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Hispanic link weekly report, November 4, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 4, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Gene Chdvez, president of the National Association for Bilingual Education, sends a letter to U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett challenging him to a public discussion on bilingual education and urging him to examine “any one of the hundreds of quality bilingual education programs across the nation.”,.. Raquel Chang-Rodriguez, a language professor at the City University of New York, is elected president of the International Institute of Ibero-American Literature at the University of Pittsburgh. She becomes the first woman elected to the institute in its47-year history... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Barbara ZCiniga, a Contra Costa County deputy district attorney, as Municipal Court judge to the
Walnut Creek-Danville judicial district. . . New York Gov. Mario Cuomo announces the formation of a committee of Hispanic state officials to coordinate relief efforts for flood victims in Puerto Rico. It will be headed by Tonio Burgos, director of Executive Services. Cuomo also appoints Meguelina llena Maldonado, chairperson of the New York Hispanic Task Force on Child Abuse and Neglect, to the newly-created Children and Family Trust Fund Advisory Board which will administer funds to support efforts aimed at preventing domestic violence and child abuse... Sonya Gonz&lez Masinter, executive director of Parent Education-Early Intervention in San Antonio, is appointed by Gov. Mark White to his Committee for Disabled Persons. . . The Polly Baca for Congress Exploratory Committee plans a fund-raising reception for the Colorado state senator Nov. 14 at the Democratic National Headquarters in Washington, D C—

Calif., N.Y. Lead in Bilingual Education Funding
COMPARING FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDING FOR BILINGUAL EDUCATION - 1984-85 Title VII (Federal) State Allocations
State Amount State Amount
California 23,241,751 California $88,000,000*
New York 22,034,517 Texas 34,102,663*
Texas 11,316,342 Massachusetts 23,000,000
Michigan 5,880,876 New Jersey 21,194,999
New Mexico 4,642,232 Illinois 17,736,500
Massachusetts 4,105,023 Alaska 12,000,000
Florida 4,064,533 New York 10,000,000
Illinois 3,479,641 Hawaii 4,257,751
Oklahoma 2,792,391 Michigan 3,800,000
New Jersey 2,236,909 Wisconsin 3,500,000*
Source: National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education * estimate by state's bilingual education office
Senators Support, Rebuke Bennett
U.S. Education Secretary William Bennett's campaign to reduce the federal role in bilingual education gained support from the Senate Appropriations Committee last week but brought a quick rebuke by the week’s end from three influencial Democratic senators.
In his published report on the committee’s recommendation for a 1986 appropriation of $143 million for bilingual education, committee Chairman Sen. Lowell Weicker (R-Conn.) encouraged Bennett “to pursue administrative, regulatory and legislative actions which will improve fluency in English for limited English proficient children by allowing local schools and parents the flexibility to determine which method of instruction would be most appropriate for their children.”
The language echoed that of the secretary in his drive to allow school districts freedom to place non-English-speaking students in immersion-English classes. Present legislation calls for a
ELECTIONS RESULTS: Hispanic Link Weekly Report will bring you results of elections of particular importance to U.S. Hispanos in the Nov. 11 issue. If there are local elections you would like to see included, please call us at (202) 234-0737 with election results.
4% cap on such classes.
That wording in the report was prepared by staff of Sen. Mark Hatfield (R-Ore.) following final mark-up of the bill Oct. 1.
Although several of the 16 committee members had previously professed strong support for the Title VII legislation which limits immersion programs in federally funded bilingual programs, Weicker’s report reflected the position of the full committee^ two separate sources in attendance told Weekly Report.
Sen. Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) used the occasion of the National Puerto Rican Coalition’s Oct. 30 banquet to reveal that he, along with Sena Edward Kennedy (D-Masa) and Paul Simon (D-lll.) were sending a strong letter to key House leaders asking them “to reject the position of the Senate.”
Dodd, the featured banquet speaker, received strong applause for his denunciation of Bennett While Bennett is still restricted by the language in Title VII and, according to one Senate aide, the Senate committee’s comments are not likely to be repeated in the final Senate-House conference report bilingual education supporters are fearful that the secretary will use the Senate committee report to justify his promised regulatory and administrative actions to narrow federal influence in bilingual education.
Figures compiled by the National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education show that California (with $23.2 million), followed by New York($22 million), led all states in federal dollars received for bilingual education programs in the 1984-85 school year.
Of the 50 states and Puerto Rico, four (Alabama, Delaware, New Hampshire and West Virginia) received no Title VII funds, which are authorized by the Bilingual Education Act of 1968.
Fifteen states also provided state dollars for bilingual programs. Leading in state allocations were California ($88 million), followed by Texas ($34 million) and Massachusetts ($23 million).
Leo Lopez, director of the Bilingual Education Office in the California State Department of Education, said local school districts can’t handle the need for bilingual programs and that the federal government has never provided sufficient money.
“It must fulfill its obligation to provide equal education to all students,” Lopez said. “Every federal dollar spent is returned tenfold.”
Federal Support‘Essential’
James Lyons, legal counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education, called federal support essential primarily because there are certain things that the federal government can achieve betterthan many states. He cited the training and retraining of teachers and providing support to parent and community groups where local districts have excluded them from the educational process.
Federal funding for bilingual education has grown from an initial $7.5 million in 1969 to its current $143 million. It peaked at $167 million in 1980.
Presently, states and local school districts are estimated to spend 2 1/2 to 3 times more than the federal government does in bilingual education.
A spot check by Weekly Report showed that while some states, such as Arizona, do not provide state funding for bilingual education, they do fund special education programs which school districts use for bilingual programs Some programs are entirely or partially funded at the local level.
- Carlos Morales


Sin pelos en la lengua
A CLASH OF CULTURES: Halloween, an old Celtic festival which welcomes spirits of the dead and causes cavities among nihos norteamericanos. is observed Oct. 31, the night before All Saints’ Day.
La Noche de los Muertos, a 2,000-year-old pagan-Christian rite in which the people of Mexico honor, feed and entertain their dead-and-buried ancestors, is celebrated the night after - on Nov. 2.
The latter had its origins in the tribal custom of laying your loved ones to rest with their most prized possessions.
