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Hispanic link weekly report, October 28, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 28, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
New York City Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones says Oct. 22 that he plans to seek the dismissal of 126 community school board members in the city for failing to file financial-disclosure statements, as required by state law... Susan Herrera, legislative director of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, announces her departure after five and a half years. Herrera plans to start her own fund-raising business in Washington, D.C. No successor has been named. . . Evelyn Guardarramas, Hispanic Republican candidate for New York City Council president in the November 5 election, announces her endorsement of Edward Koch for mayor after criticizing him at the announcement of her candidacy in May... Chicago Mayor Harold
DPT 9 P
Washington names Linda Coronado as the new chatorp&rsO^Kof the city’s Commission on Latino Affairs. She replaces Miguel Del Valle, who will continue to serve as a commission member. Coronado is director of volunteer services at Cook County Hospital. . . Joyce Romero becomes the first Hispanic woman appointed to a cabinet level position in Kansas state government as Gov. John Carlin appoints her Secretary of the Kansas Department on Aging... Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Colon says a memorial park will be built in the Mameyes section of Ponce where some 200 are known to have died in the Oct. 7 flooding and landslides triggered by a tropical storm. In another action, the governor appoints Victor Pons chief justice of Puerto Rico Supreme Court, replacing Jose Trias Monge who resigned...

N.Y. Latinos Display New Growth, Diversity
While New York’s Latinos remain much less affluent than the area’s non-Latino population, they are a young and growing population which now forms a $12 billion market.
“In an era of population decline or stagnation for New York’s older areas, Hispanics have been the principal agent of growth,” the first comprehensive Hispanic market survey there since 1977 found.
“New York Market Product Usage Study -1985,” prepared for the SIN Television Network affiliate WXTV by Strategy Research Corp. of Miami, showed further
• Hispanic population in the area grew by 1.5 million persons between 1970 and 1985 - an increase from 5.4% to 13.1 % of the total population.
• Puerto Ricans, long dominant among
MLAP Accuses Brock
Labor Secretary William Brock issued field sanitation guidelines Oct. 18 to “help the states meet their obligations while reducing the risks to farmworkers from the unsafe and unsanitary conditions in the field.” States have 18 months to adopt the guidelines and preclude issuance of a federal standard.
Luis Torres, an attorney with the Migrant Legal Action Program in Washington, D.C., which has petitioned the department to issue standards since 1972 and filed numerous cases since 1973, called Brock’s action “an abdication of his responsibility.” He added that his office currently has a case pending before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia asking the court to order the Labor Department to issue national field sanitation standards.
Youth Initiative Planned
A project to address the Hispanic youth unemployment and dropout rate nationwide was announced Oct. 21 in Washington, D.C., by the International City Management Association and Cities in Schools Inc.
The two organizations will work with local governments to devise programs to alleviate the problem and serve as a liaison between private businesses and public officials and agencies.
HISPANIC POPULATION IN NEW YORK-1985
Origin Number* Percent
Puerto Rico 1,142,996 46.8
Dom. Republic 652,094 26.7
So./Central Am. 402,979 16.5
Cuba 175,846 7.2
Mexico 53,731 2.2
Spain 14,654 0.6
TOTAL 2,442,300 100.0
" Based on head of household country of origin. Source: Strategy Research Corporation.
Latino New Yorkers, now make up only46.8% of Hispanic residents in the area.
• The average Hispanic family household includes 3.2 persons, compared to 2.66 persons
Hank Lopez Dies at 65
Enrique (Hank) Lopez, nationally respected lawyer, author and educator, died of heart failure in Los Angeles Oct. 21 at age 65.
Lopez, who collaborated with Sam Houston Johnson in writing the controversial bestseller, “My Brother Lyndon,” authored a total of a dozen books, as well as numerous articles on Hispanic and other subjects.
At the time of his death, he was working at counsel with the Los Angeles law firm of Zobrist, Vienna and McCullough and writing his autobiography.
He is survived by two sons, both accomplished musicians, Joaquin, of Mexico City, and Greg, of Los Angeles, and a daughter, Drusilla, who runs a small, progressive private school in Williams, Oregon.
Following private ceremonies Oct. 25, he was cremated per his wishes.
NPRC Sets Public Policy
The National Puerto Rican Coalition has formulated a public policy agenda for 1986 concentrating on four issues of national concern: adolescent poverty, taxation and the federal budget, civil rights and census data collection.
The agenda is to be presented to the members Oct. 28 at its 5th annual conference in Washington, D.C.
per Anglo household.
• Median annual household income is $14,400 for Hispanics, contrasted to $23,100 for non-Hispanics. (A Strategy Research study on South Florida Latinos, released in May, showed Hispanic households there with median annual incomes of $23,996, compared to $27,363 for non-Hispanics.)
• While Hispanic population growth was particularly evident in such urban counties as the Bronx, New York, Kings and Queens (where Latinos now make up 38.1%, 26.4%, 19.7% and 17.0% of the population, respectively, some degree of geographical dispersion was also noted.
The study, released Oct. 23, covered 14 New York counties, 12 in New Jersey, and one each in Connecticut (Fairfield) and Pennsylvania (Pike). It consisted of 1,498 personal, face-to-face interviews.
That Hispanics are younger- by an average 5.2 years - and poorer was reflected in their banking and shopping patterns.
While 65.2% of non-Hispanic heads of households had bank savings accounts, only 28.2% of H ispanics did. For checking accounts, the margin was even wider, 65.4% vs. 12.7’%.
Hispanics shopped more often at discount department stores(K- Mart/Alexanders), 63.0%
continued on page 2
Court Takes Fee Case
The Supreme Court agreed Oct. 21 to decide whether attorneys’ fees seven times greater than the plaintiffs’ awards in a civil rights action are appropriate.
The California case, City of Riverside v. Santos Rivera, involved a police raid on a barrio party in which tear gas was used and several guests were arrested in 1975.
Eight Mexican Americans sued the police and, after a nine-day jury trial, won a total of $33,350 for civil rights violations. The judge set their lawyers’ fees (to be paid by the city) at $245,000, calling them “reasonable” to ensure minorities’ access to the courts.
His award was upheld by an appeals court, but Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist issued a stay last August, questioning whether the fees were reasonable.


Sin pelos en la lengua
BENNETT BACKFIRE? Hispanic bilingual education advocates are suggesting softly that maybe William Bennett did them a favor. When the U.S. Education Secretary aimed his Saturday Night Special at the federal role in bilingual education a few weeks ago- claiming its 17-year investment of $1.7 billion was all a waste-he woke up a lot of dedicated educators who know better.
