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Hispanic link weekly report, December 9, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, December 9, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
At a November board of directors meeting, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce endorses Rep. Bill Richardson’s (D-N.M.) free-trade zone bill, H.R. 3199, which would establish a free-trade and coproduction zone along U.S.-Mexico border areas... Victor Palmieri, a New Yorker specializing in the rescue of distressed companies, takes over as chairman of the Overseas Development Council, succeeding Robert S. McNamara. . . California state Sen. Art Torres, chairman of the Senate Toxics and Public Safety Management Committee, calls for an investigation of the state Department of Health Services. He questions department connections with a private foundation awarded - without bid - a $3 million contract to study contaminants in drinking water... Manhattan Borough Presidentelect David Dinkins names state Sen. Olga Me'ndez (D-Bronx) to
head his screening committee that will select a Manhattan member for the Board of Education. Dinkins says he wants to appoint a Hispanic politician as his deputy... Augustin Rodriguez, a high school student from Trinity Episcopal in Richmond, Va, is elected as secretary general for the Organization of American States’ Nov. 24-26 Model General Assembly in which high school students assume the representation of OAS member countries... Janean Acevedo, a 3.9 grade point average University of California, Berkeley, undergraduate, and Emma P6rez, a doctoral candidate in Chicana history at the University of California, Los Angeles, receive the first Raquel Mdrquez Frankel Scholarship Awards presented by the Mexican American Women’s National Association at its conference in Topeka, Kansas. The scholarship was established in 1984 as a memorial to Frankel, a founder of MANA and Mujeres en Accion, Washington, D.C. -based Hispanic women’s organizations...
^2«®HISPANI^UN^WEEK^^EPO^M^^
Bob Martinez Enters Florida Governor Race
Tampa Mayor Bob Martinez kicked off his campaign for the Florida governorship Nov. 26 at press conference in the state capital, Tallahassee, announcing that state Rep. Bobby Brantley will be his running mate.
Martinez, 50, has served as Tampa mayor - an office he says he will abandon next summer when he formally qualifies as a candidate - since 1979. His present four-year term ends April 1987.
A Tampa native, Martinez left the Democratic Party in 1983 to become a Republican. On Nov. 4, he became the first Republican gubernatorial hopeful in the state to report a million dollars in contributions for his campaign.
November polls by three Florida newspapers identified him as the most popular and well-known candidate for the position among Republican voters.
Brantley, 37, is from Longwood in Seminole County.
Miami Publisher Held
Alberto A. Rodriguez, publisher of Patria, Miami Spanish-language weekly which he founded in 1959, was arrested Nov. 29 for conspiracy to distribute cocaine.
U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration undercover agents said that they purchased three kilos of the drug from Rodriguez for $91,500.
The tabloid Patria, with a 10,000 circulation, is the only Latino weekly approved to receive city advertising contracts. Strongly anti-Castro, it was the second Miami newspaper established to reach the Cuban exile community.
The Miami Herald reported that Rodriguez was said to be having financial problems.
Hispanic ‘ Baby Boom’ Slackens
Hispanic females had a significantly higher fertility rate than non-Hispanic females in 1984, according to a report released Dec. 4 by the Bureau of the Census titled “Fertility of American Women: June 1984.”
In spite of leading non-Hispanic females in the number of total and first births, Hispanic women experienced the largest drop in their fertility rates since such statistics have been collected, which was 1976. Following are the Hispanic fertility rates per 1,000 women age 18 to 44 for years compiled:
’76 ’80 ’81 ’82 ’83 ’84
101.06 106.6 99.2 97.9 102.4 86.1
Records for 1977-79 were not collected because the bureau was recording such data on an experimental basis.
A spokeswoman for the bureau cited increased labor force participation ratefe leading to postponement of births and the gradual adoption
Alvarado Declines Post
Former New York City public schools Chancellor Anthony Alvarado reversed his decision last week to accept a position as special assistant to Albert Shanker, president of the American Federation of Teachers.
Union officials said Dec. 3 that Alvarado’s decision to decline the Nov. 9 appointment, which he had previously accepted, followed strong protests by New York City members of the national union.
Appointed schools chancellor in 1983, Alvarado resigned that post in May 1984 over allegations of ethical misconduct He is expected to continue in his present position as head of an adult education and literacy program run by several New York area unions.
of the lifestyle of their non-Hispanic counterparts as reasons for the dramatic dip in the Hispanic fertility rate.
Below are the rates per 1,000 women on total and first'births:
Total Total First
Women Births Births
Hispanic 3,327,000 86.1 29.2
Non-Hispanic 46,977,000 64.4 27.5
Some other findings from the survey:
• Approximately 9% of all births in the United States are of Hispanic origin.
• The higher the level of education, the lower the fertility rate. As of 1980, the National Center for Health Statistics reported that 49% of Hispanic women completed high school, compared to 81.9% for whites.
• Families with higher incomes generally had lower fertility rates. Nearly a quarter of Hispanics lived below the poverty level as of 1981, compared to 10% for non-Hispanic families.
• Of the|3.3 million who bore children in 1984,457,000 were single and 102,000 were widowed or divorced. In 1981, about half of all!Hispanic families in; poverty wereiheaded by women.
Martin O’Connell, fertility surveys chief ! at the Census Bureau, told Weekly Report that the report did not include statistics for females younger than 18 years of age because it did not want to delve into the privacy of minors.
Results from the report, spanning the 12 months ended in June 1984, were based on a survey of 60,500 women, 6.5% of whom were Hispanic.
- F&lix Perez
U.S. WOMEN 18-44 YEARS AND AVERAGE BIRTHS BY RACE
Women by Number of Births (Number in Thousands)
Children Born
Total Women None One Two Three
Hispanic 3,327 29.1% 18.1% 22.8% 16.3%
White 42,230 38.8 18.5 23.7 12.0
Black 6,442 30.0 22.9 21.6 13.0
Source: “Fertility of American Women: June 1i
Five & Seven & Total Births
Four Six More Number Per 1,000
6.9% 4.8% 2.0% 6,056 1,820
4.4 2.1 0.5 56,832 1,346
6.1 4.6 1.8 10,839 1,682
U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census


Sin pelos en la lengua
PRINT PECCADILLOS: Television can’t claim all of the bloopers and blunders. Can we laugh at ourselves?
