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Hispanic link weekly report, December 16, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, December 16, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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DtC \ ^
Making The News This Week
Washington consultant Gloria Barajas is elected president of the Mexican American Women’s National Association, replacingVerbnica Collazo. Bettie Baca of the Democratic National Committee is voted 1 vice president. .. G. Mario Moreno, former executive director of | Ayuda, a legal services agency in Washington, D.C., replaces Richard j Fajardo as associate counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund’s office in that city. Fajardo joins j MALDEFs Los Angeles office as an attorney in employment litigation [ ... Jorge Vais Arango, 52, a Cuban poet and playwright, is honored . by the New York-based Fund for Free Expression, which monitors human rights around the world, as one of nine human rights exiles who have contributed to the cultural life of New York City... The Carnegie Hero Fund Commission honors Jos6 Eduardo Silva, a hair
stylist from Leamington, Ontario, for heroism after dying trying to save a 7-year-old girl from drowning in Lake Erie Aug. 14.1983. Thirteen U.S. citizens and nine Canadians were honored in ceremonies in Pittsburgh, with each (or their survivor) receiving $2,500 and the Carnegie Medal... Golfer Nancy L6pez, expecting her second child in spring, finished the year with a trio of top golf honors and needs only one more victory to reach the mandatory 35 for the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) Hall of Fame... 1984 Olympic gold medal winner Paul Gonzales wins a unanimous, eight-round decision in Los Angeles over Joey Roach of Boston to post his second victory in as many professional boxing appearances. The Los Angeles light flyweight is due to fight two nationally televised bouts in February and April... University of Oklahoma nose guard Tony Casillas wins the Lombardi Award as college football’s outstanding lineman. The award is named after Vince Lombardi, legendary coach of the Green Bay Packers who died of cancer in
1970...
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Mexican Immigration Aids Calif., Studies Find
California’s Mexican immigrants provide more benefits to the state than they consume in public services, according to a study by the California-based Rand Corporation released Dec. 10.
The Rand study, “Current and Future Effects of Mexican Immigration in California,” and another by the Urban Institute in Washington, D.C., released Dec. 11, generally defy California residents’ negative perceptions regarding
Alatorre Swamps6 Foes in LA. Council Victory
California Assemblyman Richard Alatorre defeated six opponents in a Dec. 10 special election to become to second Hispanic this century to serve on the 15-member Los Angeles City Council.
He will resign his state elective office to take his council seat before the end of the month. He is filling the unexpired term of Arthur Synder, who resigned Oct. 4. The term runs till June 30, 1987.
With 102 of 102“ precincts reporting, the vote showed:
Votes % of Vote
Richard Alatorre 11,928 60%
Steve Rodriguez 3,199 16%
Gilbert Avila 2,376 12%
Antonio Rodriguez 1,166 6%
Ross Valencia 872 4%
Dorothy Andromidas 231 1%
John Silva 156 1%
Rain, sleet and temperatures in the 40s reduced the turnout to 33% of council District 14’s registered voters The district has 214,000 residents. Hispanics make up 75% of its population and 50% of its voters.
Alatorre, an influential state legislator, raised and spent $300,000 on the campaign, double the combined total of his six opponents The council seat is viewed as giving the 42-year-old Los Angeles native an inside track in future mayoral, county supervisor or congressional races.
Mexican immigrants. Both studies are based on U.S. Census data for the years 1970-1980.
Whereas the Rand study examines the effects of Mexican immigrants statewide, the latter, titled “The Fourth Wave: California’s Newest Immigrants,” concerns itself with the effects on Southern California.
Approximately 80% of the state’s Mexican immigrants live in Southern California, with more than 50% in Los Angeles County.
The Rand study examines the progress of Mexican immigrants in intergrating themselves into California society. Using the ability to speak English and educational attainment as indicators of integration, the study finds that each successive generation improves. Although more than 50% of immigrants born in Mexico have not gone beyond the eighth grade, the high-school completion rates for first- and second-generation Mexican Americans 25 to 34 years of age is nearly the same as those of the entire state. More than 90% of California’s first-generation Mexicans are proficient in English.
Differentiating among the types of immigrants - short-term, cyclical and permanent - the Rand report finds that the first two classes, the majority of whom are undocumented, are reluctant to use public services for fear of apprehension by authorities. Permanent
Latino 1992 Commission
The National Hispanic Quincentennial Commission, which began forming in 1983, held an inaugural luncheon Dec. 5 in Washington, D.C., to announce some of its projects planned for the 1992 celebration.
The 14-member commission, headed by Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, will eventually grow to 50 members representing most areas of the nation. It plans on working closely with the National Quincentennial Commission, created by Congress in 1983.
The Hispanic commission will assist local groups, historical societies, schools and businesses in designing quincentennial projects. It plans a handbook for 1987 with ideas and guidelines on planning celebrations.
immigrants, however, do use public services, chiefly educational, because they typically live with spouses and children. Less than half of permanent immigrants are undocumented, according to the study.
SEE CHARTS - PAGE 2
Another concern addressed by the studies is whether immigrants depress wages and displace workers. The studies find that the low wages earned by immigrants, coupled with their large numbers, enable some industries to raise their profits, the number of employees and lower their prices. When Mexican im-
continued on page 2
‘English Plus’ Launched
The League of United Latin American Citizens and the Spanish American League Against Discrimination launched Dec. 4 in Miami a national campaign called English Plus to generate support for bilingual education, currently under attack by some groups and undergoing revision by the U.S. Department of Education.
