Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, December 2, 1985

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, December 2, 1985
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
No obstacles are expected to block the election of San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros as president of the National League of Cities at its annual Congress of Cities and Exposition Dec. 7-11 in Seattle. Cisneros, current second vice president, succeeds Cleveland Mayor George Voinovich. First Vice President Carol Bellamy, New York City Council president and customary successor to the presidency, is ineligible, having lost her bid to become New York City mayor. Cisneros is the second Hispanic to hold the post Former mayor of San Juan, P.R., Carlos Romero-Barcelo was the first . . . U.S. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Texas) chairman of the housing subcommittee, tells that body Nov. 21 that the Department of Housing and Urban Developments failure to collect information on the race of tenants in public housing projects “reflects an absence of concern” about discrimination in public housing. The department has not collected
the information since 1977. An attorney for HQDrspd^he department plans to revert to “project-level data collection irM&reid&ed programs.” ... Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt says Nov. 21 that he will ask the state legislature to fund a special program to combat the state’s 27% dropout rate among Hispanic students. . . Joe Duardo, a laser specialist at Xerox Corporation in Pasadena, Calif., is elected president of the California School Boards Association... Joe Coto, Oakland, Calif.’s first Hispanic City Council member, elected in 1973, is named interim superintendent of the Oakland Unified School District. . . Diego Ascensio, U.S. ambassador to Brazil, is appointed executive director of the Una Chapman Cox Foundation, a non-profit organization that works to improve the effectiveness of the career foreign service... Pablo Sedillo, who suffered a mild heart attack Oct. 3 in Kenmore, Wash., is back in the nation’s capital with doctor's permission to return to work full time as director of the Hispanic Secretariat of the National Catholic Conference Jan. 1...

Bilingual Ed. Changes Proposed
Parents Petition for English-Only Classes
Claiming that their children are receiving a second-rate education in bilingual education classrooms, residents in Glendale, Calif., are circulating a petition calling for the school district to establish English-only classes.
The Glendale Unified School District has approximately20,000 students, 25% of whom are Hispanic. Asian and Armenian students combine with Latinos to make enrollment 45% non-native English speakers in kindergarten through 12th grade, said Alice Petrossian, coordinator of intercultural education there.
California law mandates that bilingual instruction be provided when there are at least 10 students in a grade level who are English deficient and that these students be placed in classrooms with English-speaking peers.
Petrossian said parents’ fears are “unfounded” because most bilingual instruction occurs in groups separate from the rest of the class.
The petition has generated 200 signatures and will be presented to the school board in January.
$70,000 Awaits Heroes
Rewards totaling $70,000 await several Mexican Americans, most of them residents of Hubbard Street in Los Angeles, who participated in the capture of Richard Ramirez, the city’s suspected Night Stalker.
The money won’t be distributed until after Ramirez’s trial next year. Accused of 14 murders and 54 other felonies in Los Angeles, he faces preliminary hearing Feb. 24. There are about a dozen claimants for the reward money, contributed by private parties as well as the city, county and state.
Some families have already received gifts for their roles
The families of Jose Burgoin and Faistino Pinon, however, reported that in the past few weeks they have been receiving late-night telephone threats for their roles in the capture of the 25-year-old suspect.
U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett announced proposed regulations for bilingual education programs Nov. 21 as part of the federal role change he promised in September.
The proposed regulations interpret and implement the Bilingual Education Act as amended in 1984. When adopted in final form, they will apply to applications and awards for fiscal year 1986.
On the same day, Education Undersecretary Gary Bauer said the department’s regional civil rights directors will notify school districts that have transitional bilingual programs under binding agreements with the government that the department is willing to reconsider those agreements.
The “Lau remedies,” as they became known,
Mass. Housing Suit Settled
The Massachusetts’ Holyoke Housing Authority agreed through a consent decree Nov. 11 to discontinue its practice of bypassing Hispanics as tenants of public housing projects, following a suit by the U.S. Department of Justice.
The consent decree, formulated in the Springfield District Court, states that the Authority violated the Fair Housing Act of 1968 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by intentionally discriminating against people based on their race, color and national origin. It ordered the Authority to stop using racial quotas favoring whites. Hispanics were bypassed on the projects’ waiting list since 1977, it said.
According to an investigation that prompted the suit, of 550 families on the waiting list, 450 were Hispanic; while whites were able to get immediate placement in the projects, some Hispanics had to wait, sometimes, eight-and-a-half months longer.
The court gave the Authority 120 days to hire a reviewer to locate the discriminated families and offer them placement in the projects. Every six months for the next three years, the Authority will have to submit reports on the racial composition of applicants and admitted tenants.
refer to a 1974 Supreme Court decision which states that school districts with more than 25 minority students must provide a special language program in all academic areas.
Memorandums to regional civil rights directors (more than 400 school districts negotiated Lau remedies) and signed by Assistant Education Secretary for Civil Rights Harry Singleton, state that school districts should be notified “that they may implement any program that takes affirmative steps to provide for the effective participation of language minority students in their educational programs” The objectives of the regulations are to:
(a) Inform local educational agencies that the Act allows them to determine the extent of native language use in transitional bilingual education programs funded under section 721 (a)(1).
(b) Expand parental involvement in deciding which educational program is best suited for their children.
(c) Increase emphasis on building local capacity to operate programs for the limited English proficient without federal funds.
William Wooten, executive officer with Education’s Off ice of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs (OBEMLA), said the new regulations are meant to “focus public attention on specific aspects” of the Bilingual Education Act. He noted that the proposed regulation calling for increased parental involvement in bilingual programs was stipulated in the Act as amended in 1984.
Critics of the new regulations including
continued on page 2
New Miami City Manager
The Miami City Commission chose Cesar Odio, a Cuban refugee who came to the city in 1960, as its new city manager Nov. 26.
Odio has served as assistant city manager since 1980, earning an annual salary of $84,000. His new position calls for a $92,000 salary, but newly elected Mayor Xavier Suarez has said he will seek to cut it to $75,000.


Sin pelos en la lengua
DIRTY TRICKS (MIAMI STYLE): After Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre lost out in his Nov. 5 primary bid for a seventh term, he threw his weight behind lawyer and eventual winner Xavier Sudrez.