TODAY’S TWOSOME: The New York Governor's Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs printed a handsome, 43-page book this fall with biographies and photos of the state’s Hispanics, past and present, serving in its legislative and judicial chambers.
Unfortunately, the caption on its glossy cover photo identified the state’sfirst Hispanic judge as Emilio Munez, instead of Nuhez. And the back cover promised: Nuestra herencia/Nuestra Juventud: Esperanza para ED FUTURO{Our heritage/Ouryouth: Hope for the future).
Attractive couple, Esperanza and Ed.
TOMORROW’S WINNER: As the Chicago Tribune learned a few decades back with its “Dewey Beats Truman’’ headline, it doesn’t pay to anticipate the news just to meet deadlines. Particularly election news.
The Nov. 7 edition, of the Orlando, Fla, Spanish-language weekly La
Prensa has become a collector’s item in Central Florida with its headline: Masvidal Nuevo Alcalde de Miami (Masvidal New Miami Mayor).
YESTERDAY’S HEADLINE: Then there was the Idaho daily paper a couple of years ago which headed the story on its Latino community’s celebration of the Dec. 12 festividad de la Virgen de Guadalupe with “MEXICAN VIRGIN HONORED.”
BAD TASTE: The trophy for the worst taste of the year in 1985 should go to the San Antonio Express-News for its headline (Bad Year for Cisneros) and story last January that led off:
“Mayor Henry Cisneros will be the target of an assassination attempt or suffer from a major illness in August,” a Dallas psychic predicted. “I see something happening to him - physical trouble,” Arthur Ingalls told the Express-News.”...
SO IS THIS: California’s Heavenly Dolls Inc., is pushing its vinyl “Baby Jesus” dolls this season, complete with wooden manger, glow-in-the-dark detachable halos, and a card saying, “My name is Jesus. Jesus loves you. I am your friend. Please love me.”
And the bad news is: the company is an equal opportunity vendor-“Baby Jesus” comes in “white, Hispanic and black models.”
- Kay Barbaro
LA. Council Race:
California Assemblyman Richard Alatorre faces a field of six contenders in a Dec. 10 special election to fill the Los Angeles City Council seat vacated by 18-year incumbent Arthur Snyder.
With support from Mayor Tom Bradley and area Congressman Edward Roybal, the 41 -year-old East Los Angeles native is given a chance of avoiding a February runoff by gaining more than 50% of the vote.
His competition includes several well-known leaders in the Los Angeles community. They include:
• Steve Rodriguez, 37, city planner. He once came within 4 votes of forcing Snyder into a runoff. Rodriguezs political career was launched when President Jimmy Carter stayed with his family while campaigning for re-election in 1979.
• Gilbert Avila 49, businessman. He recently resigned as a special assistant to Gov. George Deukmejian but has the governor’s endorsement He’s the lone Republican running in
LA. Becomes'Sanctuary
Los Angeles joined Chicago and New York in protest of federal immigration law enforcement with an 8-6 City Council vote Nov. 27 to make the city one of sanctuary for Central American refugees.
The action was attacked last week by Harold Ezell, Western regional commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, as “not the American way.” He said he would ask his agency and Congress to look into preparing legislative proposals that would cut back federal funds for cities declaring sanctuary.
The Los Angeles council action has no force of law.
INS director Alan Nelson avoided committing support to Ezell's ideas, saying only that the service would look into them. INS spokesman Verne Jervis added that such municipal actions to date have been generally “statements of sympathy which have had very little impact on our operations."
Alatorre vs. Field
the heavily Democratic, 75% Hispanic 14th District
• Antonio Rodriguez, 43, director of the Center for Law and Justice in Boyle Heights. Rodriguez is a longtime activist lawyer.
Also running are Ross Valencia, 58, former aide to Snyder whom Snyder bypassed to endorse Alatorre; John Silva, 53, Lincoln Heights barber; and Dorothy Andromidas, 36, housewife and member of Lyndon LaRouche’s National Democratic Policy Committee.
In his 14 years in Sacramento, Alatorre chaired several important Assembly committees and authored many key bills, including the 1975 Agricultural Labor Relations Act.' A seat on the 15-member City Council is expected to give him essential hometown visibility to launch future campaigns eitherfor Congress, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, or the mayor’s office.
No Hispanic has been elected to the council in this century, with the exception of Roybal, who left in 1962 to run for Congress after serving since 1949.
Miami Latino Set-Aside
The Miami City Commission voted Nov. 26 to lower the guaranteed share of city contracts set aside for Hispanics from 25% to 17%.
Under a new formula, however, Hispanic women would have the option of participating in the set-aside program as “women,” for whom 17% of the contracts would also be set aside. Another 17% would go to blacks.
If approved finally Dec 19, the new ordinance would replace a February 1984 law giving Hispanics and blacks each 25% of the set-aside action.
The old ordinance failed to produce desired results, critics complained. The city spent $42.7 million in 1984, with Hispanics receiving $7.6 million and blacks $13 million.
Last October, City Commissioner Joe Carollo asked for a delay on the new set-aside ordinance vote, saying that Hispanics should receive contracts commensurate with their 62% population. Later, he withdrew his objection.
English Drives Rejected
Two California cities turned back campaigns to make English their official language in separate actions Nov. 25.
The Alhambra City Council rejected, without taking a vote, a resolution proposed by a citizens group seeking to declare English the official language there.
In Monterey Park, City Clerk Pauline Lemire rejected a resubmitted English language petition on the advice of City Atty. Richard Morillo, who earlier had rejected the petition, finding it lacked the proper wording of an ordinance. Proponents of the measure, including 3,300 who signed it, hoped the measure would be put on the April city election ballot.
Alhambra City Atty. Leland Dolley said the measure proposed in that city would violate constitutional guarantees of free speech and federal civil rights lawa
Wis. Latino Wins Job Suit
A Hispanic man in Madison, Wia, was awarded damages of $192,081 by a U.S. District Court jury there that found he was wrongly denied a state agency job in 1984.