LULAC representatives across the country are urging parents and community leaders to write letters to local officials, congressmen and the media in support of bilingual programs.
Osvaldo Soto, president of SALAD, said the campaign’s name was chosen to emphasize that proponents of bilingual education also recognize English as the nation’s primary language.
Training for N.Y.G Latinos
New York Mayor Ed Koch announced Dec. 4 the establishment of a $1 million job-training program for Hispanics in that city.
Koch made the announcement at a conference of the Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors. He said money for the program -aimed at Hispanics 18 years and older -would be taken from the $3 million the state has received under the federal Job Training and Partnership Act. The City Department of Employment will administer the program.
Employment Commissioner Manuel Bustelo said his office will ask Hispanic organizations for training proposals, with four to be selected.


Sin pelos en la lengua
REMEMBER WHEN - long, long ago - all you ever got from political candidates was a smile, a button and a bumper sticker?
We remember when, about 16 years ago, Richard Alatorre gave us our first potholder. It was blue and white, with his name and the election date on it. He was trying, for the first time, to break into the white male California Assembly.
Now Richard’s outdone himself. In his Los Angeles City Council race mailers, he offered a $5,000 scholarship to the recipient who(1) answers three questions on his political positions correctly by scratching the right boxes on a lottery-type card, and (2) wins a drawing from among those who answer the three questions right.
REMEMBER WHEN you believed what you read? Reader Armando Duron writes to tell us that the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner had a reporter and a columnist cover a major debate among L.A. City Council candidates but still miscounted the participants. It said four, instead of five. And it attributed candidate Antonio Rodriguez’s quotes to candidate Steve Rodriguez.
Sin Pelos re-quoted the quote Dec. 2 which had Steve saying that Richard Alatorre was manipulating the Mexican American Political Association by buying blocks of memberships. Correction noted. Antonio said it.
REMEMBER WHEN numbers didn’t lie, either? You’re very old if you can remember that far back.
In this week’s lead story, the Rand Corporation and the Urban Institute each ask the question: Do Mexican immigrants in California consume more in public services than they pay in taxes?
Rand says no. The Urban Institute says yes.
Why the difference? Rand factored in federal, as well as state and local taxes. The Institute included only the latter two.
REMEMBER WHEN, last week, we ran Michael Cava’s cartoon spoof of a CBS “poll” declaring coffee-bean-picker Juan Valdez as the nation’s best-known Hispanic?
So far, Weekly Report has received half a dozen calls wanting more information on the “poll,” including two from news agencies.
A CBS reporter in Miami called to tell us that he conducted an office survey of his own. And the winners were, in order: Fidel Castro, Julio Iglesias, and the Ayatollah Khomeini.
-Kay Barbaro
Mexican Immigration
continued from page 1
migrants depress wages and displace workers, it is primarily in occupations where Hispanics are concentrated, such as manufacturing.
Agreeing in most areas, the two studies diverge on the amount of taxes immigrants pay compared to the public services they receive.
Precluding educational services, immigrants contribute more in taxes than they use in public services, finds the Rand study. Although the costs of providing services to immigrants
is rising with the number of permanent immigrants, their tax revenues are increasing correspondingly, the study shows It also finds that less than 5% of all Mexican immigrants in California were receiving cash assistance in 1980.
The Urban Institute, however, finds that Mexican immigrant households in Los Angeles receive almost twice the amount of state and local services than what they pay in state and local taxes. The study attributes this gap to the immigrants’ lower incomes and large families. (See Sin Pelos.)
Some other results from both studies:
• Less than 20% of Mexican immigrants work in agriculture. More than 60% of Mexican immigrants work in service and manufacturing industries.
• About 45% of the Latinos in California are immigrants or the children of immigrants.
• For every permanent immigrant in California, three relatives have entered the state.
The Rand publication estimates there are 1.5 million immigrants from Mexico living in California. The Institute estimates the same number is expected to settle in Southern California alone in the 1980s.
- Felix Perez
WHERE MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS WORK
EDUCATIONAL, OCCUPATIONAL PROGRESS
Generation Years of schooling 09- 11 0.2 m 113-15 Hl6+ Age
Mexican born M mi25-34
Native-born 1st generation
Native-born 2nd generation
State total (all adults)
25-34
25-34
25-34
40 D ,60 Percent
Grade |--------------[Vltfr prof
I lech
! vales- cler skilled sen ice
C rail semi-skilled operations
40 50
Percent
90 100
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


THE GOOD NEWS
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA IMMIGRANTS: ‘The Fourth Wave: California’s Newest Immigrants,” a 220-page report sponsored by the Urban Institute, examines the economic and social effects of recent immigrants* * especially those in Southern California Price: $22.95 for the cloth edition, plus $2.00 for shipping, or $12.95 plus shipping for the paper edition. Order ISBN 0-87766-349-1 (cloth), ISBN 0-87766-375-0 (paper), The Urban Institute Press, P.O. Box 19958, Hampden Station, Baltimore, Md. 21211 (301) 338-6951.
CALIFORNIA MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS: The 47-page executive summary of the Rand Corporation’s “Current and Future Effects of Mexican Immigration in California” constructs a profile of Mexican immigrants, their economic effect on the state, educational achievement and projections in these areas. It’s $4.00 but will not be available until January. No date for the full report has been set yet. Contact Rand Corporation, 1700 Main St., P.O. Box2138, Santa Monica, Calif. 90406-2138 (213) 393-0411.