Today native Mexicans - like the Purepecha Indians of the Lake Patzcuaro region - visit family gravesites on Nov. 2, erect a shrine, plant candles, spread a tablecloth on top of the graves, and offer the dead a picnic of their favorite foods and beverages.
(The custom is not totally a magnanimous one. If the dead are not attended properly that night, they will rise and haunt the countryside.)
Along the U.S.-Mexico border, la Noche de los Muertos and Halloween rub against one another. Mexican cultural purists fear that the Anglo-Saxon holiday is winning out. In some areas where small Mexican and U.S. communities lie belly-to-belly, U.S. Border Patrol guards are even known to look the other way on Oct. 31 so that Mexican children may practice their English by knocking on gringo doors and chanting “trick-or-treat.”
Ricardo Avila, an occasional contributing columnist to Hispanic Link, has spent half his life in Mexico City and the balance on Long Island, New York.
In Mexico, he recalls, All Saints’ Day was for the small dead -children who dwell in limbo. On that day, families swept their children’s graves and decorated them with toys, fruit, pottery and flowers.
La Noche de los Muertos was reserved for the adult dead. Los Fieles Difuntos.
Avila has crystal memories of both the U.S. and Mexican customs.
“In Mexico City, my parents would lead me to the panteon -cemetery- to pay tribute to our departed, where a majestic woman in black would regularly arrive a few graves down the row with a piano. She would have it planted on top of her buried husband and deliver him a personal concert.”
The Long Island remembrance came a few years ago.
“We ran out of candy and a disgruntled trick-or-treat brat wrote Cheap S.O.B.’ on our front walk.”
WORLD SERIES FOOTNOTE: Did you notice the back of Cesar Cedefto’s uniform? The St. Louis outfielder's name actually had the tilde - not like you see Lee Trevino's name on golf endorsements. T-r-e-v-i-n-o.
Maybe next year, when the Mets reach the Serie Mundial, their first baseman will have Hernandez written on his back, complete with accent.
- Kay Barbaro
N.Y. Bilingual Ed. Found Inadequate
Expert Quits, Raps Study
A coalition of 25 New York City parent and civic groups issued a report Oct. 24 charging the New York City school system with failing to provide special language instruction to 44,000 non-English-speaking students, almost 40% of all those entitled to such instruction under a 1974 court order.
The report by the Educational Priorities Panel, “Ten Years of Neglect The Failure to Serve Language Minority Students in the New York City Public Schools,” found that the city’s Board of Education provided full bilingual instruction required by law to only33,000 students, or less than 30% of 114,000 entitled. Hispanics, it found, represent three-quarters of the city’s limited English proficiency students.
Federal funding for city bilingual education
NPRC Elects Betanzos
The National Puerto Rican Coalition has elected Amalia Betanzos, president of Wildcat Service Corporation, New York, to a two-year term as chairperson of its 33-member board of directors.
Chosen at its annual conference Oct. 27-30 in Washington, D.C., Betanzos succeeds Millie Torres, a New York communications consultant
Elected chairman of the 20-member Business Advisory Council of NPRC was John C. Walcott vice president of Johnson & Johnson Families of Companies.
Methodists Join Boycott
The Board of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church voted Oct. 25 in New York to support the 6-year boycott against Campbell Soup Co. by the Farm Labor Organizing Committee.
Patricia Harper, a member of the Women’s Division which recommended the action (passed 66 to 55 with 10 abstentions), said Campbell was resisting fair settlement of the issue and that boycott pressure was needed to bring the company “to the negotiating table.”
programs has declined by 20% since 1982 to $13 million. This pays for less than 5% of the public schools’ bilingual staff, the report notes. A shortage of qualified teachers is also cited as a reason for the lack of services.
Only 4% of the teaching staff are licensed bilingual teachers, compared to 12% of all students who need bilingual services, according to the panel.
A consent decree between the New York City Board of Education and Aspira of New York signed in U.S. District Court in 1974 states, “All children identified as limited-English-prof icient must receive a full bilingual program which includes English as a Second Language, native language instruction and three subject courses in their native language.”
The report calls upon the Board of Education to “develop a plan by Jan. 1,1986, to implement the court orders of a decade ago.”
Miami Ordinance Delayed
Miami City Commissioner Joe Carollo asked that body Oct. 24 to defer action on a controversial ordinance that would set aside 52% of all city contracts for blacks, H ispanics and women. Asserting that 62% of the contracts should go to Hispanics because that is their percentage of the city’s population, Carollo asked for the delay to gather more information.
A 1984 ordinance requires the city to set aside 25% of its contracts for blacks and 25% for Hispanics The proposed ordinance would require a set-aside of 17% each for blacks, Hispanics and women.
Mayor Maurice Ferre supports the ordinance, rescheduled for debate Nov. 26.
City Declares Sanctuary
The Takoma Park, Md., City Council adopted an ordinance Oct. 28 that declares the city a sanctuary foran estimated 20,000 Salvadoran and Guatemalan refugees. The city joins five others that have similar ordinances
Expert Quits, Raps Study
Gary Orfield, national desegregation expert who reported in 1982 that Hispanics had passed up blacks as the nation’s “most segregated" school children, resigned Oct 29 from a study on the subject commissioned by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights calling it biased and a waste of $400,000.
Orfield, a professor at the University of Chicago, was appointed to the study’s five-member advisory committee by former commission staff director Linda Chavez last year.
In a letter to commission Chairman Clarence M. Pendleton Jr., Orfield charged that the study was too limited and ignored the effects of desegregation on Hispanic and black children. He also complained that the study was being directed by a consulting firm which had no Hispanics or blacks on its senior research staff.
In 1982, Orfield reported that 68% of Hispanic students and 63% of black students attended public schools that were more than half minority enrollment.
Farmworkers Lobby Hill
A dozen national Hispanic and other rights organizations formed Oct. 10a Farmworkers Rights’ Coalition to lobby for the defeat of the Simpson and Rodino immigration bills and for passage of a bill mandating a federal field sanitation standard.