Juan Morales, 39, a recruiter of minority students at Madison Area Technical College, charged in a suit that the state Department of Labor, Industry and Human Relations denied him the position of migrant inspector three times because of his outspokenness on that agency’s enforcement of migrant labor laws.
The jury found that Morales was denied the job after exercising his constitutional right to free speech and that he scored first among 60 applicants on a written exam.
The awards of $110,000 in punitive damages and $82,081 in compensatory damages could be changed by Judge John Shabaz, who presided at the trial.
Presidents Set to Meet
Mexico’s President Miguel de la Madrid and President Reagan will meet Jan. 3 in Mexicali, Mexico.
A White House spokesperson said among topics expected to be discussed are immigration and border issues.
" Hispanic Link Weekly Report
2


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
N.A.H.J. EDUCATION SPECIALIST
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists, based in Washington, D.C., seeks someone to develop and implement educational activities for Hispanics nationally. Salary is $22,000 - $25,000. Candidate must have:
• 2 years of experience teaching (or working with) students.
• Educational background plus on-the-job experience in print or broadcast journalism.
• Fluency in Spanish and English, written and verbal.
• Willingness to travel.
• Good speaking ability and presentation of self.
• Knowledge of the East Coast educational systems, including journalism schools and (especially) the “Hispanic experience” in colleges and high schools in the East
• Good interpersonal skills.
Send resume ta Frank Newton, Ph. D., Executive Director, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Assistant professor, tenure-track, September 1986. Salary 1984-85: $19,048 - $27,716. Major responsibilities: composition, minority literature Other third-world literature, English education, minority advising. Doctorate in English or English education: ABD required. Letter, vita to Judy Parham, Search Committee, English Department, St Cloud State University, St Cloud, Minn. 56301. Postmark deadline: Jan. 3, 1986. AN EO/AA EMPLOYER.
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT & BOARD LIAISON $18,000-$23,000
Excellent secretarial skills required. Type 50 words per minute, word processing experience preferred, strong writing and editing skills, ability to prepare accurate minutes of meetings, strong administrative support skills, knowledge of Hispanic issues and organizations bilingual English/Spanish preferred. Send resume ta National Council of La Raza, Lupe Aguirre, 20 F St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001.
CHANCELLOR
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE
Applications and nominations are being sought for the position of Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. The Chancellor is the chief administrative officer of the University and is accountable to the Board of Regents, through the president of the University of Wisconsin Systems, for its management It is hoped that this position will be filled on or before September 2,1986.
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is a major doctoral University committed to excellence in teaching and research, and to fulfilling the special responsibilities of an institution of higher learning in a metropolitan setting. The University is a significant force in the Milwaukee community, and it is one of the two doctoral, research universities in the University of Wisconsin System.
The University offers a variety of graduate, professional, research and baccalaureate programs. There are 11 schools and colleges: Allied Health Professions, Architecture and Urban Planning, Business Administration, Education, Engineering and Applied Science, Fine Arts, Letters and Science, Library and Information Science, Nursing, Social Welfare and the Graduate School. There is a faculty of 895 members and an administrative staff of 565. There are currently 62 graduate programs, 45 Master's and 17 doctoral. The University also plays a major role in meeting the needs of the metropolitan area through its division of Outreach and Continuing Education. Current enrollment is over 26,000 full-time and part-time students, and the annual budget is in excess of $150 million.
All nominations, applications and inquires will be treated in the strictest confidence. The closing date for applications and nominations is February 1. Letters of nomination or applications with resumes should be sent to:
Professor David S.Y. Tong, Chairman, Search and Screen Committee for Chancellor, Department of Physics, Room 412, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201.
The University of Wisconsin System is an Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer.
We encourage applications from minorities and women.
THE GOOD NEWS
CHRISTMAS CARDS: Handmade silk screen Christmas cards with Puerto Rican motifs are available from Taller Polilla. Price: $8 for a box of 10 assorted cards. Contact Antonio Pagan, Taller Polilla, 7 East Third St, #10, New York, N.Y. 10003 (212) 473-6995.
FERTILITY RATES: “Fertility of American Women: June 1984,” is a 37-page U.S. Census Bureau report listing the fertility rates of women, including Latinas, fora 12-month period ending June 1984. Order series P-20, No. 401 (price not available at press time), from: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
MAJOR CONFERENCES IN ‘86: Hispanic Link Weekly Report will soon print a schedule of key Hispanic conferences to be held in 1986. Organizations wanting to be included should immediately call or send date, location, theme, contact name and telephone number to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
KELLOGG FELLOWSHIPS: The W.K. Kellogg Foundation is offering $30,000 yearly awards and other stipends for self-directed interdisciplinary fellowships. Applicants for the three-year program should be full-time or part-time employees of a non-profit organizatioa Deadline: Dec. 31. Contact Kellogg National Fellowship Program, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, 400 North Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 49017-3398 (616) 968-1611.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
MALDEF AWARD DINNER San Jos6, Calif. Dec. 11
The 3rd annual dinner of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will honor individuals who have made contributions to the California Hispanic community.
Timoteo Vdsquez (408) 246-8612
MINORITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT New York Dec. 11
New York Gov. Mario Cuomo will keynote this conference for minority business owners to gather expertise from financial institutions, corporations and economic development agencies.
Michael Nairne (518) 474-6249
BILINGUAL EDUCATION HEARINGS The National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education is conducting a series of public Hispanic Link Weekly Report
hearings to discuss specific aspects of bilingual education.
El Paso, Texas Dec. 12 Irene Rosales (915) 747-5247 Houston Dec. 13 Esther Lee Yao (713) 488-9336
NATIONAL HISPANIC UNIVERSITY
San Francisco Dec. 15-18
Titled “Hispanic America: A National Report Card,”
the university’s 4th annual conference will examine
Hispanic progress in areas such as education,
economics, technology and health.
