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Hispanic link weekly report, November 18, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 18, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This
Lydia Mendoza, a native of Houston, is among 12 women chosen by the Governor's Commission for Women for induction into the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame Nov. 14. Mendoza has been performing “musica nortena,” which combines the German folk accordion style with the traditional Mexican 12-string guitar, for 60 years... Pedro Esquivel, who has served both as director and deputy director of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s Denver, Colo., district office, is appointed to head EEOC’s San Antonio branch, recently upgraded from “area” to “district” office, one of 22 in the country... Rodolpho Sandoval is appointed executive director of the San Antonio Mexican Chamber of Commerce, replacing Tino Durdn.
Sandoval most recently worked as an indep4n||^iy(0®ess consultant and served as a lecturer in economics and law at tne university of Texas at San Antonio... Joe Rodriguez,
Baca Loses Narrowly
New Mexico State Land Commissioner Jim Baca lost his bid to become Albuquerque’s first Hispanic mayor, bowing to city councilman and auto dealer Ken Schultz Nov. 12 in the mayoral runoff there.
Schultz received 41,495 votes or 51%, and Baca, 39,450 or 49%.
Albuquerque, the state’s largest city,has a population of 330,000, 34% of which is Hispanic.
Schultz and Baca were the top two vote-getters Oct. 8. Because neither received 40% of the vote, the runoff was necessary.
The local chapter of the League of United Latin American Citizens endorsed Schultz because of his stance on the economic development of predominantly Hispanic sections of the city, Hispanic female representation in top city positions and the construction of a community college, said Herb Fernandez, immediate past-president of the local LULAC chapter.
Schultz, who replaces incumbent Harry Kinney, takes office Dec. 1.
Of the more than 160,000 registered voters, 51% turned out for the runoff as opposed to 46% for the general election.
Black Support Shown
A telephone survey by two California college professors shows that whites are the only major ethnic group opposed to bilingual education, and that blacks favor it even more than do Asians.
It also showed that Hispanics and blacks support bilingual ballots, while Asians oppose them slightly and whites oppose them strongly.
The poll, conducted by California Institute of Technology associate professors Bruce Cain and Roderick Kiewiet, included a random sample of 593 Hispanic, 335 black, 305 Asian and 409 white Californians. It found: Bil. Ed. Bil. Ballots % for/vs. % for/vs.
Hispanics
Blacks
Asians
Whites
69-22 60-31
63 - 25 49 - 38
61 - 40 43 - 50
42-51 29-67
Forty-three percent of the Hispanics and 47% of the Asians said they usually don’t speak English at home.
Su&rez Wins Miami Runoff
Attorney Xavier Suarez was sworn in Nov. 13 as Miami mayor after winning a runoff election the day before, making him the first Cuban-born mayor of a major city in the United States.
Suarez, 36, outpolled millionaire banker Raul Masvidal, 43, also Cuban, by 56.7% to 43.3%. There were 55,886 ballots cast for a 48% voter turnout rate.
Suarez succeeds six-term Mayor Maurice Ferr6, the Puerto Rico native who ran third in the city’s Nov. 5 primary. Ferr6 lost support from the city’s black voters last year after he fired black City Manager Howard Gary. Following his defeat, Ferr§ said he planned to return to politics in the future.
The election of Suarez underscores the power of the 40% Hispanic population - mostly Cuban - that shapes elections in Miami. On Nov. 5 another Cuban, Sergio Pereira, was elected by the Dade County Commission as county manager, the most powerful non-elective post in the Southeast.
Texas Districts Settle
One Texas Education Agency regional district and four Texas school districts have now reached administrative settlements with the U.S. Department of Education over alleged misuse of federal bilingual education funds.
The department's inspector general claimed after a 1982 audit that the districts improperly used $5.1 million in federal funds through program duplication and misinterpretation of guidelines.
The Texas Education Agency countered that the inspector general was trying to discredit the state’s bilingual education programs.
In a settlement reached last month, the Edgewood School District in Bexar County agreed to pay $43,000 of a $1.3 million original refund demand. District spokespersons admitted no wrongdoing but said it was cheaper to pay than to continue fighting.
Earlier, the San Antonio School District, also in Bexar County, settled a $548,000 claim for $1,000.
Others that have settled are Region 1 Education Service Center and the Austin, Pharr-San Juan-Alamo districts. The Dallas School District has yet to settle.
Suarez, who was defeated by Ferr6 in a divisive 1983 election, campaigned for the establishment of police sub-stations in storefronts as a way to control Miami’s skyrocketing crime rate. He pledged to put more attention on Hispanic and black neighborhoods that, he claimed, were ignored during Ferry’s revitalization project of the downtown business district.
The new mayor is a 1975 graduate of Harvard Law School and has worked in the Shutts and Bowen law firm since then.
In two races for Miami City Commission seats, Cuban Rosario Kennedy defeated, by 62.8% to 37.2%, incumbent Demetrio P§rez, also Cuban, to become the first Hispanic woman in that government body. In the other race, Cuban Victor De Yurre failed to unseat black incumbent Miller Dawkins, who drew 54% of the votes.
In Hialeah, Florida, where Hispanics make up 60% of the city's registered voters, two additional seats on the seven-member City Council were won by Latinos. Julio Jos6 Martinez and Herman Echevarria won 14.7% and 13.3%, respectively, in an 8-candidate runoff election, while incumbent Paulino Nuhez successfully retained his seat with 14.5%.
'-Dora Delgado
‘Vista’ Company Sold
SFN Communications Inc., a Chicago-based educational publishing, communications and information company, announced Nov. 13 that it acquired 51% of the stock of Horizon Communications, Miami, Fla., publisher of Vista Sunday newspaper supplement.
. Arturo Villar will remain as Vista’s publisher and H arry Caicedo as its vice president and editor.
SFN owns television stations in Puerto Rico, Montana and Florida and has interest in Channel 58 in Stockton, Calif., and Channel 52 in Los Angeles. Its president, John Purcell, called the purchase - which includes an option to buy the remaining 49% at a later date - “consistent with; ourlstrategy of further expansion into media operations serving the Hispanic market.”


Sin pelos en la lengua
FLABBY IS THIN, SOGGY IS DRY: What makes the English language so hard to understand is the people who speak it.