The coalition, which includes the United Farm Workers Union of America, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and Farm Labor Organizing Committee, was formed at the urging of UFW Vice President Dolores Huerta. The coalition brought 20 Florida farmworkers to a Washington, D.C, press conference Oct 23 where they explained that despite Florida's field standard, drinking water, handwashing facilities and toilets are rarely found.
A hearing on Rep. Barney Frank’s^-Mass.) field sanitation bill is set for Nov. 6.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


THE GOOD NEWS
BILINGUAL EDUCATION FUNDING: The National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education annually produces reports detailing Title VII funding by state (1984-85,65 pages) and school districts (1984-85,70 pages). Both are free.
Also available from the clearinghouse is a free Title VII Program Handbook explaining the different programs for limited English proficiency children administered by the Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs.
The NCBE has a fall 1985 Products List brochure which contains a listing of bilingual education publications available through it in areas such as parent and community involvement, teacher and administrator education and tests, measurement and evaluation. Contact NCBE, 1555 Wilson Blvd., Suite 605, Rosslyn, Va 22209 (800) 336-4560 or (703) 522-0710.
TEN YEARS OF NEGLECT: The 14-page executive summary of the Educational Priorities Panel report “Ten Years of Neglect: The Failure to Serve Language-Minority Students in the New York City Public Schools,” is available free of charge. The full 100-page report is available for a postage and handling fee only (undetermined at press time). Contact: Educational Priorities Panel, 251 Park Ave. South, New York, N.Y. 10010 (212) 674-2121.
PHOTO CONTEST: The Organization of American States is holding its 6th annual photo contest themed “Recreation Around the Hemisphere” Photos must have been taken after Jan. 1, 1983, in either South or Central American countries, Mexico or the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico. Professional and amateur photographers are invited to submit up to three entries in each category, including sports, games or hobbies. Prizes range from $500 to $100. Deadline: Feb. 1,1986. Contact Americas Photo 86 Contest, OAS General Secretariat Washington, D.C. 20006.
CHRISTMAS CARDS: Again this year, The Good News will carry a listing of artists and organizations selling Hispanic Christmas cards. Individuals and groups wanting to be included in the listing - to be published later this month - should send promotional material to Weekly Report immediately. Include information on number of designs offered, whether cards are black and white or color, price range, general types and themes (humor, religious, cultural, national origin focus, etc.), plus full address and phone number. Include card samples if you wish. Address to Carlos Morales, editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
ATTORNEY ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
National civil rights organization seeks Bilingual (English/Spanish) for supervision
ASSOCIATE COUNSEL in San Antonio to of a nonprofit Hispanic programs and grant manage office and supervise litigation. Re* development organization. Requires a BA/BS. quirements - 5 years litigation experience with one year experience in community including trial work andcivil rightslaw, manage- education. Reply to: Hispanic Institute, 368 ment experience, knowledge of Texas com* paramus Road, Paramus, N.J. 07656. munity, bilingual (English/Spanish) highly pre-, ferred. Send resume with references to Ms.
A. Herndndez, MALDEF, 26 Geary St, San Francisco, Calif.94108by 11/18/85. Available January 1986.
ADMINISTRATIVE AIDE: Minimum of two years secretarial experience, word processing experience preferred, typing 65 words per minute. Salary to $15,000 plus benefits. Re*, sumes to: Staffing Assistant, NASW, 7981 Eastern Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 20910. EO.E. â– 
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR National legal services support center, based in Washington, D.C., which provides representation to migrant and seasonal farmworkers, seeks applicants for position of EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. Candidate must have at least five years experience in the practice of law, including court experience and excellent management skills. Candidate should also have knowledge of and sensitivity to farmworkers or other legal services clients. Salary from $35,000 (DOE). Excellent benefits Send resume, references and brief statement of relevant experience to:
Search Committee Migrant Legal Action Program 2001 S St NW Suite 310
Washington, D.C. 20009. ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action County, Maryland, are available on a continuous Employer. basis Call (301) 251-2252.
DIRECTOR
RESEARCH and DOCUMENTATION The Latino Institute, a not-for-profit organization based in Chicago dedicated to building bridges between established institutions and Latino resources, seeks someone to head its research division. Salary is commensurate with experience and training.
• Experience with primary and secondary data gathering methods
• Investigative approaches to issue development and analysis
• The ability to employ these skills as part of an advocacy team to create institutional change on behalf of Hispanics in Chicago.
• Fluency in Spanish and English, written and verbal.
• Good interpersonal, supervisory and administrative skills
Interested persons should submit a resume by Nov. 27 to:
Mr. Peter Martinez Director of Programs Latino Institute 53 West Jackson, Suite 940 Chicago, Illinois 60604
Calendar
THIS WEEK
ELECTRONIC INFORMATION CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Nov. 4-6 Carlos Cuadra, president of Cuadra Associates, will discuss systems and hardware choices for in-house electronic publishing.
Michael Atkin (202) 544-1969
CAREER OPPORTUNITY DAY CONFERENCE Miami Nov. 6
Barbara Gutierrez, assignment editor at WLTV, Miami, will keynote this conference aimed at discouraging dropouts and encouraging career planning.
HISPANIC POLITICAL COALITION OF NEW YORK STATE
Albany, New York Nov. 6
The coalition will honor Shirley Rodriguez-Remeneski, director of the State Department of Social Services, for her commitment to issues affecting Hispanics in the state.
Rafael Morales (518) 382-0950 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
HISPANIC HANDICAPPED CONFERENCE Albuquerque, N.M. Nov. 6
Training and employment opportunities for handicapped Hispanics under the Job Training Partnership Act are among the topics to be discussed at this conference co-sponsored by the President’s Committee on Employment of the Handicapped.
Joe Cbrdova (505) 768-3000
MINORITY ASSESSMENT SEMINAR Tucson, Ariz. Nov. 6-9
The University of Arizona is sponsoring this conference that will examine the academic, behavioral and cognitive development of minority children.
Shitala Mishra (602) 621-7846
ASSOCIATION OF MEXICAN AMERICAN
EDUCATORS
San Jos6, Calif. Nov. 7-9
Bilingual Education is among the topics for discussion at AMAEs 20th annual conference themed MMake Something Happen.”