Elvia Mendoza (415) 451-0511
COMING SOON
CONGRESSMAN GONZALEZ TRIBUTE San Antonio Jan. 18
Rep. Henry Gonz&lez (D-Texas) will have a fete in his honor to commemorate 24 years of service in Congress. Gail Beagle (202) 225-3236
CUBAN NATIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL Miami Jan. 30,31
Titled “Ethnic Relations in the Cuban Community,”
the 3rd CNPC conference will examine issues such as media coverage of ethnic events, ethnicity and politics and relations with other ethnic groups. Guariong Diaz (305) 642-3484
NATIONAL RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS
Washington, D.C. Feb. 2-5
The 43rd annual NRB conference will include a seminar to inform Hispanic broadcasters on developments in marketing, regulations, technology and audience needs.
Barbara Sharp (201) 428-5400
SPOTLIGHT
The Center for Migration Studies of New York will hold its 9th annual conference titled “Immigration and Refugee Policy on March 20,21 in Washington, D.C. The topics to be explored are new legislation, legal representation and other developments affecting immigrants and refugees. For more information contact Maggie Sullivan, CMS 9th Annual National Legal Conference on Immigration and Refugee Policy, 209 Flagg Place, Staten Island, New York 10304 (718) 351-8800.
3


Arts& Entertainment
THE SHAPE AND SCOPE OF SPANISH-LANGUAGE television programming in the United States could be decided at a court hearing scheduled this week in Los Angeles.
At a hearing in August, U.S. District Court Judge Mariana Pfaelzer made a preliminary ruling that principals of the Spanish International Communications Corporation diverted corporate profits in their favor. Minority stockholders of SICC filed the diversion charges against the Spanish International Network, its president, Rend Anselmo, and its Mexican parent company, Televisa.
The August ruling follows an earlier recommendation by staff of the Federal Communications Commission to a federal judge that licenses to seven SIN affiliate stations not be renewed. Five of those stations are owned by SICC; all stations are owned by companies partly owned by Anselmo and Televisa.
The FCC recommendation is based on its conclusion that the SIN stations are under control of foreigners. Televisa owns 75% of SIN and Anselmo owns the remainder. SIN provides programming-and advertising - for the SICC stations and various other UHF and low power stations. Its programming is carried by cable operators in over 300 U.S. markets. SIN advertising revenues for the current year are estimated at $60 million- a dramatic increase from the 1972 figure of
$5 million.
The Los Angeles hearing is scheduled for Dec. 10 and judgment is still pending on the FCC recommendation. At press time, both parties had entered negotiations for an out-of-court settlement.
Meanwhile, Televisa continues to be a major world provider of television programming with novela exports now going to Spain, Italy and China. According to a report in the Nov. 18 issue of Electronic Media, Televisa’s export division,Protele, sold 290 hours of Mexican programming to China from January to September of this year. Protele has sold 124 programming hours to Spain - mostly dubbed Hanna-Barbera cartoons acquired by Televisa for distribution.
Two Spanish TV stations will begin airing Televisa novelas in January Los ricos tambien lloran will be carried by Televisidn Espahola, Madrid, and TO o nadie, dubbed in Galician by Televisidn Gallego.
ONE LINERS: Cuban novelist Guillermo Cabrera Infante will lecture Dec. 10 as part of a series presented with the Tesoros de Espaha exhibit at the New York Public Library.. . GalaVision carried Las mahanitas, a celebration of the miracle the Virgin of Guadalupe, live from Mexico City Dec. 11; that day and on the 12th the cable system presents the film La Virgen de Guadalupe... and Symbolic Reality, an exhibit by David Baze and John Valadez, continues at California State University, Dominguez Hills, through Dec. 12...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
LATINO COLUMNISTS: What Latino journalists are commenting on these days:
JESUS CHAVARRIA, Hispanic Business magazine (December), on the expenditures of major U.S. companies to reach the Hispanic market
“In 1985, /American companies spent an estimated $274 million to reach a population of approximately 3.1 million in Puerto Rico, and only $333.5 million to reach a stateside Hispanic population of 17 million...
“Only two years ago, the Miami market ranked third in terms of overall media expenditures, behind Los Angeles and New York. In 1983 the Miami market lagged behind New York by $5.5 million and behind Los Angeles, the perennial leader, by $8 million.
“This year, the Miami market has overtaken New York in media expenditures by a significant
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
^Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. Fordetails, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
$4.2 million and is apparently closing in on numero uno, Los Angeles.
“Although Los Angeles logged a hefty increase in both television and radio expenditures in 1985 over 1984, so did Miami. This year, a difference of only $3.5 million separates them.”
FRANK DELOLMO, Los Angeles Times, on the demands of the United Neighborhoods Organization (UNO) of East Los Angeles and the South-Central Organizing Committee (SCOC) that the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee distribute $6.6 million of its $90 million profit to groups with youth programs in the city’s blackand brown communities (The full LA Olympic board meets Dec. 9.)
“It would be a serious mistake to underestimate the staying power of UNO and SCOC ... They should, of course, Compromise. In their own unique ways the Olympic organizers and UNO and SCOC leaders have shown the rest of us that with hard work good organization and confidence Los Angeles can be a better city. That is important common ground to
share.”
R.A. ZALDIVAR, Miami Herald, on what the future holds for Maurice Ferr§ after he lost his bid for a seventh term as Miami’s mayor
“It was always thought that Ferre would run for Congress one day, that he would succeed Claude Pepper. But anybody who knows Claude Pepper must realize that the gentleman has no intention of leaving the House of Representatives anytime soon.
“And if Ferre were to run in Pepper’s district, he would be asking many of the same people who threw him out of City Hall to send him to Congress.
“Ferry’s political future might lie outside Miami as some sort of consultant to the national Democratic Party. If the Democrats were to regain the White House, Ferre might make a good candidate for an ambassador's post.