A few days before the runoff between Suarez and banker Raul Masvidal, voters in one heavily Puerto Rican neighborhood (which had been nearly unanimous in its support for compatriota Ferre) received an official-looking campaign letter addressed “Dear Cuban Brother” urging a “total Cuban takeover” of City Hall.
It was a phony, of course - with all sides denying links to it.
(Four out of five Puerto Ricans voted against Masvidal anyway.)
DIRTY TRICKS (WASHINGTON STYLE): Hispanic and other bilingual education advocates are doing a smear job on him and his boss, says Undersecretary of Education Gary Bauer.
On the subject of non-English-speaking students at his recent White House briefing and fojlow-up press conference, Bauer must have repeated half a dozen times, ‘This administration’s concern is genuine.”
He was disturbed by “concerted efforts” to misrepresent their position and found statements by unnamed “Washington-based lobbyists ... reprehensible.”
Would the undersecretary care to name those reprehensible people, a Weekly Report correspondent asked straight-faced.
Retorted Bauer “I’m not going to name them for fear of leaving
someone out.”
DIRTY TRICKS (LOS ANGELES STYLE): As Dec. 10 election day draws near, opponents of Los Angeles City Council candidate Richard Alatorre are showing frustration at his ability to stack up endorsements and dollars.
The powerful state assemblyman (who wants badly to win without a runoff) recently gained the public support of Mayor Tom Bradley (who wants to take on Gov. George Deukmejian again next year) and veteran Congressman Ed Roybal (who says he won’t retire - to open his congressional seat for Alatorre - at least until the year 2000).
Generosity is Alatorre’s middle name. To prove it, he recently paid $1,729 in membership dues for 126 people to the Mexican American Political Association chapter in his district, which overlaps the contested council district and Roybal’s congressional district.
Foul, cried opponent Steve Rodriguez. Alatorre’s largesse “violates the right of (MAPA) to make its own decisions.”
Alatorre was aghast at the thought. MAPA was a “statewide organization,” he explained. “It has nothing to do with the city.”
All right, Donald Segretti, come out, come out,wherever you are.
MIAMI ELECTION POSTSCRIPT: A WLTV exit poll there discovered a potential cubano “generation gap” in the Miami City Commission race between Rosario Kennedy and Demetrio Perez. Older, Cuba-born voters went with Perez (the incumbent and loser) by a 57%-43% spread, while their stateside-born children supported winner Kennedy by 69%-31 %.
- Kay Barbaro
NYC School Discrimination Charged
Bilingual Ed. Changes
continued from page 1
representatives of Hispanic organizations, claim they will lead to funding preference for “quick programs” that emphasize language acquisition at the expense of teaching in other basic school subjects.
The new regulations, published Nov. 22 in the Federal Register, allow for 60 days of public comment. Following that period, Education will review all comments and possibly make changes to them, Wooten said. Final regulations are expected 40-46 days after review. An announcement on grant competition for fiscal year 1986 is expected in March.
- Carlos Morales
L. A. Council Sued
The Los Angeles City Council’s 1982 redistricting plan deliberately fragments the city’s growing Hispanic population to minimize its voting strength, the U.S. Department of Justice charged in a suit filed Nov. 26.
Alleging violations of Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act, the suit seeks to invalidate the redistricting and require the city to draw new
Chavez Senate Possibility
Linda Chavez, director of the White House public liaison office, is being urged by Republican leaders to run in 1986 for the seat of retiring Sen. Charles L'athias (R-Md.), a unnamed White House official is quoted as saying in a page 1 Washington Times article Nov. 27.
The official said the 38-year-old former U.S. Civil Rights Commission staff director “was approached and she has listened.”
Chavez changed her political affiliation from Democratic to Republican after she was named to her current post.
An examination of New York City’s public high school system has found gross discrimination against minority, handicapped and low income students applying for schools with special academic or career programs. Ironically, the discrimination stems, in part, from policies to promote racial integration in the schools, it says.
“Public Schools: Private Admissions,” a report released Nov. 11 by the non-profit organization Advocates for Children, found that a city school board policy that requires schools with white majorities to admit more than 50% whites in their special programs has a discriminatory effect on Hispanic, black
on Redistricting
district lines for the 15-member body.
A Dec. 10 special election in Los Angeles’ lone Hispanic-majority district to replace Councilman Arthur Snyder, who resigned Oct. 4, is not affected. In that race, State Assembly-man Richard Alatorre is a strong favorite over a large, predominantly Hispanic field.
The Justice Department suit noted that the present council includes 11 whites, three blacks and one Asian in spite of the fact that in 1980 there were 816,000 Hispanics living in the city. Between 1970 and 1980 the Hispanic population grew from 18.4% to 27.5%.
The council’s’82 reapportionment splintered an expanding core concentration of Hispanics surrounding the downtown area into seven districts, the suit charged.
The Justice Department began its investigation after the California Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights issued a report condemning the council’s remapping effort which followed the 1980 census.
Only one Latino, Edward Roybal (now a congressman) has been elected to a Los Angeles council seat in this century.
and Asian students Citywide, students applying to the schools are approximately 32% Hispanic, 39% black, 24% white and 5% Asian.
Janet Price, project director of Advocates for Children, said that the policy, which was originally implemented for zoned or neighborhood schools, is being extended to schools which provide specialized academic, vocational or career instruction to students coming from across the city. The policy to admit more than 50% white, she said, tends to prevent “white flight” and ultimately segregation, but does not account for recent demographic changes.
The report indicated that the schools’ admission standards are “vague, ambiguous and unpublished,” permitting “back door favoritism” and leaving little recourse to rejected students.
Leaders Establish PAC
Three of the nation’s most prominent Republican Hispanic leaders - of Mexican, Puerto Rican and Cuban background -established a Political Action Committee (PAC) last week to fund Hispanic candidates for federal office in the 1986 election.
The trio, Rep. Manuel Lujan (R.-N.M.), former Puerto Rico Gov. Luis Ferre and California physician Dr. Tirso del Junco, filed a statement of organization with the Federal Election Commission Nov. 27. Del Junco chaired Hispanics for Reagan/Bush in ’84.