Tony Gonzalez (415) 363-5410
EL TEATRO CAMPESINO San Francisco Nov. 9
Edward James Olmos, 1985 Emmy award winner,
will be a master of ceremonies for the group’s 20th anniversary celebration.
Roy P6rez (408) 623-2444
COMING SOON
IPRUS GALA FALL BENEFIT New York Nov. 14
The Institute of Puerto Rican Urban Studies will donate one quarter of the revenues from the benefit to victims of earthquakes in Mexico City.
Miriam Christian (212) 665-6369
HISPANICS IN HIGHER EDUCATION Wayne, N.J. Nov. 15
Sarah Melendez, associate director of the American Council on Education’s Office of Minority Concerns, will keynote the conference themed “Strategies for Retention and Recruitment.”
C.AP6rez (201) 595-2182
NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF PUERTO RICAN WOMEN
Rockville, Md Nov. 15-17
NACOPRW*s 13th annual conference will examine the impact of education and technology on youth and women.
Carmen Monroe (301) 593-5028
3


Arts & Entertainment
ISSUES OF CONCERN TO LATINOS AND THEIR ROLE in the nation’s growing cable industry remain topical this week despite the cancellation of a minority business symposium that was tphave been held in Denver Nov. 4-6 by the National Cable television Association.
Due to limited preregistration interest, the fourth NCTA Minority Business Symposium has been rescheduled for Dallas March 15-18, to coincide with NCTA’s annual cable show there.
One current cable issue - a recent federal appeals court decision barring the Federal Communications Commission’s so-called “must carry” rules - could have an adverse effect on non-cable TV stations that carry programming of special interest to Latinos.
The court ruling, handed down July 19, held as unconstitutional the 20-year-old rules that require cable operators to carry the signals of all nearby non-cable TV stations and all public TV signals within a 35-mile radius.
Hailed as a victory by cable TV operators, the decision permits cable stations to use channels now occupied by some over-the-air stations to transmit programming by more national satellite cable services
The decision is expected to be appealed by members of the National Association of Broadcasters, who stand to lose millions of potential viewers who are cable subscribers Also opposed to the
court ruling are the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Association of Public Television Stations and the Public Broadcasting Service. The three filed a joint petition with the FCC urging it to adopt a mandatory carriage rule for all local public TV stations.
Meanwhile, one of the nation’s few Hispanic cable franchisees -the Buenavision system which serves East Los Angeles- reportedly may lose its franchise because of delays in providing service. Three years after being awarded the franchise the company remains unable to provide cable in the Boyle Heights neighborhood. According to a recent Los Angeles Times> article, Moctesuma Esparza, Buenavision’s chief executive officer, has said the delays are due to financial setbacks.
According to the article, Los Angeles Councilwoman Joan Milke Flores wants the City Council to consider re-awarding the franchise to another cable company.
In other cable news, Daniel Huerta has been named central region director for GalaVisibn, the country’s sole Spanish-language cable service. Huerta transfers to the service’s Dallas office from Los Angeles. Prior to joining GalaVisibn in January, Huerta was an executive with Home Box Office.
GalaVisidn-a sister service of the Spanish International Network - premieres this month the Spanish film Skyline. Shot entirely in New York by director Fernando Colomo, Skyline enjoyed limited theatrical release in the U.S. this summer. _ Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
NOVEMBER JOB FAIRS: The American Society of Newspaper Editors has five regional job fairs scheduled this month. Designed to match up minority college students and journalists with editors, they’re set for Oakland, Calif. (Nov. 7-9), Philadelphia (Nov. 13-15), Ann Arbor, Mich. (Nov. 14-16), Hartford, Conn. (Nov. 14-16) and Arlington, Texas (Nov. 22-23).
They II be followed by four in January (Gainesville, Fla.; Memphis, Tenn.; Richmond, Va., and St. Louis) and two in February (Austin, Texas, and Tempe, Ariz.).
Carl Morris, ASNEs minority affairs director-P.O. Box 17004, Washington, D.C. 20041 (703) 620-6087 - has details.
SOPHOMORE INTERNSHIPS: The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund has launched a
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Hepon maybe reproduced or broadcast m any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26..
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
new Minority Reporting Intern Program for College Sophomores. It’ll identify 10 outstanding journalists at four-year institutions, place them in summer reporting jobs next year, and provide them with $1,000 scholarships for their junior year studies.
The selected students will first participate in atwo-week writing seminar at a university to be decided at the Fund’s Nov. 13 board meeting.
Application forms are available through Dec. 15 from DJNF, P.O. Box 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. Deadline to submit them is Jan. 15..
EXILES’ ANNIVERSARY: The 1,500-member National Association of Cuban Journalists in Exile marked its 25th anniversary with a banquet at Miami’s Dupont Plaza Hotel on Sunday, Oct. 29. Singled out for special honors by the 800 in attendance was Guillermo Martinez Marquez, a journalist for 65 of his 85 years,along with 19 otherCubanjournalists with at least 50 years each in the business.
Martinez M&rquez, who edited Havana’s El Pais, still syndicates six political commentaries weekly to 20 newspapers throughout the Americas.
NAMES AND PLACES: Magdalena Beltran will direct the seventh annual Journalism Opportunities Conference for Minorities, sponsored by the California Chicano News Media Association, on Feb. 7-8,1986, at the University of Southern California.. Declining to seek re-election as president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Miami Herald editorial board member Guillermo Martinez has agreed to chair the NAHJ’s 1986 nominations committee.
San Diego Union reporter Steve Padilla represented the NAHJ at the Oct. 28-31 convention of the Associated Press Managing Editors Association in San Francisco. . . Ruben Blades will headline the Nov. 27 annual fiesta of the Washington, D.C., weekly El Latino...