“But wherever he is sent, he would have to be watched closely. He might start a revolutioa” i - Charlie Ericksen



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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week DEC 9 1985 head his screening comm it t e e that will se lect a Manhattan member for the Board of Education . Dinkins says he wants to appoint a Hispanic politician as his deputy . . . Augustin Rodriguez, a high school student from Trinity Episcopal in Richmond , Va, is elected as secretary general for the Organization of American States' Nov. 24 26 Model General Assembly in which high school students assume the representation of OAS member countries .. . Janean Acevedo, a 3 . 9 grade point average University of California, Berkeley, under graduate, and Emma Perez, a doctoral candidate in Chicana history at the University of California, Los Angeles, receive the first Raquel Marquez Frankel Scholarship Awards presented by the Mexican American Women's National Association at its conference in Topeka, Kansas . The scholarship was established in 1984 as a memorial to Frankel, a founder of MANA and Mujeres en Acci6n, Washington, D . C . based Hispanic women's organizations ... At a November board of directors meeting, the U . S . Chamber of Commerce endorses Rep. Bill Richardson's (DN .M.) free-trade zone bill , H .R. 3199, which would establish a free-t r ade and co production zone along U .S. -Mexico border areas . .. Victor Palmieri, a New Yorker specializing in the rescue of . distressed companies, takes over as chairman of the Overseas Development Council, succeeding Robert S. McNamara . . . California state Sen . Art Torres, chairman of the Senate Toxics and Public Safety Management Committee, calls for an investigation of the state Department of Health Services. He questions department connections with a private foundation awarded-without bid -a $3 million contract to study contaminants in drinking water . . . Manhattan Borough President elect David Dinkins names state Sen. Olga Mendez (DBronx) to Vol. 3 No. 49 PANIC LIN Dec.9,1985 Bob Martinez Enters Florida Governor Race Hispanic' Baby Boom' Slackens Tampa Mayor Bob Martinez kicked off his campaign fort he Florida governorship Nov . 26 at press conference in the state capital, Tallahassee , announcing that state Rep . ' Bobby Brantley will be his running mate . Martinez, 50, has served as Tampa mayor an office he says he will abandon next summer when he formally qualifies as a candidate-s i nce 1979. His present four year term ends April1987. A Tampa native, Martinez left the Demo cratic Party in 1983 to become a Republican. On Nov . 4 , he became the first Republican gubernatorial hopeful in the state to report a million dolla r s in contributions for his campaign . November polls by three Flor i da news papers identified him as the most popular and well-known cand i date for the position among Republican voters . Brantley, 37, is from Longwood in Seminole County . Miami Publisher Held Alberto A Rodriguez, publisher of Patria, Miami Spanish-language weekly which he founded in 1959, was arrested Nov . 29 for conspiracy to distribute cocaine. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration under cover agents said that they purchased three kilos of the drug from Rodriguez for $91 , 500. The tabloid Patria, with a 1 0,000 circulation, i s the only Latino weekly approved to receive city advertising contracts. Strongly anti-Castro, it was the second Miami newspaper established to reach the Cuban exile community. The Miami Herald reported that Rodriguez was said to be having financial problems. H i spanic females had a significantly higher fertility rate than non-H i spanic females in 1984, according to a report released Dec. 4 by the Bureau of the Census titled " Fertility of American Women : June 1984." In spite of leading non-Hispanic females in the number of total and first births , Hispanic women experienced the largest drop in their fertility rates since such statistics have been collected, which was 1976. Following are the Hispanic fertility rates per 1,000 women age 18 _ to 44 for years compiled : '76 '80 '81 '82 '83 '84 101 .06 106.6 99. 2 97 . 9 102.4 86. 1 Records for 1977 • 79 were not collected because the bureau was recording such data on an experimental basis. A spokeswoman for the bureau cited increased labor force participation rates leading to post ponement of births and the gradual adoption of the lifestyle of their nonHispanic counter parts as reasons for the dramatic dip in the Hispanic fertility rate . Below are the rates per 1 ,000 women on total and firsfbirths: Total Total Women Births Hispanic 3 ,327,000 86. 1 Non-Hispanic 46,977,000 64 . 4 First Births 29. 2 27 . 5 Some other findings from the survey: e Approximately 9% of all births in the United States are of Hispanic origin . e The higher the level of education , the lower the fertility rate . As of 1980 , the National Center for Health Statistics reported tha t 49% of Hispanic women completed high school , compared to 81. 9% for whites . e Families with higher incomes generally had lower fertility rates . Nearly a quarter of Hispanics lived below the poverty level as of Alvarado Declines Post to 10% for non-Hispanic Former New Yo r k City public schools • Of 3 . 3 million ' who bore ' children in Chancellor Anthony Alvarado reversed his 1984,457,000 were single and 102 ,000 were decision last wee!< to accept a position as widowed or divorced . In 1981, about ha l f of special assistant to Albert Shanker , president aii!Hispanic families in : poverty were , headed of the American Federat i on of Teachers. by women . Union off i cials said Dec . 3 that Alvarado's' Martin O'Connell fertility surveys chief is ion to dec the Nov. 9 appointment, 1 at the Census told Weekly Report wh1ch he had prev1ously accepted , followed that the report did not include statistics for strong . by New York City members of females younger than 18 years of age because the nat1onal un1on. it did not want to delve into the privacy of Appointed schools chancellor in 1983, minors. Alvarado resigned that post in May 1984 over Results from the report , spanning the 12 allegations of ethical misconduct. He is ex monthsendedinJune1984,werebasedona pected to continue in h i s present position as survey of 60,500 women, 6 . 5% of whom were head of an adult education and literacy program Hispanic. run by several New York area unions. Felix Perez U.S. WOMEN 18 YEARS AND AVERAGE BIRTHS BY RACE Women by Number of Births (Number in Thousands) Children Born Total Five& Seven& Total Births Women None One Two Three Four S i x More Number Per 1 ,000 Hispanic 3,327 29.1% 18.1% 22.8% 16.3% 6.9% 4.8% 2.0% 6,056 1,820 White 42,230 38.8 18.5 23.7 12. 0 4.4 2.1 0.5 56,832. 1,346 Black 6,442 30.0 22.9 21.6 13.0 6.1 4.6 1.8 10,839 1,682 Source : "Fertility of American Women: June 1984, " U . S . Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua Prensa has become a collector's item in Central Florida with its headline : Masvidal Nuevo Alcalde de Miami (Masvldal New Miami Mayor) . PRINT PECCADILLOS: Television can't claim all of the bloopers and blunders. Can we laugh at ourselves? YESTERDAY'S HEADLINE: Then there was the Idaho daily paper a couple of years ago which headed the story on its Latino community's celebration of the Dec . 