The PAC expects to conduct two special fund-raising events in Washington, D.C., prior to the ’86 elections and to raise a minimum of $20,000 for use as direct campaign contributions. The money would be divided among a minimum of five candidates, in compliance with FEC regulations.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
Christmas cards with Hispanic motifs are available from the following Hispanic-owned and-operated companies:
COLORAMA GREETING CARDS: Colorama, est. 1948, offers Spanish cards in more than 3,000 motifs for holidays and everyday. Price: 65 cents to $10.
For titles and price list write to Colorama, P.O. Box 747, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 00919 (809) 765-0760, or P.O. Box 1345, Glendale, Calif. 91209(818)241-8156.
SPANISH SPEAKING UNITY COUNCIL: For the second year, the council is offering a card which depicts a candlelight procession down the streets of Oakland’s Fruitvale District. In color, it is taken from a mural. Price: 60 cents each or 50 cents for orders of more than one dozen.
Contact: Spanish Speaking Unity Council, 1900 Fruitvale Ave., Suite 2A, Oakland, Calif. 94061 (415)534-7764.
PAVA PRINTS: Pava Prints, est. 1953, offers30 cards with Puerto Rican motifs, in color. Price: 45 cents to$1.
Brochure, including color illustrations of cards, sells for $20. Order from Pava Prints, 60 Cruz St., San Juan, Puerto Rico, 00901 (809) 723-3763, or from Henry Garcia, 1309-5th Ave., Apt. 27 D, New York, N.Y. 10029(212)831-7953.
PARA LA FAMIUA: Second year in the card business. It offers two sets of 10 assorted Mexican motifs, in color. Price: Set of 10 is $3.75. Also offered is an 8 1/2-inch numbered plate with Christmas theme by artist Ignacio Gomez for $39.50.
Contact: Para la Familia, P.O. Box 875109, Los Angeles, Calif. 90084 (213) 222-1349.
GALERIA DE LA RAZA: Galena, est. 1971, offers sets of 12 cards with Chicano and Latino themes, on colored paper. Price: $1.50 for 12, plus 50 cents postage.
Contact: Galeria de la Raza, 2851 - 24th St., San Francisco, Calif. 94110 (415) 826-8009.
DISENOS: Disehos, est. 1972, by writer/artist Jose Antonio Burciaga, has created 14 Mexican and Chicano theme cards, in black and white. Price: 40 cents each or 14 for $5.
Also available is popular“Three Wisemen” 11 -inch by 17-inch print for $5. There is a 10% discount for orders of $20 or more.
Contact: Jose Antonio Burciaga, Disehos, P.O. Box3729, Stanford, Calif. 94305-0049(415)328-9407.
HIGH SCHOOL ADMISSION IN NYC: A 172-page report by Advocates for Children of New York Inc. charges that the city’s public high school system discriminates against minority students in its admission procedures. For a copy, contact: Advocates for Children, 24-16 Bridge Plaza South, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101 (718) 729-8866. Price: $5 per copy or $4.50 for 10 copies or more.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Hispanics Designers Fashion Show & Benefit Washington, D.Q Efficient, bilingual, extremely well-organized, mature individual who can work under pressure needed January 1, to assist Executive Producer in coordinating two major shows in 1986. M ust have top-notch typing and telephone skills. Some experience in event management is helpful. Salary $16,000 to$18,000 depending on experience. Call Penny Harrison (202) 822-7895 for appointment.
MANAGING EDITOR Santa Barbara vertical market HISPANIC BUSINESS magazine seeks mature managing editor with extensive business writing/editing experience (knowledge of finance/marketing/ word processing); bilingual preferred, not essential. Position available immediately. Salary negotiable. Send letter/resume; Hispanic Business Magazine. P.O. Box 6757. Santa Barbara. Calif. 93160.
MINORITY PROJECTS COORDINATOR
The American Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation seeks a good organizer, administrator, writer, speaker and public relations person to run minority programs, including job fairs, newsletters, advisory services to newspapers and outreach programs with other newspaper organizations.
Send resume to AN PA Foundation, Box 17407, Dulles Airport, Washington, D.C. 20041.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE sought by Hispanic advertising agency in Chicago. Experience required; candidate must be fluent Spanish/ English. Call collect (312) 271-2720.
HOST/EDITOR Latin American News Service
Full-time Host/Editor for daily radio news service out of station KXCR-FM in El Paso. Texas, wanted. Position requires fluency in candidate's ability to write Spanish, a working knowledge of English and at least two years working full-time in the area of news/public affairs.
Applications are due Dec. 6. Send resume and tape to: Isabel Alegria, KXCR-FM, 2023 Myrtle St.. El Paso, Texas 79901.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT St. Cloud State University St. Cloud, Minnesota
Assistant professor, tenure-track, September 1986. Salary 1984-85: $19,048 - $27,716. Major responsibilities: composition, minority literature. Other, third-world literature, English education, minority advising. Doctorate in English or English education: ABD required. Letter, vita to Judy Parham, Search Committee, English Department St Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minn. 56301. Postmark deadline: Jan. 3, 1986. AN EO/AA EMPLOYER.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR sought by the South Carolina Education Associatioa A letter constitutes a formal application and should be accompanied by a resume and three letters of recommendation. All applications should be addressed to: Mrs. Betty J. Cunningham, Chairperson, Search Committee, South Carolina Education Association, P.O. Box 212081, Columbia, South Carolina 29221-2081.
PROMOTION ASSISTANT sought by National Public Radio Person provides research, writing and administrative support to public information specialists. Salary is $17,500 (negotiable). Interested persons should submit resume to NPR, Personnel, 2025 M St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C., has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the university. Call (202) 635-LAND.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
MALDEF DINNER Los Angeles Dec. 2
Luis Nogales, United Press International chairman, will be an honoree at the 11 th annual award banquet sponsored by the Mexican American Legal Defense anc( Educational Fund.
Charlotte Conway (213) 653-2996
SCHOLARSHIP FUND-RAISER Washington, D.C. Dec. 3
Edward James Olmos, 1985 Emmy award winner, will be the guest of honor at a reception sponsored by the Multicultural Career Intern Program to establish a scholarship fund.
Fernando Otero (202) 234-1374 Hispanic Link Weekly Report
HISPANIC WORKING WOMEN Chicago Dec. 5
The Latino Institute is presenting a conference aimed at Latina social workers with Graciela Olivarez, former head of the Federal Community Service Administration, as a keynote speaker.
