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Hispanic link weekly report, November 11, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 11, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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HR/CH
Making The News This
U.S. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas), elected to Congress Nov. 4,1961, announces plans fora major celebration in San Antonio Jan. 18 to mark the start of his 25th year of service to the state’s 20th congressional district. . . The U.S. Senate approves President Reagan’s nomination of Elizabeth Flores Burkhart to a second term on the National Credit Union Administration Board. The first woman to serve on the three-member board, she was first appointed in 1982 to fill an unexpired term. Her second term ends in 1991... California surgeon Tirso del Junco is selected by Gov. George Deukmejian to serve on the 30-member University of California Board of Regents. Del Junco had also been mentioned as a candidate to replace Margaret Heckler as Secretary of Health and Human
Services or Samuel Pierce^@^eA'«2a®8S Housing and Urban Development... The Association of Hispanic Arts in New York elects Anita Soto, manager of Community Relations/Economic Development for New York Telephone, as its chairperson and Luis Cancel, executive director of the Bronx Museum of the Arts, vice chairperson ... While Los Angeles County grand jury foreman Sam C6rdova holds a press conference Oct. 29 calling for the governor to appoint a special prosecutorto investigate the 1962 death of Marilyn Monroe, a Superior Court judge announces he’s been replaced. Reason: grand jury members say he makes too many unauthorized statements on their behalf... Ana Galarza, 35, a preschool teacher from the Bronx, finishes last in the Oct. 27 New York Marathon, finishing an hour before midnight in 11 hours, 50 minutes and 46 seconds. She wasn’t worried about completing the race, she said - just about whether she’d get mugged...
v.,3N.45(a) HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY
Miami: Cubans Win; S.W.: New Barrio Power
The nation’s premiere Cuban city, Miami, will elect its first Cuban mayor this week. Cuban attorney Xavier Suarez and Cuban banker Raul Masvidal edged six-term incumbent Maurice Ferre by 1,200 and 900 votes each in the Nov. 5 primary there. They face off Nov. 12 to determine who will replace the charismatic Puerto Rican, whose luck at juggling white, black and Latino constituencies finally ran out.
And Latinos in Las Cruces, N.M., were given a sweet foretaste of what dozens of Hispanic communities throughout the Southwest could experience in 1986 and beyond. Because of a switch from at-large to district voting, the 45% Hispanic municipality elected three Latinos to an historically all-white City Council.
Those were the highlights in this off-year election.
Las Cruces, goaded by a lawsuit and then required by state legislation passed in March, switched from a five-member council elected
MIAMI MAYORAL ELECTION
Candidate Votes Percent
Xavier Sudrez 16,224 28.9%
Raul Masvidal 15,893 28.3%
Maurice Ferr6 15,006 26.8%
at-large to a seven-member body elected by district
Two Hispanics, Herculano Ferralez and Jack Valencia, won seats uncontested. A third, Samuel Barba, defeated Ronald Hudson,53% to 47%.
The victories were heralded by Rolando Rios, legal director of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, which had sued the city, as a presage of what will happen in Texas, California and other New Mexico communities as other cities, counties and school districts are required to change.
The hew state law in New Mexico requires
cities with populations over 10,000 and counties over 13,000 to conduct district elections.
Rios said that SVREP is presently involved in nearly 40 suits in Texas, California and New Mexico concerning at-large elections. Gerrymandering to minimize minority vote remains a fear, even in district voting, he said.
Major impact of the New Mexico change will come in the March 1986 statewide elections In another important Miami development Nov. 5, the Dade County Commission appointed former assistant county manager Sergio Pereira as the Metropolitan County Manager, the most powerful nonelective post in the Southeast.
In two City Commission races there, incumbent Demetrio P§rez won 20.9% of the vote to 29.5% for Rosario Kennedy and 19% for Manolo Reyes. The other race saw incumbent Miller Dawkins outpoll Victor DeYurre, Miami Zoning Board member, 48.6% to31.5%. A Nov. 12 runoff is set for those races also. Other mayoral results:
• Hialeah, Fla., Mayor Raul Martinez ran
Latinos Increase Numbers in Mass.
The Massachusetts Commission on Hispanic Affairs released Oct. 29 a demographic analysis of Hispanics in the state which showed them to be largest minority in the commonwealth outside of Boston, going from 141,580, or 2.5% of the population in 1980, to 222,000, or 3.8% in 1985.
The report found Puerto Ricans to be the largest Latino subgroup in the state, comprising 53% of all Hispanics. Mexicans were
Aranda Is Replaced
U.S Ambassador to Uruguay Thomas Aranda Jr. was replaced Nov. 8 by former Washington, D.C., federal Judge Malcolm Wilkey.
He returned to Washington, but no determination has been made yet whether the 51-year-old Phoenix attorney, appointed by President Reagan in 1981, will be offered another diplomatic assignment.
Aranda served as a special assistant to President Gerald Ford and as a member of Reagan’s transition team prior to his Uruguay appointment.
second at 5.5%, followed by Cubans at 5%. The majority of the remaining 35.5% were found to be Dominicans, followed by Central and South Americans.
Ralph Rivera, director of the commission, said the report notes that in Chelsea and Lawrence, the two cities with the highest Hispanic concentrations, attempts are not being made to “lower barriers for Hispanic participation in the economic and political arenas.” He added that “things haven’t improved. They’re getting worse for Hispanics (in Massachusetts).”
Other report findings showed:
• One-fifth of all Hispanics spoke no English at all.
• The Hispanic median age was 21.3 years, compared to 32 for whites.
• Thirty-six percent'of Hispanic families were headed by single women.
• Forty-two percent were under 18 years of age and unable to vote.
The commission was created by the Massachusetts Legislature in 1983 and began its mission - to study the needs of the Latino population - in 1984.
continued on page 2
Chang-Diaz to Blast Off
Franklin Chang-Diaz will become the first U.S. Hispanic astronaut in space when the shuttle Columbia blasts off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida Dec. 20, or possibly earlier to avoid a Christmas Day landing.
Chang-Diaz, 35, is a native of Costa Rica who earned his Ph.D. in plasma physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. On the five-day mission as one of seven crew members, Chang-Diaz will assist in deploying the Radio Corporation of America’s (RCA) Satcom communications satellite. He will also conduct experiments on manufacturing in space involving metal alloys and crystal growth.
Mexico will send its first astronaut on a National Aeronautics and Space Administration shuttle flight when Rodolfo Neri Vela takes off aboard the space shuttle Atlantis Nov. 27 from Kennedy. He will assist in deploying a domestic communications satellite for Mexico.