CABLE TV FELLOWSHIPS: The Walter Kaitz Foundation is accepting applications for 1986-87 fellowships in cable television management. Nationwide placements in the nine-month program with starting allowances of $1,500 per month are available to 10 to 15 college graduates. Deadline: Jan. 15. For more information and application packages, contact Virginia Mak, Walter Kaitz Foundation Fellbwship.Program, P.O. Box 11080,4341 Piedmont Ave., Oakland, Calif. 94611 (415)428-2225.
ADVERTISING INTERNSHIPS: The American Association of Advertising Agencies is recruiting minority students for its 10-week summer internship program, carrying a minimum $250 weekly salary. Placements in 1986 are in Chicago, New York and on the West Coast. Deadline: Jan. 31. For information and application forms, contact: Minority Advertising Intern Program, American Association of Advertising Agencies, 666 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017(212) 682-2500.
STATUS OF PUERTO RICANS: The National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights has published a 12-page report on the social and economic conditions of 2 million Puerto Ricans living in the United States. Price: $1.50. Also available in Spanish. Contact National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, 160 W. Lippincott St, Philadelphia, Pa. 19133 (215) 634-4443.
DIRECTORY OF WOMEN’S ORGANIZATIONS: The Women’s Research and Education Institute has published the 1985 edition of “A Directory of Selected Women’s Research & Policy Centers,” which lists 29 centers and organizations researching women’s issues, including those of concern to minority women. Price: $4.25 (prepaid orders only). Contact: WREI, 204 Fourth St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-1090.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Hispanics Designers Fashion Show & Benefit Washington, D.C.
Efficient, bilingual, extremely well-organized, mature individual who can work under pressure needed January 1, to assist Executive Producer in coordinating two major shows in 1986. M ust have top-notch typing and telephone skills. Some experience in event management is helpful. Salary $16,000 to$ 18,000 depending on experience. Call Penny Harrison (202) 822-7895 for appointment.
MANAGEMENT INTERNS Phoenix, Ariz.
Starting Salary $19,700 The city seeks qualified persons who have completed, or will complete, a master's degree in public administration or a closely related field by June 1986 for its one-year Intern Program. Positions start July 1, 1986. All information and documents required for the application must be received by Jan. 31, 1986. Applications and further information can be obtained from Charles E. Hill, management and budget director,251 West Washington, Phoenix, Ariz. 85003 (602) 262-4805.
AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY/ AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Assistant professor, tenure-track, September 1986. Salary 1984-85: $19,048 - $27,716. Major responsibilities: composition, minority literature. Other third-world literature, English education, minority advising. Doctorate in English or English education: ABD required. Letter, vita to Judy Parham, Search Committee, English Department, St Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minn. 56301. Postmark deadline: Jan. 3, 1986. AN EO/AA EMPLOYER.
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
N.A.H.J. EDUCATION SPECIALIST
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists, based in Washington, D.C., seeks someone to develop and implement educational activities for Hispanics nationally. Salary is $22,000 - $25,000. Candidate must have:
• 2 years of experience teaching (or working with) students.
• Educational background plus on-the-job experience in print or broadcast journalism.
• Fluency in Spanish and English, written and verbal.
• Willingness to travel.
• Good speaking ability and presentation of self.
• Knowledge of the East Coast educational systems, including journalism schools and (especially) the “Hispanic experience” in colleges and high schools in the East.
• Good interpersonal skills.
Send resume to: Frank Newton, Ph. D., Executive Director, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045.
THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Beltr&n (213) 743-7158.
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT & BOARD LIAISON $18,000 -$23,000
Excellent secretarial skills required. Type 60 words per minute, word processing experience preferred, strong writing and editing skills, ability to prepare accurate minutes of meetings, strong administrative support skills, knowledge of Hispanic issues and organizations, bilingual English/Spanish preferred. Send resume to: National Council of La Raza, Lupe Aguirre, 20 F St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001.
Christmas Calendar
The observance of Christmas by the three dominant U.S. Hispanic groups-Mexicans, Puerto Ricansand Cubans - has become more commercialized, but vestiges of native customs and traditions remain.
Integral parts of the Christmas season in Mexico are the posadas and luminarias. Beginning nine days before Christmas, the posada religious procession reenacts Joseph and Mary’s search for shelter. Participants chant a litany. Luminarias are the lighted candles carried during the posadas and to midnight Mass.
Posadas are still staged in many U.S. Hispanic communities. Luminarias are also prevalent throughout the Southwest In the Old Town district of Albuquerque, N.M., candles placed in sand-filled paper bags line sidewalks, rooftops and the exteriors of homes.
El Dia de los Tres Reyes Magos (the Day of the Three Magi Kings), Jan. 6, enjoys more prominence than Christmas in Puerto Rico. On thisday,children lay fresh grass under their beds for the kings’ camels. Also, several days before Christmas until Jan. 6, groups of carolers take part in parandas or asaltos navidehos, in which groups of people travel from home to home singing popular Christmas
songs. The idea is to wake people who often offer food and drink. Those visited usually join the group and move on to other homes.
In the United States, Puerto Ricans place more significance on Christmas day than on el Dia de los Tres Reyes. Parandas continue to be a major part of Christmas among mainland Puerto Ricans, also.
Cuba, although predominantly Catholic, keeps Christmascelebrationsclandestineandconfinedto homes Shortly after Castro seized power, he ordered that Christmas not be celebrated.
Before Castro’s reign, Cuba, like Puerto Rico and Mexico, placed primary emphasis on the religious aspect of Christmas Christmas trees were not uncommon due to Cuba's proximity to the United States, but nacimientos, elaborately decorated creches, were more commonplace. Many local churches would honor the parishioner with the nacimiento most resembling the biblical prototype.