Millie Rivera (312) 663-3603
BABBITT TESTIMONIAL Phoenix, Ariz. Dec. 6
The National Hispanic Senior Citizens Foundation will honor Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt with New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya as keynote speaker.
Ray Gano (602) 253-4877
HOLIDAY BENEFIT DANCE Manhattan, N.Y. Dec. 6
The Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy put on their 2nd annual musical fund-raiser featuring singers Cheo Feliciano and Ruben Blades.
Gerson Borrero (212) 689-6331
ASEGURANDO NUESTRO FUTURO St. Paul, Minn. Dec. 7
Minnesota’s Spanish-Speaking Affairs Council will conduct a conference examining education, electoral participation, economic development and social services in the Hispanic community.
Ruby Lee (612) 296-9587
NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES Seattle Dec. 7-11
Hispanic Elected Local Officials, a subgroup of the N LC, conducts a one- day semi nar to sharpen lobbyi ng skills of Hispanic officials.
Ruth Faith Santana (202) 626-3115
LATINO FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL Hoboken, N.J. Dec. 8
The Renegade Theater Company along with El Museo Del Barrio is conducting a festival featuring films and videos by Hispanics from throughout the nation.
Eileen Lynch (201) 798-6860
3


Arts & Entertainment
THREE HISPANIC ACTORS ARE UP for network Awards for Cable Excellence this week as recognition for cable programming continues to be a topic of debate among cable and broadcast TV executives.
Three Latinos are nominated in separate acting awards for the ACE awards, to be handed out in Los Angeles Dec. 3 (and cablecast by the Turner Broadcasting System Dec. 6 at 9 p.m. EST).
Jose Perez is nominated in the “Actor in a Comedy Series” category for his starring role in the Showtime series Steambath. Martin Sheen picked up his nomination as “Actor in a Movie or Mini-Series” for his performance on The'Guardian, presented by Home Box Office. Finally, Trinidad Silva is nominated as “Actor in a Dramatic Series” for HBO’s Maximum Security.
TwoSpanish-language programs- both carried by Galavision, are also ACE-nominated. El Tesoro del Saber, produced by Mexico’s Televisa, is nominated in the “Children’s Programming Series,” and Santa Teresa, a production of Radio-Television Esparto!a, is nominated in the “Programming for Racial/Ethnic Minority Special/Series” category.
The ACE awards were officially established by the National Cable Television Association in 1979. In March of this year, a National
Academy of Cable Programming was created, funded largely by the NCTA, to hand out the awards.
A day after the NACB’s formation, the Academy of Television Arts and Science’s board of directors voted for the first time to consider cable programming for its yearly Emmy awards. (Such a decision cannot be put into effect until 1987, when the ATAS’ telecast contract with the three major networks expires. Some industry officials feel the networks would not renew an Emmy contract if awards are given to competing cable programs.)
ONE LINERS: Edward James Olmos directed the Bushido episode of Miami Vice that aired on NBC Nov. 22; the actor will be guest of honor at a Dec. 3 Washington, D.C., gala for the Multicultural Career Intern Program... Luis Valdez’s Teatro Campesino archives have been donated to the University of California at Santa Barbara while at a Dec. 5 ceremony at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., a collection of historical film footage of Pancho Villa will be turned over by the American Film Institute to Mexico’s Cineteca Nacionaland Filmoteca de la UNAM archives. . . Ruben Blades and Cheo Feliciano entertain at a Dec. 6 New York benefit for the Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy... and Misa Flamenca is performed at New York’s St. Peter's Church Dec. 8...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
DIRECTORY READY: A new directory of U.S. Hispanic media - English, Spanish and bilingual - comes off the presses this week.
Published by Caminos Corporation, the 1985-86 National Hispanic Media Directory lists 1,113 publications and radio and television stations geared to Latino readers, listeners and viewers.
The 465 print media include 167 newspapers, 124 magazines, 130 newsletters and 44 journals. The 648 electronic media listed are predominantly radio.
Print listings include - in addition to street and mailing addresses and phone numbers-such information as publisher, editor, advertising director, format, language, target area, frequency of publication, founding date, and circulation.
Electronic listings add general manager, news director, advertising director and hours
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas,
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast m any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition ] of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at j your next conference or convention For details, contact Hector Encksen*Mendoza (202) 234-0737
of Spanish-language programing.
The 317-page directory doesn’t claim to include every outlet, says editor Pauline Marquez. Not every publication responded to Caminos’ request for complete information. But Marquez and staff did make special followup efforts this summer, particularly with newspapers and magazines, to insure its completeness.
The guide is priced at $95, including postage and handling. For information or to order, contact Marquez at Caminos, P.O. Box 54307, Los Angeles, Calif. 90054. Telephone: (202) 222-1349.
CHRISTMAS COMING: The California Association of Latinos in Broadcasting kicks off the Christmas season with a yule party at KNBC Studios in Burbank Dec. 6. All Hispanics in the media are invited.
At the function, CALIB will honor four electronic media professionals: Teddy Fregoso, Spanish-language broadcasting pioneer and present owner of EXPRS in Los Angeles; Fernando Oaxaca, chairman of the board of
Coronado Communications; Carla Aragon, KNBC general assignment reporter; and Diana Martinez, editor at KFWB news radio.
Receiving a posthumous award will be Margo Albert, for her work with community groups.
SPANISH CLIMBING: The Spanish-language SIN affiliate in Miami, WLTV, reached a milestone Nov. 5 when its novela, Topacio, in the 7-8 p.m. time slot, convincingly outpulled affiliates of the three major networks.
Arbitron gave it a 14.9 rating/23 share, equal to 181,800 households. The ratings:
Station Rating Share
WLTV (SIN) 14.9 23
WTVJ (CBS) 11.85 18.5
WSVN (NBC) 11.25 17
WPLG (ABC) 5.25 8
GERALDO GOING: Geraldo Rivera said good-bye to 20/20 fans Nov. 21-16 years after he was, in his words, “discovered as a long-haired storefront lawyer.” Describing himself as “sort of a square peg in a round hole,” he promised to return to television.
- Charlie Ericksen
CHRISTMAS CARDS: Chile Christmas tree and La Raza cross. See Good News.