S/n pelos en lengua
QUOTE THEM, NOT ME: Here’s what folks are saying: . WILLIAM BENNETT, U.S. Secretary of Education, explaining his campaign to curtail bilingual education:
Our common history is written in English. Our common forefathers speak to us, through the ages, in English.
JOSE CARDENAS, executive director, Intercultural Development Research Association, San Antonio:
Mr. Bennett’s forefathers may speakto him in English, but all four of my grandparents spoke to me in Spanish. Through the ages, my wife’s forefathers, from Jose S. de la Garza, who received the Espiritu Santo land grant in 1735 and contributed to the domination of this hostile territory now known as Texas, to Jose Antonio Navarro, who led the effort for the independence of Texas, all speak to us in Spanish.
Mr. Bennett is in error in stating that all persons who contributed to the growth and development of this country were English speaking. JOHN JACOBS, political writer, San Francisco Examiner It’s not often that an elected local official gives a speech to a group
of other elected local officials, who then swarm toward him waving business cards, convention programs or other paper he can grace with an autograph.
But that’s exactly what happened after San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros addressed the California League of Cities convention in San Francisco. Cisneros is clearly a rising star in the national Democratic Party.
MAGDALENO (LEN) ROSE-AVILA, recently named as Southern Regional Director for Amnesty International USA:
The toughest part (of this job) is talking to people who seem to be a nuisance. They keep asking you question upon question and seem not to understand. That’s when you have to remember that you were once a nuisance, too.
BANQUET FOOTNOTE: Last May Sin Pelos gave NBOTV the gentle needle for its full-page ad in the National Hispanic Media Conference program, which effused “Gracias for placing the accent on opportunity.” “Gra-SEE-us?” we chided. In last month’s California Chicano News Media Association banquet program, the network ran the same ad minus the misplaced accent. /Bravo!
Now, if we could only teach network announcers to pronounce Spanish names correctly. Right, Vin Scully? _ ^ay
Two Cubans Defeat Ferre in Miami
continued from page 1
Jobless Rate 11.3%
The Hispanic unemployment rate increased from 10.4% in September to 11.3% in October, according to figures released Nov. 1 by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Overall unemployment rate held at 7%.
A study released the same day by the Washington-based Coalition on Women and Employment and the Full Employment Action Council disputed the BLS figures. Including “discouraged” (those unable to find a job) and “underemployed" workers (those who settle for part time), the women’s advocacy group study reported the “real” rate among Hispanic women 16 years and above to be 20.6%, as opposed to an 11.7% BLS figure.
Chicago Gains Likely
Chicago Hispanics are expected to increase their representation bn the city’s50-member council from one to four under a ward redistricting plan taken under advisement Nov. 4 by U.S. District Judge Charles Norgle.
Lone presentHispanic councilman is Puerto Rican Miguel Santiago.
The plan was drawn up with participation of Hispanic and black communities following a suit against the council and former Mayor Jane Byrne filed in July 1982. At that time Chicago’s four dominantly Hispanic communities were split'among nine wards.
Under the new plan, the four communities-WestTown, Humboldt Park(both predominantly Puerto Rican), Pilsen and Little Village (both predominantly Mexican American) - will each form the nucleus of a ward.
In each of the four proposed wards, Latino candidates favoring Mayor Harold Washington will be pitted against other Latinos backed by City Council majority leader Alderman Edward Vrdolyak and could determine the balance of power in the bitter feud between the two.
Following Judge Norgle’s approval of the new districts, Washington will push for new elections early next spring while Vydolyak forces will seek to stall them until the next mayoral race in early ’87.
unopposed and was elected to a second term.
• Phoenix architect Mike Enriquez was defeated by incumbent Terry Goddard, gaining 13% of all votes cast in his second try for elective office.
• Madison Heights, Mich., Mayor George Suarez was re-elected to a fourth term.
Albuquerque, N.M., could elect its first Hispanic mayor if Jim Baca is successful in the Nov. 12 runoff against Ken Schultz. Both outpolled incumbent Harry Kinney in the Oct. 8 primary.
In New Jersey, where Gov. Thomas Kean (R) handily- defeated Peter Shapiro, a 33rd District State House race saw Republicans Jose Arango and Ronald Dario defeat incumbent Rep. Robert Ranieri (D) and Mario Hernandez (D): Two are elected from each district.
CITY COUNCIL RACES
While New York City Mayor Ed Koch easily won a third term, Eva Guardarramas(R), a Koch backer; was defeated" by Andrew Stein in her bid to become City Council president.
In other New York borough races, incumbent Democrats Rafael Colon (11th District) and Fernando Ferrer (13th District) were re-elected to the Bronx City Council. In Brooklyn, 27th District incumbent Victor Robles(D), was also re-elected.
HOUSTON: District “I” City Councilor Ben Reyes was re-elected to a4th term, capturing 73.7% of the vote. He is the only Hispanic on the 14-member council.
LOS ANGELES: A special election Dec. 10 will be held to fill the council seat vacated by Art Snyder Oct. 4. The 75% Hispanic 14th district could elect its first Hispanic since 1962.
PHOENIX: Latina council incumbent Mary Rose Wilcox was re-elected to a second term, garnering 71% of the votes.
HIALEAH, FLA: Among the top eight vote-getters who will face each other for four
available seats in a Nov. 12 runoff are incumbent Paulino Nunez (12.7%) and challengers Julio Martinez (10.3%) and Roberto Ruiz (9.1%).
MICHIGAN: As the only Hispanics serving on city councils around the state, Paul Vasquez (Flint), Lee Silva (Ecorse) and Refugio Torres (South Gate), were re-elected to new terms.
LORAIN, OHIO: Angel Arroyo, the only Hispanic city councilor there, was re-elected.
SCHOOL BOARD RACES
BOSTON: School committee member Grace Romero (District 7), the only Hispanic on the committee, was defeated 2,815 to 698 by Juanita Wade. Observers claimed Romero’s loss was due to charges she submitted nomination papers last June which contained forged signatures. She will stand trial soon on those charges in Suffolk Superior Court.
HOLYOKE, MASS.: Puerto Rican Betty Medina Lichtenstein became the first Hispanic elected to that city’s school committee. She defeated Elaine Pluta with 55% of the vote.-
ROCHESTER, N.Y.: Puerto Rican Nancy Padilla was re-elected to the seven-member school board and remains its only Hispanic.
TOLEDO, OHIO: Sofia Quintero is re-elected to the city’s board of education and remains the only Hispanic there.