- Charlie Ericksen
A
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Gene Chavez, president of the National Association for Bilingual Education , sends a letter to U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett challenging him to a public discussion on bilingual education and urging him to examine "any one of the hundreds of quality b i lingual education programs across the nation." ... Raquel Chang Rodriguez, a language professor at the City University of New York, is elected president of the International Institute of lbero-American Literature at the University of Pittsburgh. She becomes the first woman elected to the institute in its4 7-year history .. . California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Barbara Zuniga, a Contra Costa County deputy district attorney , as Municipal Court judge to the Walnut Creek Danville judicial district. . . New York Gov. Mario Cuomo announces the formation of a committee of Hispanic state officials to coordinate relief efforts for flood victims in Puerto Rico . It will be headed by To.nio Burgos, director of E x ecutive Services. Cuomo also appoints Meguelina lien a Maldonado, chairperson of the New York Hispanic Task Force on Child Abuse and Neglect. to the newly created Children and Family Trust Fund Advisory Board which will administer funds to support efforts aimed at preventing domestic violence and child abuse ... Sonya Gonzalez Masinter, executive director of Parent Education-Early Intervention in San Antonio, is appointed by Gov. Mark White to his Committee for Disabled Persons ... The Polly Baca for Congress Exploratory Committee plans a fund-raising reception for the Colorado state senator Nov . 14 at the Democratic National Headquarters in Washington, D . C .. .. Vol. 3 No. 44 HISPANIC LINK WEEKL Calif., N.Y. Lead in Bilingual Education Funding COMPARING FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDING FOR BILINGUAL EDUCATION1984 Title VII (Federal) State California New York Texas Michigan New Mexico Massachusetts Florida Illinois Oklahoma New Jersey Amount 23,241,751 22,034,517 11,316,342 5,880,876 4,642,232 4,105,023 4,064,533 3,479,641 2,792,391 2,236,909 State Allocations State California . Texas Massachusetts New Jersey Illinois Alaska New York Hawaii Michigan Wisconsin Amount $88,000,000* 34, 1 02, 663* 23,000,000 21,194,999 17,736,500 12,000,000 10,000,000 4 ,257,751 3,800,000 3 ,500,000* Source : National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education • estimate by state's bilingual education office Senators Support, Rebuke Bennett U . S . Education SecretaryWilliam Bennetfs campaign to reduce the federal role in bilingual education gained support from the Senate Appropriations Committee last week, but brought a quick rebuke by the week's end from three influencial Democratic senators. In his published report on the committee's recommendation for a 1986 appropriation of $143 million for bilingual education, committee Chairman Sen. Lowell Weicker (RConn.) encouraged Bennett " to pursue administrative, regulatory and legislative actions which will improve fluency in Englisn for limited English proficient children by allowing local schools and parents the flexibility to determine which method of instruction would be most appropriate for their children." The language echoed that of the secretary in his drive to allow school districts freedom to place non-Englisll-speaking students in immersioll' English classes . Present legislation calls for a ELECTIONS RESULTS: Hispanic Link Weekly Report will bring you results of elections of particular importance to U .S. Hispanos in the Nov . 11 issue . If there are local elections you would like to see included , please call us at (202) 234 with election results. 4% cap on such classes . That wording in the report was prepared by staff of Sen . Mark Hatfield (ROre . ) following final mark-up of the bill Oct. 1. Although several of the 15 committee mem bers had previously professed strong support for the TitleVIIIegislation which limits immersion programs in fede r ally funded bilingual programs, Weicker's report reflected the position .of the full committee, two separate sources in attendance told Weekly Report . Sen. Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) used the occasion of the National Puerto Rican Coalition's Oct. 30 banquet to reveal that he , along with Sens. Edward Kennedy (DMass.) and Paul Simon (D-Ill.) were sending a strong letter to key House leaders asking them "to reject the position of the Senate." Dodd, the featured banquet speaker, received strong applause for his denunciation of Bennett While Bennett is still restricted by the language in Title VII and, according to one Senate aide, the Senate committee's comments are not likely to be repeated in the final Senate-House conference report, bilingual education supporters are fearful that the secretary will use the Senate committee report to justify his promised regulatory and administrative actions to narrow federal influence in bilingual education . Figures compiled by the National Clearing house for Bilingual Education show that California (with $23. 2 million) , followed by New York($22 million), led all states in federal dollars received for bilingual education pro grams in the 1984 school year. Of the 50 states and Puerto Rico , four (Al abama, Delaware, New Hampshire and West Virginia) received no Title VII funds , which are authorized by the Bilingual Education Act of 1968. Fifteen states also provided state dollars for bilingual programs. Leading in state allo cations were California ($88 million), followed by Texas ($34 million) and Massachusetts ($23 million). Leo Lopez, director of the Bilingual Education Office in the California State Department of Education , said local school districts can't handle the need for bilingual programs and that the federal government has never provided sufficient money . "It must fulfill its obligation to provide equal education to all students," Lopez said . "Every federal dollar spent is returned tenfold . " Federal Support 'Essential' James Lyons, legal counsel for the Nationa l Association for Bilingual Education, called federal support essential primarily because there are certain things that the federal goverll' ment can achieve better than many states . He cited the training and retraining of and providing support to parent and community groups where local d i stricts have excluded them from the educational process. Federal funding for bilingual education has grown from an initial $7.5 million in 1969 to its current $143 million . It peaked at $167 million in 1980. Presently, states and local school districts are estimated to spend 2 1/2 to 3 times more than the federal government does in bilingual education. A spot check by Weekly Report showed that while some states, such as Arizona, do not provide state funding for bilingual education , they do fund special education programs which school districts use for bilingual programs. Some programs are entirely or partially funded at the local level. Carlos Morales