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

HR/CR Making The News This Week the information since 1977 . An attorney for HU.f,l;:.sfrid1he plans to revert to "project-level data collection irMI:ti:JSidtted . .. Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt says Nov. 21 that he will ask the state legislature to fund a special program to combat the state's 27% dropout rate among Hispanic students. . . Joe Duardo, a laser specialist at Xerox Corporation in Pasadena, Calif., is elected president of the California School Boards Association ... Joe Coto, Oakland, Calif.'s first Hispanic City Council member, elected in 1973, is named interim superintendent of the Oakland Unified School District. .. Diego Ascensio, U.S. ambassador to Brazil, is appointed executive director of the Una Chapman Cox Foundation, a non-profit organization that works to improve the effectiveness of the career foreign service ... Pablo Sedillo, who suffered a mild heart attack Oct. 3 in Kenmore, Wash . , is back in the nation's capital with doctor's permission to return to work full time as director of the Hispanic Secretariat of the National Catholic Conference Jan. 1 ... No obstacles are expected to block the election of San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros as president of the National League of Cities at its annual Congress of Cities and Exposition Dec. 7-11 in Seattle. Cisneros, current second vice president, succeeds Cleveland Mayor George Voinovich. First Vice President Carol Bellamy, New York City Council president and customary successor to the presidency, is ineligible , having lost her bid to become New York City mayor. Cisneros is the second Hispanic to hold the post. Former mayor of San Juan, P .R., Carlos Romero-Barcelo was the first . . . U.S. Rep. Henry B. Gonzalez (DTexas) chairman of the housing subcommittee, tells that body Nov. 21 that the Department of Housing and Urban Development's failure to collect information on the race of tenants in public housing projects "reflects an absence of concern" about discrimination in public housing. The department has not collected Parents Petition for English-Only Classes Claiming that their children are receiving a second-rate education in bilingual education classrooms, residents in Glendale, Calif., are circulating a petition calling for the school district to establish English-only classes. The Glendale Unified School District has approximately 20,000 students, 25% of whom are Hispanic. Asian and Armenian students combine with Latinos to make enrollment 45% non-native English speakers in kindergarten through 12th grade, said Alice Petrossian, coordinator of intercultural education there. California law mandates that bilingual instruction be provided when there are at least 10 students in a grade level who are English deficient and that these students be placed in classrooms with English-speaking peers. Petrossian said parents' fears are " unfounded" because most bilingual instruction occurs in groups separate from the rest of the class. The petition has generated 200 signatures and will be presented to the school board in January. $70,000 Awaits Heroes Rewards totaling $70,000 await several Mexican Americans, most of them residents of Hubbard Street in Los Angeles, who participated in the capture of Richard Ramirez , the city's suspected Night Stalker. The money won't be distributed until after Ramirez's trial next year. Accused of 14 murders and 54 other felonies in Los Angeles, he faces preliminary hearing Feb . 24. There are about a dozen claimants for the reward money, contributed by private parties as well as the city, county and state. Some families have already received gifts for their roles. The families of Jose Burgoin and Faistino Piii6n, however, reported that in the past few weeks they have been receiving late-night telephone threats for their roles in the capture of the 25-year-old suspect. U .S. Secretary of Education William Bennett announced proposed regulations for bilingual education programs Nov. 21 as part of the federal role change he promised in September. The proposed regulations interpret and implement the Bilingual Education Act as amended in 1984. When adopted in final form , they will apply to applications and awards for fiscal year 1986. On the same day, Education Undersecretary Gary Bauer said the department's regional civil rights directors will notify school districts that have transitional bilingual programs under binding agreements with the government that the department is willing to reconsider those agreements. The "Lau remedies," as they became known, Mass. Housing Suit Settled The Massachusetts' Holyoke Housing Authority agreed through a consent decree Nov. 11 to discontinue its practice of bypassing Hispanics as tenants of public housing pro jects, following a suit by the U .S. Department of Justice. The consent decree, formulated in the Springfield District Court, states that the Authority violated the Fair Housing Act of 1968 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by intentionally discriminating against people based on their race, color and national origin. It ordered the Authority to stop using racial quotas favoring whites. Hispanics were by passed on the projects' waiting list since 1977, it said. According to an investigation that prompted the su i t , of 550 families on the waiting list , 450 were His panic; while whites were able to get immediate placement in the projects, some Hispanics had to wait, sometimes, eight and-a-half months longer. The court gave the Authority 120 days to hire a reviewer to locate the discriminated families and offer them placement in the projects. Every six months for the next three years , the Authority will have to submit reports on the racial composition of applicants and admitted tenants. refer to a 1974 Supreme Court decision which states that school districts with more than 25 minority students must provide a special language program in all academic areas. Memorandums to regional civil rights directors (more than 400 school districts negotiated Lau remedies) and signed by Assistant Education Secretary for Civil Rights Harry Singleton, state that school districts should be notified "that they may implement any program that takes affirmative steps to provide for the effective participation of language minority students in their educational programs." The objectives of the regulations c.re to: (a) Inform local educational agencies that the Act allows them to determine the extent of native language use in transitional bilingual education programs funded under section 721 (a) (1). (b) Expand parental involvement in deciding which educational program is best suited for their children. (c) Increase emphasis on building local capacity to operate programs for the limited English proficient without federal funds. William Wooten, executive officer with Education's Off1ce of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs (OBEMLA), said the new regulations are meant to "focus public attention on specific aspects" of the Bilingual Education Act. He noted that the proposed regulation calling for increased parental involvement in bilingual programs was stipulated in the Act as amended in 1984. Critics of the new regulations including continued on page 2 New Miami City Manager The Miami City Commission chose Cesar Odio, a Cuban refugee who came to the city in 1960, as its new city manager Nov. 26. Odio has served as assistant city manager since 1980, earning an annual salary of$84,000. His new position calls for a $92,000 salary, but newly elected Mayor Xavier Suarez has said he will seek to cut it to $75,000.