I can tune in fine on teenagers who are telling me something is good when they say if s baaad. They give their words a special lilt and roll - and their eyebrows jump up and down.
Adults are something else. Particularly those in Washington. The current classic, of course, is Secretary of Education William Bennett, who says he likes bilingual education.
This past week it was Clarence Thomas, the demolition expert appointed by President Reagan to do in the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. He called a press conference to announce that he was against discrimination.
Without so much as an eye-roll or coy grin, he added that EEOC, the body he chairs, was filing three class action suits against large employers as “examples of this commission’s program to... undertake a more vigorous litigation program through... class action cases.”
Barely half a year ago, he announced that EEOC was moving away from such social engineering, looking instead to cases involving private persons seeking individual remedies.
Whom do you believe? Thomas? Or Thomas?
Then there’s El Presidente himself.
Last month he told 2,500 Cuban exiles in Miami (gathered to celebrate the October1868 birth of that country s battle for independence
from Spain) that,“You help to renew my confidence that ourcommon dream for a free Cuba- no longer a captive state- will come to pass.” Mulling those words, New York Daily News columnist Miguel P6rez recalls when his father took him to hear President John F. Kennedy “23 years, five presidents, and many false promises” earlier.
Kennedy promised his audience of Cuban exiles that he would return the Bay of Pigs veterans’ flag to Havana one day, adding, “I can assure you that it is the strongest wish of the people of this country... that Cuba shall one day be free again.”
P6rez recalls how his father, trembling with emotion, picked him up and embraced him.
P6rez was back in Miami last month when Reagan spoke, watching the President on television news at this father’s home.
“Now we are used to American presidents playing politics with the hopes and aspirations of Cubans who believe in freedom, because now we are not so naive about American politics,” he reflects. “This time we didn’t embrace because we saw no reason to celebrate.” POSTSCRIPT/POSDATA: Author Richard Rodriguez, Aztlan’s notorious misfit, has come out of his cave again. He’s one of 11 authors bylining pieces on bilingual education for the New York Times’ fall education survey, in its Sunday, Nov. 10 edition. His article - claiming bilingual ed is really a reparation demand by middle-class Latinos- is w-e-hrd. But the others offer interesting information and views. For the paper, send $2.80 to Back Copy Dept., New York Times, 229 W. 43rd St., New York, N.Y. 10036.
- Kay Barbaro
Latino Reps Shunned by Rich PACS
Hispanics in the U.S. House of Representatives were generally bypassed by “no-tax" companies which contributed $4.9 million to congressional candidates in 1984.
Pplitical action committees associated with 50 major companies which paid no federal taxes during President Reagan’s first term donated to Republicans over Democrats by a 2-1 margin, spending most of their money on
Calif. Univ. Rule Disputed
The educational policy committee of the California State University system voted Nov. 12 to require high school students to take 15 academic courses as a prerequisite for admission - an action opposed by many Hispanic and black educators. Rudy Acuha, Chicano studies professor at Cal State Northridge, labelled the rule “elitist.” Many high schools serving Hispanics and blacks do not offer the full range of college preparatory courses, noted trustee Celia Ballesteros, of San Diego.
The standards for the 19 state university campuses would take effect in 1988. A university analysis showed that only 9% of the system’s 1985 freshmen met the requirements which will be mandatory in three years.
Castillo Joins Caucus
Elvira Castillo, a native of Weslaco, Texas, was appointed executive director the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Nov. 1. She replaced Susan Herrera, who resignedafterS 1/2 years to open a consultant firm in the capital.
Prior to joining the caucus, Castillo was a legislative analyst for the city of Los Angeles. She earned a masters degree in public administration at the University of Southern California.
close races, according to a survey released by Citizens for Tax Justice Nov. 1.
Largest overall contributors were Tenneco ($366,700,85% to GOP), Harris Corp.($261,500, 91 % to GOF), and Dow Chemical Co. ($249,950, 92% to GOP).
Ten incumbent Hispanic Democrats, led by Californian Tony Coelho($7,900), received a total of $27,500. New Mexico’s Manuel Lujan, the lone Republican incumbent, got$15,800.
Only Henry B. Gonz&lez of Texas took no money at all.
California’s Matthew (Marty) Martinez, chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, received $200, but his Republican challenger, Richard G6mez, was given $500. Another non-incumbent Hispanic, Louis Gallegos, was given $1,500 in his New Mexico campaign against Bill Richardson, who received $4,000.
Others receiving contributions: E. “Kika” de la Garza, Texas, $4,000; Solomon Ortiz, Texas, $3,750; Esteban Torres, Calif., $3,400; Robert Garcia, New York, $1,500; Albert Bustamante, Texas, $1,500; and Edward Roybal, Calif., $1,250.
Launch Date Changed
The launch date of the space shuttle Columbia has been advanced from Dec. 20 to Dec. 18, to avoid a Christmas Day landing. Franklin Chang-Diaz, who will become the first U.S. Hispanic astronaut on that flight, now will land Dec. 23.
Chang-Diaz is expected to provide a 15-minute commentary and demonstration in Spanish from space and talk with President Luis Alberto Monge of Costa Rica, the country of his birth.
Mexico astronaut Rodolfo Neri Vela’s liftoff aboard the space shuttle Atlantis has also been moved up, from the day of Nov. 27 to the night of Nov. 26.
URI Sold to Mexican
United Press International Was sold Nov. 12 for more than $40 million to Mexico press magnate Mario Vazquez Raria and Houston financier Joe Russo. The sale needs approval of a federal bankruptcy judge, inasmuch as the 78-year-old news agency filed for protection under Chapter II of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code last April.
UPI Chairman Luis Nogales was active in the lengthy negotiations. While no announcement as to his remaining as UPl’s chief is expected until after the sale becomes final within the next few months, Vdzquez Raria stated that he planned to make minimal top-level changes.
Bilingual Signs Ordered
Florida’s Dade County Metrorail system will have to spend upto$2.5 million removing its English-only signs and brochures and replacing them with bilingual ones after the U.S. Urban Mass Transportation Administration ruled that the exclusion of other languages violates the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Bonnie Whyte, UMTA’s public affairs director, told Weekly Report that bilingual signs and brochures are presently being designed by the Metro-Dade Transportation Administration. The Civil Rights Act requires local governments to provide equal access to public facilities.