They resented Bennett’s playing so loosely with the facts. And-news clips from across the nation show us - they are responding to media inquiries with statistics and flesh-and-blood local examples of the program’s dividends.
The downside of Bennett’s blast, the advocates say, is that it confirms their worst fears about the administration’s intention to use bilingual education (along with immigration) as a scare issue to rile those among us who harbor vague fears of things foreign.
The orchestrated attack has already brought its embarrassment to the department. While Bennett was wading through his 17-page policy address in New York City, his lieutenant, Undersecretary Gary Bauer, was at the microphone of the Office of Education auditorium in
Washington, “briefing” invited media on the issue there.
Bauer flatly told reporters that the department would seek to “broaden the definition” of transitional bilingual education, allowing school districts more wiggle-room in their interpretation of the federal law.
When he said it, he knew - or should have known - that a memo circulated at OE three weeks earlier said that any such redefining is prohibited under current law.
The weekly tabloid Education Week led off its Oct. 23 edition with an article on Bauer's goof.
Confronted last week by a reporter, Bauer confessed, “My use of the word‘definition’ might have been ill-phrased.” But, he promised, the department would instead publicize other ways in which districts could lessen the amount of native-language instruction provided limited-English-proficient students.
Also according to Education Week, the department is considering sending a letter to more than 500 school districts inviting them to “renegotiate” long-standing agreements governing their bilingual education curricula.
Doesn’t Mr. Bennett have any children of his own he can pick on?
- Kay Barbaro
N.Y. LATINO POPULATION *
Year Number Percent
1970 991,900 5.4
1980 2,064,200 11.5
1985 2,442,300 13.1
* - 28 county area (ADI)
COPS Starts in Chicago Calif. Dropouts Hit 50% New York Latinos Gain
LANGUAGE PREFERENCE OF N.Y. LATINOS
Language used At Home At Work Social Occasions
SPANISH 66.0% 29.9% 54.2%
ENGLISH 7.0% 32.5% 6.4%
BOTH 27.0% 37.6% 39.4%
Source: Strategy Research Corp. 1985 New York Hispanic Market Study.
The Midwest Hispanic Leadership Conference in Chicago Oct. 11-13, which drew 1,100 participants, successfully launched a Committee for Organizing, Planning and Support (COPS). (See Oct. 7 Weekly Report.) Another initiative undertaken at the conference was a survey of Midwest Hispanic leaders.
COPS organizational meetings will be held from late October to December in 30 cities across the nation.
The survey, an attempt to gauge the political attitudes of Hispanic leaders in the Midwest, will canvass 1,500 Hispanic leaders from the Midwest. The results will be tabulated in December.
Test Allowed for Migrants
Texas migrant farmworker students, previously unable to take a basic skills test to graduate from high school because it conflicted with harvesting seasons, have been granted their own day on which to take the test. The Texas Board of Education voted in favor of the proposal Oct. 1 2.
The Educational Assessment of Minimum Skills Test, which must be passed to receives high school diploma, is the result of toughened education standards in Texas. Administered bi-annually and for the first time this month, the test will also be given in May. Migrant students may take the test in January.
ELECTIONS RESULTS: Hispanic Link Weekly Report will bring you results of elections of particular importance to U.S. Hispanos in the Nov. 11 issue. If there are local elections you would like to see included, please send us a news clip previewing the election, one with results or call us direct: (202) 234-0737.
The California Council of Hispanic Affairs made public Oct. 10 a report recommending major changes in the state’s school system to control what it found was a 50% dropout rate and poor academic achievement of Hispanic kindergarten through 12th grade students.
The council, appointed by California School Superintendent Bill Honig, came up with 100 recommendations for the state’s 1,158,700 Hispanic students following statewide hearings in 1984 through this year. Among them:
• Targeting students most likely to drop out and developing intervention policies to keep them in school.
• Focusing on schools “where Hispanic underachievement begins and is rarely reversed.”
• Imposing sanctions, including court receivership, on schools that show no improvement.
• Evaluating the teacher proficiency test to reduce the 40% failure rate of Hispanic candidates.
Koch Halts INS Reports
New York Mayor Ed Koch sent a memorandum to city department heads Oct. 17 ordering them and their employees not to report undocumented immigrants to federal authorities because it is “not a New York City crime.”
Koch, who estimated there were between 400,000 and750,000 undocumented people in the city, said the federal government allows the undocumented into the city, yet fails to share the cost of providing services to them.
At the same time, Koch said he did not want to discourage the undocumented from seeking services they are entitled to, such as medical treatment, or from sending their children to school.
continued from page 1
vs. 53.2%. Non-Hispanics more frequently visited full-service department stores (Sears/ Macys), 41.0% vs. 36.0%, and exclusive department stores (Bloomingdale’s/Saks), 5.4% vs. 1.0%.
Hispanic households were less inclined to have hard liquor drinkers(39.4% vs. 50.4%) or wine drinkers (37.3% vs. 50.7%), but slightly more likely to include beer drinkers (61.1% vs. 58.3%).
General occupational differences were not great, with Hispanics slightly more prevalent in blue-collar jobs (38.5% vs. 36.7%) and non-Hispanics in white-collar jobs (43.1 % vs. 38.6%).
But in the white collar category, non-Hispanics were twice as likely to be professionals, owners, managers, office workers or sales persons. Half of the Hispanics identified as technical operators.
Non-Hispanics also had more education. They included 8.9% college graduates, vs. 5.2% for Hispanics. Among Hispanics, 11.5% reported having a fifth grade education or less; only 1.6% of non-Hispanics reported they did.
- Charlie Ericksen
Corrections
Memorial services for Dr. Ralph Guzman were conducted at the University of California, Santa Cruz, not Santa Clara, as stated in Weekly Report Oct 21. A memorial foundation is being established at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in his name.
Pat Baca was not the only Hispanic reelected to the Albuquerque City Council as stated in Weekly Report Oct. 14. Steve Gallegos, District 3, was also re-elected.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
NEW YORK LATINOS: Strategy Research Corporation has released its 88-page “New York Hispanic Market Product Usage Study.” Copies are available free. Write Edwin Rivera, WXTX, Ch. 41, Twinbridge Plaza, 24 Meadowland Parkway, Secaucus, N.J. 07094.
STUDY ON U.S. HISPANIC CATHOLICS: “The Hispanic Catholic in the United States: a Socio-Cultural and Religious Profile” examines beliefs, attitudes, opinions and behavior patterns of Hispanic Catholics Price: $12, plus $2 postage and handling. Contact The Northeast Catholic Pastoral Center of Hispanics Inc., 1011 First Ave., New York, N.Y. 10022(212)751-7045.