While still observing the pious origin of Christmas, Cuban Americans have absorbed many of the American traditions of the season.
St. Nick has largely displaced el Dia de los Tres Reyes Magos, the more popular holiday in Mexico, Puerto Rico and Cuba, among U.S. Hispanics.
- Felix Perez
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘ N* Street N Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix P6rez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


Arts & Entertainment
A NEW NOVEL, A NEW FILM AND a work in progress for Hollywood keep Gabriel Garda Marquez busy, while international interest in Latin American film and video products increases with recent events held in Brazil, Cuba and the United States.
The film, Tiempo de morir, basecfcon an original screenplay by Garcia Marquez, opened the second annual International Film, Video and TV Festival in Rio de Janeiro Nov. 25. Directed by Jorge All Triana, the film was shot earlier this year at Armero, Colombia - the region destroyed by a volcano last month.
(Garcia Marquez’ latest novel, El amor en los tiempos del colera, was released Dec. 6 by Colombian publisher Oveja Negra. The writer is reportedly working on a screenplay for a film, yet untitled, to be produced in Hollywood.)
While Tiempo de morir took “Best Film” honors in Rio de Janeiro, another film has earned more notoriety. Removed from the screening schedule at the last minute, French director Jean Luc Godard’s Hail Mary has been condemned by the Catholic church in Argentina where it was to open this month.
Rio de Janeiro winners included the Puerto Rican novela Ligia Helena, which took “Best Short” honors.
Another film exposition - the seventh International Festival of New Latin American Cinema- wraps up this week in Havana. Argentina’s La historia oficial and Tiempo de morir screened at the Cuban festival. At press time, Latino director Haskell Wexler was scheduled to make an appearance.
United States participants in the festival, held Dec. 2-16, included actors Robert de Niro (whose latest film, The Mission, was shot in Colombia) and Jack Lemmon (whose films were screened in.a festival retrospect).
Closer to home, the seventh annual convention of the Asociacion de Exhibidores de Peliculas en Espahol was held in Las Vegas, Nev., Dec. 2-4. Participating exhibitors- Azteca Films, Maya Cine, Mexcinema, Pan American, Televicineand De Marco-screened Spanish-language films to be released in the United States in coming months.
Independent film producers also exhibited works at the Las Vegas convention. U.S. actors Richard Yniguez and Roxanna Bonilla showed La negrita. The husband-wife team shot the film in Costa Rica.
In related news, the 11 th annual Festival de Cine de America Latina ended Dec. 7 in Huelva, Spain, with Argentine film El rigor del destino grabbing top honors; original art by Humberto Calzada has been chosen as poster for the third Miami Film Festival scheduled for February.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
MIAMI RATINGS: A Miami ratings service controversy has escalated into formal Federal Trade Commission charges filed by the city’s Spanish-language television station WLTV-Channel 23.
The station accused the A.C. Nielsen Company of “being grossly biased” in favor of younger and non-Hispanic households in its audience sample. In its complaint, WLTV-which programs for a 35-year-and-older Hispanic audience - says that Nielsen’s numbers could cost the station as much as $1 million in 1986.
Television advertising costs are based on ratings figures provided by such services as Nielsen and Arbitron. Nielsen began serving Miami with its metered samples Nov. 1.
In the past, non-Hispanic stations complained that Arbitron sampled older, Hispanic audiences too heavily. One network affiliate has already
signed on with Nielsen; another is expected to soon. Neither had subscribed to Arbitron in the past, claiming it ignored their younger Anglo audiences.
WLTV charged in its complaint that Nielsen may have intentionally weighed its viewer sample to encourage the non-Hispanic stations to “sign on as subscribers.”
ALATORRE COVERAGE: The Los Angeles Herald Examiner Dec. 11 gave Richard Alatorre’s election to the Los Angeles City Council a bold headline, “Alatorre Wins in Landslide.” The rival Los Angeles Times played it on page one, but its two major stories dealt with the resignation of San Diego Mayor Roger Hedgecock and President Reagan’s ordering lie detector tests in the federal spy scandal.
None of the three network-affiliated television stations in Los Angeles led off with Alatorre’s victory on their late newscasts.
VISTA’S AVAILABLE: The English-language Hispanic weekend supplement Vista, now carried by establishment dailies in 17 cities,
features U.S. Hispanic astronauts this month and San Diego’s Raquel Martinez, who’s gaining fame in Mexico as a bullfighter, in its Jan. 4-5 edition.
Those who don’t receive it may get a current copy by sending $1 to cover postage and handling to: Harry Caicedo, Vista, Suite 301, 2355 Salzedo St., Coral Gables, Fla. 33134.