12 festividad de Ia Virgen de Guadalupe with "MEXICAN VIRGIN HONORED." TO DAY'S TWOSOME: The New York Governor's Advisory Committee for Hispanic Affairs printed a handsome, 43-page book this fall with biographies and photos of the state's Hispanics, past and present , serving in its legislative and judicial chambers. Unfortunately, the caption on its glossy cover photo identified the state's first Hispanic judge as Emilio Munez, instead of Nuflez. And . the back cover promised: Nuestra herencla/Nuestra juventud: BAD TASTE: The trophy for the worst taste of the year in 1985 should go to the San Antonio Express-News for its headline (Bad Year for Cisneros) and story last January that led off: Esperanza para ED FUTURO ( 0 u r heiitage/ Our youth: Hope for the future). "Mayor Henry Cisneros will be the target of an assassination attempt or suffer from a major illness in August," a Dallas psychic predicted . " I see something happening to himphysical trouble," Arthur Ingalls told the Express-News." . . . SO IS THIS: California's Heavenly Dolls Inc . , is pushing its vinyl "Baby Jesus" dolls this season, complete with wooden manger, glow-in-the-dark detachable halos, and a card saying, "My name is Jesus. Jesus loves you. I am your friend. Please love me." Attractive couple, Esperanza and Ed. TOMORROWS WINNER: As the Chicago Tribune learned a few decades back with its "Dewey Beats Truman" headline, it doesn't pay to anticipate the news just to meet deadlines. Particularly election news. And the bad news is: the company is an equal opportunity vendor " Baby Jesus" comes in "white, Hispanic and black models." The Nov. 7 edition, of the Orlando, Fla., Spanish-language weekly La LA. Council Race: California Assemblyman Richard Alatorre faces a field of six contenders in a Dec. 1 0 special election to fill the Los Angeles City Council seat vacated by 18-year incumbent Arthur Snyder. With support from Mayor Tom Bradley and area Congressman Edward Roybal, the 41 year-old East Los Angeles native is given a chance of avoiding a February runoff by gaining more than 50% of the vote . His competition includes several well-known leaders in the Los Angeles community. They include: e Steve Rodriguez, 37, city planner . He once came within 4 votes of forcing Snyder into a runoff . Rodrigueis political career was launched when President Jimmy Carter stayed with his family while campaigning for reelection in 1979. • Gilbert Avila, 49 , businessman . He recently resigned as a special assistant to Gov . George Deukmejian but has the governor's endorse ment He's the lone Republican running in LA. Becomes 'Sanctuary' Los Angeles joined Chicago and New York in protest of federal immigration law enforcement with an 8 City Council vote Nov. 27 to make the city one of sanctuary for Central American refugees . The action was attacked last week by Harold Western regional commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, as "not the American way." He said he would ask his agency and Congress to look into preparing legislative proposals that would cut back federal funds for cities declaring sanctuary . The Los Angeles council action has no force of law. INS director Alan Nelson avoided committing support to Ezell's ideas , saying only that the service would look into them. INS spokesman Verne Jervis added that such municipal actions to date have been generally"state ments of sympathy which have had very little impact on our operations." 2 Alatorre vs. Field the heavily Democratic, 75% Hispanic 14th District. • Antonio Rodriguez, 43, director of the Center for Law and Justice in Boyle Heights. Rodriguez is a longtime activist lawyer . Also running are Ross Valencia, 58, former aide to Snyder whom Snyder bypassed to endorse Alatorre; John Silva, 53, Lincoln Heights barber, and Dorothy Andromidas, 36, house wife and member of Lyndon LaRouche ' s National Democratic Policy Committee . In his 14 years in Sac r amento, Alatorre chaired several important Assembly committees and authored many key bills, including the 1975 Agricultural Labor Relations ACt: A seat on the 15-member City Council is expected to give him essential hometown visibility to launch future campaigns either for Congress , the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, or the mayor's office . No Hispanic has been elected to the council in this century, with the exception of Roybal , who left in 1962 to run for Congress after serving since 1949. Miami Latino Set-Aside The Miami City Commission voted Nov . 26 to lower the guaranteed share of city contracts set as i de for Hispanics from 25% to 17% . Under a new formula, however, Hispanic women would have the option of participating in the set-aside program as " women," for whom 17% of the contracts would also be set aside . Another 17% would go to blacks . r If approved finally Dec. 19 , the new ordinance would replace a February 1984 law giving Hispanics and blacks each 25% of the set aside action. The old ordinance failed to produce desired results, critics complained . The city spent $42 . 7 million in 1984, with Hispanics receiving $7. 6 million and blacks $1. 3 million. Last October, City Commissioner Joe Carollo asked for a delay on the new set-aside ordinance vote, saying that Hispanics should receive contracts commensurate with their . 62% population. Later, he withdrew his objection. -Kay Barbaro English Drives Rejected Two California cities turned back campaigns to make English their official language in separate actions Nov . 25. The Alhambra City Council rejected, without taking a vote , a resolution proposed by a citizens group seeking to declare English the official language there. In Monterey Park, City Clerk Pauline Lemire rejected a resubmitted English language petition on the advice of City Atty . Richard Morillo, who earlier had rejected the petition , finding it lacked the proper wording of an ordinance . Proponents of the measure, including3,300 who signed it, hoped the measure would be put on the April city election ballot. Alhambra City Atty . Leland Dolley said the measure proposed in that city would violate constitutional guarantees of free speech and federal civil rights laws. Wis. Latino Wins Job Suit A Hispanic man in Madison, Wis., was awarded damages of$192,081 by a U .S. District Court jury there that found he was wrongly denied a state agency job in 1984. Juan Morales, 39, a recruiter of minority students at Madison Area Technical College, charged in a suit that the state Department of Labor, Industry and Human Relations den i ed him the position of migrant inspector three times because of his outspokenness on that agency's enforcement of migrant labor laws . The jury found that Morales was denied the job after exercising his constitutional right to free speech and that he scored first among 60 applicants on a written exam . The awards of $110,000 in punitive damages and $82,081 in compensatory damages could be changed by Judge John Shabaz , who presided at the trial . Presidents Set to Meet Mexico's President Miguel de Ia Madrid and President Reagan will meet Jan . 