The administrative order, which takes precedence over a 1980 county ordinance banning the use of Spanish in public signs and publications, resulted from a UMTA review of the rail system following complaints from representatives of Miami's Hispanic community. The signs will also be translated into French for the county’s Haitian population.
UMTA is requiring bilingual translation of schedules, directions, warnings that car doors open automatically, instructions on how to pay the fare and brochures on the system.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


THE GOOD NEWS
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
U.S. CENSUS POPULATION PROFILES: This 10th annual report provides data on population trends and projections, immigration patterns, marital status and living arrangements, school enrollment, labor force composition and other demographic information. For a copy of the 47-page “Population Profile of the United States: 1983-84,” Series P-23, No. 145, orderfrom: Superintendent of Documents, U.S Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. Price not available at press time.
HISPANIC CITIZENSHIP: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has published a free “National Directory of Citizenship Services” listing 340 citizenship service providers across the country. Also available are transcripts of the “Proceedings of the First National Conference on Citizenship and the Hispanic Community,” held May 5, 1984, in Washington, D.C. Price: $5.00. Contact NALEO, 420 South Capitol St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003. (202) 546-2536.
HISPANIC ACTORS DIRECTORY: Nosotros film organization is offering, beginning Dec. 1, a directory listing Hispanic actors, producers, directors and singers for $5, plus $1 postage and handling. Contact: Loyda Ramos, artistic director, Nosotros, 1314 N. Wilton Place, Hollywood, Calif. 90028 (213) 465-4167.
TORRES NEW DISTRICT OFFICE: U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) has announced the opening of a new district office at 8819 Whittier Blvd., Suite 101, Pico Rivera Calif. 90660 (213) 695-0702. His Norwalk and West Covina offices are now closed. (See Dec. 24,1984, Weekly Report.)
EDUCATIONAL FACTS: Key facts on the way student aid works are summarized in four fact sheets published by the American Council on Education. “The Use of Student Loans is on the Rise”, “Families Use Self-Help to Meet Most College Costs”, “Grant Aid is Concentrated on Low^Income Students” and “Student Borrowing has Implications for Career Choice” are available free from the American Council on Education, Division of Policy Analysis and Research, One Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 939-9450. Include self-addressed envelope.
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
VICE PRESIDENT FOR LEGAL PROGRAMS
National civil rights organization seeks vice president for legal programs in Los Angeles to manage legal programs in five offices. Requirements: 6-8 years extensive experience in civil rights/public interest law, knowledge of Hispanic issues. Resume with references by Nov. 25 to Ms. A. Hernandez, MALDEF,
634 S. Spring St., 11 th floor, Los Angeles, CA 90014.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR National Labor and Civil Rights Organization
Federal or state lobbying experience, legislative analysis, fund raising and management skills required. Experience with farmworker issues preferred Commitment to social justice for low income farmworkers required $37,000+ depending on skills and experience. Send resume to Search Committee, Farmworker Justice Fund, 2001 S St NW., Suite 312,
Washington, D.C. 20009. No calls please.
Deadline 11/30/85. EOE
LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE of the City University of New York frequently conducts searches for faculty and administrative j personnel. For additional materials and information, contact Eneida Rivas, Personnel/ {
Affirmative Action Coordinator, LaGuardia Community College, The City University of PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND, New York, 31-10 Thomson Ave., Long Island government office of personnel has a JOB City, N.Y. 11101 (718) 626-2700. hotline (301) 952-3498.
DIRECTOR
RESEARCH and DOCUMENTATION
The Latino Institute, a not-for-profit organization based in Chicago dedicated to building bridges between established institutions and Latino resources, seeks someone to head its research division. Salary is commensurate with experience and training.
• Experience with primary and secondary data gathering methods.
• Investigative approaches to issue development and analysis.
• The ability to employ these skills as part of an advocacy team to create institutional change on behalf of Hispanics in Chicago.
• Fluency in Spanish and English, written and verbal.
• Good interpersonal, supervisory and administrative skills.
I interested persons should submit a resume by Nov. 27 to:
Mr. Peter Martinez
Director of Programs
Latino Institute
53 West Jackson, Suite 940
Chicago, Illinois 60604
Calendar
THIS WEEK
BILINGUAL EDUCATION HEARINGS The National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education is holding a series of hearings open to the public on specific aspects of bilingual education.
Seattle Nov. 18
Sam Kerr.(206) 442-0460
Chicago Nov. 21
Rosemary Thompson (312) 353-5215 Detroit Nov. 22
George Giannetti (313) 548-4484
ISLAND DISCOVERY ANNIVERSARY
Washington, D.C. Nov. 19
Bishop Alvaro Corrada of the Archdiocese of
Washington, D.C., will preside over a special Mass
celebrating the discovery of Puerto Rico and honoring
Our Lady of the Providence, Patroness of Puerto
Rico.
Maria Lagos (301) 853-4530
NALEO CITIZENSHIP CONFERENCE Los Angeles Nov. 22
The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials presents its 2nd conference on three areas of citizenship: social service provision, Hispanic attitudes and INS administration.
Joan Anzalone (202) 546-2536 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
HISPANIC ELDERLY CONFERENCE New Orleans Nov. 22, 23
The National Hispanic Council of Aging is cosponsoring a training seminar to provide organizational and research skills to those interested in working with the elderly community.
Rebeca Gilad (301) 251-9696
SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE BILINGUALISM New York Nov. 22, 23
The 9th annual symposium, sponsored by New York * University and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, will cover linguistics, culture and other aspects of bilingualism and education.
Antonio Simoes (212) 598-2776
MALDEF DINNER Los Angeles Dec. 2
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund presents its 11 th annual recognition banquet to honor individuals who have made contributions to the Hispanic community.
Charlotte Conway (213) 653-2966
HISPANIC WORKING WOMEN Chicago Dec. 5
Presented by the Latino Institute, this conference is aimed at Hispanic women working for government and non-profit social service agencies.
Millie Rivera (312) 663-3603
BILINGUAL EDUCATION HEARINGS R»o Piedras, Puerto Rico Dec. 6 N6stor Gonz&lez (809) 765-6633
El Paso, Texas Dec. 12 Irene Rosales (915) 747-5247 Houston Dec. 13 Esther Lee Yao (713) 488-9336
HOLIDAY BENEFIT DANCE Manhattan, N.Y. Dec. 6
The Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy present its 2nd annual musical fund-raiserfeaturing Rub&n Blades and Cheo Feliciano.