ROLODEX ROULETTE: Julio Barreto, reporter with the National Catholic News Service, joins the National Puerto Rican Forum as director of its Washington, D.C., office ... San Diego Union reporter Felipe Garcia begins his American Political Science Association fellowship on the capitol staff of Sen. Charles Grassley (R-lowa)... Nuestro magazine hires Ricardo Fouster as a reporter ... Diana Navarrete, formerly communications director for SER-Jobs for Progress, joins the sales force of KSSA, Radio Variedades, in Dallas... Cecilio Morales, reporter for another capital publication, Employment and Training Reporter, is promoted to its managing editor - Charlie Ericksen
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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DeC 1 61985 . . M k • T'h N T'h • Ull. k stylist from Leamington, Ontario, for heroism after dymg trytng to a lng I j e ews I j IS rvee savea7-year-oldgirlfromdrowninginLakeErieAug.14.1983. Thirteen U.S . citizens and nine Canadians were honored m ceremontes '" Washington consultant Gloria Barajas is elected president of the Mexican American Women's National Association, replacingVer6nica Collazo. Bettie Baca of the Democratic National Committee is voted vice president. . . G. Mario Moreno, former executive director of Ayuda, a legal services agency in Washington, D.C. , replaces Richard Fajardo as associate counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund's office in that city. Fajardo joins MALDEPs Los Angeles office as an attorney in employment litigation ... Jorge Vals Arango, 52, a Cuban poet and playwright, is honored by the New York-based Fund for Free Expression, which monitors human rights around the world , as one of nine human rights exiles who have contributed to the cultural life of New York City . . . The Carnegie Hero Fund Commission honors Jose Eduardo Silva, a hair Pittsburgh, with each (or their survivor) receiving $2,500 and the Carnegie Medal. .. Golfer Nancy L6pez, expecting her second child in spring, finished the year with a trio of top golf honors and needs only one more victory to reach the mandatory 35 for the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) Hall of Fame ... 1984 Olympic gold medal winner Paul Gonzales wins a unanimous, eight-round decision in Los Angeles over Joey Roach of Boston to post his second victory in as many professional boxing appearances. The Los Angeles light flyweight is due to fight two nationally televised bouts in February and April ... University of Oklahoma nose guard Tony Casillas wins the Lombardi Awarci as college football's outstanding lineman. The award is named after Vince Lombardi, legendary coach of the Green Bay Packers who died of cancer in 1970 ... Vol.aNo.sol HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Dec. 16,1985 Mexican Immigration Aids Calif., Studies Find California ' s Mexican immigrants provide more benefits to the state than they consume in public services , according to a study by the California-based Rand Corporation released Dec. 10. The Rand study , "Current and Future Effects of Mexican Immigration in California," and another by the Urban Institute in Washington , D.C., released Dec. 11, generally defy California residents ' negative perceptions regarding AlatorreSwamps6 Foes in LA. Council Victory Californ i a Assemblyman Richard Alatorre defeated six opponents in a Dec. 0 special election to become to second Hispanic this century to serve on the 15-member Los Angeles City Council. He will resign his state elective office to take his council seat before the end of the month. He is filling the unexpired term of Arthur Synder, who resigned Oct. 4 . The term runs till June 30, 1987. With 102 of 102precincts reporting, the vote showed: Votes %of Vote Richard Alatorre 11,928 60% Steve Rodriguez 3,199 16% Gilbert Avila 2,376 12% Antonio Rodriguez 1,166 6% Ross Valencia 872 4% Dorothy Andromidas 231 1% John Silva 156 1% Rai11, sleet and temperatures in the 40s reduced the tl.irnout to 33% of council District 14's registered voters. The district has214,000 residents. Hispanics make up 75% of its population and 50% of its voters. Alatorre , an influential state legislator, raised and spent $300,000 on the campaign, double the combined total of his six opponents. The council seat is viewed as giving the 42-year-old Los Angeles native an inside track in future mayoral, county supervisor or con gressional races . Mexican immigrants. Both studies are based on U .S. Census data for the years 1 970-1980. Whereas the Rand study examines the effects of Mexican immigrants statewide, the latter, titled "The Fourth Wave : California's Newest Immigrants, " concerns itself with the effects on Southern California. Approximately 80% of the state' s Mexican immigrants live in Southern California, with more than 50% in Los Angeles County. The Rand study examines the progress of Mexican immigrants in intergrating themselves into California society. Using the abil ity to speak English and educational attainment as indicators of integration, the study finds that each successive improves. Although more than 50% of immigrants born in Mexico have not gone beyond the eighth grade, the high -school completion rates for first-and second-generation Mexican Americans 25 to 34 years of age is nearly the same as those of the entire state. More than 90% of California's first-generation Mexicans are proficient in English . Differentiating among the types of immigrants short-term, cyclical and permanent the Rand report finds that the first two classes, the majority of whom are undocumented, are reluctant to use public services for fear of apprehension by authorities. Permanent Latino 1992 Commission The National Hispanic Quincentennial Commission, which began forming in 1983, held an inaugural luncheon Dec . 5 in Washington, D.C., to announce some of its projects planned for the 1992 celebration. The 14-member commissi on , headed by Raul Yzaguirre , president of the National Council of La Raza, will eventually grow to 50 members representing most areas of the nation. It plans on working closely with the National Quincentennial Commission, created by Congress in 1983. The Hispanic commission will assist local groups, historical societies, schools and businesses in designing quincentennial pro jects. It plans a handbook for 1987 with ideas and guidelines on planning celebrations. immigrants, however, do use public services, chiefly educational, because they typically live w i th spouses and children. Less than half of permanent immigrants are undocumented, according to the study. SEE CHARTS-PAGE 2 Another concern addressed by the studies is whether immigrants depress wages and displace workers. The studies find that the low wages earned by immigrants, coupled with their large numbers, enable some industries to raise their profits, the number of employees and lower their prices. When Mexican im-continued on page 2 'English Plus' Launched The League of Un i ted Latin American Citizens and the Spanish American League Against Discrimination launched Dec. 4 in Miami a national campaign called English P l us to generate support for bilingual education, currently under attack by some groups and undergoing revision by the U.S. Department of Education. LULAC representatives across the country are urging parents and community leaders to write letters to local officials. congressmen and the media in support of bilingual programs. Osvaldo So to, president of SALAD , said the campaign' s name was chosen to emphasize that proponents of bilingual education also recognize English as the nation' s primary language. Training for N. Y.C. Latinos New York Mayor Ed Koch announced Dec. 4 the establishment of a $1 million job-training program for Hispanics in that city. Koch made the announcement at a conference of the Association of Puerto Rican Executive Directors. He said money for the programaimed at Hispanics 18 years and older -would be taken from the $3 million the state has received under the federal Job Training and Partnership Act. The City Department of Employment will administer the program. Employment Commissioner Manuel Bustelo said his office will ask Hispanic organizations for iraining proposals, with four to be selected.