U.S. EDUCATIONAL TRENDS: The Census Bureau has prepared a study on growth in educational attainment, quality of schooling, cost of education and the relationship between education and the economy. For copies of “Education in the United States, 1940-83: A Survey of Trends and Current Concerns,” contact: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Cost: $2.25. Order GPO stock No. 003-024-06355-7.
CENSUS OF GOVERNMENTS: A 59-page book by the Census Bureau shows national, state and local data on government organization, taxable property values, government finances, public employment and topical studies. Copies of “Graphic Summary,” Vol. 6, No. 5, are available from above address Order GPO stock No. 003-024-06345-0. Phone (202) 783-3238 for price (not available at press time).
BIBLIOGRAPHY ON CHIC AN OS: “Literatura Chicana: Creative and Critical Writings Through 1984” is a 104-page book with 750 bibliographic citations of literature relating to the Mexican American experience. It includes poetry, fiction, theatre, oral tradition, dissertations, bibliographies, anthologies and video and sound recordings. Cost: $23. Contact: Floricanto Press, 604 William St, Oakland, Calif. 94612(415)893-3149.
FLOOD CONTRIBUTIONS: Persons interested in donating money to aid the flood victims in Puerto Rico can do so by sending checks or money orders to either United for Puerto Rico or Ponce Emergency Relief Fund, ISLA, P.O. Box 65557, Washington, D.C. 20035.
CALIFORNIA’S HISPANIC DROPOUTS: “Findings and Recommendations of the 1984-85 Statewide Hearings Held by the Council” (of Hispanic Affairs) is a 36-page report on the Hispanic dropout rate and academic underachievement in the California school system. For a free copy, contact California State Department of Education, Bill Honig, Superintendent of Public Instruction, 721 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, Calif. 95814-4785 (916) 324-1857.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
STAFF COUNSEL
The Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law of the Boston Bar Association, a small private civil rights law office sup* ported by contributions and voluntary cocounsel assistance from 26 prominent Bostbn area law firms, is seeking an attorney to become a staff counsel concentrating in the area of fair housing with general practice in voting rights, employment discrimination, municipal services, community development, education and other significant law reform matters. Applicants should have a minimum of 2-3 years legal experience; be admitted to the Bar of any jurisdiction (although if not admitted in Massachusetts, must be willing to sit for next Massachussetts Bar exam); demonstrated commitment to civil rights law and prior experience in civil rights litigation or in a related area. Salary- mid to high $20,000 O.O.E. & fringe benefits. Please forward a resume before Dec. 1, 1985, to the:
Executive Director
Lawyer's Committee for Civil Rights
Under Law
294 Washington Street Room 401
Boston, Mass. 02108 EEO/AA employer. Women, minorities, the handicapped and the elderly are encouraged to apply.
POLICY ANALYSIS FELLOW for three to six months, approximately $1,000 per month. Master's degree in public affairs or related field preferred. Policy analysis course work, strong research and analytical skills experience with knowledge of Hispanic community, civil rights enforcement or housing and community development required. Bilingual (Spanish/ English) preferred. Send resume to: Charles Kamasaki, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001.
RECEPTION IST/SECRETARY Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Washington, D.C., seeks reception ist/secretary for D.C. office. Position requires good typing and organizational skills. Candidates with two years experience and bilingual in English and Spanish preferred. Good benefits and near subway. Send resume to MALDEF, 1701 18th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009.
FACULTY VACANCIES The Department of English at Iowa State University has six tenure-track positions for the Fall of 1986. Applicants must complete all requirements for Ph.D. by May 1986. MLA interview or interview in Arnes. Iowa, at applicant's expense required. All positions listed are available mid-August 1986. Application deadline: Dec.2. Thesix tenure-track positions are:
Asst Prof.- American Literature; Asst. Prof.
- American Literature/Literature by and about Women; Asst. Prof.-Creative Writing(Fiction/ Essays); Asst. Prof. - Creative Writing (Poetry); Asst Prof.- Reading, and Asst Prof.- Secondary English Education.
Send application letter, vita and dossier (creative writing candidates should also send samples of writing) to: Frank E. Haggard, Chair, Department of English, Iowa State University, 203 Ross Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011.
ASSOCIATE DEAN SU NY/EM PI RE STATE COLLEGE Genesee Valley Regional Center in Rochester, N.Y.
SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE, a national leader in non-traditional higher education, is seeking an Associate Dean. The Associate Dean has leadership responsibility for the academic program of the Center maintaining standards and improving academic quality, program innovation and development, maintaining and improving academic systems and faculty development. Salary: low 40’s. Hire date: Feb. ’86. For further information, call Dean V. Montana (716) 244-3641.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT $14,000
- $16,000 per year. Experience in word processor alpha-micro preferred. Minimum of two years administrative secretarial experience; ability to proofread and edit work; type 65 to 70 words per minute and bilingual and biliterate (Spanish/English) required. Send resume to: Charles Kamasaki, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001-
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Maryland, are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Beltr&n (213) 743-7158.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANICS AND EDUCATION Immaculata, Pa. Oct. 29
Immaculata College issponsoring acolloquium that will explore the schooling provided for English-deficient individuals.
Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647-4400 HISPANIC EXECUTIVES SEMINAR San Antonio Oct. 30,31
“Executive Competence - Pathway to Excellence” is a management training conference sponsored by the Association of Hispanic Federal Executives. Israel Valdez (202) 245-8467
HISPANIC PSYCHOTHERAPY CONFERENCE San Antonio Oct. 31, Nov. 1 Co-sponsored by the National Coalition of Hispanic Mental Health and Human Services Organizations, the 2 nd annual event will highlight treatment specific
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
to Hispanics.
Tina Knoll (512) 226-3391
SMALL BUSINESS MARKETING SYMPOSIUM Williamsburg, Va. Oct. 31, Nov. 1 Topics such as sales, promotions, public relations, advertising and media usage will be covered in this seminar co-sponsored by the Small Business Administration.
Success’85 1-800-225-2468
MANA CONFERENCE
Topeka, Kansas Oct 31 - Nov. 3
The Mexican American Women’s National Association
holds its 9th annual conference featuring workshops
on leadership, heritage, health and organizational
development.
Linda Quintanilla (202) 223-3440
HISPANICS IN THE CORPORATE WORLD New York Oct. 31
The 5th annual conference of the Wall Street chapter of Image will evaluate the impact Hispanics have made economically, professionally, educationally
and politically.