PAGE 2

Sin pelos en Ia lengua someone out." DIRTYTRICKS(LOSANGELES STYLE): As Dec. 10 election day draws near, opponents of Los Angeles City Council candidate Richard Alatorre are showing frustration at his ability to stack up endorsements and dollars. DIRTY TRICKS (MIAMI After Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre lost out in his Nov. 5 primary bid for a seventh term, he threw his weight behind lawyer and eventual winner Xavier Suarez. A few days before the runoff between Suarez and banker Raul Masvidal, voters in one heavily Puerto Rican neighborhood (which had been nearly unanimous in its support for compatriota Ferre) received an official-looking campaign letter addressed "Dear Cuban Brother'' urging a "total Cuban takeover'' of City Hall. The powerful state assemblyman (who wants badly to win without a runoff) recently gained the public support of Mayor Tom Bradley (who wants to take on Gov. George Deukmejian again next year) and veteran Congressman Ed Roybal (who says he won' t retire-to open his congressional seat for Alatorre-at least until the year 2000). It was a phony, of course-with all sides denying links to it. (Four out of fiv e Puerto Ricans voted against Masvidal anyway. ) Generosity is Alatorre's middle name. To prove it, he recently paid $1 ,729 in membership dues for 126 people to the Mexican American Political Association chapter in his district, which overlaps the contested council district and Roybal's congressional district. DIRTY TRICKS (WASHINGTON STYLE): Hispanic and other bilingual educati on advocate s are doing a smear job on him and his boss, says Undersecretary of Education Gary Bauer. Foul , cried opponent Steve Rodriguez. Alatorre ' s largesse " violates the right of (MAPA) to make its own decisions." On the subject of non-English-speaking students at his recent White House bri efing and follow-up press conferenc e , Bauer must have repeated half a dozen tim e s , "This administration's concern is genuine." Alatorre was aghast at the thought. MAPA was a "statewide organization," he explained. "It has nothing to do with the city. " He was disturbe d b y "concerted efforts" t o misrepresent their position and found statements by unname d " W ashington-based lobbyists .. .-reprehensible." All right, Donald Segretti, come out, come out, wherever you are. MIAMI ELECTION POSTSCRIPT: AWL TV e xit poll there discovered a potential cubano "generation gap" in the Miami City Commission race b etween Rosario Kennedy and Demetrio Perez. Older, Cuba born voters went with Perez (the incumbent and loser) by a 57%-43% spread , while their stateside-born ch i ldren supported winner Kennedy by 69% -31%. Would the undersecretary care to nam e those reprehensible people, a Weekly Report correspondent asked straight-faced. Retorted Bauer: " I ' m not going to name them for fear of leaving Kay Barbaro Bilingual Ed. Changes cont i nued from page 1 NYC School Discrimination Charged representatives of Hispanic organizations, claim they will lead to funding preference for "quick programs" that emphasize language acquisition at the expense of teaching in other basic school subjects. The new regulations, published Nov. 22 in the Federal Register, allow for 60 days of public comment. Following that period, Education will rev iew all comments and possibly make changes to them, Wooten said. Final regulations are e xpected 40-45 days after review. An announcement on grant com petition for fiscal year 1 986 is e xpected in March. Carlos Morales An examination of New York City's public high school system has found gross dis crimination against minor i ty , handicapped and low income students applying for schools with special a cademic or career programs. Ironically, the discrimination stems, in part , f r om policies to promote racial integration in the s chools, it says . "Public Schools: Private Admi ssions," a report released Nov. 11 by the non-profit organization Advocates for Children, found that a city school board policy that requires sc h o ols with white majorities to admit more than 50% whites in their sp e cial programs h as a discriminator y effect on Hispanic, bla c k L. A. Council Sued on Redistricting The Los Angeles City Council's 1982 re districting plan deliberately fragments the city's growing Hisp a nic population to minimize its voting strength, the U . S . Department of Justice charged in a suit filed Nov. 26. Alleging violations of Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act , the suit seeks to invalidate the redistricting and require the city to draw new Chavez Senate Possibility Linda Chavez , director of the White House public liaison office, is being urged by Republican leaders to run in 1986 for the seat of retiring Sen. Charles (R Md. ) , a unnamed White House official is quoted as saying in a page 1 Washington Times article Nov. 27. The official said the 38year-o ld former U . S . Civi l Rights Commission staff director "was approached and she has listened." Chavez changed her politic al affiliation from Democratic to Republican after she was named to her current post. 2 district lines for the 15-member body. A Dec. 10 spe"cial election in Los Angeles' lone Hispanic-majority district to replace Councilman Arthur Snyder, who resigned Oct. 4 , is not affected. In that race, State Assembly man Richard Alatorre is a strong favorite over a large, predominantly Hispanic field. The Justice Department suit noted that the prese nt council includes 11 whites, three blacks and one As i an in spite of the fact that in 1980 there were 816,000 Hispanics living in the city. Between 1970 and 1980 the Hispan i c population grew from 18. 4 % to27. 5%. The council ' s '82 reapportionment splintered an e xpanding core concentration of Hispanics surrounding the downtown area into seven distric ts, the suit charged. The Justice Department began its investigation aft e r the California Advisory Committee to the U . S . Commissi on on Civil Rights issued a report condemning the council' s remapping effort which followed the 1980 census. Only one Latino, Edward Roybal (now a congressman) has been elected to a Los Angeles council seat in this century. and Asian students. Citywide , students applying to the schools are approximately 32% His panic, 39% black, 24% white and 5% Asian . Janet Price, project director of Advocates for Children, said that the poli cy, which was originally implemented for zoned or neighbor hood schools, is being extended to schools whi c h provide specialized academic , vocational or career instruction to students coming from a c ross the city. The policy to admit more than 50% white, she said, tends to prevent "white flight' ' and ultimately segregation, but does not account for recent demographic changes. The report indicated that the schools' admission standards are "vague, ambiguous and unpublished, " permitting "back door favoritism" and leaving little recourse to re jected students. Leaders Establish PAC Three of the nation's most prominent Republican Hispanic leaders-of Mexican, Puerto Rican and Cuban background -established a Political Action Committee (PAC) last week to fund Hispanic candidates for federal office in the 1986 election. The trio, Rep. Manuel Lujan (R.-N.M.) , former Puerto R ico Gov. Luis Ferre and California physician Dr. Tirso del Junco, filed a statement of organization with the Federal Election Commission Nov. 27. Del Junco chaired Hispanics for Reagan/Bush in '84. The PAC expects to conduct two special fund-raising events in Washington, D.C., prior to the '86 elections and to raise a minimum of $20,000 for use as direct campaign contributions. The money would be divided among a minimum of five can didates, in compliance with FEC regulations . H1span1c Lm k Weekl y Re p o rt