Gerson Borrero (212) 689-6331
NATIONAL HISPANIC UNIVERSITY San Francisco Dec. 15-18
The university conducts its 4th annual convocation titled “Hispanic America: A National Report Card,” covering issues such as education, economics, health and technology.
Elvia Mendoza (415) 451-0511
FIRST NOTICE
CONGRESSMAN GONZALEZ ANNIVERSARY FETE
San Antonio Jan. 18 Gail Beagle (202) 225-3236
CUBAN NATIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL
Miami Jan. 30,31
Guariond Diaz (305) 642-3484
CONFERENCE NACIONAL DE TEATROS HIS-PANOS
San Antonio Feb. 7-9
Mario Sanchez (512) 643-1660 Ext. 157
3


Arts & Entertainment
A HIT BROADWAY SHOW, A NEW FILM getting rave reviews, and international awards for one of its popular singers are among recent Argentine achievements in arts and entertainment here and abroad.
Tango Argentino has been playing to full-house audiences since it began a limited engagement at Manhattan's Mark Hellinger Theater in early October. Conceived and directed by Argentina’s Hector Orezzoli and Claudio Segovia, the review began touring Europe after the 1983 Autumn Festival in Paris.
New York City critics first took notice of Tango Argentino last June when the show played a one-week engagement off- Broadway. Reviews have generally been favorable about the show, that retells the history of tango with music and dance against a simple black and white background. Last month, Vanity Fair devoted a four-page display to the show.
New York’s interest in things Argentine continues this month with the premiere there of La historia oficiai. The film is the first work by 39-year-old director rioplatense Luis Penzo. Starring Norma Aleandro and Hector Alteiro, La historia oficiai deals with the topic of South America’s desaparecidos
Already New York Times critic Walter Goodman has written that in
the film “politics meet the human heart” and the New York Post’s Rex Reed called it a “luminous miracle of beauty and authenticity.”
In a related item, Argentine novelist Manuel Puig, whose work Kiss of the Spider Woman was the basis for Argentine director Hector Babenco's film, said recently that the movie transmits the message in the book, in spite of a script and a cast that were “at first, reason for desperation."
Puig told the Associated Press’ Carlos Brezina recently that the film’s casting “ had nothing to do with the characters” and called it “a big risk.”
Meanwhile, Argentine writer Ernesto Sabato- the 1980 winner of the Spanish Premio Cervantes de Literatura- has added the names of Mexican storyteller Juan Rulfo, Spanish funnyman Camilo Jose Cela and Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Mdrquez to the list of this year's nominees for the prize. The winner of Spain’s top literary award will be announced in that country Nov. 29.
Another Argentine - Singer Valeria Lynch - took both top prizes at the recent International Song Festival held in Tokyo. Lynch was named the festival’s best singer and took the event’s Grand Prize for her performance of the song Rompecabezas. The singer, one of the performers on the U.S. Latino charity recording of Cantan§, cantaras, followed her Tokyo triumph with a Las Vegas recording session with
Barry Manilow. . . ..... _ „_______
- Antonio Meiias-Rentas
Media Report
THE PIED PIPER OF PRINT: At age 13, Maggie Rivas won her first writing contest. She was a junior high school student in Devine, Texas, 30 miles south of San Antonio.
Competing against other eighth graders in schools throughout the area, she got the blue ribbon for an essay on “My Most Memorable Teacher.”
Today, the ribbon’s in a scrapbook and Maggie's a reporter in the business news department of The Dallas Morning News.
This year, Rivas and a group of Dallas/Ft. Worth Hispanic journalists- banded together as the Network of Hispanic Communicators - are staging their fourth annual writing contest for ninth through twelfth grade students.
It’s a major event now, supported by The Dallas Morning News, The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, WFAA-TVand KSSA/Radio
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of:
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Elsa Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast m any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 iasuas) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Encksen*Mendoza (202) 234*0737.
Variedades. Cash prizes totalling $800 are ' divided among six winners. There’s an awards . banquet and speeches.
1 When Maggie Rivas was elected to the board of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists a couple of years ago, she never told fellow board members about her
‘HOW TO* KIT AVAILABLE Individuals or organizations interested in conducting writing contests geared to Hispanic high school students may request a free “how-to" kit from Maggie Rivas, Business News Dept., The Dallas Morning News, Communications Center, Dallas, Texas 75265.
blue ribbon-but she did pesterthem with her idea of a national essay contest.
This year, because of her persistence, 14 cities around the country will be conducting similar competitions.
The contests, in nearlyall instances staged by Latino news media groups, set their own
rules and prizes. They re spread among such cities as Chicago, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Dallas, Ft. Worth, Tucson, El Paso, San Diego, Fresno, Seattle, Boston, Miami, Washington, D.C., and Odgen, Utah.
Those who write on the common topic -profiling an important Hispanic person in their community- are eligible to compete for an expenses-paid trip to the National Hispanic Media Conference in Miami next April.
Will the contests help steer young Latinos and Latinas into journalism careers?