Julie Aguilera (212) 309-0107
COMING SOON
MINORITY BUSINESS SYMPOSIUM
Denver Nov. 4-6
Ann Dorman (202) 775-3690
MEXICAN AMERICAN EDUCATORSCONFERENCE
San Jos6, Calif. Nov. 7-10 Tony Gonzalez (415) 363-5410
SPOTLIGHT
The Program in Bilingual Education at New York University and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, will hold their 9th annual symposium on bilingualism on Nov. 22, 23 at New York University For information concerning pre-registration and research paper submittal, contact Antonio Simoes, Bilingual Education Program, New York University, School of Education, Health, Nursing and Arts Professions, 239 Greene Street, New York, N. Y. 10003.


Arts & Entertai
EFFORTS BY HISPANIC ARTISTS CONTINUE THIS week to aid victims of recent natural tragedies in Mexico and Puerto Rico.
The most recent of these benefits- to assist survivors of the floods and landslides on the southern coast of Puerto Rico- were telethons airing on Spanish-language stations on the island commonwealth and continental United States.
New York television station WNJU held a nine-hour telethon Oct.
19 that raised a press time estimate of $1.2 million for Puerto Rico’s victims.
A second telethon for Puerto Rico- produced and aired live Oct. 20 by commercial radio and TV stations on the island - raised an estimated S5.5 million. The Spanish International Network carried a portion of the telethon in the United States, with live segments originating on New York and Los Angeles affiliate stations.
Opening the Puerto Rico telethon was Mexican comedian Mario Moreno “Cantinflas,” who had weeks before participated in the live segment from Los Angeles for the Mexico, estamos contigo benefit broadcast.
“Were in this beautiful country that has suffered a collapse,” Moreno said, “and we come from my country which has also suffered a very strong collapse.”
Other recent benefit efforts by Hispanic artists include a 12-hour
concert at Houston’s Astrodome, held Oct. 12; a two-day art auction in Mexico City that raised $410,000; and a concert by Julio Iglesias in Mexico City that raised an estimated $81,000.
Meanwhile, opera star Placido Domingo- who lost four relatives jn the Mexico earthquake- is reportedly cancelling all artistic commitments for a year.
“As in the theater, the show must go on,” Domingo told the Associated Press. In a more recent interview with the London Times, however, Domingo said he has decided to cancel all scheduled appearances and spend time giving concerts to raise funds for Mexico’s disaster survivors.
Other artists are committing performance proceeds to the quake victims. Mexican cellist Carlos Prieto has earmarked proceeds from his current six-city U.S. tour to the victims; and Spanish singer Raphael, also on a current U.S. tour commemorating his 25th anniversary as an entertainer, has promised to organize a telethon in Spain sometime in late December.
ONE LINERS: Some 250 Washingtonians gathered Oct. 18 as guests of LULAC Council 11041 and Joe Toro, special promotions director of Somerset Imports, for a book-signing party for Sonia J. Davila and her new book, “Poems of an Arias.”. . . A ceramics exhibition by Venezuelan Dalita Navarro opens at the Organization of American States there Oct. 30.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
RIVERA LEAVES ABC: Geraldo Rivera, the nation’s top Hispanic news personality, disclosed Oct. 22 his plans to quit ABC News at the end of November. His final 20/20 episode will be Nov. 21.
Rivera,43, said his immediate planscall for a few months of traveling and unraveling “after 15 years of hard and honorable work” and that he will probably relocate on the West Coast.
He and the network indicated that he would do future free-lance pieces for 20/20.
Rivera’s contract with ABC concluded in September. He and the network could not come to terms ona newone. Although hedid not report on the 20/20 Marilyn Monroe segment which ABC cancelled this month, Rivera was outspoken in his criticism of the
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas,
No portion of Hispanic Lmk Weekly Report maybe reproduced Oi broadcast m any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza <202) 234-0737.
cancellation.
Rivera was also a senior producer on 20/20.
WELCOME TO WASHINGTON: A National Press Club reception, coordinated by the Hispanic News Media Association, Washington, D.C., and joined in by the capital’s major media organizations, will welcome the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) to its new headquarters in the National Press Building Nov. 14.
VISTA ADDS FIVE: The nation’s new Hispanic Sunday supplement, Vista, which debuted in September, boosts its circulation in November from 441,000 to 602,000 with the addition of five subscribing newspapers.
Joining its original dozen dailies are four Texas newspapers, The Laredo News, The McAllen Monitor, The Brownsville Herald, The Harlingen Valley Star, and Puerto Rico’s English-language San Juan Star.
Monthly now, Vista still plans to go weekly early next year.
LATINA IS BACK: After suspending publication following three issues in 1983, Latina magazine is back in business. The November issue of Grace Soto’s monthly has a press run of 100,000, a lead story on Raquel Welch, and a bound-to-be-controversial reprint(from California magazine) of Richard Rodriguez’s article, “Unilingual, Not Unilateral.”
Those who subscribed in ’83 will be getting their copies every month, Soto says. Additionally, Latina is attempting to be the first Hispanic magazine to find success on the newsstands.