3 in Mexicali, Mexico . A White House spokesperson said among topics expected to be diacussed are immigration and border issues. • Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Le. t Hispanic Link help you in your search for-executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classifi8d ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D . C . 20005 . . Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p . m . (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the sam& week Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. N . A . H.J. EDUCATION SPECIALIST The National Association of Hispanic Journalists. based in Washington, D.C., seeks someone to develop and implement educational activities for Hispanics nationally . Salary is $22,000-$25,000. Candidate must have: • 2 years of experience teaching(orworking with) students • Educational background plus on-the-job experie nce in print or broadcast journalism . • Fluency in Spanish and English. written and verbal. • W i llingn ess to travel . • Good speaking ability and present11tion of self . • Know l e dge of the East Coast educational syste ms. including journalism schools and (especially) the " Hispanic experience" in colleges an d h igh schools in the East. e Good i n te rpersonal skills . Send r e sume to: Frank Newton, Ph. D., E xecutive Director, National Association of Hi spa nic Journalists. Nat i onal Press Building , Suite 634, Washington , D .C. 20045. ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Assistant professor , tenure-track, Septembl!r 1986. Salary1984: $19,048-$27,716. Major responsibilities: composition, minority literature. Other. thirt}world literature , Engl ish education, minority advising . Doctorate in English o r English education: ABO required . Letter , vita to Judy Parham. Search Committee , English Sl Cloud State University. St. Cloud , Minn. 56301 . Postmark deadiine : Jan . 3, 1986. AN EO / AA EMPLOYER. EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT & BOARD LIAISON $18,000 $23,000 E xcellent secretarial ski lls requ i red . Type 0 0 words per minute, word processing ex perience preferred, strong writing and edit i ng skills. ability to prepare accurate minutes of meetings, strong administrative support skills, knowledge of Hispanic i ssues and organizations, bilingual English/Spanish preferred. Send resume to: National Council of La Raza Lupe Aguirre , 20 F St. NW , 2nd Floor, Wash ington, D .C. 20001 . THE GOOD NEWS CHRISTMAS CARDS: Handmade silk screen Christmas cards with Puerto Rican motifs are available from Taller Polilla. Price: $8 for a box of 10 assorted cards. Contact Antonio Pagan, Taller Pol ilia, 7 East Third St. , #1 0, New York, N . Y . 10003 (212) 473. FERTILITY RATES: "Fertility of American Women: June 1984," is a 37-page U.S. Census Bureau report listing the fertility rates of women, including Latinas, for a 12-month period ending June 1984. Order series P-20, No. 401 (price not available at press time), from: Superintendent of Documents, U . S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C . 20402 (202) 783. CHANCELLOR UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSINMILWAUKEE Applications and nominations are being sought for the position of Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee . The Chancellor is the chief administrative officer of the University and is accountable to the Board of Regents, through the president of the University of Wisconsin Systems , for its management. It is hoped that this position will be filled on or before September 2, 1986. The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is a major doctoral University committed to excellence in teaching and research, and to fulfilling the special responsibilities of an institution of higher learning in a metropolitan setting. The University is a significant force in the Milwaukee community , and it is one of the two doctoral, research universities in the University of Wisconsin System. The University offers a variety of graduate, professional, research and baccalaureate programs. There are 11 schools and colleges: Allied Health Professions , Architecture and Urban Planning , Business Admin i stration , Education , Engineering and Applied Science, Fine Arts, Letters and Science , Library and Information Science , Nursing, Social Welfare and the Graduate School. There i s a faculty of 895 members and an administrative staff of 565. There are currently 62 graduate programs . 45 Master's and 17 doctoral. The University also plays a majo r role in meeting the needs of the metropolitan area through its division of Outreach and Continuing Education . Current enrollment is over 26,000 full-time and parttime students, and the annual budget is in excess of $150 million . All nominations , applications and inquires will be treated in the strictest confidence . The closing date for applications and nominations is February 1. Letters of nomination or applications with resumes should be sent to : Professor David S . Y . Tong , Chairman, Search and Screen Committee for Chancellor , Department of Physics, Room 412, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee , P . O . Box 413, Milwaukee , Wisconsin 53201 . The University of Wisconsin System is an Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer . We encourage applications from minorities and women. MAJOR CONFERENCES IN '86: Hispanic Link Weekly Report will soon print a schedule of key Hispanic conferences to be held in 1986. Organizations wanting to be included should immediately call or send date, location, theme, contact name and telephone number to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington D.C. 20005 (202) 234. KELLOGG FELLOWSHIPS: The W.K Kellogg Foundation is offering $30,000 yearly awards and other stipends for self-directed inter disciplinary fellowships. Applicants for the three-year program should be fuHime or part-time employees of a non-profit organization Deadline: Dec. 31 . Contact: Kellogg National Fellowship Program, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, 400 North Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 49017 3398 (616) 968-1611. Calendar hearings to discuss specific aspects of bilingual education . the 3rd CN PC conference will examine issues such as media coverage of ethnic events , ethnicity and politics and relations with other ethnic groups . Guar i one Diaz (305) 642 3484 THIS WEEK MALDEF AWARD DINNER San Jose , Calif. Dec . 11 The 3rd annual dinner of the Mexican American L ega l Defense and Educational Fund will honor individuals who have made contributions to the California Hispanic community . Timoteo Vasquez (408) 246-8612 'MINORITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT New York Dec . 11 New York Gov. Mario Cuomo will keynote this conference for minority business owners to gather expertise from financial institutions, corporations and economic development agencies. Michael Nairne (518) 474 BILINGUAL EDUCATION HEARINGS The National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education is conducting a series of public Hispanic Link Weekly Report El Paso, Texas Dec. 12 Irene Rosales (915) 747-5247 Houston Dec . 13 Esther Lee Yao (713) 4889336 NATIONAL HISPANIC UNIVERSITY San Francisco Dec . 15 Titled "Hispanic America : A National Report Card," the university's 4th annual conference will examine Hispanic progress i n areas such as education , economics , technology and health. Elvia Mendoza (415) 451-0511 COMING SOON CONGRESSMAN GONZALEZ TRIBUTE San Antonio Jan . 