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua REMEMBER WHEN long, long ago all you ever got from political candidates was a smile, a button and a bumper sticker? We remember when, about 16 years ago, Richard Alatorre gave us our first potholder. It was blue and white, with his name and the election date on it. He was trying, for the first time, to break into the white male California Assembly . Now Richard's outdone himself . In his Los Angeles City Council race mailers, he offered a $5,000 scholarship to the recipient who (1) answers three questions on his political positions correctly by scratching the right boxes O!l a lottery-type card, and (2) wins a drawing from among those who answer the three questions right. REMEMBER WHEN you believed what you read? Reader Armando Duron writes to tell us that the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner had a reporter and a columnist cover a major debate among L.A. City Council candidates but still miscounted the participants. It said four, instead of five. And it attributed candidate Antonio Rodriguez's quotes to candidate Steve Rodriguez. Sin Pelos re-quoted the quote Dec. 2 which had Steve saying that Richard Alatorre was manipulating the Mex ican American Political Association by buying blocks of memberships. Correction noted. Antonio said it. REMEMBER WHEN numbers didn' t lie , either? You ' re very old if you can remember that far back. In this week's lead story, the Rand Corporation and the Urban Institute each ask the question: Do Mexican immigrants in California consume more in public services than they pay in ta x es ? Rand says no . The Urban Institute says yes . Why the difference? Rand factored in federal, as well as state and local taxes . The Institute included only the latter two . REMEMBER WHEN, last week, we ran Michael Cava's cartoon spoof of a CBS " poll " declaring coffee-bean-picker Juan Valdez as the nation's best-known Hispanic? So far, Weekly Report has received half a dozen call s w a nting more information on the " poll," including two from news agencies. A CBS reporter in Miami called to tell us t hat he conducted an office su r vey of his own . And the winners were, in order: Fidel Castro, Julio Iglesias, and the Ayatollah Khomeini. Kay Barbaro Mexican Immigration continued from page 1 migrants depress wages and displace workers, it is primarily in occupations where Hispanics are concentrated, such as manufacturing. is rising with the number of permanent im migrants, their tax revenues are increasing correspondingly , the study shows. It also finds that less than 5% of all Mexican immigrants in California were receiving cash assistance in 1980. • Less than 20% of Mexican immigrants work in agriculture . More than 60% of Mexican immigrants work in service and manufacturing industries . e About 45% of the Latinos in California are immigrants or the children of immigrants. • For every permanent immigrant in California, three relatives have entered the state. Agreeing in most areas, the two studies diverge on the amount of taxes immigrants pay compared to the public services they receive . Precluding educational services, immigrants contribute more in taxes than they use in public services, finds the Rand study . Although the costs of providing services to immigrants 2 I N D u s T R y 0 c c u p A T I 0 N WHERE MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS WORK Source : Rand Corporation The Urban Institute, however, finds that Mexican immigrant households in Los Angeles receive almost twice the amount of state and local services than what they pay in state and local taxes . The study attributes this gap to the immigrants' lower incomes and large families. (See Sin Pelos.) Some other results from both studies: The Rand publication estimates there are 1 . 5 million immigrants from Mexico living in California . The Institute estimates the same number is expected to settle in Southern California alone in the 1980s. Felix Perez EDUCATIONAL, OCCUPATIONAL PROGRESS Generation Mexican born Native-born 1st generation Native-born 2nd generation State total (all adults) 25-34 Grade Level 9-11 12 13-1S 16+ D \IJ(r prot' • Crafl .lnskilled/ 'l..illrd '''" ;, .,. "lll'ratinn' Farm Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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THE GOOD NEWS SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA IMMIGRANTS: "The Fourth Wave: California's Newest Immigrants," a 220-page report sponsored by the Urban Institute, examines the economic and social effects of recent immigrants, especially those in Southern California. Price: $22.95 for the cloth edition, plus $2.00 for shipping, or $12.95 plus shipping for the paper edition. Order: ISBN 0-87766-349-1 (cloth). ISBN 0-87766-375-0 (paper). The Urban Institute Press, P . O. Box 19958, Hampden Station, Baltimore, Md. 21211 (301) 338-6951. CALIFORNIA MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS: The47-page executive summary of the Rand Corporation's "Current and Future Effects of Mexican Immigration in California" constructs a profile of Mexican immigrants, their economic effect on the state, educational achievement and projections in these areas. lfs $4.00 but will not be available until January. No date for the full report has been set yet. Contact: Rand Corporation, 1700 Main St., P .O. Box2138, Santa Monica, Calif. 90406-2138 (213) 393-0411. CABLE TV FELLOWSHIPS: The Walter Kaitz Foundation is accepting applications for 1986-87 fellowships in cable television management. Nationwide placements in the nine-month program with. starting allowances of$1 ,509 per month are available to 10 to 15 college graduates. Deadline: Jan. 15. For more information and application packages, contact: Virginia Mak, Walter Kaitz Foundation Fellowship. Program, P .O. Box 11080,4341 Piedmont Ave., Oakland, Calif. 