- Dora Delgado and Felix Perez
Lottery Winner Arrested
An undocumented immigrant who won $2 million in the Nov. 4 California Lottery was arrested two days later by the Immigration and Naturalization Service after telling lottery officials he was in the country illegally.
Jos6 Caballero, 24, a native of Mexico, was arrested at his home in San Jose, after he spun a wheel in Los Angeles to gain $100,000 a year for 20 years, less withholding for federal income tax. A lottery official said Caballero would receive his winnings.
The INS plans a hearing to determine whether Caballero will be allowed to stay in the U.S.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


THE GOOD NEWS
HANDICAPPED EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS: The Children’s Defense Fund has published a parents’ handbook in Spanish on the educational rights of handicapped children. Order “94-142 y 504: Numeros que Equivalen a los Derechos Educativos de los Ninos Impedidod* from the Children’s Defense Fund, Publications Dept., 122 C St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001(800)424-9602. Price: $4.75 plus postage apd handling.
CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCES: Hispanic Link’s column service, syndicated to newspapers nationally, looks each year for memorable Christmas season stories, anecdotal pieces which reflect cultural influences. 700 words. Submissions by non-professional as well as professional writers encouraged. We work with authors. Payment on acceptance. For our free writer’s guidelines and samples of past seasonal columns, contact Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. (202) 234-0280.
MASSACHUSETTS LATINOS: The Massachusetts Commission on Hispanic Affairs has produced a demographic analysis of Hispanics in the state and a progress report on its efforts. A six-page executive summary of the demographic report and the progress report are both available free of charge. The full demographic report should be available in two weeks. Contact: Commission on Hispanic Affairs, State House, Room 185, Boston, Mass. 02133 (617) 722-1362.
PROGRAMS FOR WORKING WOMEN: The Department of Labor’s Bureau of Women has published an outline of its programs and activities ranging from promotion of employer’s child care centers to expansion of job potential among displaced homemakers and low-income women. Single copies of the 16-page “Women’s Bureau: Meeting the Challenges of the 80’s” are available free from the Women’s Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20210. Include self-addressed mailing label. For each additional copy, send $1.00 to Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. A 25% discount on orders of 100 or more.
A VIEW OF U.S. HISPANICS: The Minority Student Program Office at Michigan State University has published a 7-page information brochure on statistics, geographical dispersion, and cultural and racial heritage of Hispanics in the United States. “The Mestizos, a view of the U.S. Hispanic Community” is available free (or 25$ each for more than one copy) from Coordinated Minority Student Programs Office, 339 Student Services Building, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich. 48824 (517) 353-7748.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per.word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
ATTORNEY
National civil rights organization seeks ASSOCIATE COUNSEL in San Antonio to manage office and supervise litigation. Requirements - 5 years litigation experience including trial work and civil rights law, management experience, knowledge of Texas community, bilingual (Engiish/Spanish) highly preferred. Send resume with references to Ms. A. Hernandez, MALDEF, 28 Geary St, San Francisco, Calif.94108 by 11/18/85. Available January 1986.
JOB OPENING, ARLINGTON, VA. RECREATION OUT REACH SPECIALIST (Bilingual: Vietnamese/English;
Spanish/English) $19,133-21,057. #72826BCA
Inform diverse community of current recreation programs; determine recreation/leisure needs; develop and evaluate programs; serve as resource facilitator for department
Requires any combination of five years of experience, training orcollege(post secondary) education in out reach, family services recreation or related field.
For further information and application form, call (703) 558-2167, or contact Arlington County Personnel Department, 2100 14th St., North Arlington, Va 22201.
Closing date is Nov. 21.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Maryland, are available on a continuous basia Call (301) 251-2252.
THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Beltran (213) 743-7158.
DIRECTOR
RESEARCH and DOCUMENTATION
The Latino Institute, a not-for-profit organization based in Chicago dedicated to building bridges between established institutions and Latino resources, seeks someone to head its research division. Salary is commensurate with experience and training.
• Experience with primary and secondary data gathering methods.
‘ • Investigative approaches to issue development and analysis.
• The ability to employ these skills as part of an advocacy team to create institutional change on behalf of Hispanics in Chicago.
• Fluency in Spanish and English, written and verbal.
• Good interpersonal, supervisory and administrative skills
Interested persons should submit a resume by Nov. 27 toe
Mr. Peter Martinez
Director of Programs
Latino Institute
53 West Jackson, Suite 940
Chicago, Illinois 60604
VICE PRESIDENT FOR LEGAL PROGRAMS
National civil rights organization seeks vice president for legal programs in Los Angeles to manage legal programs in five offices Requirements: 6-8 years extensive experience in civil rights/public interest law, knowledge of Hispanic issues. Resume with references by Nov. 25 to Ms. A Hernandez, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th floor, Los Angeles CA 90014.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC MEDIA AWARDS New York Nov. 11
Hispanics in Communications conducts its4th annual “El Cervantes” Hispanic Media awards.
Jackie DaCosta (212) 418-0622
IPRUS FALL GALA BENEFIT New York Nov. 14
The Institute of Puerto Rican Urban Studies will donate one quarter of all contributions from this fund-raiser to earthquake victims in Mexico. Miriam Christian (212) 665-6369
HISPANIC CPA CONFERENCE San Antonio Nov. 14,15
The American Association of Hispanic Certified Public Accountants will conduct its annual conference with seminars on personal finance planning and how to start a CPA firm.
Robert Trevifto (512) 680-1006
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
HISPANICS IN HIGHER EDUCATION Wayne, N.J. Nov. 15
Themed “Strategies for Retention and Recruitment” associate director of the American Council on Education’s Office of Minority Concerns Sarah Melendez will be the keynote speaker.
CA PSrez (201) 595-2182
ROYBAL RECOGNITION DINNER Los Angeles Nov. 15
The dinner is to recognize the work of Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) with the elderly community and to establish an endowed chair in his name at California State University.
Carol Numrick (213) 224-3273
NACOPRW CONFERENCE Rockville, Md. Nov. 15-17
The National Conference of Puerto Rican Women presents its 13th annual conference examining the effect of technology and education on women and youth.
Carmen Monroe (301) 593-5028
HISPANIC COLLEGE DAY
College Park Md. Nov. 16
The Northeast chapter of the League of United
Latin AmericairCitizens will conduct this seminar to provide motivation for college-bound high school youth.