PAGE 3

THE GOOD NEWS Christmas cards with Hispanic motifs are available from the following Hispanic-owned and -operated companies: COLORAMA GREETING CARDS: Colorama, oot. 1948, offers Spanish cards in more than 3 ,000 motifs for holidays and everyday. Price : 65 cents to $1 0. For titles and price list write to Colorama, P.O. Box 7 4 7 , Hato Rey , Puerto Rico 00919 (809) 765-0760, or P .O. Box 1345, Glendale, Calif. 91209 (818) 241-8156. SPANISH SPEAKING UNITY COUNCIL: For the second year, the council is offering a card which depicts a candlelight procession down the streets of Oakland's Fruitvale District. In color, it is taken from a mural . Price : 60 cents each or 50 cents for orders of more than one dozen. Contact: Spanish Speaking Unity Council, 1900 Fruitvale Ave., Suite 2A, Oakland, Calif. 94061 (415) 534-7764. PAVA PRINTS: Pava Prints, est. 1953, offers30 cards with Puerto Rican motifs, in color. Price : 45 cents to $1. Brochure, including color illustrations of cards, sells for$20. Order from Pava Prints, 60 Cruz St., San Juan, Puerto Rico , 00901 (809) 723-3763, or from Henry Garcia, 13095th Ave. , Apt. 27D, New York, N .Y. 1 0029 (212) 831-7953. PARA LA FAMILIA: Second year in the card business. It offers two sets of 1 0 assorted Mexican motifs, in color. Price : Set of 1 0 is $3.75. Also offered is an 8 1 /2-inch numbered plate with Christmas theme by artist Ignacio Gomez for $39.50. Contact: Para Ia Familia, P.O. Box 875109, Los Angeles, Calif. 90084 (213) 222-1349. GALER/A DE LA RAZA: Galeria , est. 1971, offers sets of 12 cards with Chicano and Latino themes, on colored paper. Price : $1.50 for 12, plus 50 cents postage. Contact: Galeria de Ia Raza, 2851 -24th St., San Francisco, Calif . 9411 0 (41 5) 826-8009. DISEROS: Disenos, est. 1972, by writer/artist Jose Antonio Burciaga , has created 14 Mexican and Chicano theme cards, in black and white. Price : 40 cents each or 14 for $5. Also available is popular"Three Wisemen" 11-inch by 17-inch print for $5. There is a 10% discount for orders of $20 or more. Contact: Jose Antonio Burciaga, Disenos, P.O. Box3729, Stanford, Calif. 94305-0049 (415) 328-9407. HIGH SCHOOL ADMISSION IN NYC: A 172-page report by Advocates for Children of New York Inc. charges that the city's public high school system discriminates against minority students in its admission procedures. For a copy, contact: Advocates for Children, 24-16 Bridge Plaza South, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101 (718) 729-8866. Price: $5 per copy or $4.50 for 1 0 copies or more. CORPORATE CLASS -IFI E os PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p . m . (En Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Hispa n ics Designers Fa shio n Show & Washington, D.C. Efficient. bilingual, extremely well organized, m ature individual who ca n work under pressure needed January 1 . to assist E xec uti ve Producer in coord i n ating two major shows in 1986. Must have t op notch t yping and telephone s kills. Some experience in event m anagement is helpful. Salary$16,000 to$18 ,00 0 depending on experience. Call Penny Harrison (202) 822 for appointment. MANAGING EDITOR Sant a Barba r a vertical market HISPANIC BUSINESS magazine seeks mature managing editor with extensive business writing/editing experi ence (knowledge o f finance/ m arke ting/ word processing); bilingua l preferred, not essential. Position avai labl e immediately. Sa l ary negotiabl e . Send letter/ resume: H is panic Business Magazine. P .O. Box 6 757. Sa nt a Barbara. Cal if . 9 3160. MINORITY PROJECTS COORDINATOR The American Newspaper Publisher s Association F oundation seeks a good o rganizer, admini stra tor. wri ter, speaker a nd publ ic r elatio n s person to run minority p rogr ams, includ i ng job fairs, newsletters, adv isory services t o newspapers and out reach programs w ith other newspaper organizations. Se nd resume toANPA Foundation, Box 17407, Dulles Airport , Washington. D.C . 20041. AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE sought by Hispanic advertising agency in Chicago. Experience r equired; candidate must be fluent Spanis h / Eng li s h . Call collect (312) 271?0. HOST/EDITOR Latin American News Service Full-time Host/Editor for daily radio news service out o f station KXCRFM in El Paso. Texas. wanted. Position requires fluency in candidate's ability to write Spanish, a working knowledge of English and at least two years working full-time in the area of news/public a ff ai rs. Applications are due Dec. 6. Send resume and tape to: Isabel Alegria, KXCR FM , 2023 Myrtle St .. El P aso. Texas 79901. ENGLISH DEPARTMENT St. Cloud State University St. Cloud, Minnesota Assistant professor. tenur&track, September 1986. Sa lar y 1984: $19.048-$27,716. Major re sponsibi liti es: composition, min o rity literature . Other: third-world literature . English ed ucation, minority advising. Doctorate in English or Englis h education: ABD required. L etter, v it a to Judy Parham , Search Committee, Engli sh D epartment St Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minn. 56301 . Postmark deadline: Jan. 3 , 1986. AN EO/AA EMPLOY ER. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR sought by the South Carolina Education Association . A letter constitutes a formal application and should be accompanied by a resume and three letters of recommendation. All applications should be addressed t o : Mrs. Betty J . Cunningham, Chai rpers on. Searc h Committee, South Carolina Education Associati o n , P . O . Box 212081, Columbia , South Carolina 29221. PROMOTION ASSISTANT sought by National Public Radio . P erso n provides research, writing a nd administrative support to public information specialists. Salary i s $17,500 (negotiable). Interested persons s h ould submit resume to NPR , Personnel, 2025 M St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20036. THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY of Washington, D.C . , has prerecorded job listings, updated Mondays, for positions at the university. Call (202) 635LAND. Calendar HISPANIC WORKING WOMEN Chi cago Dec. 5 ASEGURANDO NUESTRO FUTURO St. Paul , Minn. Dec. 7 THIS WEEK MALDEF DINNER Los Angeles Dec. 2 Luis Nogales, United Press International c hairman , will be a n honoree at the 11th annual award banquet sponsored by the Mexican American Legal Defense anq Educational Fund . Charlotte Conway (213) 653-2996 SCHOLARSHIP FUND-RAISER Washington, D . C . Dec. 3 Edward James Olmos, 1985 Emr:ny award winner, will be the guest of honor at a reception sponsored by th e Multicultural Career Intern Program to establish a scholarship fund. F ernando Otero (202) 234-1374 Hispanic Link Weekly Report The Latino Institute is presenting a confere nce aimed at Latina social workers with Gracie I a Olivarez, former h ea d of the Federal Community Service Administration, as a keynote speaker. Millie Rivera (312) 663-3603 BABBITT TESTIMONIAL Phoenix, Ariz. Dec. 6 The National Hispanic Senior Citizens Foundation will honor Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt with New Mexico Gov. Toney Anay a as keynote speaker. Ray Gano (602) 2534877 HOLIDAY BENEFIT DANCE Manhattan, N.Y . Dec . 6 The Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy put on their 2nd annual musical fund-raiser featuring singers Cheo Felician o and Ruben Blade s . Gerson Borrero (21 2) 689-6331 Minnesota's Spanish-Speaking Affairs Council will conduct a conference examining education , electoral participation, economic development and social serv ices in the Hispanic community. Rub y Lee (612) 296-9587 NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES Seattle Dec. 7-11 Hispanic Ele cted Local Officials, a subgroup of the NLC, conducts a one-day seminar to sharpen lobbying skills o f Hispanic officials. Ruth Faith Santana (202) 626-3115 LATINO FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL Hoboken, N . J . Dec. 8 The Renegade Theater Company along with El Museo Del Barrio is conducting a festival featuring films and videos by Hispanics from throughout the nation. Eileen L y n c h (201) 798-6860 3

PAGE 4

Arts & Entertainment Academy of Cable Programming was created, funded largely by the NCTA, to hand out the awards. THREE HISPANIC ACTORS ARE UP for network Awards for Cable Excellence this week as recognition for cable programming continues to be a topic of debate among cable and broadcast TV executives. Three Latinos are nominated in separate acting awards for the ACE awards, to be handed out in Los Angeles Dec. 3 (and cablecast by the Turner Broadcasting System De c . 6 at 9 p.m . ES1) . . Jose Perez is nominated in the " A ctor in a Comedy Series" category for his starring rol e in th e Showtime series Steambath. Martin Sheen picked up his nomination as "Actor in a Movie or MiniSeries" for h is performance on The Guardian, presented by Home Box Office. Finally, Trinidad Silva is nominated as "Actor in a Dramatic Series" for HBO's Maximum Security. A day after the NACB's formation, the Academy of Television Arts and Science's board of directors voted for the first time to consider cable programming for its yearly Emmy awards. (Such a decision cannot be put into effect until1987, when the ATAS' telecast contract with the three major networks expires. Some industry officials feel the networks would not renew an Emmy contract if awards are given to competing cable programs. ) Two Spanishlanguage programs-both ca rried by Galavision, are a l so ACE-nominated. El Tesoro del Saber, produced by Mexico's Televisa, is nominated in the "Children's Programming Series," and Santa Teresa, a productio n of Radio-Television Espanola, is nominated in the "Programming for Racial/Ethnic Minority Special/Series" category. ONE LINERS : Edward James Olmos directed the Bushido episode of Miami Vice that aired on NBC Nov. 22; the actor will be guest of honor at a Dec . 3 Washington, D . C., gala for the Multicultural Career Intern Program ... Luis Valdez ' s Teatro Campesino archives have been donated to the University of California at Santa Barbara while at a De c . 5 ceremony at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D . C., a collection of historical film footage of Pancho Villa will be turned over by the American Film Institute to Mexico's Cineteca Nacional and Fi/moteca de Ia UNAM archives. . . Ruben Blades and Cheo Feliciano entertain at a Dec . 6 New York benefit for the Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy ... and Misa Flamenca is performed at New York' s St. Peter's Church Dec. 8 ... The ACE awards were offici a ll y established by the National Cable Television Association in 1979. In March of this year, 1:1 National Media Report DIRECTORY READY: A new directory of U.S. Hispanic mediaEnglish, Spanish and bilingualcomes off the presses this week. Published by Caminos Corporation, the 1985-86 National Hispanic Media Directory lists 1 ,113 publications and radio and television stations geared to Latino readers, listeners and viewers. The 465 print media include 167 news papers, 1 24 magazines, 130 newsletters and 44 journa ls . The 648 electronic media listed are predominantly radio . Print listings include-in addition to street and mailing addresses and phone numberssuch information as publisher, editor, adver tising director, format , language, target area, frequency of publication, founding date, and c irculation. Electronic listings add general manager, news director, advertising director and hours HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nat•ona1 publicatiOn of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 • N' Street N. W. Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234 Publtsher. Hector Er1cksen Mendoza Editor: Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Feli x Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No por1 10n o l H 1span,c Lmk Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast 1n any form w tfhour advance oerm15510n Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. of Spanish-language programing. The 317-page directory doesn't claim to include every outlet, says editor Pauline Marquez. Not every publication responded to Cam i nos' request for complete information. But Marquez and staff did make special follow up efforts this summer, particularly with news papers and magazines, to insure its com pleteness. The guide is priced at $95, including postage and handling. For information or to order, contact Marquez at Caminos, P . O . Box 54307, Los Angeles, Calif . 90054. Telephone: (202) 222. CHRISTMAS COMING: The California Association of Latinos in Broadcasting kicks off the Christmas season with a yule party at KNBC Studios in Burbank Dec. 6. All Hispanics in the media are invited. At the function, CALl 8 will honor four elec tronic media professionals: Teddy Fregoso, Spanish-language broadcasting pioneer and present owner of EXPRS in Los Angeles; Fernando Oaxaca, chairman of the board of ;A "' "' "' 0: .!!? "' "0 "' ;;; <.:J