LATINAS IN NAIROBI: Two half-hour documentaries, one in Spanish and one in English, on the participation of Latinas in the 1985 World Conference on the United Nation’s Decade for Women in Nairobi and the nongovernmental organization’s conference there were distributed to the National Public Radio network via satellite Oct. 25. The shows were written, produced and narrated by Elisabeth Perez Luna of Toucan Productions, Philadelphia. - Charlie Ericksen
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Making The News This Week nc ') 0 Washington names Linda Coronado as th e rfeW the c ity' s Commission on .Latino Affairs. She replaces Miguel Del Valle, who will continue to serve as a commission member. Coronado is director of volunteer services a t Cook County Hospital. . . Joyce Romero becomes th e first Hi span i c woman appointed to a cabinet l eve l position in Kansas state government as Gov. John Carlin appoints her Secretary of th e Kansas Departme nt on Aging ... Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Colon says a memorial park will be built in the Mameyes section of Ponce where some 200 are known to have died in the Oct. 7 flooding and landslides triggered by a tropical storm. In another action, th e governor appoints VIctor Pons chief justice of Puerto Rico Supreme Court, replacing Jose Trias Monge who resigned: . . New York City Schools Chancellor Nathan Quinones says Oct. 22 that he plans to seek the dismissal of 126 community school board members in the city for failing to file financial-disclosure statements, as required by state law ... Susan Herrera, legislative director of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, announces her departure after five and a half years. Herrera plans to start her own fund-raising business in Washington, D.C. No successor has been named. . . Evelyn Guardarramas, Hispanic Republican candidate for New York City Council president in the November 5 election, announces her endorsement of Edward Koch for mayor after criticizing him at the announcement of her candidacy in May ... Chicago M ayo r Harold vol.aNo•>l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Oct 28, 1985 N.Y. Latinos Display New Growth, Diversity While New York's Latinos remain much less affluent than the area's nonLatino population, they are a young and growing population which now forms a $12 billion market. "In an era of population decline or stagnation for New York's older areas, Hispanics have been the principal agent of growth," the first comprehensive Hispan ic market survey there since 1977 found. "New York Market Product Usage Study-1985," prepared for the SIN Television Net . work affiliate WXTV by Strategy Research Corp. of Miami, showed further: • Hispanic population in the area grew by 1.5 million persons between 1970 and 1985 an increase from 5.4% to 13.1% of the total population. • Puerto Ricans, long dominant among MLAP Accuses Brock Labor Secretary William Brock issued field sanitation guidelines Oct. 18 to "help the states meet their obligations while reducing the risks to farmworkers from the unsafe and unsanitary conditions in the field." States have 18 months to adopt the guidelines and preclude issuance of a federal standard. Luis Torres, an attor[ley with the Migrant Legal Action Program in Washington, D.C., which has petitioned the department to issue standards since 1972 and filed numerous cases since 1973, called Brock's action "an abdication of his responsibility." He added that his office currently has a case pending before the U .S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia asking the court to order the Labor Department to issue national field sanitation standards. Youth Initiative Planned A project to address the Hispanic youth unemploymeni and dropout rate nationwide was announced Oct. 21 in Washington, D . C., by the International City Management Association and Cities in Schools Inc. The two organizations will work with local governments to devise programs to alleviate the problem and serve as a liaison between private businesses and public officials and agencies. HISPANIC POPULATION IN NEW YORK-1985 Origin Puerto Rico Dom. Republic So./Central Am . Cuba Mexico Spain TOTAL Number* 1 ,142,996 652,094 402,979 175,846 53, 731 14,654 2 ,442,300 Percent* 46.8 26.7 16.5 7.2 2.2 0.6 1000 Based on head of household country of origin. Source: Strategy Research Corporat ion. Latino New Yorkers, now make up only46.8% of Hispanic residents in the area. • The average Hispanic family household includes 3.2 persons, compared to 2.66 persons Hank Lopez Dies at 65 Enrique (Hank) Lopez, nationally respected lawyer, author and educator, died of heart failure in Los Angeles Oct. 21 at age 65. Lopez, who collaborated with Sam Houston Johnson in writing the controversial best seller, "My Brother Lyndon," authored a total of a dozen books. 3S well as numerous articles on Hispanic and other subjects. At the time of his death, he was working at counsel with the Los Angeles law firm of Zobrist, Vienna and McCullough and writing his autobiography. He is survived b y two sons, both accom plished musicians, Joaq uin , of Mexico City, and Greg, of Los Angeles, and a daughter, Drusilla , who runs a small , progressive private school in Williams, Oregon. Following private cerem onies Oct. 25, h e was cremated per hi s wishes, NPRC Sets Public Policy The National Puerto Rican Coalition has formulated a public policy agenda for 1986 concentrating on four issues of national c on cern: adolescent poverty, taxation and the federal budget, civil rights and census data collection. The agenda is to be presented to the members Oct. 28 at its 5th annual conference in Washington, D.C. per Anglo h o usehold. • Median annual household income is $14,400 for Hispanics, contrasted to $23,100 for non-Hispanics. (A Strategy Research study on South Florida Latinos, released in May, showed Hispanic households there with median annual incomes of $23,996, compared to $27,363 for nonHispanics.) • While Hispanic population growth was particula rly evident in such urban counties as the Bronx, New York, Kings and Queens (where Latinos now make up 38.1 %, 26.4%, 19.7 % and 17.0% of the population, respectively), some degree of geographical dispersion was also noted. The study, released Oct. 23, covered 14 New Yo rk counties, 12 in New Jersey, and one each in Connecticut (Fairfield) and Pennsylvania (Pike). It consisted of 1,498 personal, face-to-face interviews. That Hispanics are younger-by an average 5.2 years-and poorer was reflected in their banking and shopping patterns. While 65.2% of non-Hispanic heads of house holds had bank savings accounts, only28.2% of Hispanics did. For checking accounts, the margin was even wider, 65.4% vs. 12.7"0/o. Hispanics shopped more often at discount department stores (K-Mart/ Alexanders), 63. 0% continued on page 2 Court Takes Fee Case The Supreme Court agreed Oct. 21 to decide whether attorneys' fees seven times greate r than the plaintiffs' awards in a civil rights action are appropriate. Th e California case, City of Riverside v. Santos Rivera , involved a policPraid on a barrio party in which tear gas was used and several guests were arrested in 1975. Eight Mexican Americans sued the police and, after a nine-day jury trial, won a total of $33,350 for civil rights violations. The judge set their lawyers' fees (to be paid by the city) at $245,000, calling them "reasonable" to ensure minorities' access to the courts. His award was upheld by an appeals court, but Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist issued a stay last August, question ing whether the fees were reasonable.