Andres Tobar (703) 379-7487
COMING SOON
NATIONAL HISPANIC COUNCIL ON AGING New Orleans Nov. 22, 23 Rebeca Gilad (202) 265-1288
SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE BILINGUALISM
New York Nov. 22,23
Antonio Simoes (212) 598-2776
INSTITUTE FOR PUERTO RICAN POLICY BENEFIT DANCE New York Dec. 6 Gerson Borrero(212) 689-6331
SPANISH SPEAKING AFFAIRS COUNCIL
CONFERENCE
St. Paul Minn. Dec. 7
Ruby Lee (612) 296-9587
NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES CONFERENCE • Seattle Dec. 7-11 Randy Arndt (202) 626-3158
3


Arts & Entertainment
THE LONG-AWAITED THEATRICAL RELEASE of a controversial Hispanic-themed movie is scheduled in three U.S. cities this month as Latinos continue a steady visible presence in the country’s film industry.
Haskell Wexler’s Latino, a film about a Chicano’s experience training contra rebels in Nicaragua, opens in Los Angeles Nov. 13, in Chicago Nov. 15 and in San Francisco Nov. 22.
Starring Robert Beltran and Annette Cardona, the film was enthusiastically received earlier this year at the Cannes Film Festival.
Latino’s pro-leftist tint reportedly has kept “major” distributors uninterested. Domestically, the film is being released by Cinecom-an “art film” distributor- successful with the U.S. release of El Norte and Kiss of the Spider Woman.
A spokeswoman for director Wexler would not reveal the financial terms of Cinecom’s distribution agreement. She told Weekly Report, however, that the cost of distributing the film was being undertaken by Wexler himself.
Wexler financed the $4 million film — shot in secrecy last March in Nicaragua Latino is the second feature directed by Wexler. As a cinematographer, he is known for his work in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Bound for Glory.
Meanwhile, two U.S. Hispanic producers are readying to begin shooting in February a feature film for Columbia Pictures. Larry Cano (an executive producer of Silkwood) and Frank Zuniga (who last directed the Golden Seal) are projecting a$5-6 million budget for theirfilm based on the life of New Mexican labor hero Reyes Tijerina
Cano will produce King Tiger; director Zuniga will also serve as executive producer. Some 17 Hispanic actors are expected to be cast for the projecf s ensemble.
(Zuniga, who serves as president of the Hollywood chapter of the H ispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, is among recipients of this yeai's El Cesar award. The Pan American Theatrical Association hands out the honors Nov. 16 in Los Angeles.)
In a related item, Argentine director Hector Babenco will direct William Kennedy’s Pu/rtzerPr/ze-winning novel ironweed. Announcing the project in Albany, N.Y., recently, the director of Kiss of the Spider Woman quoted Spanish poet Juan Ramon Jimenez: “I don’t choose the best the best chooses me.”
ONE LINERS: Sheila E. stars in Warner Bros, current release Krush Groove. . . Embassy Home Entertainment releases The Emerald Forest to the home video market Nov. 13. The fiim is based on the true story of a Peruvian man who lost his son in the Amazon jungle... Carlos Palomino and Henry Silva will star in the upcoming Fists of Steel to be shot in Hawaii... And Blue City, a film co-starring Julie Carmen, will be released by Paramont Pictures next year...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
THE READING ROOM: Here are some recent publications of interest, for personal reading or Christmas giving: DREAMTIGERS, by Jorge Luis Borges (University of Texas Press, P.O. Box 7819, Austin, Texas 78713), 95 pp., $6.95 paperback This translation offers poems, sketches, parables and stories by the Argentine master. Borges calls it his most personal work.
ON THE BORDER, by Tom Miller(University of Arizona Press, 1615 E. Speedway, Tucson, Ariz. 85719), 212 pp., $7.95 paperback.
Now in paperback, Miller's portrait of the 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border is both detailed and entertaining.
THE RAIN GOD, by Arturo lslas(Alexandrian Press, 1070 Arastradero Road, Palo Alto, Calif. 94303), 180 pp., $13.95 cloth cover,
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen* Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
$6.95 paperback.
A first novel by the Chicano writer, it weaves together tales of the family of Miguel Angel, raised in a Texas bordertown, as he tries to reconcile his Mexican Catholic heritage and U.S. university education.
A POLITICAL PORTFOLIO, by Raymond Barrio (Ventura Press, Box 1076, Guerneville, Calif. 95446), 212 pp., $4.75 paperback.
The angry author of “The Plum Plum Pickers,” Barrio has put together 72 of his newspaper columns which, in his words, “examine a number of corrosive social and political aberrations in our modern yuppified society such as U.S. tycoons, corporate grandfathers, ideological botchery, censorship, the Lone Ranger syndrome, human rights violations, Hispanic exploitation and much more.”
LATINO ETHNIC CONSCIOUSNESS, by F6lix M. Padilla (Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, Ind. 46556), 187 pp., $20.95 cloth cover.
Focusing on Mexican American and Puerto Rican populations in Chicago, Padilla asserts that such social conditions as poverty and discrimination create a broader Latino ethnic consciousness and behavior.
THE OLD GRINGO, by Carlos Fuentes (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 19 Union Square West, New York, N.Y. 10003) 199 pp., $14.95 cloth cover.
In this blend of history and fiction translated by the author and Margaret Sayers Peden, Fuentes uses Ambrose Bierce- the American journalist who disappeared in Mexico in 1913 -as a vehicle to exercise his special writing talents.
ASSAULT WITH A DEADLY WEAPON, by Roberto Rodriguez (ATM Communications, 1915 Hartog Dr., San Jose, Calif. 95131), 170 pp., $6.5}5 paperback
Rodriguez, now editorofCaminos magazine, bares all about his 1979 arrest and beating as he attempted to cover a police raid on Whittier Boulevard for Lowrider magazine.
- Charlie Ericksen
ON NOVEMBER Z7+K MEXICAN
Astronaut Rodolfo neri vela
WILL LIFTOFF ABOARD THE
space shuttle Atlantis.