94611 (415) 428-2225. ADVERTISING INTERNSHIPS: The American Association of Advertising Agencies is recruiting minority students for its 1 0-week summer internship program, carrying a minimum $250 weekly salary. Placements in 1986 are in Chicago, New York and on the West Coast. Deadline: Jan. 31 . For information and application forms, contact: Minority Advertising Intern Program, American Association of Advertising Agencies, 666 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017 (212) 682-2500. STATUS OF PUERTO RICANS: The National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights has published a 12-page report on the social and economic conditions of 2 million Puerto Ricans living in the United States. Price: $1.50. Also available in Spanish. Contact: National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, 160 W. Lippincott St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19133 (215) 634-4443. DIRECTORY OF WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS: The Women's Research and Education Institute has published the 1985 edition of "A Directory of Selected Women's Research & Policy Centers," which lists 29 centers and organizations researching women's issues, including those of concern to minority women. Price: $4.25 (prepaid orders only). Contact: WREI, 204 Fourth St. SE, Washington, D.C . 20003 (202) 546-1090. CO RPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D. C . 20005. Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p.m . (ED Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Hispanics Designers Fashion Show & Washington. D.C. Efficient. bilingual, extremely well organized, mature individual who can work under pressure needed January 1, to assist Executive Producer in coordinating two major shows in 1986. Must have top notch typing and telephone skills. Some experience in event management is helpful. Salary$16,000 to$18,000 depending on experience. Call Penny Harrison (202) 822 for appointment. MANAGEMENT INTERNS Phoenix, Ariz . Starting Salary $19,700 The city seeks qualified persons who have completed, or will complete, a maste(s degree in public administration or a closely related field by June 1986 for its one-year Intern Program . Positions start July 1, 1986. All information and documents required for the application must be received by Jan. 31 , 1986. Applications and further information can be obtained from Charles E. Hill , manage ment and budget director , 251 West Washington , Phoenix, Ariz. 85003 (602) 262. AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY / AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. ENGLISH DEPARTMENT Assistant professor , tenure-track. September 1986. Salary 1984: $19,048-$27,716. Major responsibilities: composition, minority literature. Othec third-world literature, English education, minority advising. Doctorate in English or English education: ABO required. Letter , vita to Judy Parham, Search Committee , English St Cloud Stale University , St. Cloud, Minn. 56301 . Postmark deadline: Jan . 3, 1986. AN EO/AA EMPLOYER. PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952. N . A .H.J. EDUCATION SPECIALIST The National Association of Hispanic Journalists. based in Washington. D.C .. seeks someone to develo p and implement educational acti vities for Hispanics nationally. Salary is $22,000-$25,000. Candidate must have : e 2 years of experience teaching (or working with) students. • Educational background plus on the-job experience in print or broadcast journalism. e Fluency in Spanish and English, written and verbal. • Willingness to travel. • Good speaking ability and presentation of self . • Knowledge of the East Coast educational systems, including journalism schools an9 (especially) the "Hispanic experience" in colleges and high schools in the East. • Good interperso nal skills. Sen . d resume to: Frank Newton, Ph . D., Executive Director, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, National Press Building , Suite 634, Wash i ngton, D.C . 20045. THE CALIFORNIA Chicano News Media Association has a national job clearinghouse for Hispanics in the media. For information call Magdalena Beltran (213) 743. EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT & BOARD LIAISON $1 8.000 -$23,000 Excellent secretarial skills required. Type 60 words per minute, word processing ex perience preferred, strong writing and editing skills, ability to prepare accurate minutes of m"etings. strong administrative support skills. knowledge of Hispanic issues and organizations. bilingual English / Spanish preferred. Send resume to: National Council of La Raza. Lupe Aguirre, 20 F St. NW , 2nd Floor, Washington, D . C . 20001 . Christmas Calendar The observance of Christmas by the three dominant U . S . Hispanic groupsMexicans , Puerto Ricans and Cubans-has become more commercialized , but vestiges of native customs and traditions remain. songs . The idea is to wake people who often offer food and drink . Those visited usually join the group and move on to other homes. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Integral parts of the Christmas season in Mexico are the posadas and luminarias. Beginning nine days before Christmas , the posada religious pro cession reenacts Joseph and Mary's search for shelter . Participants chant a litany. Luminarias are the lighted candles carried during the posadas and to midnight Mass. Posadas are still staged in many U .S. Hispanic communities. Luminarias are also prevalent throughout the Southwest In the Old Town district of Albuquerque, N . M . , candles placed in sand-filled paper bags line sidewalks, rooftops and the exteriors of homes. El Dia de los Tres Reyes Magos (the Day of the Three Magi Kings), Jan. 6, enjoys more prominence than Christmas in Puerto Rico. On this day, children lay fresh grass under their beds for the kings' camels . Also , several days before Christmas until Jan. 6, groups of carolers take part in parandas or asaltoa navidenos, in which groups of people travel from home to home singing popular Christmas Hispanic Link Weekly Report In the United States , Puerto Ricans place more significance on Christmas day than on el Dia de los Tres Reyes. Parandas continue to be a major part of Christmas among mainland Puerto Ricans, also . Cuba, although predominantly Catholic, keeps Christmas celebrations clandestine and confined to homes. Shortly after Castro seized power , he ordered that Christmas not be celebrated. Before Castro's reign, Cuba , like Puerto Rico and Mexico , placed primary emphasis on the religious aspect of Christmas. Christmas trees were not un common due to Cuba's proximity to the United States, but nacimientos, elaborately decorated creches, were more commonplace. Many local churches would honor the parishioner with the nacimiento most resembling the biblical prototype . While still observing the pious origin of Christmas, Cuban Americans have absorbed many of the American traditions of the season. St. Nick has largely displaced el Dia de los Tres Reyes Magos, the more popular holiday in Mexico, Puerto Rico and Cuba , among U .S. Hispanics. -Felix Perez A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 • N' Street N Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publishec Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editoc Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado, Felix Perez. Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Rewrt maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance p6rmission Annual subscription (52 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details. con;act Hector EricksenMendoza (202) 234. 3