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua Washington, "briefing" invited media on the issue there. Bauer flatly told reporters that the department would seek to "broaden the definition" of transitional bilingual education, allowing school districts more wiggle-room in their interpretation of the federal law. BENNETT BACKFIRE? Hispanic bilingual education advocates are suggesting softly that maybe William Bennett did them a favor . When the U.S. Education Secretary aimed his Saturday Night Special at the federal role in bilingual education a few weeks ago-claiming its 17 year investment of $1.7 billion was all a waste-he woke up a lot of dedicated educators who know better. When he said it, he knew-or should have known-that a memo circulated at OE three weeks earlier said that any such redefining is prohibited under current law. They resented Bennett's playing so loosely with the facts. Andnews clips from across the nation show us -they are responding to media inquiries with statistics and flesh and blood local examples of the program's dividends. The weekly tabloid Education Week led off its Oct. 23 edition with an article on Bauer's goof. Confronted last week by a reporter, Bauer confessed, "My use of the word 'definition' might have been ill phrased." But, he promised, the department would instead publicize other ways in which districts could lessen the amount of native-language instruction provided limited English-proficient students. The downside of Bennett' s blast, the advocates say , is that it confirms their worst fears about the administration's intention to use bilingual education (along with immigration) as a scare issue to rile thos e among us who harbor vague fears of things foreign. The orchestrated attack has already brought its embarrassment to the department. While Bennett was wading through his 17-page policy address in New York City, his lieutenant, Undersecretary Gary Bauer, was at the microphone of the Office of Education auditorium in Also according to Education Week, the department is considering sending a letter to more than 500 school districts inviting them to "renegotiate" long-standing agreements governing their bilingual education curricula. Doesn't Mr. Bennett have any children of his own he can pick on? Kay Barbaro N.Y. LATINO POPULATION* LANGUAGE PREFERENCE OF N.Y. LATINOS Year Number Percent Language used At Home At Work Social Occasions 1970 991,900 5.4 1980 2,064,200 11. 5 1985 2,442,300 13.1 • • 28 county a rea ( ADI) COPS Starts in Chicago The Midwest Hispanic Leadership Conference in Chicago Oct. 11, which drew 1,100 participants, successfully launched a Com mittee for Organizing, Planning and Support (COPS). (See Oct. 7 Weekly Report . ) Another initiative undertaken at the conference was a survey of Midwest Hispanic leaders. COPS organizational meetings will be held from late October to December in 30 cities across the nation. The survey , an attempt to gauge the political attitudes of Hispanic leaders in the Midwest, will canvass 1 ,500 Hispanic leaders from the Midwest. The results will be tabulated in December. Test Allowed for Migrants Texas migrant farmworker students, previously unable to take a basic skills test to graduate from high school because it conflicted with harvesting seasons, have been granted their own day on which to take the test. The Texas Board of Education voted in favor of the proposal Oct. 12 . The Educational Assessment of Minimum Skills Test, which must be passed to receive a high school diploma , is the result of toughened education standards in Texas. Administered bi-annually and for the first time this month, the test will also be gi v en in May. Migrant students may take the test in January. ELECTIONS RESULTS: Hispanic Link Weekly Report will bring you results of elections of particular importance to U .S. Hispanos in the Nov. 11 issue. If there are local elections you would like to see included, please send us a news clip previewing the election, one with or call us direct: (202) 234. 2 SPANISH 66.0% 29.9% 54. 2% ENGLISH 7 . 0% 32. 5% 6.4% BOTH 27.0% 37.6% 39.4% Source: Strategy Research Corp. 1985 New York Hispanic Market Study. Calif. Dropouts Hit soo;o The California Council of Hispanic Affairs made public Oct. 10 a report recommending major changes in the state's school system to control what it found was a 50% dropout rate and poor academic achievement of Hispanic kindergarten through 12th grade students. The council, appointed by California School Superintendent Bill Honig, came up with 100 recommendations for the state's 1 ,158,700 Hispanic students following statewide hearings in 1984 through this year . Among them: • Targeting students most likely to drop out and developing intervention policies to keep them in school. • Focusing on schools "where Hispanic underachievement begins and is rarely reversed" • Imposing sanctions, including court re ceivership, on schools that show no improve ment. • Evaluating the teacher proficiency test to reduce the 40% failure rate of Hispanic can didates. Koch Halts INS Reports New York Mayor Ed Koch sent a memorandum to city department heads Oct. 17 ordering them and their employees not to report un documented immigrants to federal authorities because it is "not a New York City crime." Koch, who estimated there were between 400,000 and 7 50,000 undocumented people in the city, said the federal government allows the undocumented into the city, yet fails to share the cost of providing services to them. At the same time, Koch said he did not want to discourage the undocumented from seeking services they are entitled to, such as medical treatment, or from sending their children to school. New York Latinos Gain continued from page 1 vs. 53.2% . NonHispanics more frequently visited full-service department stores(Sears/ Macys), 41. 0% vs. 36.0%, and exclusive depart ment stores (Bioomingdale's/Saks), 5.4% vs . 1.0% . Hispanic households were less inclined to have hard liquor drinkers(39.4% vs. 50.4%) or wine drinkers (37.3% vs. 50. 7%), but slightly more likely to include beer drinkers (61 . 1% vs. 58.3%). General occupational differences were not great, with Hispanics slightly more prevalent in blue-collar jobs (38.5% vs. 36.7%) and non Hispanics in white-collar jobs (43 . 1% vs. 38.6%). But in the white collar category, nonHispanics were twice as likely to be professionals, owners, managers, office workers or sales persons. Half of the Hispanics identified as technical operators. NonHispanics also had more education. They included 8.9% college graduates, vs. 5 . 2% for Hispanics. Among Hispanics, 11. 5% reported having a fifth grade education or less; only 1.6% of nonHispanics reported they did. Charlie Ericksen Corrections Memorial services for Dr. Ralph Guzman were conducted at the University of California, Santa Cruz, not Santa Clara, as stated in Weekly Report Oct 21. A memorial foundation is being established at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in his name. Pat Baca was not the only Hispanic re elected to the Albuquerque City Council as stated in Weekly Report Oct. 14. Steve Gallegos, District 3, was also re-elected. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS NEW YORK LA Tl NOS: Strategy Research Corporation has released its 88-page "New York Hispanic Market Product Usage Study." Copies are available free. Write Edwin Rivera, WXTX, Ch . 