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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HR/C R Making The News This Week Services or Samuel Housing and U r ban Development. . . The Association of Hispanic Arts in New York e l e c ts Anita Soto, manager of Community Rel ations/Economic Development for New York Telephone, as its chairperson and Luis Cancel, executive director of the Bronx Museum of the Arts, vice chairperson . .. While LosAngelesCountygrandjuryforeman Sam C6rdova holds a press conference Oct. 29 calling for the governor to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate the 1962 death of Marilyn Monroe, a Superior Court judge announces he's been replaced . Reason: grand jury members say he makes too many unauthorized statements on their behalf . . . Ana Galarza, 35, a preschool teacher from the Bronx , finishes last in the Oct. 27 New York Marathon, finishing an hour before midnight in 11 hours, 50 minutes and 46 seconds. She wasn ' t worried about completing the race , she said -just about whether she'd get mugged . . . U .S. Rep . Henry B. Gonzalez(DTexas), elected to Congress Nov . 4, 1961 , announces plans fora major celebration in San Antonio Jan. 18 to mark the start of his 25th year of service to the state ' s 20th congressional district. . . The U.S. Senate approves President Reagan's nomination of Elizabeth Flores Burkhart to a second term on the National Credit Union Administration Board. The first woman to serve on the three-member board , she was first appointed in 1982 to fill an unexpired term. Her second term ends in 1991 ... California surgeon Tirso del Junco is selected by Gov. George Deukmejiah to serve on the 30-member University of California Board of Regents . Del Junco had also been mentioned as a candidate to replace Margaret Heckler as Secretary of Health and Human Vol. 3 No. 45 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY RE Nov. 11, 1985 Miami: Cubans Win; S. W.: New Barrio Power The nation's premiere Cuban city, Miami , will elect its first Cuban mayor this week Cuban attorney Xavier Suarez and Cuban banker Raul Masvidal edged six-term incumbent Maurice Ferre by 1,200 and 900 votes each in the Nov . 5 primary there . They face off Nov . 12 to determine who will replace the charis matic Puerto Rican , whose luck at juggling white, black and Latino constituencies finally ran out. And Latinos in Las Cruces, N . M . , were given a sweet foretaste of what dozens of Hispanic communities throughout the Southwest could experience in 1986 and beyond. Because of a switch from at-large to district voting, the 45% Hispanic municipality elected three Latinos to an historically all-white City Council . Those were the highlights in this off-year election . Las Cruces , goaded by a lawsuit and then required by state legislation passed in March , switched from a five-member council elected MIAMI MAYORAL ELECTION Candidate Xavier Suarez Raul Masvidal Maurice Ferre Votes 16,224 15,893 15,006 Percent 28.9o/o 28.3% 26.8% at large to a seven-member body elected by district. Two Hispanics, Herculano Ferralez and Jack Valencia, won seats uncontested. A third, Samuel Barba, defeated Ronald Hudson, 53% to 47% . The victories were heralded by Rolando Rios, legal director of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project , which had sued the city, as a presage of what will happen in Texas, California and other New Mexico communities as other cities, counties and school districts are required to change. The new state law in New Mexico requires Latinos Increase Numbers in Mass. The Massachusetts Commission on His panic Affairs released Oct. 29 a demographic analysis of His panics in the state which showed them to be largest minority in the common wealth outside of Boston , going from 141 ,580 , or 2 . 5% of the population in 1980, to 222,000, or 3 . 8% in 1985. The report found Puerto Ricans to be the largest Latino subgroup in the state , com prising 53% of all Hispanics. Mexicans were Aranda Is Replaced U.S Ambassador to Uruguay Thomas Aranda Jr. was replaced Nov.8 by former Washington, D . C . , federal Judge Malcolm Wilkey. He returned to Washington, but no deter mination has been made yet whether the 51-yearold Phoenix attorney, appointed by President Reagan in 1981, will be offered another diplomatic assignment. Aranda served as a special assistant to President Gerald Ford and as a member of Reagan ' s transition team prior to his Uruguay appointment. second at 5.5%, followed by Cubans at 5%. The majority of the remaining 35. 5% were found to be Dominicans , followed by Central and South Americans. Ralph Rivera, director of the commission, said the report notes that in and Lawrence, the two cities with the h ighest Hispanic concentrations, attempts are not being made to "lower barriers for Hispanic participation in the economic and political arenas. " He added that "things haven't improved. They're getting worse for Hispanics (in Massachusetts)." Other report findings showed : • One-fifth of all Hispanics spoke no English at all. • The Hispanic median age was 21. 3 years, compared to 32 for whites. • Thirty-six percent of Hispanic families were headed by single women. e Forty-two percent were under 18 years of age and unable to vote . The commiss i on was created by the Massa chusetts Legislature in 1983 and began its mission to study the needs of the Latino populationin 1984. cities with populations over 10,000 and counties over 13,000 to conduct district elections. Rios said that SVREP is presently involved in nearly 40 suits in Texas, California and New Mexico concerning at-large elections. Gerrymandering to minimize minority vote remains a fear, even in district voting, he said . Major impact of the New Mexico change will come in the March 1986 statewide elections. In another important Miami development Nov . 5, the Dade County Commiss i on appointed former assistant county manager Sergio Pereira as the Metropolitan County Manager, the most powerful nonelective post in the Southeast : In two City Commission races there, in cumbent Demetrio Perez won 20.9% of the vote to 29.5% for Rosario Kennedy and 19% for Manolo Reyes . The other race saw in cumbent Miller Dawkins outpoll Victor DeYur r e , M ianii Zoning Board member, 48.6% to 31 .5% . A Nov . 12 runoff is set for those races also . Other mayoral resu l ts : • Hialeah, Fla . , Mayor Raul Martinez ran c o ntinued on pag e 2 ChangDiaz to Blast Off Franklin Chang-Diaz will become the first U.S. Hispanic astronaut in space when the shuttle Columbia blasts off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida Dec . 20, or poss i bl y earlier to avoid a Christmas Day landing . Chang-D i az , 35, is a native of Costa Rica who earned his Ph. D . in plasma physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Techno logy. On the five-day mission as one of seven crew members, ChangDiaz will assist in deploying the Radio Corporation of America's (RCA) Satcom communications satellite . He will also conduct experiments on manufacturing in space involving metal alloys and crystal growth. Mexico will send its first astronaut on a National Aeronautics and Space Adminis tration shuttle flight when Rodolfo N eri Vela takes off aboard the space shuttle Atlantis Nov. 27 from Kennedy. He will assist in deploying a domestic communications satellite for Mexico.