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Arts & Entertainment A NEW NOVEL, A NEW FILM AND a work in progress for Hollywood keep Gabriel Garcia Marquez busy, while international intf,rest in Latin American film and video products increases with recent events held in Brazil, Cuba and the United States. The film, Tiempo de morir, based:con an original screenplay, by . . Garcia Marquez, opened the second annual international Film, Video and TV Festival in Rio de Janeiro Nov. 25. Directed by Jorge Ali Triana, the film was shot earlier this year at Armero, Colombia-the region destroyed by a volcano last month. (Garcia Marquez' latest novel, El amor en los tiempos del co/era, was released Dec. 6 by Colombian publisher Oveja Negra. The writer is reportedly working on a screenplay for a film, yet untitled, to be produced in Hollywood.) While Tiempo de morir took "Best Film" honors in Rio de Janeiro, another film has earned more notoriety . Removed from the screening schedule at the last minute, French director Jean Godard's Hail Mary has been condemned by the Catholic church in Argentina where it was to open this month. Rio de Janeiro winners included the Puerto Rican nove/a Ligia Helena which took "Best Short" honors. Another film exposition-the seventh International Festival of New Latin American Cinema-wraps up this week in Havana. Argentina's La historia oficial and Tiempo de morir screened at the Cuban festival. At press time, Latino director Haskell Wexler was scheduled to make an appearance. United States participants in the festival, held Dec. 2-16, included actors Robert de Niro (whose latest film, The Mission, was shot in Colombia) and Jack Lemmon(whose films were screened in .a festival retrospect). Closer to home, the seventh annual convention of the Asociacion de Exhibidores de Peliculas en Espanol was held in Las Vegas, Nev. , Dec. 2-4. Participating exhibitors-Azteca Films, Maya Cine, Mexcinema, Pan American, Televicine and De Marco-screened Spanish-language films to be released in the United States in coming months. Independent film producers also exhibited works at the Las Vegas convention. U.S. actors Richard Yniguez and Roxanna Bonilla showed La negrlta. The husband-wife team shot the film in Costa Rica , In related news, the 11th annual Festival de Cine de America Latina ended Dec. 7 in Huelva, Spain, with Argentine film El rigor del destino grabbing top honors; original art by Humberto Calzada has been chosen as poster for the third Miami Film Festival scheduled for February. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media R signed on with Nielsen; another is expected e port to soon. Neither had subscribed to Arbitron in the past, claiming it ignored their younger features U.S. Hispanic astronauts this month and San Diego's Raquel Martinez, who's gaining fame in Mexico as a bullfighter, in its Jan. 4-5 edition . -----------------Anglo audiences. MIAMI RATINGS: A Miam1 ratings service controversy has escalated into formal Federal Trade Commission charges filed by the city's language television station WL TV Channel23. The station accused the A.C. Nielsen Company of "being grossly biased" in favor of younger and non-Hispanic households in its audience sample. In its complaint, WLTV which programs for a 35-year-and-older His panic audience-says that Nielsen's numbers could cost the station as much as $1 million in 1986. Television advertising costs are based on ratings figures provided by such services as Nielsen and Arbitron. Nielsen began serving Miami with its metered samples Nov. 1. In the past, non-Hispanic stations complained that Arbitron sampled older, Hispanic audiences too heavily. One network affiliate has already WL TV charged in its complaint that Nielsen may have intentionally weighed its viewer sample to encourage the non-Hispanic stations to "sign on as subscribers." ALATORRE COVERAGE: The Los Angeles Herald Examiner Dec. 11 gave Richard Alatorre's election to the Los Angeles City Council a bold headline, "Alatorre Wins in Landslide." The rival Los Angeles Times played it on page one, but its two major stories dealt with the resignation of San Diego Mayor Roger Hedgecock and President Reagan's ordering lie detector tests in the federal spy scandal. None of the three network-affiliated television stations in Los Angeles led off with Alatorre's victory on their late newscasts. VISTA'S AVAILABLE: The English-language Hispanic weekend supplement Vista, now carried by establishment dailies in 17 cities, Those who don't receive it may get a current copy by sending $1 to cover postage and handling to: Harry Caicedo, Vista, Suite 301, 2355 Salzedo St., Coral Gables, Fla. 33134. ROLODEX ROULETTE: Julio Barreto, reporter with the National Catholic News Service, joins the National Puerto Rican Forum as director of its Washington, D.C. , office ... San Diego Union reporter Felipe Garcia begins his American Political Science Association fellowship on the capitol staff of Sen. Cha1es Graasley (A-Iowa) ... Nuestro magazine hires Ricardo Fouster as a reporter ... Diana Navarrete, formerly communications director for SEA-Jobs for Progress, joins the sales force of KSSA, Radio Variedades, in Dallas ... Cecilio Morales, reporter for another capital publication, Employment and Training Reporter, is promoted to its managing editor Charlie Ericksen L____-__L,__. I BURCIAGA "U:t'ss 4 Hispanic Link Weekly Report