Rivas is more than optimistic. A contest ribbon motivated her, and the first Dallas winner, Anna Macias, now a sophomore at the University of Texas, Austin, is already in the “network,” having since earned internships with ABC News in Washington, D.C., and with The Dallas Morning News. Every year, Rivas hears the comment from teachers and counselors: If it hadn't been for the stimulation of a contest put on by Hispanic journalists, the students would never have imagined themselves as writers. - Charlie Ericksen

MALATHION
M4-VEAR
^ LIFE EXPECTANCY OF
FARM ^WORKERS

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THE KILLING FIELDS
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week Sandoval most recently worked as an consul tant and served as a lecturer in economics and law f!niversity of Texas at San Antonio ... Joe and art s administrator, is hired as director for the Corpus Christi Multicultural Center ... Ralph Rivera, former research assistant with the Massachusetts Commission on Hispanic Affairs, is appointed its director ... Trinidad L6pez, former education specialist with the National Institute for Multicultural Education in Albuquerque, N.M., is named Deputy Director of the New Mexico Arts Division , Office of Cultural Affairs ... Washington attorney Eduardo Pel'la is re-elected president of the League of United Latin American Citizens' Foundation at its San Diego board meeting ... The California Museum of Latino History appoints Jose Valle, general director of Noticias del Mundo, as a member of its advisory council ... Lydia Mendoza, a native of Houston, is among 1 2 women chosen by the Governor's Commission for Women for induction into the Texas Women's Hall of Fame Nov. 14. Mendoza has been performing " musica nortena," which combines the German folk accordion style with the traditional Mexican 12-string guitar, for 60 years ... Pedro Esquivel, who has served both as director and deputy director of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission;s Denver, Colo., district office, is appointed to head EEOC's San Antonio branch, recently upgraded from "area" to " district'' office, one of 22 in the country ... Rodolpho Sandoval is appointed executive director of the San Antonio Mexican Chamber of Commerce, replacing Tino Duran. Vol. 3 No. 46 HISPANIC LINK Y REP ! Nov. 18,1985 . Baca Loses Narrowly New Mexico State Land Commissioner Jim Baca lost his bid to become Albuquerque's first Hispanic mayor, bowing to city council man and auto dealer Ken Schultz Nov. 12 in the mayoral runoff there . Schultz received 41,495 votes or 51%, and Baca, 39,450 or 49%. Albuquerque , the state's largest city; has a population of 330,000, 34% of which is Hispanic. Schultz and Baca were the top two vote getters Oct. 8. Because neither received 40% of the vote , the runoff was necessary . The local chapter of the League of United Latin American Citizens endorsed Schultz because of his stance on the economic development of predominantly Hispanic sections of the city, Hispanic female re presentation in top city positions and the construction of a community college, said Herb Fernandez, immediate past-president of the local LULAC chapter. Schultz, who replaces incumbent Harry Kinney, takes office Dec. 1. Of the more than 160,000 registered voters, 51% turned out for the runoff as opposed to 46% for the general election . Black Support Shown A telephone survey by two California college professors shows that whites are the only major ethnic group opposed to bilingual education, and that blacks favor it even more than do Asians. It also showed that Hispanics and blacks support bilingual ballots, while Asians oppose them slightly and whites oppose them strongly . The poll, conducted by California Institute of Technology associate professors Bruce Cain and Roderick Kiewiet, included a random sample of S93 Hispanic, 335 black, 305 Asian and 409 white Californians. It found : Hispanics Biacks Asians Whites 811. Ed. Bil. Ballots % for/vs. % for/vs. 69-22 60-31 63-25 49-38 51 -40 43-50 42 51 29-67 Forty-three percent of the Hispanics and 47% of the Asians said they usually don't speak English at home. Suarez Wins Miami Runoff Attorney Xavier Suarez was sworn in Nov. 13 as Miami mayor after winning a runoff election the day before , making him the first Cuban-born mayor of a major city in the United States. Suarez, 36, outpolled millionaire banker Raul Masvidal , 43, also Cuban, by 56.7% to 43. 3% . There were 55,886 ballots cast for a 48% voter turnout rate. Suarez succeeds six-term Mayor Maurice Ferre, the Puerto Rico native who ran third in the city's Nov . 5 primary . Ferre lost support from the city's black voters last year after he fired black City Manager Howard Gary . Following his defeat , Ferre said he planned to return to politics in the future. The election of Suarez underscores the power of the 40% Hispanic populationmostly Cuban-that shapes elections in Miami . On Nov . 5 another Cuban, Sergio Pereira, was elected by the Dade County Commission as county manager, the most powerful non-elective post in the Southeast. Texas Districts Settle One Texas Education Agency regional district and four Texas school districts have now reached administrative settlements with the U . S . Department of Education over alleged misuse of federal bilingual education funds . The department's inspector general claimed after a 1982 audit that the districts improperly used $5. 1 million in federal funds through program duplication and misinterpretation of guidelines . The Texas Education Agency countered that the inspector general was trying to dis credit the state's bilingual education programs. In a settlement reached last month, the Edgewood School District in Bexar County agreed to pay $43,000 of a $1. 3 million original refund demand District spokespersons admitted no wrongdoing but said it was cheaper to pay than to continue fighting . Earlier, the San "Antonio School District, also in Bexar County, settled a $548,000 claim for $1,000. Others that have settled are Region 1 Education Service Center and the Austin, Pharr-San Juan-Alamo districts. The Dallas School D i strict has yet to settle. Suarez, who was defeated by Ferre in a divisive 1983 election, campaigned for the establishment of police sub-stations in store fronts as a way to control Miamrs skyrocketin g crime rate. He pledged to put more attention on Hispanic and black neighborhoods that, he claimed, were ignored during Ferre's re . vitalization project of the downtown business district. The new mayor is a 1975 graduate of Harvard Law School and has worked in the Shutts and Bowen law firm since then. In two races for Miami City Commission seats, Cuban Rosario Kennedy defeated, by 62. 8% to 37.2%, incumbent Demetrio Perez, also Cuban, to become the first Hispan ic woman in that government body . In the other race, Cuban Victor De Yurre failed to unseat black incumbent Miller Dawkins, who drew 54% of the votes . In Hialeah, Florida, where Hispanics make up 60% of the city's registered voters, two additional seats on the seven-member Ci t y Council were won by Latinos . Julio Jose Martinez and Herman Echevarria won 14. 7% and 13.3%, respectively , in an a-candidate runoff election, while incumbent Paulino Nunez successfully retained his seat with 14.5%. '-Dora Delgado 'Vista' Company Sold SFN Communications Inc., a Chicago based educational publishing, communications and information company, announced Nov. 13 that it acquired 51% of the stock of Horizon Communications, Miami, Fla., publisher of Vista Sunday newspaper supple ment. Arturo Villar will remain as Vista's publisher and Harry Caicedo as its vice president and editor. SFN owns television stations in Puerto Rico, Montana and Flor ida and has interest in Channel 58 in Stockton, Calif., and Channel 52 in Los Angeles. Its president, John called the purchase -which includes an option to buy the remaining 49% at a later date"consistent with tourl strategy of further expansion into media operations serving the Hispanic market."