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Sin ' pelos en Ia lengua of other elected local officials, who then swarm toward him waving bu,siness cards, co.nvention programs or other paper he can grace with an autograph. , QUOTE THEM, NOT MJ:: Here's what folks are saying : But that's exactly what happened after San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros addressed the California League of Cities convention in San Francisco . Cisneros is clearly a rising star in the national Democratic Party. WILLIAM BENNETT, U.S. Secretary of Education, explai ning his campaign to curtail bilingual education: Our common history is written in English Our common forefathers speak to us , through the ages, in English JOSE CARDENAS, executive director, Intercultural Development Research Association, San Antonio: MAGDALENO (LEN) ROSE-AVILA, recently named as Southern Regional Director for Amnesty International USA: Mr. Bennett's forefathers may speak to him in English, but all fourof my grandparents spoke ' to me in Spanish : Througth he ' ages, ' iny wife ' s forefathers, from Jose S. de Ia Garza, who received the Espiritu San t o land 'in 17:j5 and,contributedto t he -domination of this hostile territory now known as Texas ; to Jose Antonio Navarro, who led the effort for the independence of Texas, all speak to us in Spanish' The toughest part (of this job) is talking to people who seem to be a nuisance . They keep asking you question upon question seem not to understand. That's when you have to remember that you were once a nuisance, too . . BANQUET FOOTNOTE: Last May Sin Pelos gave NBC TV the gentle needle for its full-page ad in the National Hispanic Media Conference program , which effused "Gracias for placing the accent on opportunity." "Gra-SEE-us?" we chided. In last month's California Chicano News Media Association banquet program, the network ran the same ad minus the misplaced accent. ;Bravo! Mr. Sennett is in error in stating that all persons who contributed to the growth and development of this country were English speaking. JOHN JACOBS, political writer, San Francisco Examiner: Now, if we could only teach network announcers to pronounce It' s not often that an elected local official gives a speech to a group Spanish names correctly. Right, Vin Scully? _ Kay Barbaro Jobless Rate 11 .30/o The Hispanic unemployment rate increased from 1 0.4% in September to 11. 3% in October,' according to figures released Nov . 1 by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Overall unem. ployment rate held at 7% . A study released the same day by the Washington-based Coalition on Women and Employment and the Full Employment Action Council disputed the BLS figures. Including "discouraged" (those unable to find a job) and "underemployed" workers (those who settle for part time) , the women' s advocacy group study reported the "real" rate among Hispanic women 16 years and above to be 20.6% , as opposed to an 11. 7% BLS figure. Chicago Gains Likely Chicago Hispanics are expected to increase their rep resentation bn the city's 50-member council from one to four under a ward redis tricting plan taken under advisement Nov. 4 by U . S . District Judge Charles Norgle. Lone present His . panic councilman is Puerto Rican Miguel Sant iago. The plari was drawn up with participation of Hispanic and black commu'nities following a suit against the council and former Mayor Jane Byrne fi . led in .July 1982. At that time Chicago's four dominantly Hispanic com munities were split'among nine wards. Under the riewplan, thefourcommunitiesWest Town, Humboldt Park(both predom i nantly Puerto Rican), Pilsen and Little Village (both predominantly MexicanAmerican)will each form the nucleus of a ward . In each of the four proposed wards, Latino candidates favoring Mayor Harold Washington will be pitted against other Latinos backed by City Council majority leader Alderman Edward Vrdolyak and co'uld determine the balance of power in the bitter feud between the two. Followir)g Judge Norgle's approval of the new districts, Washington will push for new elections early next spring while Vydolyak forces will seek to stall them until the next mayoral race in early '87. 2 Tw. o Cubans Defeat Ferre in Miami continue d from page 1 unopposed and was elected to a second term . e Phoenix architect Mike Enriquez was defeated by incumbent Terry Goddard , gaining 13% of all votes cast in his second try for elective office. e Madison Heights, Mich., Mayor George Suarez was re-elected to a fourth term. Albuquerque, N . M . , could elect its first His panic mayor if Jim Baca is successful in the Nov. 12 runoff against Ken Schultz. Both outpolled incumbent Harry Kinney in the Oct. 8 primary. In New Jersey, where Gov . Thomas Kean (R) handily ,defeated Peter Shapiro, a 33rd District State House race saw Republicans Jose Arango and Ronald Daria defeat in cumbent Rep. Robert Ranieri (D) and Mario Hernandez (D): . Two are elected from each district. CITY COUNCIL FJACES While New York City Mayor Ed Koch easily won a third term, Eva Guardarramas(R), a Koch backer; was defeated\ by Andrew Stein in her bid to become City Council president. 111 other New York borough races, incumbent Democrats Rafael Colon (11th District) and Fernando Ferrer(13th District) were re-elected to the Bronx City Council. In Brooklyn, 27th District incumbent Victor Robles(D) , was also re-elected. HOUSTON: District "I" City Councilor Ben Reyes was re-elected to a 4th term, capturing 73.7% of the vote . He is the only Hispanic on the 14-member council. LOS ANGELES: A special election Dec. 10 will be held to fill the council seat vacated by Art Snyder Oct. 4 . The 75% Hispanic 14th district could elect its first Hispanic since 1962. PHOENIX: Latina council incumbent Mary Rose Wilcox was re-elected to a second term, garnering 71% of the votes . HIALEAH, FLA: Among the top eight vote getters who will face each other for four available seats in a Nov . 12. runoff are in cumbent Paulino Nunez (12 . 7 % ) and challengers Julio Martinez (1 0 . 3 % ) and Roberto Ruiz (9 .1%) . MICHIGAN : As the only Hispanics serving on city councils around the state , Paul Vasquez (Flint) , Lee Silva (Ecorse) and Refugio Torres (South Gate) , were re-elected to new terms. LORAIN, OHIO: Angel Arroyo , the only His panic city councilor there, was re-elected . SCHOOL BOARD RACES BOSTON : School committee member Grace Romero (District 7), the only Hispanic on the committee, was defeated 2,815 to 698 by Juanita Wade . Observers claimed Rome.ro ' s loss was due to charges she submitted nomination papers last June which contained forged signatures. She will stand trial soon on those charges in Suffolk Superior Court. HOLYOKE, MASS . : Puerto Rican Betty Medina Lichtenstein became the first Hispanic elected to that city's school committee. She defeated Elairii:l Pluta witt rB5%-of the vote.ROCHESTER, N.Y.: Puerto Ric ' an Nancy Padilla was re-elected to the seven-member school board and remains its only Hispanic. TOLEDO , OH 10 : Sofia Quintero is re-elected to the city's board of education and remains the only Hispanic there. -Dora Delgado and Felix Perez Lottery Winner Arrested An undocumented immigrant who won $2 million in the Nov. 4 California Lottery was arrested two days later by the Immigration and Naturalization Service after telling lottery officials he was in the country illegally. Jose Caballero, 24, a native of Mexico, was arrested at his home in San after he spun a wheel in Los Angeles togain$1 00,000 a year for 20 years ; less withholding for federal income tax. A lottery official said Caballero would receive his winnings. The INS plans a hearing to determine whether Caballero will be allowed to stay in the U.S. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS HANDICAPPED EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS: The Children's Defense Fund has published a parents' handbook in 'Spanish on the educational rights of handicapped children. Order"94 y504: Numeros que Equivalen a los Derechos Educat i vos de los Niflos lmpedidos'' from the Children' s Defense Fund, Publications Dept., 122 C St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (800) 424. Price: $4.75 plus postage and handling. CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCES: Hispanic Link' s column service, syndicated to newspapers nationally, looks each year for memorable Christmas season stories, anecdotal pieces which reflect cultural influences. 700 words. Submissions by non-professional as well as professional writers encouraged. We work with authors. Payment on acceptance. For our free writer's guidelines and samples of past seasonal columns, contact Charlie Eri cksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005. (202) 234. MASSACHUSETTS LATINOS: The Massachusetts Commission on Hispanic Affairs has produced a demographic analysis of Hispanics in the state and a progress report on its efforts. A six-page executive summary of the demographic report and the progress report are both available free of charge. The full demographic report shoula oe available in two weeks. Contact: Commission on Hispanic Affairs, State House, Room 185, Boston, Mass. 02133 (617) 7221362. PROGRAMS FOR WORKING WOMEN: The Department of Labor's Bureau of Women has published an outline of its programs and activities ranging from promotion of employer's child care centers to expansion of job potential among displaced homemakers and low income women. Single copies of the 16-page "Women's Bureau: Meeting the Challenges of the 80' s " are available free from the Women' s Bureau, U . S . Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave . N.W . , Washington, D . C . 20210. Include self-addressed mailing label. For each additional copy, send $1.00 to Superintendent of Documents , U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington , D .C. 20402. A 25% discount on orders of 100 or more. A VIEW OF U.S. HISPANICS: The Minority Student Program Office at Michigan State University has published a 7-page information brochure on statistics, geographical dispersion, and cultural and racial heritage of Hispanics in the United States. " The Mestizos, a view of the U . S . Hispanic Community" is available free (or 25 each for more than one copy) from Coordinated Minority Student Programs Office, 339 Student Services Buildi ng, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich. 48824 (517) 353-7748. CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic L i nk help you in y ou r search for executives and prQiessionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N . St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p . m . (En Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. ATTORNEY National c i vil rights organization se e ks ASSOCIATE COUNSEL in San Antonio to m a nage office and superv i se litigat( on. Re qui rements -5 ye ars litigation e xperience inc luding trial work and c i v il rights law , manage m ent e x perien ce, knowl edge of Tex as c om munity , bilingual (English/Spanish) h ighly pre ferred . Send resume with to Ms. A . Hernandez , MALDEF, 28 Geary St. , San Fran c isco, Calif . 941 08 by 11/18/85. Available January 1986. JOB OPENING, ARLINGTON,. VA. RECREATION OUT REACH SPECIALIST (Bilingual : Vie tnamese / English ; Spani s h / English) $19,133-21,057. #72826BCA Inform diverse community of current recreation programs; determine recreation/leiSu r e needs; develop and evaluate programs ; serve as resource facilitator for department. Requi res any c ombination of f i ve years of e x perience, training or college (post secondaryj e ducation in out reach , family services recrea tion or related field . DIRECTOR RESEARCH .and DOCUMENTATION The Latino Institute, a not-for-profit organization based in Chicago dedicate d to building bridges between establis hed institutions and Latino resources, s e e k s someone to head i ts research divi si on . Salary is commEmsurate With e xperience and training . • Experience p ri mary and sec on dary data gather ing methods. • Invest igative approaches to i ssu e development and anal ysis. • The abi l ity to employ these skills as part of an advocacy team to c reat e insti tutional change on behalf of H i spanics in Ch icago. • Fluency in Spanish and Engli s h , written and verbal. • Good interpersonal, supervisory and administrative skills. Interested persons should subm i t a resume by Nov . 27 to: Mr. Peter Martinez Director of Programs Latino Institute 53 West Jackson, Su ite 940 Chicago, Illinois 60604 For further information and application form , call (703) 558-2167, or contact Arlington County Personnel Department, 2100 14th St., North Arlington , Va 22201. L-------------.....J Closing date i s Nov . 21. ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONSwfth Montgom ery County, Maryland, a re availab l e on a c ontinuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252. THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media As sociation has a national job clearinghouse for H i spanics in the media . For . i nformation c all Magdalena Beltran (213) 743-7158. VICE PRESIDENT FOR LEGAL PROGRAMS National civil rights organization seeks vic e president for legal prog r ams in Los Angeles to manage legal programs in five offi c es. Re quirements : 6 years extensive exp erience in Civil rights/public interest law, knowledge of Hispanic issues . Resume with referen c e s by Nov. 25 to Ms. A Hernandez, MALDEF, 6 3 4 S . Spring St. , 11 th floor, Los Angeles, CA !10014 . Latin American Citizens will conduct this seminar to provide motivation for college-bound high school Calendar HISPANICS IN HIGHER EDUCATION Wayne, N . J . Nov. 15 Themed " Strategies for Retention and associate director of the American Council on Education ' s Office of Minority Concerns Sarah Melendez will be the keynote speaker. youth . THIS WEEK HISPANIC MEDIA AWARDS New York Nov. 11 Hispanics in Communications conducts it s 4th annual "EI Cervantes " Hispanic Media awards. Jackie DaCosta (212) 418-0622 IPRUS FALL GALA BENEFIT New York Nov. 14 The Institute of Puerto Rican Urban Studies will donate one quarter of all contributions from this fund-raiser to earthquake victims in Mexico . Miriam Christian (212) 665 HISPANIC CPA CONFERENCE San Antonio Nov. 14,15 The American Association of Hispanic Certified Public Accountants will conduct its annual conference with seminars on personal finance planning and how to start a CPA firm . Robert Trevino (512) 680 006 Hispanic Link Weekly Report C.A. Perez (20 .1) 595 ROYBAL RECOGNITION DINNER Los Angeles Nov. 15 The dinner is to recognize the work of Rep. Edward Roybal (DCalif.) w ith the elderly community and to establish an endowed chair in his name at California State University . Carol Numrick (213) 224 NACOPRW CONFERENCE Rockville, Md . Nov. 15 The National Conference of Puerto Rican Women presents its 13th annual conference examining the effect of technology and education on women and youth . Carmen Monroe (301) 593 HISPANIC COLLEGE DAY Andres Tobar (703) 379-7487 COMING SOON NATIONAL HISPANIC COUNCIL ON AGING New Orleans Nov. 22, 23 Rebeca Gilad (202) 265 SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE BILINGUALISM New York Nov . 22 , 23 Antonio Simoes (212) 598 INSTITUTE FOR PUERTO RICAN POLICY BE NEFIT DANCE New York Dec . 6 Gerson Borrero (212) 689 SPANISH SPEAKING AFFAIRS COUNCIL CONFERENCE St. Raul Minn. Dec. 7 Ruby Lee (612) 296 NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES CONFERENCE College Park, Md. Nov. 16 Seattle Dec. 7 The Northeast chapter of the League of United . Randy Arndt (202) 626 3158 3