41, Twin bridge Plaz a , 24 Meadowland Parkway, Secaucus, N.J. 07094. STUDY ON U.S. HISPANIC CATHOLICS: " The Hispanic Catholic in th e United States: a Socio-Cultural and Religious Profile " examines beliefs , attitudes, opinions and behavior patterns of Hispanic Catholics. Pric e : $ 12 , plus $2 postage and handling. Contact: The Northeast Catholic Pastoral Center of Hispanics Inc., 1011 First Ave. , New York, N.Y. 10022 (212) 751-7045. U.S. EDUCATIONAL TRENDS: The Census Bureau has prepared a study on growth in educational attainment, quality of schooling, cost of education and the relationship between education and the economy. For copies of"Education in the United States, 1940-83: A Survey of Trends and Current Concerns," contact: Superintendent of Documents, U . S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D .C. 20402. Cost: $2.25. Order GPO stock No. 003-024-06355-7. CENSUS OF GOVERNMENTS: A 59-page book by the Census Bureau shows national, state and local data on government organizat i on , taxable property values, government finances, public employment and topical studies. Copies of "Graphic Summary," Vol . 6, No.5, are available from above address. Order GPO stock No . 003-024-06345-0. Phone (202) 783-3238 for price (not available at press time). BIBLIOGRAPHY ON CHICANOS: "Literatura Chicana: Creative and C rit ical Writings Through 1984" is a 1 04-page book with 750 bibliographic citations of literature relating to the Mexican American experience. It includes poetry, fiction, theatre, oral tradition, dissertations, bibliographies, anthologies and video and sound recordings. Cost: $23. Contact: Floricanto Press , 604 William St., Oakland, Calif . 94612 (415) 893. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS STAFF COUNSEL The L awyer's Committ ee for C i v il R ig ht s Under Law of th e Boston Bar Association. a s ma ll private civil rights law office sup port ed by contributions and voluntary co counsel assista nce from 26 promine nt Bostbn area law firms, i s seeking an attorney to become a s t aff counsel con centrating i n the area of fair housing with general practice in voting rights. employ ment discriminatio n . municipal services, community development, education and other significant law reform matte r s . Ap pl icants should h ave a minimum of 2 yea r s legal experience; be admitted t o the Bar of an y jurisdiction (although if not admitted in Massach u se tts, must be willing t o sit for ne xt Massachussetts B a r exam) ; demonstrated commitmen t to civil rights law and prior experience in civil rights litigation or in a r e lated a r ea . Salarymid to high $20,000 D.O. E . & fringe benefits. Please forwa rd a resum e bef o re Dec. 1 , 1985, to the: Executi ve Director Lawyer's Commiltee for Civi l Rights Under Law 294 Washington Street Room 401 Boston, Mass. 02108 EEO/AA employer. W o m e n , minorities, the handicapped and the elderly are encouraged to apply. POLICY ANALYSIS FELLOW lor lhree t o six months, approximately $ 1 ,000 per month. Master's degree in public affairs or related field preferred. Policy analysis course work, s trong research and analytical skills experience with knowledge of Hispanic communit y , civil rights enforcement o r housing a nd community developmenl required. Bilingual (Spanish/ English) preferred. Send resume to: Charles Kamasaki , National Cou ncil o f L a R aza , 20 F St. NW, Washington. D . C . 20001 . FACUL TV VACANCIES The Department of English at Iowa State University has s i x tenure-track positions for the Fall o f 1986. Applicants must complete all requirements for Ph . D . by May 1986. M LA interview or intervieYJ in Ames, Iowa, atapplicanfs expense required. All positions listed are available midAugust 1986. Application deadline: Dec.2. Thes ixtenure-trackpositions are: Asst. Prof.-American literature; Asst. Pr of. -American Literature/Literature b y and about Women; Asst. Prof . -Creative Writing ( Fi c tion/ Essays); Asst. Prof . Creative Writing( Poetryj ; Asst. Prof.Reading ; and Asst. Prof.Secondary English Education. Send application leiter, vita and dossier (c r eative writing candidates should also send samples of writing) to: Frank E . Haggard, Chair, Department of English, Iowa State Un iv ersity, 203 Ross Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011. ASSOCIATE DEAN SUNY/EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE Genesee Valley Regional Center in Rochester, N . Y . SU N Y / EMPIRE STATE COLLEGE , a national leader in non-traditional higher education, is seeking an Associate D ean. Th e Associate Dean has leade r ship responsibility for the academic progra m of the Center. maintaining s t andards and improving academic quality. program innovation and development, maintaining and improving academic systems a"d faculty development. Salary: low 40' s . Hire date: Feb. '86. For further information, cal l Dean V . Montana (716) 244. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT $14,000 $16,000 per year. Experience in word processor alpha-micro preferred. Minimum of two yea r s administrative secre tarial ex peri e nce ; abilily t o proofread and edit work; type 65 to 70 words per minute and bilingual and biliter a t e (Spanish/ English) requir ed. Send resume t o : FLOOD CONTRIBUTIONS: Persons interested in donating money to aid the flood victims in Puerto Rico can do so by sending checks or money orders to either United for Puerto Rico or Ponce Emergency R e li e f Fund , ISLA , P . O . Box 65557, Washington, D .C. 20035. RECEPTION 1ST /SECRETARY Charles Kamasaki , National Council of La Ra za , 20 F Sl. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 -CALIFORNIA'S HISPANIC DROPOUTS: "Findings and Re commendations of the 1984-85 Statewide Hearings Held by the Council" (of Hispanic Affairs) is a 36-page report on the Hispanic dropout rate and academic underachievement in the California s c hool system. For a free copy, contact: California State Department of Edu cation, Bill Honig, Superintendent of Public Instruction, 721 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, Calif. 95814-4785 (916) 324-1857. Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Washington, D .C .. seeks receptionisVsecretary for D . C . o ffice . P osi t ion requires good typing and organizational skills . Candidates with two year s experience and bilingual in Englis h and Spanish preferred. Good benefits and near subway. Send re suiTle to MALDEF, 1701 18th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009. ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Maryland, are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251. THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national jobclearing.house for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Beltran (213) 743. Calendar THIS WEEK HISPANICS AND EDUCATION Imma c ulata , Pa. Oct. 29 Immaculata College is sponsoring a colloquium that wi ll explore the schooling provided for English deficient individuals . Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647 HISPANIC EXECUTIVES SEMINAR San Antonio Oct. 30,31 "Executive Competence-Pathway to Excellence" is a management training conference sponsored by the Association of H ispanic Federal Executives. Israel Valdez (202) 245 HISPANIC PSYCHOTHERAPY CONFERENCE San Antonio Oct. 31, Nov. 1 Co-sponsored by the National Coalition of Hispanic Mental H ea lth and Human Services Organizations, the 2 nd annual event w i ll highlight treatment specific Hispanic Link Weekly Report to Hispanics. Tina Knoll (512) 226 SMALL BUSINESS MARKETING SYMPOSIUM Williamsburg, Va. Oct. 31, Nov . 1 Topics such as sales, promotions, public relations, advertising and media usage will be covered in this seminar co-sponsored by the Small Business Ad ministration. Success '85 1-800 MANA CONFERENCE Topeka, Kansas Oct. 31 Nov . 