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua from Spain) that, "You help to renew my confidence that our common dream for a free Cuba-no longer a captive statewill come to pass . " Mulling those words, New York Daily News columnist Miguel Perez recalls when his father took him to hear President John F. Kennedy "23 years, five presidents, and many false promises" earlier . FLABBY IS THIN, SOGGY IS DRY: What makes the English language so hard to understand is the people who speak it. I can tune in fine on teenagers who are telling me something is good wtten they say if s baa ad. They give their words a specialli It and rolland their eyebrows jump up and down. Adults are something else. Particularly those in Washington. The current classic, of course, is Secretary of Education William Bennett, who says he likes bilingual education. Kennedy promised his audience of Cuban exiles that he would return the Bay of Pigs veterans' flag to Havana cine day, adding, "I can assure you that it is the strongest wish of the people of this country ... that Cuba shall one day be free again." This past week it was Clarence Thomas, the demolition expert appointed by President Reagan to do in the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. He called a press conference to announce that he was against discrimination. Perez recalls how his father, trembling with emotion, picked him up and embraced him. Perez was back in Miami last month when Reagan spoke, watching the President on television news at this father's home. "Now we are used to American presidents playing politics with the hopes and aspirations of Cubans who believe in freedom, because now we are not so naive about American politics," he reflects . "This time we didn't embrace because we saw no reason to celebrate." Without so much as an eye-roll or coy grin, he added that EEOC, the body he chairs, was filing three class action suits against large employers as "examples of this commission's program to ... undertake a more vigorous litigation program through ... class action cases . " Barely half a year ago, he announced that EEOC was moving away from such social engineering, looking instead to cases involving private persons seeking individual remedies. Whom do you believe? Thomas? Or Thomas? Then there's El Presidente himself. Last month he told 2,500 Cuban exiles in Miami (gathered to celebrate the October 1868 birth of that country's battle for independence POSTSCRIPT/POSDATA: Author Richard Rodriguez, Aztlan's notorious misfit, has come out of his cave again. He's one of 11 authors bylining pieces on bilingual education for the New York Times' fall education survey, in its Sunday, Nov. 1 0 edition. His article -claiming bilingual ed is really a reparation demand by middle-class Latinos-is w-e-i-r-d . But the others offer interesting information and views. For the paper, send $2.80 to Back Copy Dept., New York Times, 229 W . 43rd St., New York, N.Y . 10036. Latino Reps Shunned by Rich PACS Hispanics in the U.S. House of Representatives were generally bypassed by"no-tax" companies which contributed $4.9 million to congressional candidates in 1984. Political action committees associated with 50 major companies which paid no federal taxes during President Reagan's first term donated to Republicans over Democrats by a 2 margin, spending most of their money on Calif. Univ. Rule Disputed The educational policy committee of the California State University system voted Nov . 12 to require high school students to take 15 academic courses as a prerequisite for admission an action opposed by many Hispanic and black educators. Rudy Acuna, Chicano studies professor at Cal State Northridge, labelled the rule "elitist." Many high schools serving Hispanics and blacks do not offer the full range of college preparatory courses, noted trustee Celia Ballesteros, of San Diego. The standards for the 19 state university campuses would take effect in 1988. A univer sity analysis showed that .only 9% of the system's 1985 freshmen met the requirements which will be mandatory in three years. Castillo Joins Caucus Elvira Castillo, a native of Weslaco, Texas, was appointed executive director the Con gressional Hispanic Caucus Nov . 1. She replaced Susan Herrera, who resigned after5 1/2 years to open a consultant firm in the capital. Prior to joining the caucus, Castillo was a legislative analyst for the city of Los Angeles. She earned a masters degree in public administration at the University of Southern California. 2 close races, according to a survey released by Citizens for Tax Justice Nov . 1. Largest overall contributors were Tenneco ($366,700, 85% to GOP), Harris Corp. ($261 ,500, 91% to GOP), and Dow Chemical Co. ($249,950, 92% to GOP). Ten incumbent Hispanic Democrats, led by Californian Tony Coelho($7,900) , received a total of $27,500. New Mexico's Manuel Lujan, the lone Republican incumbent, got$15,800. Only Henry B. Gonzalez of Texas took no money at all. California's Matthew (Marty) Martinez, chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, received $200, but his Republican challenger, Richard G6mez, was given $500. Another non-incumbent Hispanic, Louis Gallegos, was given $1 ,500 in his New Mexico campaign against Bill Richardson, who received $4,000. Others receiving contributions: E. "Kika" de Ia Garza, Texas, $4,000; Solom6n Ortiz, Texas, $3,750; Esteban Torres, Calif., $3,400; Robert Garcia, New York, $1 ,500 ; Albert Bustamante, Texas, $1 ,500; and Edward Roybal, Calif . , $1 ,250. Launch Date Changed The launch date of the space shuttle Columbia has been advanced from Dec. 20 to Dec. 1 8, to avoid a Christmas Day landing. Franklin ChangDiaz, who will become the first U.S. Hispanic astronaut on that flight, now will land Dec. 23. ChangDiaz is expected to provide a 15 minute commentary and demonstration in Spanish from space and talk with President Luis Alberto Monge of Costa Rica, the country of his birth. Mexico astronaut Rodolfo Neri Vela's lift off aboard the space shuttle Atlantis has also been moved up, from the day of Nov. 27 to the night of Nov. 26. -Kay Barbaro UPI Sold to Mexican United Press International was sold Nov . 12 for more than $40 million to Mexico press magnate Mario Vazquez Raiia and Houston financier Joe Russo. The sale needs approval of a federal bankruptcy judge, inasmuch as the 78-yearold news agency filed for protection under Chapter II of the U .S. Bankruptcy Code last April. U PI Chairman Luis Nogales was active in the lengthy negotiations. While no announce ment as to his remaining as UPI's chief is expected until after the sale becomes final within the next few months, Vazquez Raiia stated that he planned to make minimal top-level changes. Bilingual Signs Ordered Florida's Dade County Metrorail system will have to spend up to$2.5 million removing its English-only signs and brochures and replacing them with bilingual ones after the U.S. Urban Mass Transportation Administration ruled that the exclusion of other languages violates the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964. Bonnie Whyte, UMTA's public affairs director, told Weekly Report that bilingual signs and brochures are presently being designed by the Metro-Dade Transportation Administration. The Civil Rights Act requires local governments to provide equal access to public facilities. The administrative order, which takes precedence over a 1980 county ordinance banning the use of Spanish in public signs and publications, resulted from a UMTA review of the rail system following complaints from representatives of Miami's Hispanic community. The signs will also be translated into French for the county's Haitian population. UMTA is requiring bilingual translation of schedules, directions, warnings that car doors open automatically, instructions on how to pay the fare and brochures on the system . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS U.S. CENSU S POPULATION PROFILES: This 1Oth annual report CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS provides data on population trends and projections, immigration liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii patterns, marital status and living arrangements, school enrollment, labor force composition and other demographic information. For a copy of the 47-page "Population Profile of the United States: 19838 4 , " Series P -23, No. 145, o rderfrom: Superintendent of Documents, U . S Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C . 20402 (202) 783-3 238. Price not available at press time. HISPANIC CITIZENSHIP: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has published a free "National Di rectory. of Citizenshi p Services" listing 340 citizenship service provider s across the country. A lso available are transcripts of the " P roceedings of the First National Conference on Citizenship and the Hispanic Community," held May 5 , 1984, in Washington, D.C . P ri ce: $ 5 .00. Contact NALEO, 420 South Capitol St. SE, Washington, PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N 'St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (E1) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per. word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. D.C. 20003. (2 0 2) 546-2536. HISPANIC ACT ORS DIRECTORY: Nosotros film organization is offe ring, beginning Dec. 1, a directory listing Hispanic ac t ors, producers, dire ctors and singers for$5, plus$1 postage and handling. Contact: Loy d a Ramos, artistic director, Nosotros, 1314 N . Wilton Place, Hollywood, Calif. 90028 (213) 465-4167. TORRES NEW DISTRICT OFFICE: U .S. Rep. Esteban Torres (D Calif. ) has announced the opening of a new district office at 8819 W hittier Blvd. , S uite 101, Pico Rivera Calif. 90660 (213) 6950702. His Norwalk and West Covina offices are now closed. (See Dec. 24, 1984, Weekly Report. ) VICE PRESIDENT F()R LEGAL PROGRAMS National civil rights organization seeks vice president for legal programs in Los Angeles to manage legal programs in five offices. Re quirements: 6-8 years extensive experience i n civil rights /public interest law, knowledge of Hi s panic issues . Resume with references b y Nov. 25 to Ms. A. Hernandez, MALDEF , 634 S . Spring St. , 11th floor, Los Angeles, CA 90014. I EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR I National Labor and Civil Rights Organization 1 Federal or state lobbying experience, legis lative analys is, fund raising and management skills required . E xperience with farmworker issues preferred Commitment to social justice for low income farmworkers required . $37,000+ depending on skills and experience. Send resume to Search Committee, Farmworker Justice Fund, 2001 S St. NW., Suite 312, Washington, D.C. 20009. No calls please. Deadline 11/30/85. EOE DIRECTOR RESEARCH and DOCUMENTATION The Latino Institute, a not-for-profi t organization based in Chicago dedicated to building bridges between established institutions and Latino resources, seeks someone to head its research di v ision . Salary is commensurate with experience and training. • Experience with primary and s e con dary data gathering methods. • Investigative approaches t o i ssue development and analysis. • The ability to employ these s k ill s as part of an advocacy team to create tutional change on behalf of Hispanics i n Chicago. • Fluency in Spanish and En g lish, written and verbal. • Good interpersonal, supervisory a n d administrative skills. Interested persons should submit a resume by Nov. 27 to: Mr. Peter Martinez Director of Programs Latino Institute 53 West Jackson. Suite 940 Chicago, Illinois 60604 EDUCATIONA L FACTS: Key facts on the way student aid works a r e summarized i n four fact sheets published by the American Council on Education. "The Use of Student Loans is on the Rise", " F amilies Use Self-Help to Meet Most College Costs", "Grant Aid is Concentrated on Low-Income Students" and "Student Borrowing has Implications for Career Choice" are available free from the American Council on Education, Division of Policy Analysis and Research, One Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 9399450. Include self-addressed envelope. LaGUARDIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE of the City University of New York frequently conducts searches for faculty and administrative personnel. For additional materials and information, contact Eneida Rivas, PersonneV A f firmative Action Coordinator, LaGuardia 1'---------------' Calendar THIS WEEK BILINGUA L EDUCA T ION HEARINGS The N ation a l Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilin g ual Education is hold ing a series of hearings o p e n to t he public on specific aspects of bilingual e duca t ion . S ea ttle Nov. 18 S a m Kerr.(206) 4 420460 C h ic a g o N ov . 21 Ros e mary Thompson {312) 353-5215 D e troit N o v . 22 Geo r g e Giann e tti {313) 548 4484 ISLAND D I SC OVERY ANNIVERSARY W ash ington, D .C. Nov . 19 Bish o p Alv aro Corrada of the Archdiocese of Washing ton, D.C., will preside over a special Mass cel ebrating ttle discovery of Puerto Rico and honoring Our L ady of t he Providence , Patroness of Puerto R ic o . Mar i a Lagos {301) 853-4530 NALE O CITIZENSHIP CONFERENCE L os Angeles Nov. 22 The N ational Association of Latino Elec t ed and App o inted Officials presents its 2nd conference on t h r ee areas of citizenship : social service provision , His panic attitudes and INS admin i stration. J oan Anz alone {202) 546 2536 H is pani c Link Weekly Report Community College, The City University of New York, 31-10 Thomson Ave . , Long Island C ity, N.Y . 11101 (718) 626-2700. PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY , MAR YLAND, government office of personnel ha s a JOB hotline (301) 952-3498. HISPANIC ELDERLY CONFERENCE New Orleans Nov. 22, 23 rhe National Hispanic Council of Aging is cosponsoring a training seminar to provide organizational and research skills to those interested in working with the elderly community. Rebeca Gilad {301) 2519696 SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE BILINGUALISM New York Nov . 22, 23 The 9th annual symposium , sponsored by New York University and the University o f Massachusetts at Amherst, will cover linguistics, culture and other aspects of biling ualism and education. Antonio Simoes {212) 598-2776 MALDEF DINNER Los Angeles Dec. 2 The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund presents its 11th annual recognition banquet to honor indiv i duals who have made contributions to the Hispanic community . Charlotte Conway {213) 653-2966 HISPANIC WORKING WOMEN Chicago Dec . 