18 Rep . Henry Gonzalez (DTexas) will have a fete in his honor to commemorate 24 years of service in Congress. Gail Beagle (202) 225 CUBAN NATIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL Miami Jan. 30, 31 Titled "Ethnic Relations in the Cuban Community," NATIONAL RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS Washington, D.C. Feb . 2-5 The 43rd annual NAB conference will include a seminar to inform Hispanic broadcasters on develop ments in marketing , regulations, technology and audience needs. Barbara Sharp (201) 428 SPOTLIGHT The Center for Migration Studies of New York will hold its 9th annual conference titled "Immigration and Refugee Policy" on March 20,21 In Washington, D . C . The topics to be explored are new legislation , legal representation and other developments affecting immigrants and refugees . For more information contact Maggie Sullivan , CMS 9th Annual National Legal Conference on Immigration and Refugee Policy, 209 Flagg Place, Staten Island, New York 10304 (718) 351!800 . 3

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Arts & Entertainment THE SHAPE AND SCOPE OF SPANISH-LANGUAGE television programming in the United States could be decided at a court hearing scheduled this week in Los Angeles. At a hearing in August, U.S. District Court Judge Mariana Pfaelzer . made a preliminary ruling that principals of the Spanish International Communications Corporation diverted corporate profits in their favor. Minority stockholders of SICC filed the diversion charges against the Spanish International Network, its president, Rene Anselmo, and its Mexican parent company, Televisa. The August ruling follows an earlier recommendation by staff of the Federal Communications Commission to a federal judge that licenses to seven SIN affiliate stations not be renewed. Five of those stations are owned by SICC; all stations are owned by companies partly owned by Anselmo and Televisa . The FCC recommendation is based on its conclusion that the Sl N stations are under control of foreigners. Televisa owns 75% of SIN and Anselmo owns the remainder. SIN provides programming-and advertising-for the SICC stations and various other UHF and low power stations . Its programming is carried by cable operators in over 300 U.S. markets . SIN advertising revenues for the current year are estimated at $60 milliona dramatic increase from the 1972 figure of $5 million . The Los Angeles hearing is scheduled for Dec . 10 and judgment is still pending on the FCC recommendation. At press time, both parties had entered negotiations for an out-of-court Meanwhile, Televisa continues to be a major world prov1der of television programming with nove/a exports now going to Spain, Italy and China. According to a report in the Nov . 18 issue of Electronic Media, Televise's export division,Protele, sold 290 hours of Mexican programming to China from January to September of this year. Protele has sold 124 programming hours to Spainmostly dubbed Hanna Barbers cartoons acquired by Televisa for distribution. Two Spanish TV stations will begin airing Televisa nove/as in January: Los ricos tambien 1/oran will be carried by Te/evisi6n Espanola, Madrid, and Tu o nadie, dubbed in Galician by Televisi6n Gallego. ONE LINERS: Cuban novelist Guillermo Cabrera Infante will lecture Dec. 10 as part of a series presented with the Tesoros de Espana exhibit at the New York Public Library ... GalaVision carried Las mananitas, a celebration of the miracle the Virgin of Guadalupe , live from Mexico City Dec. 11; that day and on the 12th the cable system presents the film La Virgen de Guadalupe ... and Symbolic Reality, an exhibit by David Baze and John Valadez , continues at California State University, Dominguez Hills, through Dec . 12 ... -Antonio Mejias-Rentas $4. 2 million and is apparently closing in on share." M e d .• a R e p 0 rt numero uno , Los Angeles. R.A. ZALDIVAR, Miami Herald, on what "Although Los Angeles logged a hefty increase the future holds for Maurice Ferre after he in both television and radio expenditures in lost his bid for a seventh term as Miami's 1985 over 1984, so did Miami. This year, a mayor. LATINO COLUMNISTS: What Latino difference of only $3. 5 million separates • "It was always thought that Ferre would run journalists are commenting on these days : them." for Congress one day , that he would succeed JESUS CHAVARRIA, Hispanic Business FRANK DELOLMO, Los Angeles Times, Claude Pepper. But anybody who knows Claude magazine (December), on the expenditures on the demands of the United Neighborhoods Pepper must realize that the gentleman has of major U.S. companies to reach the Hispanic Organization (UNO) of East Los Angeles and no intention of leaving the House of Repmarket: the South-Central Organizing Committee resentatives anytime soon. "In 1985, American companies spent an (SCOC) that the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing "And if Ferre were to run in Pepper's district, estimated $27 4 million to reach a population Committee distribute $6. 6 million of its $90 I he would be asking many of the same people of approximately 3 . 1 million in Puerto Rico , million profit to groups with youth programs who threw him out of City Hall to send him to and only $333.5 million to reach a stateside in the city's black and brown communities. (The Congress . Hispanic population of 17 million. . . full L.A. Olympic board meets Dec. 9 . ) "Ferre' s political future might lie outside "Only two years ago , the Miami market " It would be a serious mistake to underMiami as some sort of consultant to the ranked third in terms of overall media ex estimate the staying power of UNO and SCOC national Democratic Party . If the Democrats penditures, behind . Los Angeles and New . . . They should , of course, compromise . In were to regain the White House, Ferre might York In 1983 the Miami market lagged behind their own unique ways, the Olympic organizers make a good candidate for an ambassador's New York by $5.5 million and behind Los and UNO and SCOC leaders have shown the post. Angeles, the perennial leader, by $8 million . rest of us that with hard work, good organization "But wherever he is sent, he would have to " This year, the Miami market has overtaken and confidence Los Angeles can be a better be watched closely. He might start a revolution." New York in media expenditures by a significant city. That is important common ground to 1 -Charlie Ericksen HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234.0737 Publisher. He ctor Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting : Dora Delgado , Felix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio MejiasRentas. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form w ithout advance permission Annual subscription (52 Issues) S98 . "Trial subscription (13 Issues) S28 . 4 CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : Include the latest edition of Hispanic link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention . For details, contact Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234. A NEW CBS POl-L HAS RVfALED THAT COLOMBIAN COFFEE PICKER JUAN VALDEZ IS THE BEST KNoWN HISPANIC AMONG-NONHISPANICS IN TH. I TED STATES.