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Sin pelos e n Ia lengua -Ricardo Avila, an occasional contributing columnist to Hispanic Link, has spent half his life in Mexico City and the balance on Long Island , New York . A CLASH OF CULTURES: Halloween, an old Celtic fest i val which welcomes spirits of the dead and causes cavities among norteamericanos. is observed O ct. 31, th e night before All Saints' Day . In Mexico, he recalls, All Saints ' Day was for the small dead children who dwell in limbo . On that day, families swept their children ' s graves and decorated them with toys, fruit, pottery and flower s . La Noche de los Muertos, a 2 ,000-year-old pagan Christian rite i n which the people of Mexico honor, feed and entertain their dead-andburied ancestors, is celebrated the night after-on Nov . 2 . La Noche de los Muertos was reserved for the adult dead. Los Fieles Difuntos. The latter had its origins in the tribal custom of laying your loved ones to rest with their most prized possessions . Today native Mexicanslike the Purepecha Indians of the Lake Patzcuaro region-visit fam i ly gravesites on Nov . 2 , e rect a shrine , plant candles, spread a tablecloth on top of t he graves , and offer the dead a picnic of their favorite foods and beverages . Avila has crystal memories of both the U.S. and Mexican customs. " In Mexico City, my parents would lead me to the pante6n -cemetery-to pay tribute to our departed, where a majestic woman in black would regularly arrive a few graves down the row with a piano . She would have it planted on top of he r buried husband and deliver him a personal concert." ' The Long Island remembrance came a few years ago. (The custom is not totally a magnanimous one . If the dead are not attended properly that night, they will r i se and haun t the countryside. ) " We ran out of candy and a disgruntled trick-or-treat brat wrote Cheap S.O.S.' on our front walk .'' ' Along the U . S .-Mexico border, Ia Noche de los Muertos and Halloween rub against one another . Mex ican cultural purists fear that the Ang l o-Saxon holiday is winning out. In some areas where small Mexican and U.S. communities lie belly-to-belly , U . S . Border Patrol guards are even known to look the other way on Oct. 31 so that Mexican ch i ldren may practice the i r English by knocking on gringo doors and chanting " trick-or-trea t." WORLD SERIES FOOTNOTE: Did you notice the back of Cesa r Cedeno's uniform? The St. Louis outfielder's name actually had the tildenot like you see Lee Trevino ' s name on golf endorsements. T-r-e-v-i-n-o . Maybe next year, when the Mets reach the Serie Mundial, their first baseman will have Hernandez written on his back, complete with accent. -Kay Barbaro N.Y. Bilingual Ed. Found Inadequate Expert Quits, Raps Stu dy A coalition of 25 New York City paren t and civic groups issued a report Oct. 2 4 cha r ging the New York City school system with failing to provide special language instruction to 44,000 non-Englisll-speaking students, almost 40% of all those entitled to such instruction under a 197 4 court order. The report by the Educational Priorities " Ten Years of Neglect The Failure to Serve Language Minori t y Students in the New York City Public Schools, " found that the city's Board of Education prov i ded full bilingual in struction required by law to only 33 , 000 students, or less than 30o/o of 114 ,000 entitled. Hispanics, it found , r epresent three-quarters of the city's limited English proficiency students. Federal funding for city bilingual education N PRC Elects Betanzos The National Puerto Rican Coalition has elected Amalia Betanzos, president of Wildca t Service Corporation, New York, to a two-year term as chairperson of its 33-member board of directors. Chosen at its annual con f e r ence Oct. 27-30 in Washington , D . C., Betanzos succeeds M i llie Torres , a New York communications consultant Elected chairman of the 20-member Business Advisory Council of NPRC was John C . Walcott, vice pres i dent of Johnson & Johnson Families of Companies. Methodists Join Bo y cott The Board of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church voted Oct. 25 in New York to support the 6-year boycott against Campbell Soup Co . by the Farm Labor Organiz i ng Comm ittee. Patric i a Harper, a member of t he Women ' s Division which recommended the action (passed 66 to 55 w i th 10 abstentions) , said Campbell was res isting fair settlement of the issue and that boycott pressure was needed to bring the company "to the negotiating table . " 2 programs has declined b y 20% since 1982 to $13 million . This pays for less than 5% of the public schools' bilingual staff, the report notes . A shortage of qualified teachers is also cited as a reason for the lack of services. Only 4% of the teaching staff are licensed bilingual teachers, compared to 12% of all s t udents who need bilingual services, according to the panel . A consent decree between the New York City Board of Education and Aspira of New York signed in U.S. D i strict Court in 1974 states, "All children identified as limite&Englisll proficient must receive a full bilingual program which includes English as a Second Language, native language instruction and three subject courses in their native language.'' The report calls upon the Board of Education t o " develop a plan by Jan . 1 , 1986 , to implement the court orders of a decade ago.'' Mi a mi Ordinance Delayed Miami City Commissioner Joe Carollo asked that body Oct. 24 to defer action on a controversial ordinance tha t would set aside 52 % of all city contracts for blacks, Hispanics and women . Assert i ng that 62% of the contracts should go to Hispanics because that is their percentage of the city's population , Carollo asked for the delay to gather more information . A 1984 ordinance requires the city to set aside 25% of its contracts for blacks and 25% for Hispanics. The proposed ordinance would require a set-aside of 17% each for blacks , Hispan ics and women . Mayor Maurice Ferre supports the ordinance, rescheduled for debate Nov . 26. C ity Declares Sanctuary The Takoma Park, Md., City Council adopted an ordinance Oct. 28 that declares the city a sanctuary for an estimated 20,000 Salvadoran and Guatemalan refugees. The city joins five others that have similar ordinances. Gary Orfield, national desegregation expert who reported in 1982 that Hispanics had passed up blacks as the nation's " most segregated' ' school children, resigned Oct. 29 from a study on the subject commissioned by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights , calling it biased and a waste of $400,000. Orfield , a professor at the University of Chicago, was appointed to the study's five member advisory committee by former com mission staff director Linda Chavez last year . In a letter to commission Chairman Clarence M . Pendleton Jr., Orfield charged that the study was too limited and ignored the effects of desegregation on Hispanic and black children . He also complained that the study was being directed by a consulting firm which had no Hispanics or blacks on its senior research staff . In 1982, Orfield reported that 68% of His panic students and 63% of black students attended public schools that were more than half minority enrollment. FarmwC?rkers Lobby Hill A dozen national Hispanic and other rights organizations formed Oct. 1 0 a Farmworkers Rights' Coalition to lobby fort he defeat of the Simpson and Rodino imm i gration bills and for passage of a bill mandati ng a federal field sanitat i on standard . The coalition, which includes the United Farm Workers Union of America , Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and Farm Labor Organizing Committee, was formed at the urging of UFW Vice President Dolores Huerta. The coalition brought 20 Florida farmworkers to a Washington, D . C., press confe r ence Oct. 23 where they explained that despite Florida's field standard, drinking water, handwashing facilities and toilets are rarely found. A hearing on Rep. Barney Frank's(D-Mass . ) field sanitation bill is set for Nov. 6. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS BILINGUAL EDUCATION FUNDING: The National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education annually produces reports detailing Title VII funding by statE:! (1984-85, 65 pages) and school districts(1984-85, 70 pages) . Both are free. Also available from the clearinghouse is a free Title VII Program Handbook explaining the different programs for limited English proficiency children administered by the Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs. The NCBE has a fall 1985 Products List brochure which contains a listing of bilingual education publications available through it in areas such as parent and community involvement, teacher and administrator education and tests, measurement and evaluation. Contact NCBE, 1555 Wilson Blvd., Suite 605, Rosslyn, Va 22209 (800) 336-4560 or (703) 522-0710. TEN YEARS OF NEGLECT: The 14-page executive summary of the Educational Priorities Panel report "Ten Years of Neglect: The Failure to Serve Language-Minority Students in the New York City Public Schools," is available free of charge. The full1 OOpage report is available for a postage and handling fee only(undetermined at press time) . Contact: Educational Priorities Panel, 251 Park Ave. South, New York, N .Y. 10010 (212) 674. PHOTO CONTEST: The Organization of American States is holding its 6th annual photo contest themed "Recreation Around the Hemisphere." Photos must have been taken after Jan. 1, 1983, in either South or Central American countries, Mexico or the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico. Professional and amateur photographers are invited to submit up to three entries in each category, including sports, games or hobbies. Prizes range from $500 to $100. Deadline: Feb. 1, 1986. Contact Americas Photo 86 Contest, OAS General Secretariat Washington, D . C . 20006. CHRISTMAS CARDS: Again this year, The Good News will carry a listing of artists and organizations selling Hispanic Christmas cards. Individuals and groups wanting to be included in the listing-to be published later this month should send promotional material to Weekly Report immediately . Include information on number of designs offered, whether cards are black and white or color, price range, general types and themes (humor, religious, cultural, national origin focus, etc.), pl ' us full address and phone number. Include card samples if you wish. Address to Carlos Morales, editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. CORPORATE CLASS I Fl EDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington. D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ED Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per.word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. ATTORNEY ASSISTANT DIRECTOR National civi L rights organization seeks Bilingual (English/Spanish) for supervision ASSOCIATE COUNSEL in San Antonio to of a nonprofit Hispanic programs and grant manage office and supervise litigation. Redevelopment Requires a B.A/BS. quirements -5 years litigation experience with one year experience in community including trial work and civil rights law. manageeducation. Reply to: Hispanic Institute, 368 ment experience. knowledge of Texas comParamus Road, Paramus. N.J. 07656. munity, bilingual (English/Spanish) highly pre-1r---------------, !erred. Send resume with references to Ms. A Hernandez, MALDEF, 28 Geary St. San DIRECTOR Francisco.Caln.94t08by11/18/85. Available RESEARCH and DOCUMENTATION January 1986. ADMINISTRATIVE AIDE: MiniR?.um of two years secretarial experience. word processing : experience preferred. typing 65 words per minute. Salaryto$15,000 plus benefits. Re-1 sumes to: Staffing Assistant, NASW, 7981 Eastern Ave .. Silver Spring. Md. 20910. E.O.E. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR National legal services support center, based in Washington, D.C .. which provides represen tation to migrant and seasonallarmworkers. seeks applicants lor POSition of EXECUTIVE DIRECT.OR. Candidate must have at least live years experience in the practice of law, including court experience and excellent management skills. Candidate should also have knowledge of and sensitivity to farm workers or other legal services clients. Salary from $35,000 (DOE). Excellent benefits. Send resume, references and brief statement of relevant experience to: Search Committee Migrant Legal Action Program 2001 SSt NW Suite 310 Washington, D.C. 20009 . . An Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. The Latino Institute, a notforprolit organization based in Chicago dedicated to building bridges between established institutions and Latino resources, seeks someone to head its research division. Salary is commensurate with experience and training. e Experience with primary and secon dary data gathering methods. • Investigative approaches to issue development and analysis. • The ability to employ these skills as part of an advocacy team to create insti tutional change on behalf of Hispanics in Chicago. • Fluency in Spanish and English, written and verbal. • Good interpersonal, supervisory and administrative skills. Interested persons should submit a resume by Nov. 27 to: Mr. Peter Martinez Director of Programs Latino Institute 53 West Jackson, Suite 940 Chicago, Illinois 60604 ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Maryland, are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251. Calendar HISPANIC HANDICAPPED CONFERENCE Albuquerque , N.M. Nov. 6 will be a master of ceremonies for the group's 20th anniversary celebration. THIS WEEK ELECTRONIC INFORMATION CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Nov. 4 Carlos Cuadra, president of Cuadra Associates, will discuss systems and hardware choices for in house electronic publishing. Michael Atkin (202) 544 1969 CAREER OPPORTUNITY DAY CONFERENCE Miami Nov. 6 Barbara Gutierrez. assignment editor at WL lV, will keynote this conference aimed at discouraging dropouts and encouraging career planning . HISPANIC POLITICAL COALITION OF NEW YORK STATE Albany, New York Nov. 6 The coalition will honor Shirley director oi the State Department of Social Services, for her commitment to issues affecting Hispanics in the state. Rafael Morales (518) 382 Hispanic Link Weekly Report Training and employment opportunities for handicapped Hispanics under the Job Training Partnership Act are among the topics to be co-sponsored by the Presidenrs Committee on Employment of the Handicapped. Joe C6rdova (S05) 768 MINORITY ASSESSMENT SEMINAR Tucson, Ariz. Nov. 6 The University of Arizona is sponsoring this conference that will examine the academic, behavioral and cognitive development of minority children. Shita l a Mishra (602) 621 ASSOCIATION OF MEXICAN AMERICAN EDUCATORS San Jose, Calif. Nov. 7 Bilingual Education is among the topics for discussion at AMAE's 20th annual conference themed "Make Something Happen . " Tony Gonzalez (415) 363 0 EL TEATRO CAMPESINO San Francisco Nov. 9 Edward James Olmos, 1985 Emmy award winner, Roy Perez (408) 623 COMING SOON IPRUS GALA FALL BENEFIT New York Nov. 14 The Institute of Puerto Rican Urban Studies will donate one quarter of the revenues from the benefit to victims of earthquakes in Mexico City. Miriam Christian (212) 665 HISPANICS IN HIGHER EDUCATION Wayne, N .J. Nov . 