5 Presented by the Latino Institute, this conference is aimed at Hispanic women working for government and non profit social serv i ce agencies. Millie Rivera {312) 663-3603 BILINGUAL EDUCATION HEARINGS Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico Dec . 6 Nestor Gonzalez {809) 765-6633 El Paso , Texas Dec . 12 Irene Rosales {915) 747-5247 Houston Dec. 13 Esther Lee Yao {713) 488-9336 HOLIDAY BENEFIT DANCE Manhattan, N.Y. Dec . 6 The Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy present its 2nd annual musical fund-ra i serfeaturing Ruben Blades and Cheo Feliciano. Gerson Borrero {212) 689-6331 NATIONAL HISPANIC UNIVERSITY San Francisco Dec. 15-18 The university conducts its 4 t h annual con v ocation titled "Hispanic America: A National Report Card , " co v ering issues such as education, economics , health and technology . Elvia Mendoza {415) 451-0511 FIRST NOTICE CONGRESSMAN GONZALEZ ANNIVERSARY FETE San Antonio Jan . 18 Gail Beagle {202) 225-3236 CUBAN NATIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL Miami Jan . 30,31 Guarione Diaz {305) 642-3484 CONFERENCIA NACIONAL DE TEATROS H /8-PANOS San Antonio Feb. 7-9 Mario Sanchez (512) 643-1660 Ext. 157 3

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Arts & Entertainment the film "politics meet the human hearf' and the New York Posfs Rex Reed called it a "luminous miracle of beauty and authenticity." A HIT BROADWAY SHOW , A NEW FILM getting rave reviews, and international awards for one of its popular singers are among recent Argentine achievements in arts and entertainment here and abroad. In a related item, Argentine novelist Manuel Puig, whose work Kiss of the Spider Woman was the basis for Argentine director Hector Babe nco's film, said recently that the movie transmits the message in the book, in spite of a script and a cast that were-" at first, reason for desperation." Tango Argentino. has been playing to full-house audiences since it began a limited engagement at Manhattan's Mark Hellinger Theater in early October. Conceived and directed by Argentina's Hector Orezzoli and Claudio Segovia, the review began touring Europe after the 1983 Autumn Festival in Paris. Puig . told the Associated Press' Carlos Brezina recently that the film's casting "had nothing to do with the characters" and called it"a big risk." Meanwhile, Argentine writer Ernesto Sabato-the 1980 winner of the Spanish Premio Cervantes de Literatura-has added the names of Mexican storyteller Juan Rulfo, Spanish funnyman Camilo Jose Cela and Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez to the list of this year's nominees for the prize. The winner of Spain ' s top literary award will be announced in that country Nov. 29. New York City critics first took notice of Tango Argentino last June when the show played a one-week engagement off Broadway . Reviews have generally been favorable about the show, that retells the history of tango with music and dance against a simple black and white background. Last month, Vanity Fair devoted a four page display to the show. New York ' s interest in things Argentine continues this month with the premiere t here of La historia oficial. The film is the first work by 39-yearold director rioplatense Luis Penzo . Starring Norma Aleandro and Hector Alteiro, La historia ofi cial deals with the topic of South America's desaparecidos. Another Argentine-Singer Valeria Lynch-took both top prizes at the recent International Song Festival held in Tokyo. Lynch was named the festival's best singer and took the event's Grand Prize for her performance of the song Rompecabezas. The singer, one of the performers on the U.S. Latino charity recording of Can tare, cantaras, followed her Tokyo triumph with a Las Vegas recording session with Already New York Times critic Walter Goodman has written that in Barry Manilow . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report THE P IED PIPER OF PRINT: At age 13, Maggie Rivas won her first writing contest. She was a junior high school student in Devine, Texas, 30 miles south of San Antonio. Competing against other eighth graders in schools throughout the area, she got the blue ribbon for an essay on "My Most Memorable Teacher." Today, the ribbon ' s in a scrapbook and Maggie's a reporter in the business news department of The Dallas Morning News. This year, Rivas and a group of Dallas/Ft. Worth Hispanic journalists-banded together as the Network of Hispanic Communicators -are staging their fourth annual writing contest for ninth through twelfth grade students . It's a major event now, supported by The Dallas Morning News, The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, WFAATVand KSSA/Radio HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nat•onal publlcat•on of: Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N' Street N. W. Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234 or 2340737 Publisher Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales Reporting : Dora Delgado , Felix Perez. Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas. Elsa Ericksen Mendoza . No portiO n of H t spantc Ltnk Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast m any l otm w1thour advanc e perm1ssion . Annual subscription (52 issues) $98. Trial subscription (t 3 issues) $28. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : Include the latest ed1t1on of H•span•c L1nk Weekly Rel)ort i n part i c i pants' packets at your ne)(t conference or convention. For deta•ls. contact Hector EncksenMendoza (20?1 234. 4 Variedades. Cash prizes totalling $800 are ' divided among six winners. There ' s an awards . banquet and speeches. When Maggie Rivas was elected to the board of the National Association of His panic Journalists a couple of years ago, she never told fellow board members about her 'HOW TO' KIT AVAILABLE Individuals or organizations interested in conducting writing contests geared to His pan i c high school students may request a free "how-td' kit from Maggie Rivas, Business News Dept., The Dallas Morning News, Communications Center, Dallas, Texas 75265. blue ribbon-but she did pester them with her idea of a national essay contest. This year, because of her persistence, 14 cities around the country will be conducting similar competitions. The contests, in nearly all instances staged by Latino news media groups, set their own rules and prizes. They're spread among such cities as Chicago, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Dallas, Ft. Worth, Tucson, El Paso, San Diego, Fresno, Seattle, Boston, Miami, Washington , D.C., and Odgen, Utah. Those who write on the common topic profiling an important Hispanic person in their community-are eligible to compete for an expenses-paid trip to the National panic Media Conference in Miami next April. Will the contests help steer young Latinos and Latinas into journalism careers? Rivas is more than optimistic. A contes1 ribbon motivated her, and the first Dallas winner, Anna Macias, now a sophomore at the . University of Texas, Austin, is already in the" network," having since earned internships with ABC News in Washington, D.C., and with The Dallas Morning News. Every year , Rivas hears the comment from teachers and counselors: If it hadn't been for the stimulation of a contest put on by Hispanic journalists, the students would never have imagined themselves as writers. Charlie Ericksen THE KILLING FIELDS Hispanic Link Weekly Report