3 The Mexican American Women's National Association holds its 9th annual conference featuring workshops on leadership, heritage, health and organizational development. Linda Quintanilla (202) 223 HISPANICS IN THE CORPORATE WORLD New York Oct. 31 The 5th annual conference of the Wall Street chapter of Image will evaluate the impact Hispanics have made economically, professionally, educationally and politically. Julie Aguilera (212) 309 07 COMING SOON MINORITY BUSINESS SYMPOSIUM Denver Nov. 4 Ann Dorman (202) 775 MEXICAN AMERICAN EDUCATORSCONFERENCE San Jose, Calif . Nov. 7 Tony Gonzalez (415) 363 0 SPOTLIGHT The Program in Bilingual Education at New York University and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, will hold their 9th annual symposium on bilingual is m on Nov. 22, 23 at New York University For information concerning pre-registration and research paper submittal, contact Antonio Simoes, Bilingual Education Program, New York University, School of Education, Health, Nursing and Arts Pro fessions, 239 Greene Street, New York, N.Y. 10003. 3

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Arts & Entertainment EFFORTS B Y HISPANIC A RTIST S CONTINUE THI S week tc a id v i ctims o f recent n atura l tragedies i n M ex ico a n d Pu erto Rico. Th e most recent o f these b e n e fit s -t o assi s t surv i vo r s o f th e floods and landslide s on the southern c oast of Puerto Rico-were telethons airing on Spanish-la n g u a g e s t a t io n s on the i s la n d comm o nwealth and continental United States. N e w Y o rk t e l evis i or. s t ation WNJU h e ld a nine-hou r t elethon O ct. 19 that r a ised a press time e s tim a t e of S 1.2 million f o r Puerto Rico's v i ctims. A s econ d t e l e thon f o r Pu erto Ri c o produced and a ir e d li ve O ct. 2 0 by comme r c i a l r a di o a nd T V s t ations o n th e i s land r a ised a n estima t e d$5.5 million. The Spanish International Network carried a portio n o f the t e l e th o n in th e Un i t e d St a tes, with li ve segm e nt s o rig i n ating o n New Yo r k and Los A ng e les a ffili a t e s t a ti o ns. Opening the Puerto Rico telethon was Mexican comedian Mario M o r eno " C antinflas , " who had weeks b efore participa t e d in th e liv e s e g m ent f rom Los Angele s f o r th e M exico. es tamos contigo benefit broa dcast. " We'r e in this beautiful country th a t has suffe r e d a coll a p se,' ' Moreno said, "and we come from my country which has also suffered a ve r y stro n g c oll a p se." O t h e r recent ben e f i t efforts b y Hispa ni c a rtist s in c lude a 1 2h our ca ncell a tion. concert at H o u s t o n's Astro d o m e , h e ld O ct. 12; a two-da y art auction in Mexico City that raised $41 0 ,000; and a concert by Julio Iglesias in Mexico C it y that raised a n estimated $81 ,000. M e an w hil e , opera s t a r Placido Domingo-who lost four relatives in th e Mex ico ea rthquak e -i s reportedly cancelling all artisti c commitments f o r a ye a r . " As in th e thea t e r, th e s h o w must go on, " Domingo told the Associated Press_ In a more recent interview with the London Times, however , Domingo said he has decided to cancel all scheduled appearances and spend time giving concerts to raise funds for Mexico' s dis a ster s urvi v ors. Othe r a rti s t s are committing performance proceeds to the quake v i c tim s . Mexi c an c e lli s t Carlos Prieto ha s earmarked proceeds from hi s current six-city U.S. tour to the victims; and Spanish singer R a ph a el , a lso on a current U.S. tour commemorating his 25th a nni ve r sa r y as a n ente rt a iner, has promised to organize a telethon in S p a ir , s o m e tim e in l a t e December. ONE LINERS: Some 250 W ashingtonians gathered Oct. 18 as g uest s of LULAC Counc il 11041 a nd Joe Toro, special promotions d irect o r of Som e r se t Impo rts , for a book-signing party for Sonia J . D av il a and her ne w boo k , "Poems of an Arias.". . . A ceramics exhibition by Venezuelan Dalila Navarro opens at the Organization o f American States th e r e Oct. 3 0. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report Rive r a w a s a l so a se nior producer on 20/ 20. LATINA IS BACK: After suspending publi cation following three issues in 1983, Latina magazine is back in business. The November issue of Grace Solo' s monthly has a press run of 100,000, a lead story on Raquel Welch, a nd a bound-to-be-controversial reprint(from C alifornia magazine) of Richard Rodriguez's article, "Unilingua l , Not Unilateral." RIVERA LEAVES ABC: G e r aldo Riv e ra, t h e n a ti o n's top His p a ni c news p e rson a lity, disclosed O c t . 22 hi s pla n s to qui t ABC News a t th e e n d of November. His fin a l 20/20 e pi sode will b e Nov. 21. Ri ve r a , 4 3. sa id hi s imme di a t e pl ans call f o r a few months o f traveling and unrave lin g " af t e r 1 5 years of h a rd a nd h onorable work" a n d t h a t h e w ill proba bl y reloca t e o n the W es t Coast. H e and t h e ne twork i ndi c ated t h a t h e would do future free-l a nce pi eces for 2 0 / 20. Rive r a ' s contract with ABC conclude d in September. H e a nd th e network could n o t com e t o terms o n a new one. Although h e di d n ot r e p ort o n th e 20/20 M a rilyn Monroe segm e nt whic h ABC cancelle d this month, R ive r a was outspoke n in his c riti c ism o f the HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street N . W . Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publrsher Hector Errcksen-Mendoza Ed r t o r Carlos M orales Reporting: D o r a Delgado, Feli x Perez . Charlie Ericksen . Antonio Mejias-Rentas . No port1cn ot l'i tSpdr.,c L lf'lk Weekl y Repc}lf m aybe reproduced a, tJ. oadc a s: many torm N ttr.out advance perrr.tSSIOn Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. C ONFERENCE COORDI NATORS. Include the latesl edr t ron o f H•span•c L•nk Weekly Report .n part• c•pants' p acke:s a! your next conference o r convent1on F o r det ads. contact Hect o • E rrc ksen M e ndol a t202J 234 4 WELCOME TO WASHINGTON: A National Press Club reception, coordinated by th e Hispanic News Media A ssociation, Washington, o_c_, and j oined in by th e c apita l's major medi a organizations, w ill we l c om e th e National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) to it s n e w h eadquarters in the National Press Bu i ldin g Nov. 14. VISTA ADDS FIVE: Th e n ation's new His p a ni c Sunday suppleme nt, Vista, which debute d in Septembe r, boost s its circulation in November fr o m 441 ,000 to 602,000 w ith the addi ti o n of five subscribin g news p apers. J oining it s original dozen dailies a re four Texas newspa p e rs , The Laredo News, The McAllen Monitor, The Brownsville Herald, The Harlingen Valley Star, a nd Pu e rto Rico 's English-langua g e San Juan Star_ M onthly now, Vis ta still pl a ns to go weekly earl y n ex t year . Those who subscribed in '83 will be getting their copies every month, So to says. Addition ally, Latina is attempting to be the first Hispanic magazine to find success on the newsstands. LATINAS IN NAIROBI: Two half-hour documentaries, one in Spanish and one in English, on the participation of Latinas in the 1985 World Conference on the United Nation' s Decade for Women in Nairobi and the non governmental organization's conference there were di stributed to the National Public Radio network via satellite Oct. 25. The shows were written, produced and narrated by Elisabeth Perez Luna of Toucan Productions, Philadel phia. -Charlie Ericksen H ispanic Link Weekly Report