15 Sarah Melendez, associate director of the American Council on Education's Office of Minority Concerns, will keynote the conference themed "Strategies for Retention and Recruitment." . C.APerez (201) 595 NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF PUERTO RICAN WOMEN Rockville, Md. Nov. 15 NACOPRWs 13th annual conference will examine the impact of education and technology on youth and women. Carmen Monroe (301) 593C28 3

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Arts & Enterta.inment court ruling are the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Association of Public Television Stations and the Public Broadcasting Service. The three filed a joint petition with the FCC urging it to adopt a mandatory carriage rule for all local public TV stations. ISSUES OF CONCERN TO LATINOS AND THEIR ROLE in the nation's growing cable industry remain topical this week despite the cancellation of a minority business symposium that was t9_ have been held in Denver Nov . 4-6 by the National Cable Television Association. Due to limited preregistration interest, t he fourth NCTA Minority Business Symposium has been rescheduled for Dallas March 15-18, to coincide with NCTA's annual cable show fhere. One current cable issue-a recent federal appeals court decision barring the Federal Communications Commission's so-called "must carry" rules-could have an adverse effecron non-cable TV stations that carry programming of special interest to Latinos. Meanwhile, one of the nation's few Hispanic cable franchiseesthe Buenavision system which serves East Los Angeles-reportedly may lose its franchise because of delays in providing service . Three years after being awarded the franchise the company remains unable to provide cable In the Boyle Heights neighborhood. According to a recent Los Angeles Times. article, Moctesuma Esparza, Buenavision's chief executive officer, has said the delays are due to financial setbacks. The court ruling, handed down July 19, held as unconstitutional the 20-year-old rules that require cable operators to carry the signals of all nearby non-cable TV stations and all public TV signals within a 35 mile radius. According to the article, Los Angeles Councilwoman Joan Milke Flores wants the City Council to consider re-awarding the franchise to another cable company. In other cable news, Daniel Huerta has been named central region director for GalaVisi6n, the country's sole Spanish-language cable service. Huerta transfers to the service's Dallas office from Los Angeles. Prior to joining GalaVisi6n in January, Huerta was an executive with Home Box Office. Hailed as a victory by cable TV operators, the decision permits cable stations to use channels now occupied by some over"the-air stations to transmit programming by more national satellite cable services. The decision is expected to be appealed by members of the National Association of Broadcasters, who' stand to lose millions of potential viewers who are cable subscribers. Also opposed to the GalaVisi6n-a sister service of the Spanish International Network -premieres this month the Spanish film Skyline. Shot entirely in New York by director Fernando Coloma, Skyline enjoyed limited theatrical release in the U.S. this summer. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report NOVEMBER JOB FAIRS: The American Society of Newspaper Editors has five regional job fairs scheduled this month. Designed to match up minority college students and journa lists with editors, they're set for Oakland , Calif . (Nov. 7-9), Philadelphia (Nov . 13-15), Ann Arbor, Mich. (Nov. 14-16), Hartford, Conn. (Nov . 14-16) and Arlington, Texas (Nov. 2223). They'll be followed by four in January(Gaines ville, Fla.; Memphis, Tenn.; Richmond, Va., and St. Louis) and two in February (Austin, Texas, and Tempe, Ariz.). Carl Morris, ASNE's minority affairs director P.O. Box 17004, Washington, D.C. 20041 (703) 620-6087has details . SOPHOMORE INTERNSHIPS: The Dow Jones Newspaper Fund has launched a HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nat1onal publication of: Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street N . W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No portion of H1spamc Lmk WeeklyHepor1 maybe reproduced or broadcast tn any form w1thout advance permtSSion. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (1 3 issues) $26 .. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edi . tibn of Htspanic Link Weekly Report in parttctpants' packets at your next conference or convent•on. For details. contact Hector ErtcksenMendoza (2021 234. 4 new Minority Reporting Intern Program for College Sophomores. It'll identify 10 out standing journalists at four-year institutions, place them in summer reporting jobs next year, and provide them with $1 ,000 scholarships for their junior year studies. The selected students will first participate in a . two-week writing seminar at a university to be decided at the Fund's Nov. 13 board meeting. Application forms are available through Dec. 15 from DJNF, P.O. Box300, Princeton, N . J . 08540. Deadline to submit them is Jan. 15. EXILES' ANNIVERSARY: The 1 ,500 membe.r National Association of Cuban Journalists in Exile marked its 25th anniversary with a banquet at Miami's Dupont Plaza Hotel on Sunday, Oct. 29. Singled out for special honors by the 800 in attendance was Guillermo Martinez Marquez, a journalist for 65 of his 85 years,along with 19 other Cuban journalists with at least 50 years each in the business. so WHAT TiME is YOUR DEAt)RHMNF COMiNG OUI\0 EAT \::, ;,, \I {i•l• I, lq'\\. \I '' Martinez Marquez, who edited Havana's El Pals, still syndicates six political commentaries weekly to 20 newspapers throughout the Americas . NAMES AND PLACES: Magdalena Beltran will direct the seventh annual Journalism Opportunities Conference for Minorities, sponsored by the California Chicano News Media Association, on Feb. 7-8,1986, at the University of Southern California ... Declining to seek re-election as president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Miami Herald editorial board member Guillermo Martinez has agreed to chair the NAHJ's 1986 nominations committee. San Diego Union reporter Steve Padilla represented the NAHJ at the Oct. 28 convention of the Associated Press Managjng Editors Association in San Francisco ... Ruben Blades will headline the Nov. 27 annual fiesta of the Washington, D.C., weekly El Latino ... /_, , , ., Charlie Ericksen SAMf TIM YOURS 15 COMING 10 SMELL YOUR .:: ' rLowtf{s', .l. \. Hispanic Link Weekly Report