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Arts & Entertainment Meanwhile, two U.S. Hispanic producers are readying to begin shooting in February a feature film for Columbia Pictures. Larry Cano (an executive producer of Silkwood) and Frank Zuniga (who last directed the Golden are projecting a $5-6 million budget for their film based on the life of New Mexican labor hero Reyes Tijerina. THE LONG-AWAITED THEATRICAL RELEASE of a controversial Hispanic-themed movie is scheduled in three U.S. cities this month as Latinos continue a steady visible presence in the country's film industry. Haskell Wexler's Latino, a film about a Chicano's experience training contra rebels in Nicaragua, ope. ns in Los Angeles Nov. 13, in Chicago Nov . 15 a:1d in San Francisco Nov. 22. Cano w i ll produce King Tiger ; director Zuniga will also serve as executi ve producer. Some 17 Hispanic actors are expected to be cast for the project's ensemble. Starring Robert Beltran and Annette Cardona, the film was enthusias tically received earlier this year at the Cannes Film Festival. (Zuniga, who serves as president of the Hollywood chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences, is among recipients of this year's El Cesar award . The Pan American Theatrical Association hands out the honors Nov. 16 in Los Angeles . ) In a related item, Argentine director Hector Babenco will direct William Kennedy's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Ironweed. Announcing the project in Albany, N.Y . , recently, the director of Kiss of the Spider Woman quoted Spanish poet Juan Ramon Jimenez: "I don't choose the best, the best chooses me." Latino' s pro-leftist tint reportedly has kept "major'' distributors uninterested. Domestically, the film is being released by Cinecoman "art film" distributor-successful with the U.S. release of El Norte and Kiss of the Spider Woman . A spokeswoman for director Wexler would not reveal the financial terms of Cinecom's distribution agreement. She told Weekly Report, however, that the cost of distributing the film was being undertaken by Wexler himself. Wexler financed the $4 millio n film-shot in secrecy last March in Nicaragua. Latino is the second feature directed by Wexler . As a cinematographer, he is known for his work in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Bound for Glory. ONE LINERS: Sheila E. stars in Warner Bros. current release Krush Groove. . . Embassy Home Entertainment releases The Emerald Forest to the home video market Nov. 13. The fiim is based on the true story of a Peruvian man who lost his son in the Amazon jungle ... Carlos Palomino and Henry Silva will star in the upcoming Fists of Steel to be shot in Hawaii ... And Blue City, a film co-starring Julie Carmen, will be released by Paramont Pictures next year ... Media Report , THE READING ROOM: Here are some recent publications of interest, for personal reading or Christmas giving: DREAMTIGERS, by Jorge Luis Borges (University of Texas Press, P.O . Box 7819, Austin , Texas 78713), 95 pp., $6.95 paperback This translation offers poems, sketches, parables and stories by the Argentine master. Borges calls it his most personal work. ON THE BORDER, by Tom Miller( University of Arizona Press , 1615 E. Speedway, Tucson, Ariz. 85719), 212 pp., $7.95 paperback. Now in paperback, Miller's portrait of the 2,000-mile U.S. -Mexico border is both detailed and entertaining. THE RAIN GOD, by Arturo lslas(Aiexandrian . Press , 1 070 Arastradero Road, Palo Alto, Calif. 94303), 180 pp., $13.95 cloth cover, HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A n a t 1ona l publication o f : Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street N. W . Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publ i sh e r H ec tor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado , Felix Perez , Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No port1on of H1span1c Lin k Weekl y Report ma ybereproducedo r broadcast m any form w1thout advanc e permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CO NFERE NC E COORDINATORS : Include the latest edi t io n of H1span1C L 1 nk Weekly Report in participants' pa ckets at your ne x t conf e r e nce o r convention. For details, c ontact Hector (2021 234. 4 $6.95 paperback A first novel by the Chicano writer, it weaves together tales of the family of Miguel Angel , raised in a Texas bordertown, as he tries to reconcile his Mexican Catholic heritage and U.S. university educati on. A POLITICAL PORTFOLIO, by Raymond Barrio(Ventura Press, Box 1076, Guerneville, Calif. 95446), 212 pp., $4.75 paperback The angry author of " The Plum Plum Pickers," Barrio has put together 72 of his newspaper columns which , in his words , "examine a number of corrosive social and political aberrations in our modern yuppified society such as U.S. tycoons , corporate grandfathers, ideological botchery, censorship, the Lone Ranger syndrome , human rights violations, Hispanic exploitation and much more. " LATINO ETHNIC CONSCIOUSNESS, by Felix M. Padilla (Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame , Ind . 46556), 187 pp., $20.95 cloth cover. Focusing on Mexican American and Puerto Rican populations in Chicago, Padilla asserts that such social conditions as poverty and discrimination create a broader Latino ethnic consciousness a n d behavior. THE OLD GRINGO, by Carlos Fuentes (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 19 Union Square West, New York, N.Y . 1 0003) 199 pp. ,$14.95 cloth cover. In this blend of history and fiction translated by the author and Margaret Sayers Peden, Fuentes uses Ambrose Bierce-the American journalist who disappeared in Mexico in 1913-as a vehicle to exercise his special writing talents. ASSAULT WITH A DEADLY WEAPON, by Roberto Rodriguez (ATM Communications, 1915 Hartog Dr., SanJ6se, Calif . 95131 ) , 170 pp. , paperback Rodriguez, now editor of Caminos magazine, bares all about his 1979 arrest and beating as he attempted to cover a police raid on Whittier Boulevard for Lowrider magazine . Charlie Ericksen -Antonio Mejias-Rentas ON NOVEMBER 27+h MEXICAN ASTRONAUT RODOLFO NERI VELA WILL LIFT OFF ABOARD THE SPACE SHUTTLE A1LANTIS. Hispanic Link Weekly Report