< Week l y Report maybe reproduced or broadca s t m any lor m W ithout advance permiSSIOn Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (1 3 issues) $26. CONFERENC E COORD INATO RS : Include I h e latest e d ttto n of H•spantc L•nk Weekly R e p o rt m p a rtt c tpants' packets at your next conferenc e o r convent1 o n . F o r d etails, contac t Hector EncksenMendoza 12021 234-0737. 4 Its survey was published Oct. 15, after New York ' s Spanish-language daily, El Diario-La Prensa, protested that the disaster received only "a few flimsy columns in most papers and barely _ a mention on radio and television news." Samples of what the Times was told: The Washington Post: "We were slow off the mark at the outset, and I have no good excuse for that. " The New York Dally News: " There were a lot of other things going on and we just blew it." The Los Angeles Times sent a reporter to Ponce for one day . " In retrospect," its national editor said, " I would have kept the reporter there to do a follow-up . " Gerson Borerro , of the New York-based Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, called coverage of the slide which occurred the same day the Achille Lauro was hijacked in the Mediter ranean" shameful. " "The hijacking of the ship was important, but there was no balance,'' he told the Times. Louis N ufiez, president of the National Puerto Rican Coalition , assessed establishment press attention to Puerto Rico as inadequate . "It has a fixation on the Middle East," he told Weekly Report. "Basically, it's very poor on all of Latin America" "The U.S . media is ambivalent about Puerto Rico," added Juan Gonzalez, a founder of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights and a reporter and columnist with the Philadelphia Dally News. "Sometimes it's treated like part of the United States, but more often it's played like another Latin American country." Does the U.S. press' realization that it overlooked a major story on the island herald a change of coverage habits.? No one went so far as to suggest that. NAMES: Former Carter White House aide Raul Tapia has been elected chairman of Republic Communications Corp., permittee of KRRTTV, scheduled to air next month as the first independent television station in the Kerrville-San Antonio, Texas market. . . In Miami, popular anti-Communist commentator Armando Perez has been signed as general manager of Radio Mambi, the Spanish language station which purchased the license and plant of WGBS.TV. It will begin broad casting next month, too. Charlie Ericksen j NO cot.W/?EN Do ! Hispanic Link Weekly Report